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BY THAI

HITECTS

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CONTENTS PREFACE

KA HOUSE IDIN ARCHITECTS 14 - 41

SOMJAI HOUSE NPDA STUDIO 42 - 63

WATERFALL HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN 64 - 87

MARBLE HOUSE OPENBOX ARCHITECTS 88 - 115


RABBIT RESIDENCE BOONDESIGN 116 - 139

SUGAR HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN 140 - 169

TWISTED HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN 170 - 201

ABOUT AWARDS 202 - 205

BIOGRAPHY 208 - 211


PREFACE

In the rapid digitalisation of the world, the use of social media is a way to tremendously increase the potential and power of communications systems. The ability to disseminate information in an accelerated manner leads to viral communication; notably in the design and architectural circles. Submissions of entries into contests and the receival of international awards have become guarantees or pathways that offers recognition and trust with an international standard. Being selected to design innovative and complex architecture from every corner of the globe also allows for new opportunities and possibilities in the future. This book compiles design work for private residences that have received awards and international recognition between 2017 and 2019. It consists of work that received the People’s Choice Award; an inclusive opportunity, organised by print and online medias, for people who are not in the architectural or design fields to weigh-in on their favourite design. The finalists were then judged by a panel of highly qualified judges from The Association of Architects and other trusted agencies in Asia, Europe, and the United States. In addition, the original presentations from the competition has been collected and presented in various forms. They communicate and demonstrate the design capabilities, the creative and unique concepts, and the elaborate manner that controls the quality of construction. The collection of suggestions and criticisms of the panel of experts across different contests can be considered an exchange of experiences, a pathway of new knowledge, and a database of analysis on lifestyle in the modern era. Hopefully, this book will be a spark, a driving force, and an encouragement for architects and the architectural circle in Thailand to continue building and developing work, especially residential designs that Thai architects are recognised for internationally. A final congratulations, once again, for the designers and architects who have built recognition for the Thai architecture industry on the international stage.

RATTAWUT CHANSRITRAKUL


14

KA HOUSE


KA HOUSE IDIN ARCHITECTS

2A ARCHITECTURE AWARD 2017 SECOND PLACE RESIDENTIAL BY 2A MAGAZINE, IRAN

KA HOUSE

15


KA HOUSE IDIN ARCHITECTS

Owner Krishnarath Puranasamsiddhi Waraporn Puranasamsiddhi Location Pak Chong, Nakhon Ratchasima Area 250 sq.m. Completion 2015 Principal Architect Jeravej Hongsakul Project Architect Rubporn Sookatup Interior Designer IDIN Architects: Sarin Rangsikanbhum Jureerat Korvanichakul Structural Engineer Pakanut Siriprasopsothorn System Engineer Eakachai Hamhomvong Panot Kuakoolwong Photographer

Ketsiree Wongwan


22


KA House is a vacation home for a couple who enjoys outdoor activities; a place where they can spend time relaxing on their backyard, engaging with their family members, and lounging with a great view of the lake. The house was designed to allow space for an expansive yard; therefore, the building is placed on the front end of the plot, connected to the fence. In a sense, the lake-view performs an “actual entrance�, while the front door looks like it is the back of the house. The inclining fence draws the view from the outside to the inside. At the same time, the space is gradually revealed as one walks through the entrance and into the house. Due to the steep curve of the site, the parking space was designed to be a half-level underground, in order to maintain the smooth continuity of the vista and to hide the disorder of the outside world. The main building is separated into two levels: the lower level includes the living and dining spaces, which are connected to a spacious deck laid alongside the building, and the mezzanine level is dedicated to bedrooms. Activities could be seen from all around the house from the mezzanine to the pool. The house is wrapped by triangular wooden laths, creating a diverse degree of openness through different viewpoints and times. Light and shadow play an important role throughout different times of the day. In the morning, soft light will flow to the bedrooms creating a playful shadow in each space. In the afternoon, light will flow to the living area and hallways. These multipurpose laths can be opened; it acts as a sunshade, a visual screen for the AC compressor, creates lively shadows throughout the house, and also adds privacy for the owners at night time.

