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THE BUDGET

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MEET THE LHS MENTAL HEALTH TEAM

05 STUDENT HOSTS SUICIDE AWARENESS WALK

08 DISTRICT TAKES ACTION ON SCHOOL SAFETY

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LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL

LAWRENCE, KS

VOLUME 126, ISSUE 7 APRIL 22, 2019


THE BUDGET News

IN THIS ISSUE ?

Forensics team qualifies for nationals page 16

Teachers find weird items as they pack before construction page 14

Girls swim team starts season off strong page 21

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THE BUDGET

AP classes struggle to keep up after snow days page 12

LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL

LAWRENCE, KS

VOLUME 126, ISSUE 7 APRIL 22, 2019

MEET THE LHS MENTAL HEALTH TEAM

05 STUDENT HOSTS SUICIDE AWARENESS WALK

08

LHSBUDGET.COM STORIES Shootings at Holcom Park point out change is still needed Support offered for students following shooting

FOLLOW US: @lhsbudget

DISTRICT TAKES ACTION ON SCHOOL SAFETY

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YOUTUBE

LHS STUCO ELECTIONS 2019-2020 ROOM 137’S STRANGE ITEMS

ON THE COVER — Students battle the strain of stress and other issues. Mental health team workers stand by ready to help students stay on track while one student leads a suicide prevention walk. DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER

JUNIORS TAKE ACT TEST FOR FREE BY KENNEDY BIGHAM

STAFF WRITER

Juniors are ecstatic that the ACT is over and done with. The ACT was rescheduled for April 2 after the initial test date was canceled because of bad weather. “I was a bit nervous,” junior Savana Hook said. “[I’m] glad it’s over with.” This marked the first year that Kansas offered a free ACT test for all juniors across the state. “I think that’s awesome,” junior Ben Hoopes said. “I feel like we needed to have that in Kansas for a long time and for people that don’t have the money to take the test, it’s a great boost for them.” The ACT is the primary college entrance exam used by midwest universities, and students are able to take it multiple times in order to raise their scores. “It’s great,” junior Emily Truong. “I wish I could take it for

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APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

free all the time.” One of the struggles juniors faced when it came to the ACT was the time crunch. The test takers were given various times to complete each part of the test. Due to this, some people felt they had to rush to answer questions. “I found myself answering a bunch of questions but leaving like 20 or something that I had to guess on,” Hoopes said. Students said taking the ACT during the school day was beneficial. “I think more people showed up [because it was on a school day],” Hook said. “I’m glad I got to take it.” TESTS — Rows of tables await juniors in the west gym the morning of April 2. Juniors spent the morning taking the ACT while other students attended classes. The original plan had been for underclassmen to complete pre-ACT prep during the test date, but those plans changed after the initial test date was canceled because of bad weather. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE


News THE BUDGET

“LAWRENCE HIGH WANTS ALL OF ITS SENIORS TO STAY SAFE AND PARTICIPATE FULLY IN EVENTS HELD TO RECOGNIZE THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS CHESTY LIONS.”

—Principal Matt Brungardt in a letter to parents warning about pranks and hazing before “Senior Week,” which featured a story time reading in E2 by senior Nikki Aqui

LHSBUDGET.COM

HISPANIC & LATINO

ACADEMIA CELEBRATED BY KENNEDY BIGHAM

STAFF WRITER

Two Lawrence High students scored in the top 1 percent of Hispanic and Latin test takers for the PSAT, taken in October. Juniors Amelia Vasquez and Ryan Claycamp were unaware of what the PSAT had to offer when they took it last semester. “I did not know that the PSAT could give you scholarships,” Vasquez said. “I just thought it would give me an example score of what I would get on the SAT.” The National Hispanic Recognition Program (NHRP) is used by colleges to find Hispanic and Latino students with strong academic qualities. “I probably will be joining [the program] and filling out the application for it,” Vasquez said. “I’m really excited and really glad I can participate in it.”

The students learned of their scoring placements via email last month. “They said, ‘You scored in the top percentage. We want to invite you to this celebration honoring your academia,’ ” Claycamp said. “I went, ‘Hey, mom, look.’ ” Claycamp said taking the ACT starting his sophomore year gave him practice with college exams. “The ACT questions are considered to be a little harder than the PSAT questions, so I was already prepping for a little harder questions, so the new questions weren’t as bad.”

STAR STUDENTS — Junior Amelia Vasquez and Ryan Claycamp scored in the top 1 percent of Hispanic and Latino PSAT test takers. PHOTO BY RILEY UNEKIS

SAVE THE DATE 5 EVENTS YOU SHOULDN'T MISS 1 2 3 4 5 APRIL 25-27 SHOWTIME 7:30 P.M. AUDITORIUM

APRIL 30

CHESTY’S BIRTHDAY ICE CREAM & BAND PERFORMANCE AT LUNCH

MAY 5

MUD VOLLEYBALL NOON BROKEN ARROW PARK

MAY 8

BAND ICE CREAM SOCIAL 7 P.M. AUDITORIUM & CAFETERIA

MAY 15

LHS VS. FSHS SOFTBALL GAME 5 P.M. SOFTBALL FIELD

PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL APRIL 22, 2019

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News THE BUDGET

News HELLO, MY NAME IS... Six members of the mental health team introduce themselves

Reporting by Cuyler Dunn

QUICK TAKE

Information from the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Alliance on Mental Illness

MAREN SANTELLI 9 years at LHS Social Worker What do you do? “We have a specialized program at Lawrence High for students who have emotional or behavioral challenges that make it harder for them at school. I provide support for that program. I also have a caseload of students who receive special education services.”

