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The World’s Story

A History of the World in Story, Song and Art Volume 6 U.S. History - A New Nation, Middle East

Edited by Eva March Tappan

Libraries of Hope


The World’s Story A History of the World In Story, Song and Art Volume 6 U.S. History - A New Nation, Middle East Copyright © 2019 by Libraries of Hope, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher. International rights and foreign translations available only through permission of the publisher. The World’s Story, A History of the World in Story, Song and Art, edited by Eva March Tappan. (Original copyright 1914) Cover Image: Belshazzar's Feast, by Rembrandt, (c. 1634-1639). In public domain, source Wikimedia Commons. Libraries of Hope, Inc. Appomattox, Virginia 24522 Website www.librariesofhope.com Email: librariesofhope@gmail.com Printed in the United States of America


CONTENTS THE UNITED STATES I. THE FIRST YEARS OF THE NA TION

Samuel Francis Smith

AMERICA

3

How PHILADELPHIA CELEBRATED THE RATIFICATION OF THE

John Bach McMaster Baclz McMaster From"A History of the People of the United States."

CONSTITUTION

THE FIRST INAUGURATION DAY •

THE DEATH OF WASHINGTON •

5

• Jolin

9

RED JACKET AND THE MISSIONARY •

From"Famous Indian Chiefs."

,

.

Charles H. L. Jolmston

Cyrus Townsend Brady From"American Fights and Fighters."

THE BURNING OF THE PHILADELPHIA

14 19 24

TIIE TRIALS OF TIIE BRITISH MINISTER IN JEFFERSON'S AD-

James Parton

MINISTRATION

From"Life of Thomas Jefferson."

THE CLERMONT'S FIRST ADVERTISEMENT

33 40

n. THE WAR OF 1812 WHAT CAUSED TIIE SECOND WAR WITH ENGLA:'\D

Agnes C. Laut

43

How WINFIELD Scorr RESCUED THE IRISHMEN.

James Eames

48

From"Canada, the Empire of the North." From"The Giant of Three Wars."

. Philip Freneau Tlzomas Tracy Bouv� Charles Morris

ON TIIE CAPTURE OF THE GUERRIERE THE SHANNON AND THE CJIESAPEAKE How PERRY SAVED THE NORTHWEST

From "Heroes of the Navy in America."

THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER • • Francis TECUMSEH, TIIE !?-.'D IAN BRJGADIER· GENERAL

Scott Key

53 55 59 69

C harles H. L. Jolznston

71

Willis J. Abbot From "The Naval History of the United States." THE "HORSE-MARINES" OF r8r4 . . . John Bach McMaster From"A History of the People of the United States."

77

From "Famous India n Chiefs."

TJIE PRIVATEERS OF 1812 .

91


CONTENTS AFGHANISTAN

Rev. Artlzur .Ma le

THE HILL OF BONES •

From "Scenes through the Battle Smoke."

99

PERSIA I. THE MIGHTY EMPIRE SOHRAB'S LAST CONTEST

Mattliew Arnold

109

WHEN CYRUS THE GREAT WAS A IloY

Xe11oplzo11

118

Jacob Abbott

129

From "Sohrab and Rustum."

From "The Cyropa:dia, or Instruction of Cyrus."

How CYRUS THE GREAT WON THE LAND OF Goto

From "Cyrus the Great." THE SE\"ES SLEEPERS OF EPHES'CS IS THE LA:-."D OF LYDIA

Translated by W. E. Aytoun.

Jolza 1111 Wolfga ng ran Goethe

155

Herodotus

160

Herodotus

173

Plutarch

193

hIXG DARI'CS AXD THE FLYIXG SCTTHIAXS

Ho'l'I" XERXES SET Ol'T TO COXQUER GREECE

From "Stories of the East from Herodotus," by A. Translated by Henry Carey.

II.

D.-\YS

THE LAST KL'-G OF PERSIA

OF •

J. Church.

DECLIXE

.

.

.

From "Plutarch's Lives," corrected and translated by A. H. Clough.

James Russell L<ro1.·ell 206 Eli:abcth .-1. Reed 209

DARA • • • • • • • • • • . • THE BCTLDIXG OF THE BRIDGE OF Tt.:s

From "Persian Literature Ancient and ?>Iodern."

LITTLE STORIES FRO� S.-UJI

.

.

.

.

Sadi 215

From "Persian Poetry for English Readers," by S. Robinson.

III. STORIES OF ::\IODERX PERSIA POE'S TALES AT THE PERSIA..'- CocRT •

TViljrid Sparroy

THE PRIXCE WIIO LOST HIS BOOK THE

TJ iljrid Sparroy 229

FOOD OF TIIE ROYAL TCTOR

.

From"Persian Children of the Royal Family.'

ll

°

Jr'irJ1t r 'd sparroy

221 234


COXTE�TS . . . C. J. Trills 239 A PERSU:S- WEODI�G From "Persia as It is." THE PERSIA.'\" B.u.URS Eustache de Lorey a11d Douglas Slcden 249 From'' Queer Things about . . Samuel G. U"ilson 258 Persia."�.£'- .YEA�'.s CALLS A:S-D m ".Persian Lite and Customs." Jf g c I\'. HO\\" THI�GS ARE DO�E IX PERSIA r

How THE PERSUXS BCTLD A HO'GSE S. G. T . Benjamin THE :\'CDIEXCE CHA)IBER OF THE SHAH S. G. 11". Benjamin Ho" To ir.\KE CALLS S. G. TT'. Be11jami11 �l..\KD;G .-\ PRESEXT TO A); OFFICI..\L S. G. Tl'. Benjamin GETTI:S-G A Guss OF :'.\lILK S. G. Tl'. Benjamin From "Persia and the Persians." How A PERSIA :s- :'.\IoH.unIEDA:S- SAYS HIS PRAYERS S. G. ffilso11 From"Persian Liie and Customs."