23


42

KA HOUSE


SOMJAI HOUSE NPDA STUDIO

ARCHITIZER A+ AWARDS 2018 POPULAR CHOICE WINNER ARCHITECTURE + SUSTAINABILITY BY ARCHITIZER, USA

KA HOUSE

43


SOMJAI HOUSE NPDA STUDIO

Owner Somjai Piriyaprakob Location Ko Pha-ngan, Surat Thani Area 240 sq.m. Completion 2015 Principal Architect Nutthawut Piriyaprakob Interior Designer and Landscape Architect Nutthawut Piriyaprakob Structural and System Engineer Apisit Chawacharoen Photographer

Anotherspacestudio Jeerasak Tongyonk Sofography


Physical model for construction.

50


Thailand’s traditional and local architecture has not changed in many years. Using the same techniques, borrowing the same elements, and disregarding local craftsmanship and workers are all examples of the crisis affecting the Thai architecture circle. The design of Somjai House aims to re-explore traditional architecture in a new, tasteful, and creative way by focusing on the specific local conditions. This project is located in the midst of a tropical coconut plantation on Pha-ngan island. Each design element has its specific purpose. The form of the architecture reflects the skyline along the hills behind, which allows for the wind to flow smoothly over the curves of the structure. The front of the building is designed with an open angle to receive the full panorama of the sea. The cantilever concept is used to protect the building from the southern sunlight. And the tilted roof allows for the rain to flow through the bathroom and collected in the fish pond. The use of red as the structure’s primary colour is to make the building stand out against the fresh green tones of the coconut plantation and the deep, calming blue of the sea. To protect the house from the heat, brick and polished concrete were selected due their cooling properties and local workers’ expertise. A thin iron staircase also showcases the craftsmanship of local workers skillful in metal work. The building consists of bedrooms with connecting bathrooms, and a pantry. The main hall serves as a flexible-multi-purpose space; it can be used as a living space or even a yoga area. The upper deck was designed to provide a panoramic view of the surrounding coconut plantation, the sea, the nearby Samui island, and the hills.

SOMJAI HOUSE

51


64

KA HOUSE


WATERFALL HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE MASTERPRIZE 2018 HONORABLE MENTION RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE BY FARMANI GROUP, USA

KA HOUSE

65


WATERFALL HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN

Location Phatthanakan, Bangkok Area 900 sq.m. Completion 2017 Project Manager Woranol Sattayavinij Project Designer Woranol Sattayavinij Chotiros Techamongkhalaphiwat Interior Designer Architects 49 House Design: Archanart Kespayak Sirasa Sermsook Kanchai Poolsawad Pornchanok Vattanapooti Landscape Architect Bermuda Landscape Lighting Designer 49 Lighting Design Consultants Structural Engineer Architectural Engineering 49 System Engineer M&E Engineering 49 Photographer

Krisada Boonchaleow


DIAGRAM A

DIAGRAM B

DIAGRAM C

70


Waterfall House is designed for a single family who is looking for a house that is suitable for Thai modern living conditions. One of them is a modern house with a lot of glazing for transparency and natural light but comfortable to live in without too much heat from sunlight in Bangkok. A requirement of a compact house that feels spacious and connected is also a main design criteria. The name “Waterfall House� comes from the feature of waterfalls at the center of the house. This waterfall feature is a result of a split-level design which aims to connect both visual and accessibility aspects between living spaces. The sloped surfaces of the waterfall have two functions, dividing and connecting. For the dividing function, the slope slab makes the half-level separation of parking space and lower level living space possible with no waste space. For the connecting function, the slope becomes pleasant waterfalls that link the lower and upper living spaces. The half-level difference between two living spaces provides separation of activities without distance or closed wall. The central opening with the waterfalls allows visual connection to the upper floor and the air-flow which is necessary for a tropical house. The waterfalls bring a cooling and tranquil atmosphere to the surrounding space. The front open-terrace with a wide span structure creates a unique entrance experience. This covered space provides good shading for the inner living room during late mornings and afternoons. The character of the house simply reflects the concept of connecting the living space and directly express the different volumes of each space through the continuous folding white surface.