SYLVIA TREVINO-MAACK 9 years at LHS Psychologist

LORI STUSSIE 12 years at LHS Counselor

What should students know about what you do? What do you do? “Basically, when students don’t “I’m the school psychologist, so I know whom to ask for help, do some testing for students that counselors are a good start. If we are having some difficulties and ultimately are not being successful.” can’t assist with an issue, we usually know where to turn.”

50%

Amount of youth age 8-15 who didn’t receive mental health services in 2018

61.6%

Amount of young adults aged 18-25 who didn’t receive mental health services in 2018

KELSEY BEUK

CARISSA WELSH

CRYSTAL KAUTZ

5 years at LHS Counselor

1 semester at LHS Social Worker

Whats a fun fact about you? “While putting myself through college, I worked at Starbucks. I became the first female coffee master in Kansas through that company, so I traveled all over the state to give presentations and classes about roasting, tasting, etc.”

2 1/2 years at LHS Counselor

What should students know about what you do? “If they come down to see me, they will be welcomed and valued in my office. I will listen to you, and we will have a conversation. I will do what I can to advocate and help you.”

What do you do? “We help students with schedules, we track their credits, we tailor their other course options based on academic need and interests, and just help with personal and social things.”

x2

Multiplier that LGBTQ individuals are more likely to have a mental health condition than straight individuals

PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET News

HEALTHY HABITS Students battle multiple stressors beyond school in daily life REPORTING & DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER

STUDENTS BIGGEST STRESSORS

Sources: Survey of 100 Students and CDC data

HOW DO YOU COPE WITH STRESS?

“SLEEP, EATING, TALKING WITH PEOPLE, AND PRAYER.”

41%

KNOW WHERE TO FIND THE MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES AT LHS

“BADLY. CRYING, SLEEPING, OVEREATING, HAVING A BREAK DOWN. I NEED BETTER COPING METHODS.” “I’M STILL LEARNING HOW TO COPE, AND IT CAN GET HARD. USUALLY I TRY TO PROBLEM SOLVE AND PREPARE FOR ANY SITUATION THAT MIGHT STRESS ME OUT.”

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2

85%

BELIEVE HOMEWORK LOAD IS AT LEAST SOMETIMES TOO LARGE

13%

HAVE ACCESSED THE MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES AT LHS

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER

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“JUST BY GETTING THE MOST IMPORTANT STUFF DONE THEN PLAYING VIDEO GAMES.”

64%

STRESSED EVERY DAY

4

84%

KNOW THERE ARE MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT LHS

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“I TAKE A NAP OR BREAK AND COME BACK TO THINGS, OR I TRY TO MAKE THEM MORE INTERESTING OR SEEK HELP”

1

SCHOOL DAYS MISSED DUE TO MENTAL HEALTH 0 DAYS

1 DAY

24% 16%

2-3 DAYS

29%


HOMEWORK COLLEGE PLANNING

THINGS THAT STAND IN THE WAY OF EXERCISE

EXTRACURRICULARS

FRIENDS

FAMILY

NON-ATHLETIC EXTRACURRICULARS

4

1

?

1

2

3

2

3

98%

NATIONAL

93%

STUDENTS WHO HAVE DRANK

REN

30

CE

%

HIG

H

TIO NA

L NA

%

60

STUDENTS WHO HAVE BINGE DRANK IN THE LAST MONTH

4-5 DAYS

18%

5+ DAYS

18%

OTHER

AFTER SCHOOL JOB SOCIAL MEDIA

LAW

REN

4% CE HIGH

TIO NA

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR SELF CARE? “I ENJOY RUNNING AND PLAYING VIDEO GAMES. IT FREES MY MIND.”

GET LESS THAN 8 HOURS OF SLEEP EVERY NIGHT

LAW

LAWRENCE HIGH

?

90%

5

67%

GET LESS THAN 60 MIN. OF EXERCISE DAILY

STUDENTS WHO EAT VEGETABLES AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK

?

PREVENTATIVE FACTORS OF SLEEP

4

KEY

News THE BUDGET

NA

L

14%

“I LIKE TO SPEND SOME TIME HOME ALONE IN MY FAVORITE CLOTHES AND JAM OUT TO SOME MUSIC. SOMETIMES I’LL DO SOME YOGA OR PUT ON A FACE MASK AND BURN SOME INCENSE.” “BULLET JOURNAL, LIGHT CANDLES, READ FOR FUN, FACE MASKS, BUBBLE BATH.” “I TRY TO LISTEN TO MY BODY. I DRINK A LOT OF WATER AND WHEN I CAN FEEL MYSELF BECOMING ANXIOUS, I TRY TO TAKE A STEP BACK AND BREATH. AND I TAKE A LOT OF SHOWERS. THEY USUALLY HELP CLEAR MY MIND. R.I.P TO MY WATER BILL.”