275 277 279 283

285

286

MESOPOTAMIA

I. THE KINGDQ:\1S OF CIIALDJEA AND ASSYRIA TUE CHALDtEANS AND TllEIR WAYS . . Diodorus tlze Sicilian From "The Historical Library of Diodorus the Sicilian," translated by G. Uooth. How TIIE CnALDtEANS WROTE llooi.s . • . . G. Jlaspcro From "The Dawn of Civil ization, Egypt and Chal<l:ca." THE TOWER OF BADEL . . . . . . . Sir David Lyndsay How TllE ASSYRIANS AND BADYLONIANS LIVED A. II. Sayce From "Social Life among the Assyrians and Babylonians." TUE DESTRUCTIO� OF SENNACIIERID • . . . . L ord Byron

291 296 301 305 314

II. BABYLON THE MAGNIFICENT How SEMlRAl!IS BCILT BABYLON . . • Diodorns tlze Sicilia11 TIIE 1'1AKE-BELJEVE ELEPIIANTS OF SEMIRAMIS

319

Diodorns tlte Sicilia11 325 From "The Historical Library of Diodorus the Sicilian," trans­ lated- by G. Booth. From tlze Old Testa111c11t 332 DANIEL TIIE FEARLESS . . . IIeinriclz IIeine 339 . . . . BELSIIAZZAR , , , Translated by C. G. Leland. TIIE FALL OF BABYLON Jacob Abbott 341 From "History of Cyrus the Great." Ill


UNITED STATES I THE FIRST YEARS OF THE NATION


HISTORICAL NOTE DURING the Revolution the colonies had stood together, but when the war came to an end, each one began to think what would be best for itself. In 1787 a convention was decided upon to "form a more perfect union," and then it was that the Constitution of the United States was written. Very important questions came up for settlement. How much power should be given to the central Government and how much to each State? How long should the President's term of office be? How should the States be represented? There was a vast amount of debate and discussion, but finally the Constitution was submitted to the States. The Federalists were eager for its ratification; the Anti-Federalists opposed, chiefly on the ground of its giving so much power to the central Government. The consent of nine States was necessary for adoption. Between December 7, 1787, and February 6, 1788, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jer­ sey, Georgia, Connecticut, and Massachusetts had signi­ fied their acceptance. Maryland came into line in April; South Carolina in May; then there was a month's delay. At last the Federalists carried the day in New Hampshire and a few days later, in Virginia, and the Constitution was adopted. After the adoption of the Constitution, each State chose electors to vote for a President. Every vote was cast for Washington, and in 1789 he became President of the United States. The first difficulty for the new nation to meet was the lack of money. The United States had a poor financial rating, because what the Continental Congress had borrowed had never been repaid. Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury, made two propositions to Congress. The first was to tax foreign goods brought into the country. The second was somewhat startling, for he wished the whole Government to assume the debt of each State. This was finally done; and now every creditor of each State became anxious to have a strong central Government, in order that he might get his money.


AMERICA BY SAMUEL FRANCIS SMITH

1\1 Y country, 't is of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing; Land where my fathers died, Land of the pilgrims' pride, From every mountain-side Let freedom ring. 1\1:y native country, thee, Land of the noble free, Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills; 1\1:y heart with rapture thrills Like that above. Let music swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees Sweet freedom's song; Let mortal tongues awake, Let all that breathe partake, Let rocks their silence break, The sound prolong. Our fathers' God, to Thee, Author of liberty, 3


THE UNITED STATES To Thee we sing; Long may our land be bright \Vith freedom's holy light; Protect us by thy might, Great God, our King.

4


HOW PHILADELPHIA CELEBRATED THE RATIFICATION OF THE CONSTITUTION (1788] BY JOHN BACH l\.IcMASTER

PHILADELPHIA was the :first large city to receive the news [of the adoption of the Constitution], and there the popular rejoicings put on a more impressive form. It was known so early as the 26th of June that New Hampshire had assented; but every one felt that the Constitution could never be firmly set up while so great and populous a State as Virginia held out. When, therefore, the post that came in on the evening of the 2d of July brought letters telling that Virginia was Federal, the doubts and fears that had tormented men for seven months were put at rest. It was instantly de­ termined that the coming 4th of July should be made the occasion for a great display of Federal spirit; that there should be speeches and toasts and a procession, and that the procession, it was said, should be such a one as the continent had never seen. Not a moment was wasted, and by the night of the 3d all was ready. The pavements had been swept, the trees had been lopped. Ten ships had been procured, dressed in bunting and anchored in the Delaware, one at the foot of every street from the North Liberties to South Street. They were typical of the ten ratifying States. As the :first rays of the morning sun came over the eastern bank of the Delaware, the ship Rising Sun, 5


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The World's Story Volume 6: U.S. A New Nation, Middle East  

The World's Story Volume 6: U.S. A New Nation, Middle East