WATERFALL HOUSE

71


88

KA HOUSE


MARBLE HOUSE OPENBOX ARCHITECTS

GERMAN DESIGN AWARD 2018 WINNER EXCELLENCE COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN - ARCHITECTURE BY GERMAN DESIGN COUNCIL, GERMANY

KA HOUSE

89


MARBLE HOUSE OPENBOX ARCHITECTS

Location Ratchadapisek, Bangkok Area 1,000 sq.m. Completion 2017 Principal Architect Ratiwat Suwannatrai Project Architect Nattawan Supanan Project Designer Sudatip Pipatthakorn Nonglak Boonseang Interior Designer Openbox Architects: Wannapat Jenpanichkarn Pichaya Sampanvejsobha Landscape Architect Openbox Architects: Wannaporn Suwannatrai Chawannuch Jirasukprasert Lighting Designer FOS Lighting Design Studio Structural Engineer and System Engineer S.P.C. Design Photographer

W Workspace


94

KA HOUSE


OPENBOX Architects’ recent residential design intertwines architecture, interior, and landscape design in the form of a marble sculpture. The idea is to allow the inhabitants’ living behaviour to carve a personal space into the monolithic creation. The main structure appears weighted and solid, yet it floats lightly, defying gravity, while the landscape flows underneath it through the centre courtyard. Surplus marble pieces left on the ground become a part of the landscape; an isolated yet related feature as they used to be part of the main marble boulder. The excavation of the unique shapes, forms and spaces are created by shifting the linear and non-linear planes of building. The Marble House is situated on one end of a rectangular plot with a large, magnificent rain tree on the opposite end. The contrast of the minimalistic structure and a fully grown, raw-formed rain tree over a reflective swimming pool creates a memorable scene for the house. The impressive sights of natural and man-made structures are enhanced when seen side-by-side. The marble structure is, in fact, a large-scale, light-weight, collection of walls tiled with marble-patterned print. As the external finish applied over a layer of internal brick walls, it also acts as weather cladding that shields the house from direct sunlight. The humid head from Bangkok’s summers are warded off and the materials help to keep the interior temperature cool throughout the day. The relationship between the architecture and its landscape is subtly displayed everywhere. The primary square-shaped structure surrounds an open courtyard in the centre, allowing natural light and ventilation to reach all remote corners. Bamboo nestled in the centre courtyard sways to create the presence of the wind. The concept of “private balconies” are very useful for an urban residence crowded by neighbours. Pockets of enclosed open terraces create privacy, while welcoming natural light and ventilation. The void above these areas become a great feature, in the words of architect, of a “the private sky”. However, some windows do have to be placed on the neighbouring side. This is where the concept of tilting windows towards more open corners of the surrounding environment further contributes to the form of the house. After all, the design started with following the inhabitants’ behaviors and view preference in order to naturally form this piece of sculpture. The interplay of materials, spaces, and forms flows seamlessly inside-out and outside-in, reaffirming the strong connections between the architecture, interior, and the landscape.

95


116

KA HOUSE


RABBIT RESIDENCE BOONDESIGN

HABITUS, HOUSE OF THE YEAR 2018 WINNER ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE BY HABITUS, AUSTRALIA

KA HOUSE

117


RABBIT RESIDENCE BOONDESIGN

Owner Pok Kobkongsanti Location Lat Phrao, Bangkok Area 700 sq.m. Completion 2017 Principal Architect Boonlert Hemvijittraphan Interior Designer Boonlert Hemvijittraphan Pok Kobkongsanti (Loose Furniture) Landscape Architect T.R.O.P. : Terrains + Open Space Lighting Designer Boonlert Hemvijitraphan Pok Kobkongsanti Structural and System Engineer Boondesign Photographer

W Workspace


122


Nestled in a quiet, residential neighbourhood of Bangkok, Residence Rabbit is the work of Boondesign. Known for his unique and innovative designs, architect Boonlert Hemvijitraphan offers an alternative solution for the urban home. A home for a young couple and their son, three requirements dictated the design of the house: it should be able to grow alongside the gradual transformation of the lives of the occupants; it must accommodate two generations with widely differing preferences and needs; and it needs to provide close connection to the natural environment despite being located in the heart of a metropolis. These requirements have been translated into subtle but creative design solutions, as the architect considered such requirements as opportunities rather than problems. The two-storey house occupies the site while leaving enough open space for a calming pool, large trees, and an inviting lawn. As the owner, Pok Kobkongsanti, is a renowned landscape architect, the relationship between the house and the landscape was naturally crucial. By dividing the house into two closely interconnected volumes, the architects gave the owners the natural environment that they craved. The landscape becomes a protective buffer and an energising setting for those living inside the house. The exterior of the house has a subtle quietness that contrasts with the richness of its interior organisation and its integral relationship to the landscape. The stark white walls become a blank canvas juxtaposed against the surrounding landscape. Factors such as the location and amount of sunlight are taken into account and translated into the house’s configuration as well as its openings. Given such a relationship between the house and its landscape, it becomes a place for the activities and experiences of the inhabitants rather than the expression of stylistic character from the outside. To the owners, this is a house that is designed and built for them to fill-up. Everything in the house offers the freedom of arrangement in a manner that the owner is happy with. Everyone is given both private and shared spaces; thus living, working, and playing within the house are, all at once, separated yet joined. It is not difficult to imagine each space being reorganised and reshaped according to their needs, where activities could flow from one open space to another with a sense of ease. Rather than a complete object composed by the designer, this house is allowed to live and breathe while it envelopes life. Additional to this flexibility, the house is well-equipped with spatial organisation that ensures that whatever is necessary for everyday living is easily accessible. Well-designed settings for living, cooking, dining, working, and playing positions items in a manner that is conveniently placed yet aesthetically pleasing or hidden from view. Both architectural elements and interior equipments are designed sustainably and built to last. Through its configuration and constitutive elements, the house is designed as an ensemble of flexible spaces that allows internal and external factors to come into play. It furthers the notion of lived experience as a constant state of flux. Seeing it this way allows us to understand and imagine the real subject matter of the house’s design intent. Written by Tonkao Panin