14%

HAVE RIDDEN IN A CARE WITH A DRIVER UNDER THE INFLUENCE PAGE DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET News

IN TEARS — Josie Abernathy joins the walk for suicide awareness on March 23. All proceeds went to the Landen Lucas Foundation.”The walk turned out really great,” Abernathy said. “I didn’t really help with the planning, but I’m pretty close to Jordan, and he ran some things off me and it turned out a lot better than anybody expected. The turnout was amazing. I joined because not only am I really close to Jordan, it has affected my family as well, so I feel like it’s really important to raise awareness around the community.” PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

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APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL


News THE BUDGET

WALKING FOR

CHANGE

Student organizes suicide awareness walk, fundraiser BY FREEMAN SPRAY

WEBMASTER & COPY EDITOR

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ALL HUGS — Junior Jordan Ott embraces his mother during the We Got Your Back Suicide Awareness Walk, which he organized in memory of his brother. “We had everyone come in from all different age groups, from elders to the kids that weren’t even 3 yet,” Ott said. “I think that was really powerful, and I think the community took a step in the right direction — like it was something great, something that was really needed.” PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE SMILING — Juniors Haven Rethman and Katie Williams walk at the We Got Your Back Walk at the Boys and Girls Club Teen Center. “I went because I wanted to support my friend Jordan,” Rethman said. “It was a really good experience, and I enjoyed hearing my friend perform his speech.” PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

oping for change, about 300 people gathered at the Boys and Girls Club Teen Center to raise awareness about suicide on March 23. Junior Jordan Ott organized the event in memory of his brother, Isaiah, who died from suicide in 2013. “I understand what a lot of people do go through, from both sides, being the victim or someone being hurt by it,” Ott said. “So I felt like I just wanted to get the message out there, to help save somebody.” Originally, the event had been planned for Feb. 23, but was pushed back due to inclement weather. “I didn’t want to push it back,” Ott said. “In that time frame you never know if somebody could commit suicide.” The proceeds from the event went to the Landen Lucas Foundation, a nonprofit created by professional basketball player Landen Lucas to help provide athletics scholarships for student athletes who can’t afford equipment and entry fees. The event included representatives from Headquarters, the Lawrence counseling center and suicide prevention lifeline; and Bert Nash, a nonprofit mental health organization. “I really just reached out, seeing who would fit the category or who could help with what I was trying to do,” Ott said. These groups provided information about their services and about steps individuals can take to help prevent suicide. Emphasis was placed on reaching out to people when they behave concerning ways. “When people see that other people are hurting like that,” attendee and LHS graduate James Reader said,” they just don’t worry about it, like it’s not their fault, but it’s like they should get help.” Ott and the organizations assembled at the event also stressed the importance

of opening up to others about one’s own feelings. “Events like this can bring people out and just bring awareness to things that are going on in your community,” Ott’s Aunt Paula Wesley said. “We don’t ever know what is going on between closed doors.” The final station was the walk: four laps in the gym, completed by each attendee. The Suicide prevention resources laps were National Suicide Prevention Lifeline representaCenter for Kansas tive of the (800) 273-8255 four divisions or (785) 841-2345 of wellbeing headquarterscounselingcenter.org established Students may also reach out to in the Native mental health team members American (most of whom are in student services) for help. medicine wheel: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. Ott discussed the importance of this symbol in a speech, encouraging everyone to not neglect any part of the whole. “[Suicide] is something that needs to be acknowledged, not only when it just happens, because then it’s too late,” Ott said. “I think if we got the community educated about all the problems and factors of it, it could help.

HELP

LOOKING UP — Junior Jordan Ott releases balloons at the We Got Your Back suicide awareness walk on March 23. Ott planned the event in memory of his older brother. “To me, it was a dream come true,” Ott said. “We had over 300 people come and just like everybody there all supporting the cause. I think it was really powerful for our community, all standing together for something that’s really big that goes unnoticed, which is suicide. ...Everybody was positive even though it’s such a negative topic. Everybody was there and willing to listen. I felt like really proud of it. It really brought tears to my eyes when I gave my speech and the end of the event and just seeing everyone wearing the shirt. “ PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET News

SAFETY SECURED

USD 497 implements new ways to improve student safety BY CONNOR SCHMAUS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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he school district has begun implementing new plans for student safety after analyzing data from community conversation responses in March. Beginning April 15, the school began locking additional doors to better secure the grounds until construction is completed. The goal is to provide temporary solutions as the school prepares for major physical changes. “We will take immediate steps to limit access to our building during the school day,” Principal Matthew Brungardt said in a letter to staff and parents. “While these measures require changes to students’ regular traffic patterns, and may cause some minor inconveniences, they are intended to enhance safety and security.” To further improve security, the district will also be issuing ID badges to students to gain entry to the building, similar to what staff currently use. Superintendent Anthony Lewis has pushed for this idea since the initial community conversation held at Lawrence High on Feb. 21. “We have received the printer and materials needed to create student access ID badges,” Lewis said. “I don’t care about the cost. Student safety is more important than us worrying about how much a badge will cost.” Many of these plans come with renewed urgency. In February, two students brought loaded weapons to LHS — with a total of three guns being brought to school this school year. Concerns were heightened on March 29 when two Lawrence High students were shot at Holcom Park, which pressed the issue of