123


170

KA HOUSE


SUGAR HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN

GERMAN DESIGN AWARD 2019 SPECIAL MENTION EXCELLENCE COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN - ARCHITECTURE BY GERMAN DESIGN COUNCIL, GERMANY

KA HOUSE

141


SUGAR HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN

Location Bang Khae, Bangkok Area 2,000 sq.m. Completion 2017 Project Director Kiattisak Veteewootacharn Project Manager Rattawut Chansritrakul Project Designer Atthanit Kulrakampusiri Interior Designer Architects 49 House Design: Rattawut Chansritrakul Kanchai Poolsawad Landscape Architect Architects 49 House Design Nongnooch Tropical Garden Lighting Designer 49 Lighting Design Consultants Structural Engineer Architectural Engineering 49 System Engineer M&E Engineering 49 Photographer

W Workspace


152


Located in the fluctuating skyline near the suburban area of Bangkok, this geometric three-story dwelling is constructed and substitutes some parts of the old house that are situated among the existing surroundings of a swimming pool, pool deck, the guest house and the preserved big scale of palm trees. The main approach entering from the main entrance is against the “big wall”, that is the main skeleton and main core of the house. This solid configuration could protect the uncontrollable and chaotic surroundings especially at the back of the house. The long and narrow rectangular glass window against this main entrance initially expresses as a focal point of the first visual approach. The preconceived idea of this residence is inspired by the house owner’s family business which is design-built as a turnkey service for the sugar production’s factories all over the world. Therefore, the “Sugar crystallization” is addressed to be an analogical interpretation for the main concept of this house. Nevertheless, at first glance, the main skeleton located at the center of the house looks like a solid core , the composition of the opening related to the main function does not obstruct the view and of being comfortable at all. Moreover it could make a unique motif as an innovative composition like a “Livable sculpture” as well as the “Comfortable sanctuary”. The graphical architectonic diagram is gradually interpreted and generated from the scientific experiment to the architectural exploration. Simultaneously, it could obviously perform the sense of belonging in different characters as follows: “Main core”, a solid exposed concrete massing, represents parents’ quarters, main circulation, family living room and living quarter for family A. “Crystal A”, stone cladding and transparent massing, represents living quarters for family B, formal living space and exercise room. “Crystal B”, ultra cantilevered with ivory stone cladding massing represents living quarters for family C. “Crystal C”, overhanging glass window, represents the Buddha room. Moreover, the negative space of the “Crystal B” would create the sense of welcoming for the reception area beneath the long span and through a ventilated covered living terrace like the transition semi-outdoor space of “traditional Thai house” that we are familiar with.

SUGAR HOUSE

153


170

KA HOUSE


TWISTED HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN

GERMAN DESIGN AWARD 2019 SPECIAL MENTION EXCELLENCE COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN - ARCHITECTURE BY GERMAN DESIGN COUNCIL, GERMANY

KA HOUSE

171


TWISTED HOUSE ARCHITECTS 49 HOUSE DESIGN

Location Bang Kapi, Bangkok Area 4,000 sq.m. Completion 2017 Project Director Kiattisak Veteewootacharn Project Manager Rattawut Chansritrakul Project Designer Pitipong Amonviratanaskul Interior Designer Architects 49 House Design: Archanart Kespayak Kriangsak Srikomonsilp Krit Chaingamsri Landscape Architect T.R.O.P. : Terrains + Open Space Lighting Designer 49 Lighting Design Consultants Structural Engineer Architectural Engineering 49 System Engineer M&E Engineering 49 Photographer

W Workspace


182


This geometric dwelling is situated amidst big rain trees either inside or outside the boundary, in suburban area of Bangkok. Although, the location is near the urban fabric such as the transporting connections, it is still a friendly and peaceful neighborhood as well as a good natural environment. There are three different functions consisting of main house, glass pavilion and exercise complex which are delicately organized in this charismatic setting. Sometimes, an inspired concept would not be necessarily derived from the physical perception, similar to this residence, it is generated by an emotional experience of “the moment and interpretation of movement” which the architect gained during the initial site investigation. Therefore, the title “Twisted” is firstly based on a walk through pattern of winding and swing movements of the big rain trees. This site observation could also remind us of a “Mission” to preserve this unique existing condition without much disturbing it. As mentioned earlier, the most difficult task is to preserve all of them. Although we had done our best with various alternatives , it was hard to get a suitable layout that met our vastly complicated requirements. they would make the building much larger. Hence, we finally had to cut them. At the same position towards the back of the plot of land, the one that was eliminated is nostalgic metaphor of the main circulation of the house which is similar to the core of a big tree.

TWISTED HOUSE

183


ABOUT AWARDS


Historically, Asia’s architecture has tended to be heterogeneous; each civilization – from the Persians to the Chinese, the Indians to the Ottomans – has contributed to the creation of an architectural cartography that established the spatial organization of cities such as Istanbul, Isfahan, Samarkand, Calcutta, Beijing, and Tokyo, and immensely influenced the architectural traditions of the western continents. Consequently, Eastern contributions to Western culture and architecture deserve significant scholarly investigation. Nineteenth and twentieth century modernism (as evidenced by the modern movement in architecture in the West) dominated the landscapes and cityscapes in Asia, with largely unpleasant results. With the vast urbanization that has taken place in the later part of the twentieth century, the number of megalopolises that have emerged marks a dominant trend around the world. By the end of the twenty-first century, Asia will have the largest number of megalopolises. Recently, architectural traditions and cultures on the continent of Asia have started to stray from modernism. Architects in Asia are now offering alternatives relevant to their specific geographies and cultures.

www.2amagazine.com

As part of its expanding activities 2A is now organizing the 2A Asia Architecture Award (2AAA). This event takes place annually to highlight and celebrate regional and Asian achievements in architecture which will feature awards and exhibitions as well as debates by the participants on the influences and methods. 2A Continental Architectural Award is a critical effort to recognize and acknowledge architects who have engaged in creating and designing buildings and cities in Asia originating from their specific cultural and geographical localities and possess specific quality and characteristics attributable to their local origins. This continent-wide annual award is an attempt to offer long overdue recognition to a whole new class of architects. A specific theme will be determined and announced every year, and the award’s content will be adjusted accordingly. 2ACAA brings up and discusses the following aspects of the contemporary practice of architecture in the world: • Theoretical visions of culture, customs, politics, economics, history, and other social elements • Ideas regarding various origins • Conceptualizations • Artistic and aesthetic criteria • Sustainability • Modern life and technology

The Architizer A+Awards is the largest awards program focused on promoting and celebrating the year’s best architecture and products. Its mission is to nurture the appreciation of meaningful architecture in the world and champion those products that are integral to bringing great buildings to life. Imagine your work in front of a global audience of 400+ million. The A+Awards live at Architizer.com, the largest online community of architects in the world, with an audience 7+ million strong. But the awards are bigger than just the architectural community. Entries are judged by distinguished luminaries from fields as diverse as design, technology, real estate, fashion, and more. Finalists and winners are recognized in as the year’s most influential visionaries online and in print — and the buzz is huge. Architizer’s core mission is to Empower Architects, via our marketplace connecting architects and building-product manufacturers, and via our inspiring content, awards program, and global reach spotlighting the world’s best architecture. Architizer connect architects with the tools they need to build better buildings, better cities, and a better world.

www.awards.architizer.com


The Architecture MasterPrize (AMP) aims to become one of the most respected architectural awards and set a new benchmark for the architectural and design professions globally. At its best, architecture and design is about embracing technology to set the imagination free. It’s about innovating, pushing boundaries, and utilizing technologies and materials to realize the near impossible. It is about creating built forms, structures and spaces that can send our spirits soaring, reaffirm our humanity, and ultimately touch our very souls. The AMP celebrates the very best in design excellence and innovation from the worlds of Architectural, Interior, and Landscape Design. The awards program is dedicated to showcasing and promoting exceptional talent, and the value of the art and science of architecture in enriching our lives.