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student safety. School Psychologist Sylvia Trevino-Maack believes the incident is proof that action is needed outside of current measures. “I think many of those things are still too vague,” Trevino Maack said. “Let’s move into action.” With the temporary expansion of mental health resources as a result of the shooting, the district is finalizing portions of its new strategic planning process. Parts of the plan include social and emotional support to promote the safety of students. “We have a strategy team currently working on objectives, initiatives and action steps around that area of focus,” Lewis said. “The school board will consider approval of the final plan at the end of June.” Even with immediate changes, Lewis maintains that the district will continue to use new information to influence gradual improvements to security. The implementation of an anonymous “Contact Us” option on the USD 497 website has allowed many community members to leave feedback on current measures. “We want to continue to encourage open communication among students, parents, school staff and community members,” Lewis said. “Maintaining open lines of communication is critical to preventing school violence.” Trevino Maack hopes feedback from new measures and past incidents will help students cope with the aftermath of such trying times, but that student-staff involvement should be more direct. “I think we need to do better,” Trevino Maack said. “I hope we get the opportunity to debrief on so many things that are happening so fast and levels of anxiety being so high.”

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

SECURE ENTRANCE — One of the ways the district is exploring to improve security and safety is to give each student an ID badge to wear during the school day. Already, more doors are being locked to better secure the building. PHOTO BY AIDIN MANNING


News THE BUDGET

QUICK TAKE

Some of the district’s immediate plans include:

Continuing to emphasize personal relationships and caring adult connections at school

Investigating high school student access IDs

Adding texting to the district notification system

Promoting mental health teams and safety reporting tools in our middle and high schools

Exploring safety and suicide prevention apps and text hotlines

Researching clear backpacks and effectiveness of metal detectors

PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET News

MAKING UP LOST TIME Schedule changes to make up for snow days affect both classes and extracurriculars as school day is extended

BY MACY LANDES

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

A

fter seven snow days and one delayed start day, seniors at Lawrence High and Free State lacked the minutes mandated by state law. In response, USD 497 implemented a longer school day to combat this issue. The decision to add time rather than days came, in part, from the bond construction schedule. In order to finish on time, construction has to begin directly after the school year ends. “There were really no other options that were workable,” debate coach and Lawrence Education Association vice president Jeff Plinsky said. “If we added days to the end, we would have had to push the construction back even more.” Another option was to remove block days, but that would have cut heavily into teacher plan time. “Everyone agreed on this being the best available option,” Principal Matt Brungardt said. Even though it was deemed the

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best solution, the extended day has its setbacks. “I don’t think adding minutes to the day is nearly the same thing as making up days of instruction,” AP Literature and Composition teacher Melissa Johnson said. “And in AP, even if we had made up that time by adding days on at the end of the year, the AP exam would have happened anyway. So really, in a sense, nothing could happen that would make up for the time lost as far as AP prep goes.” The few minutes added to class time haven’t done much in the way of curriculum changes either. “It’s not like I’m going to assign, ‘Oh, now you have an extra 10 pages of reading because our days are longer,’ you know what I mean?” Johnson said. “So changing the schedule that way just doesn’t do much.” In addition to minute class time changes, the schedule change has already affected extracurriculars. “In the end, it will probably cause some girls to miss more of practice, thus limiting their opportunity to be the best they could be at swimming or diving,” girls swimming and diving coach

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

Kent McDonald said. The effects of the changes haven’t just been negative, though. “[Our coach] works and comes straight from work to practice and he’s usually in a rush,” senior softball player Jesse Cox said. “I think the schedule change has helped him more than it has the rest of us.” The change has also affected students with after school jobs. “One of the problems is that at my work, someone has to stay until I get there,” senior Caitlynn Kliem said. “So not only do they have to pay that person to stay longer, they also have to adjust my pay.” The revised schedule, while inconvenient, is necessary. “I definitely understand that this time has to be made up,” Johnson said. “And I wasn’t sure what the best way was so I think it’s fine.” EDUCATION — Physics teacher Alan Gleue teaches his sixth hour class on April 16. Several classes have fallen behind on work due to the number of snow days and are struggling to catch up before the end of the school year. PHOTO BY ANDREW LIEBEGOTT


News THE BUDGET

STRESSED STUDENTS

Students discuss how snow days, new schedule are affecting preparation for AP tests “I think overall it’s a negative impact because I get less instruction from my teachers. Also, although I have more time to do homework, it’s not that helpful for AP tests, and I feel like teachers have started teaching AP later now because of the snow days. It’s a little more negative, but it doesn’t really matter.” —LISA YANG, JUNIOR

“So that was a while ago, so it was in like February and stuff, so I hadn’t gotten fully onto studying for AP exams and such. I played a lot of video games and hung out in the snow and stuff. I probably looked at it a little bit but not super intensely.” —JOSEPH LEUSCHEN, SOPHOMORE

“They’ve given us less time to prepare because we have longer school days, so we don’t have as much time to study after school for them.” —MADISON FREED, FRESHMAN

PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET Features

Features

PECULIAR

DISCOVERIES

Teachers reflect on weird items they have found while packing up their rooms BY CUYLER DUNN

U

STAFF WRITER

pcoming construction is helping teachers rediscover weird and lost memories. LHS is approaching a massive construction project set to begin this summer, and teachers have already began packing and getting ready for the transition. This has allowed staff members to uncover old projects or interesting relics that had been left collecting dust. CTE teacher Jay Hundley recently revived a decade-old project. “Before I came here, I was teaching down in Texas, and I started an armoire,” Hundley said. “It’s a tall wardrobe basically. I didn’t get it done, so I brought it up here, and for 21 years I hadn’t worked on it. Finally, over the Christmas break, I finished it. It was a 25-year project.” Hundley hadn’t found the time to finish his project until he rediscovered it. “It was in the storage room,” he said. Art teacher Wendy Vertacnik came in last summer to do some cleaning before her floors were removed, and she found a lost piece from a former LHS artist that had eluded her for years. “So, Miranda [Pratt] was like a major scholarship winner, and she went to Kansas City Art Institute,” Vertacnik said. “She was head of art club and just a real good student.”