The Architecture MasterPrize stands: • To advance the appreciation of quality architectural design around the world, • To celebrate the greatest achievements in architecture, interior design and landscape design, • To showcase the world-class talent and visionaries in these fields. A jury of esteemed architects, industry professionals and academics will consider entries in 41 categories across the disciplines of architecture, interior design and landscape design. The MasterPrize is honoring and awarding the talents of those who push boundaries and set new standards, who turn the ordinary into the truly extraordinary and inspire others, today and for generations to come.

The Design Award of the Federal Republic of Germany is the official design award for Germany presented by the German Ministry for Economics and Technology. The award was given for the first time under the name ‘Federal Award for Good Design’ in 1969 and thereafter every two years. Moreover, the focus of the award was changed on each occasion. The name of the award was first changed in 1992. Thereafter, the Federal Product Design Award and the Federal Award Promoter of Design – which went to a personality for achievements in the design field – were presented annually. Since 2006, it has been called the Design Award of the Federal Republic of Germany and is given for outstanding achievements in the fields of product and communication design, and to a personality in the design sector. Since 2012, the prize competition has been administered by DMY Berlin GmbH & Co. KG. A company can only enter the competition for the Design Award if its product has already been awarded a national or international design prize. Another precondition for entry is that companies must have been nominated by the Ministries and Senators of the Federal States or by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology. German Design Awards by the German Design Council Since 2012, the German Design Council (Rat für Formgebung) hosts the German Design Awards, which honour innovative products and projects, their manufacturers and designers in the German and international design sector. Only those formally nominated can take part in the competition. The evaluation criteria for nomination include the overall concept, sustainability, aesthetics, durability and functionality, amongst other things.

www.architectureprize.com

www.german-design-award.com


Habitus House of the Year: A new celebration of regional excellence Habitus celebrate ten years of Habitus and sustained design excellence in the Indo-Pacific region with a new program. For ten years, Habitus has shone a muchneeded spotlight on the unique architecture, design, and art of the Indo-Pacific. Produced in the region but beloved around the world, Habitus has emerged as the leading global destination for design hunters in search of unique, inspiring projects that challenge conventional ideas about residential architecture and design. Over the years They’ve evolved across both our print and digital platforms to present the best of regional design in the most original, engaging ways – an evolution that reflects the amazing progress of architecture and design in our part of the world. The past ten years have seen astounding growth in our region, and the emergence of a number of leading lights who are changing what it means not only to design but also to live in the vibrant Indo-Pacific region.

www.habitusliving.com

In spite of this growth, Habitus has remained faithful to its origins as a labour of love: a magazine for design lovers by design lovers. As Habitus celebrate ten years of championing regional excellence, Habitus is pleased to announce ‘Habitus House of the Year’, a new program honouring outstanding residential design in the Indo-Pacific. The upcoming special edition will showcase a handpicked shortlist of the twenty best homes completed in our region in the past twelve months, and will be supplemented by an exclusive online showcase of five projects hosted right here on Habitus Living. In true Habitus fashion, the shortlist will honour homes by established practitioners and emerging talents alike, creating a snapshot of the current state of regional design and a tantalising glimpse into what the next ten years may bring. From this shortlist, and independent jury of design heavyweights will award top honours for the Habitus House of the Year, Exemplary Integration of Environment, and Outstanding Interior Architecture.


W O R L D T R A D E A N D AC C O M M O DAT I O N C O . , LT D .

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MOTIF GROUP

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HOUSES BY THAI ARCHITECTS | GLOBAL RECOGNITION  

ISBN 978-616-459-018-2 / 292x292 mm / 222 pages / hard cover with jacket / English / 1,600 THB This book compiles design work for private...

HOUSES BY THAI ARCHITECTS | GLOBAL RECOGNITION  

ISBN 978-616-459-018-2 / 292x292 mm / 222 pages / hard cover with jacket / English / 1,600 THB This book compiles design work for private...

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