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Vertacnik said she has always been good at keeping track of student artwork. “In all my years teaching I have only lost two pieces, and that was one of them,” she said. “I know she felt bad that the piece was lost, and we searched everywhere but couldn’t find it.” Luckily Vertacnik’s summer cleaning paid off in more ways than one. “So this summer when they took all these shelves out, it was behind there so we found it, and I was thrilled because she was such a good student.” Photo teacher Angelia Perkins found a decomposing photo prop while cleaning her room. “We went on a fieldtrip out to western Kansas with the whole portfolio group and someone’s parents had an old farm that was abandoned,” Perkins said. “So they allowed the whole class to photograph at the farm, and there were all sorts of out-buildings. There was the house itself. There was a barn. So, we just went in and out of all these wonderful spaces to photograph and in the barn was this freaky looking thing, which we didn’t know what it was but then we figured out that it was a chicken.” The chicken had been left in very dry conditions causing it to create a mummy-like form. “It had been in such a dry environment that nothing was rotted but all the skin was really tight on the outside, so in

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY NOAH GINSBERG

the dry conditions, where it had been, it basically mummified it,” Perkins said. The class decided to use the scary find for later pictures and projects. “We took some pictures on location but a lot of people wanted to do something like, ‘Oh, this would be so weird to use in a work of art.’ So in our freaky ways of everything we use for art, we decided to put it in a box and to bring it home,” Perkins said. Perkins rediscovered recently while cleaning out her room. “I put it in a box and put it up there and when I was cleaning I was like, ‘Oh, what is this?’ and I opened it up, and it’s the mummified chicken,” she said. Journalism teacher Barbara Tholen discovered some school history along with peculiar games. “I knew I had all this in here, but I’ve got all these archived, old copies of The Budget,” Tholen said. “Some of them are newer but then in one of these boxes, I’ve got one package I found one that’s from 1905.” Along with old issues of The Budget, she also found old awards. “I have boxes and boxes of awards that I found,” she said. “Some of that stuff I found underneath my [previous] room because there’s tunnels that run underneath the building. I remember pulling one out in that room from 1913 or something.” Beyond the rich history, Tholen un-


Features THE BUDGET

covered, she also found old board games. “Earlier this year, this whole bottom shelf was full of bizarre board games, like weird board games,” Tholen said. “I got rid of a bunch of them, but these are the ones that I just can’t part with because I think they’re too funny. The New Kids on the Block board game. I think I’m going to take it home because I feel like it would be a fun thing to bust out at a party, and I have no idea why we have it.” Tholen and many other LHS teachers continue to clean and pack up their rooms, ready for construction to begin. “I just think these are weird,” said Tholen, “and who knows why we have them here.”

FOWL PLAY — Photography teacher, Angelia Perkins discovered a partially fossilized chicken skeleton in her room during clean-out. Perkins is known for her collection of odd and interesting objects and this was one of the more unique finds in her room. The chicken had previously been used as a prop, including this photo taken by graduate Allie Fischer. PHOTO COURTESY OF ANGELIA PERKINS FOUND — Jay Hundley uncovered a large armoire while cleaning out his room and workshop for the upcoming changes during construction. This was the biggest piece found among other past projects from students and himself. PHOTO COURTESY OF JAY HUNDLEY

LOST AND FOUND—Art teacher Wendy Vertacnik found a piece of art that had been missing for years. The piece was made by former student Miranda Pratt and was one of only two art projects Vertacnik had ever lost. The missing art was found when shelves were removed from the room during the summer. PHOTO COURTESY OF WENDY VERTACNIK GAMER— Barbara Tholen found several old board games hidden away in her room, including ‘Saved by the Bell” and “The Barbie Game.” Tholen’s classroom will be one of the first demolished during the summer construction. PHOTO BY NOLA LEVINGS

PAGE DESIGN NOAH GINSBERG APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET Features

HEADING TO NATIONALS In addition to sending nine students to the National Catholic Forensics League Tournament, LHS is sending these 10 students to the National Speech and Debate Association Tournament in Houston.

Congressional Debate House

Joel Rose sophomore

Helen Viloria freshman

Congressional Debate Senate Jenna Riggins freshman

Original Oration

Aurelia Balcazar senior

Duo Interpretation

Jasper Mumford & Ellie Bates junior sophomore

Lex Moulton & Jared CotĂŠ senior senior

World Schools Debate

Haylee Rose senior

Vera Petrovich senior

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APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE


Featuwwres THE BUDGET

FANTASTIC FORENSICS Students plan to travel to a new national forensics tournament BY ZORA LOTTONBARKER

I

STAFF WRITER

n May, nine Lawrence High students will travel to Milwaukee, WI, to compete in the National Catholic Forensics League tournament for the first time in recent years. Two freshman, Helen Viloria and Jenna Riggins, qualified for the national competition. “It’s so weird, honestly,” Viloria said. “I’m still processing it, because this is my first year doing anything like forensics, and the fact that I am going to reach out to such a far tournament, it’s really cool.” Riggins will be competing in the oral declamation category. “It’s where you re-give a speech that someone’s already given, and so you try to give it as best you can,” said Riggins. “Really, you try to give it better than they did the first time, which can be really, really hard. The point is to really try to embody the original speaker as much as you can.” Viloria and sophomore Joel Rose will both be competing in congressional debate. “We do a mock session of congress, and we give negation and affirmation speeches, and pass and fail resolutions, just like the actual Congress does,” Rose said. Riggins said that her forensics coaches proved to be strong resources for her. “It’s one of those things where you’re super proud of it, but you know you can’t get there alone,” Riggin said.

“I’m super proud of myself, but I’m upcoming tournament. also really thankful and proud of the “We just have a lot of good work that I got from coaches and the speakers that can speak of the top of ability that I was able to step up for a their heads as well as they are good brand new event this year.” with conflict in debate rounds and are Viloria was excited about the really good with the line by line debate tournament, but anticipated it would and the clash and just overall have a be tough competition. very diverse and wide range of skills “I’m excited for the whole with our debate team.” experience in general because I’ve Riggins said this competition will never really done anything like this be completely new territory. before,” Viloria said. “I think “I think that that it will be a really great we as a program “I THINK THE learning opportunity in every hold ourselves to aspect of it. I know that for CHALLENGE WILL very high standards, nationals, it’s a big tournament but we don’t have and a lot of the competitors are JUST BE STAYING much expectation going to be experienced people REALLY LEVEL for this tournament who have done this before, and just because we I’ve only had a few tournaments HEADED.” have not been to do it. So, I’m mostly scared in it before, and — JENNA RIGGINS for competing and trying to obviously we want shape up to fit with the other to do very well and competitors.” we have several congress qualifiers Riggins was excited about meeting and qualifiers in other events, but we new people, but also felt nervous about don’t have high expectations,” she said. competing against more experienced “It’s not like we’re saying, ‘We’ve won forensicators. this tournament in the past and so we “I think meeting new people and should win it again.’ We have no stake. being able to compete against people We obviously would love to win, but who are from other places and all we don’t have a previous commitment across the nation is going to be a really to live up to.” interesting opportunity, and I’ll get to PRACTICING — Sophomore see other people’s perspectives about Anthony Racy gives an authorship for topics, which is really cool,” Riggins congressional debate about the abolition said. “I think the stress is something of the TSA. “I like congressional debate that will definitely take me off guard, because it is a good place to discuss and especially once we get there and we’re debate U.S. economics and politics at a setting up. I think the challenge will competitive level,” Racy said. “I am looking just be staying really level headed forward to debating with some of the best about everything and not letting the people at congressional debate in the stress take control.” Rose said Lawrence High’s high nation and beating them.” standards will play favorably at the PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET Features

THAT’S SHOWBIZ Z

BY FREEMAN SPRAY

COPY EDITOR

M

usically- and theatrically-involved students are back to the grind for this year’s highly anticipated Showtime performance. Students typically spend 40 mintues a week working with directors on polishing their performance, choir director Dwayne Dunn said. “For students in five to six acts, that adds up to several hours a week, but it is the only way to produce the high standards that Showtime is known for,” he said. The commitment did not stop senior Alyssa Waller, who will be appearing in 14 acts, six of which are features. In addition, Waller noted that performers must take charge of their own parts and work together to make sure every move is memorized in order to put together a fluid act. “We have to coordinate all of that ourselves and it’s really hard to have to tell each other what to do and take leadership,” Waller said. “Whoever is in

charge of the act tells me their vision, then I just figure out how to work with all the people. Like Waller, senior Sydney Hawley jumped at the opportunity to go above and beyond. “I’m in more featured acts this year, so I’m liking it a lot more,” she said. The acts with large casts proved especially difficult to organize, due to conflicts with other extracurriculars and events. “With so many students involved in varsity athletics, other school activities, jobs, church groups, etc. it is hard to coordinate schedules to rehearse together with the directors,” Dunn said. With a limited schedule, there is a lot of emphasis put on practice outside of rehearsal. The performers are largely responsible for their own preparation, and in no aspect of the show is this more demanding than with the choreography. “It can be really tough, and we’ve had to change it a lot, and it’s hard to remember it all, especially with all the different songs that we’re doing,” Hawley said. “I try to match the words

DEMONSTRATING — Choreographer Barb Wasson shows choir students new steps during rehearsals as Showtime approaches. Wasson has helped with choreography for several years. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE PRACTICING — Seniors Alyssa Waller and Tiffani Smith sing along to “Someone In The Crowd” from the film “La La Land” during showtime rehearsal. “Each act has its own story and it’s really quite special to be able to share that with everyone,” Smith said. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

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APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE

with the moves, but if they don’t match, that’s when I struggle.” Once the dust is settled and the final product is assembled, the performers will come out weary but accomplished, having created a show all their own. “I enjoy seeing what the students come up with, both musically and in their staging. They have some very creative ideas,” Dunn said. “They also learn a lot about working together, compromise, resiliency, and hard work. You start to see them taking charge, solving problems and working together, and they begin to seem more like adults as they accomplish these things.” Showtime performances will be in the theater starting at 7:30 p.m. April

25-27.

SINGING — Senior Jared Coté practices “Careless Whisper” for his solo during Showtime rehearsal on March 29. “Doing things with the people that you care about and love is pretty incredible,” Coté said. “Showtime is definitely jammed pack with things to do. If rehearsals are late, I will go home about 9:40. That’s the latest I’ve ever gone home.” PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE


Features THE BUDGET

MUSIC REVIEW

REVIEWS BY MACY LANDES

In anticipation of their fourth album, “Father of the Bride,” American rock band Vampire Weekend has put out two songs every few weeks. I’ll be reviewing two songs, “Sunflower” and “Big Blue,” both released on March 6.

Sunflower Sunflower, the third single released since the announcement of their new album, features a super funky bass line preceding an equally groovy guitar melody played by guest artist Steve Lacy. Although I’ll always love their early work, I’ll admit it sometimes lacks the supplementation of foundational elements common in alternative music, like a low bass sound. Listening to the laid-back melody of “Sunflower,” you’d never know the band’s fame stems from violin interjections, lyrics and ivy league life.

Big Blue This song reminds me a lot of “Step,” off of their third studio album, Modern Vampires of the City. It might just be because they both begin with Ezra Koenig, the band’s lead singer, singing with minimal instruments behind him, and the accompaniment comes later. Nonetheless, it’s more along the lines of what I know and love to hear from Vampire Weekend. The twangy guitar licks throughout are a change from their usual preppy sound, but I like both equally. PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE APRIL 22, 2019

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Sports THE BUDGET

Sports

SWIMMING TO SUCCESS Girls swimming, diving continues undefeated BY DANIEL DAVIDSON

SPORTS EDITOR

G

irls swimming and diving continues to make a splash this season with seven first place finishes in eight outings. LHS finished fourth at state last season and coach Kent McDonald says the team is projected to go further. “The team is already doing better this year,” McDonald said. “Our times in almost every event are faster this year than last year.” Among its wins, the Lions took first place by a 204 point margin over Free State on April 9, finishing with a champion swimmer in all events but one. The first real test for the swimmers came in their fourth meet, the Olathe Invitational. That’s where the Lions’ winning streak first broke last year. Up against 16 other teams this year, LHS took first. “It helps see where we are at the beginning of the season,” senior Emily Guo said. “It’s a

test of how we measure up to other schools now.” Guo came in first in the 100 yard butterfly and anchored the top 400 yard freestyle relay team. Lawrence won the 400 and 200 yard freestyle relay in Olathe, relays being a team strong point, according to McDonald. The next seven teams trailed behind by three seconds in the 200 relay, with junior Marian Frick in the lead. Yet to be beat, the swimmers look to continue dropping times and taking wins. “Everyone who swam last year at state has returned,” Frick said. “We can only get better.” BACKSTROKE — Sophomore Madison Khule works on her stroke during warmups at the home meet on March 26. “We have a lot of seniors and most of the new people swam club before they joined,” Khule said on the success of the team. In the future, Khule hopes to work on her breast stroke in order to have another stroke to compete with. PHOTO BY ELYZEBETH WORKMAN

SAVE THE DATE APRIL 30

JV SUNFLOWER MEET INDOOR AQUATIC CENTER

MAY 2-4

VARSITY SUNFLOWER LEAGUE MEET SUMMIT TRAIL MIDDLE SCHOOL

MAY 16-18

STATE PRELIMS, SEMIS, AND FINALS TOPEKA HUMMER SPORTS PARK

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

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THE BUDGET Sports

SOURCE: JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE

1

Tommy John Surgery, more formally known as ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction, is used to repair a torn UCL inside the elbow.

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TOMMY JOHN SURGERY 2

3

A UCL is a ligament on the A UCL reconstruction surgery inner side of your elbow that involves harvesting a tendon helps secure your elbow joint. from your own body, or from a donor, and attaching it to act as a new UCL.

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT

4

It may take overhead athletes more than a year or longer to return to their prior level of play after a UCL reconstruction.


Sports THE BUDGET

TOMMY JOHN TURNAROUND After sitting out a year due to reconstructive surgery, senior pitcher makes return to the diamond for season

BY EMILY GORDON-ROSS

STAFF WRITER

A

t the start of baseball season in 2017, senior Jackson Hewins, then a sophomore, felt something wasn’t OK in his right

arm. After the season was over, he went to the doctor and learned he had injured his ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), a tendon on the inner side of the elbow that connects the upper arm to the forearm. To get it repaired, Hewins had to undergo surgery. “I had Tommy John surgery,” said Hewins. “The surgery took a [healthy] tendon out of my forearm and put it in my elbow.” In Tommy John surgery, holes are drilled in the bones above and below where the injured tendon was, and the healthy tendon is threaded through in replacement. Hewins’ surgery was April 10, 2018. With recovery for this surgery typically taking between 12-14 months, Hewins was unable to play for the entirety of his junior year. “I felt bad for him because he

was a good pitcher and had a bright future, but now all of that could be prevented because of the injury,” said senior teammate Garrett Romero. “I was just shocked and hoping he’d make a speedy recovery.” This kind of injury is common among pitchers. “We have had players that have had Tommy John surgery [before],” said baseball coach Brad Stoll. “With these types of injuries the tear occurs over time. [I was] totally bummed for the kid. I hate when good kids that work hard get injured and are unable to play a sport they love.” Hewins has been working hard in physical therapy the last year to build up strengthen his arm to play for the 2019 season. “Started off using dumbbells, working on strength little at a time,” said Hewins. “It’s going good, I’m right on track to be fully recovered in 12 months.” Early this season, the baseball team traveled to a tournament in Oklahoma where Hewins was cleared to pitch for the weekend. Romero was inspired by his teammate’s spirit and work ethic. “It’ll help this team greatly to see a teammate that was injured his whole junior year work his butt off to get

where he is and now he’s out there pitching again,” Romero said. “It just makes you want to work harder and play better for him and the rest of your teammates.” Stoll felt the same way. Hewins’ commitment to the team and his recovery has made his team and coach proud of his recovery. “It was such a great experience to watch him throw in Oklahoma,” Stoll said. “We were down in the game and we fought back for the win with him on the mound. He was the winning pitcher and the entire team was pumped up for him. Great moment.” Oklahoma was an important milestone for Hewins, and to play and pitch well was just icing on the cake. “It was my first time pitching in a game since 2017 and I thought it went really well,” Hewins said. “I pitched two innings and had four strikeouts and didn’t give up a run. It felt really good to finally be back out there and be able to compete with my teammates after all the hard work that we have put in.” FIELD — Senor pitcher Jackson Hewins fields a ground ball in practice. Hewins, after tearing his UCL, recovered from surgery in time to star in his senior season. PHOTO BY FYNN STOVALL

PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT APRIL 22, 2019

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D UBLES TR UBLE THE BUDGET Sports

Expanded boys tennis team starts season strong BY DANIEL DAVIDSON

SPORTS EDITOR

T

he tennis season opened at the Emporia Invitational with doubles team junior Kanak Masten and senior Cooper Wright taking first place. Junior Aiden Von Feldt also took third in three singles. “I saw some good things,” Coach Chris Marshall said. “I think the players I took showed promise and with hard work could really help us this year.” Finishing ninth at state last year, Masten and Wright are ready to keep leading the team in points. They will also take charge of a wave of newcomers this year. With 38 members, compared to last year’s 14, all the tennis courts are finally getting filled at practice. “We got a lot of people out,” senior Ryan Logan said. “We have a lot of talent and can really do something special this year.” This will Marshall’s 10th year as head coach. “He focuses on the essentials,” sophomore Drew Dean said, “and gets us to the place we need to be to get those points.” Masten and Wright are likely to be a standout duo for the team this season and have been practicing during the off-season to come prepared.

“What sets them apart from our other players,” Marshall said, “is their ability to hit the ball to the right spot consistently.” They are not the only doubles pair to watch, however. During the City Series against Free State and Bishop Seabury, Logan and Dunn took third in a 8-4 win against Free State. Masten and Wright took second, but it was not enough for the Lions to “IT WILL BE take the city title. Masten said his second UP TO OUR year with Wright will be a SENIORS AND special one. “Last year we were not RETURNING expecting to get as far as PLAYERS.” we did,” Masten said. “This —CHRIS MARSHALL, year, I think we have high TENNIS COACH expectations, but we’re playing against new, different opponents.” A cold, rainy start to the spring season of tennis has not watered down team spirits. “The LHS boys tennis is bigger and better than ever,” Dean said. PRACTICE TIME — Junior Kanak Masten hits a volley during warm ups at practice on April 4 at the LHS tennis courts.”I enjoy playing tennis because it’s fun to spend time with my teammates,” Masten said. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

QUICK TAKE UPCOMING MATCHES

4/22 GE Quad 3:30 p.m. GE High School 4/23 Bonner Springs 3 p.m. HOME 4/24 Sunflower League 9 a.m. College Blvd Activity Center

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APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY NOAH GINSBERG

AUDIO INTERVIEW

SoundCloud soundcloud.com/lhsbudget


Sports THE BUDGET

COURTING WINS — Sophomore Kirk Johnson finishes hitting a forehand during practice on April 4. “I enjoy the fast pace and intensity of the game,” Johnson said. ”I also really enjoy the strategy and mental part of the game.” Johnson hoped to finish in the top eight at league and regionals. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE LEANING IN — Freshman Ryan Hardie returns the ball during tennis practice on April 4. “You have to practice and learn you will make mistakes and you got to learn from your mistake,” Hardie said. “Getting down the mental toughness that you need to play tennis, like if you make a mistake you got to power through it. That’s the one thing you can’t practice and have to focus on that.” PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE PAGE DESIGN NOAH GINSBERG APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET Opinion

Opinion

COLLEGE

FOR ALL

Scandal reminds that opportunity must be based off aptitude, not economics BY CONNOR SCHMAUS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

O

ver the last month, several celebrities were charged with sabotaging the college admissions process for their children at prestigious universities. The scandal, which put a spotlight on Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, also exposed a well-known college admissions coach, Rick Singer, for bribery and faked results on entrance exams. Singer was paid thousands of dollars in return for his services. Not only does this violate everything middle and working class students want to believe about achievement, it undermines the effort given by those who legitimately apply for admission at these schools. This is yet another example of how deeply rooted privilege is in the United States. I’m a firm believer in the idea that college is not for everyone, but those who want to should not be disadvantaged in yet another aspect of life GRAPHICS BY ARIANNA MYERS-ARENTH

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because of the oppressively wealthy. With attempts at diversity by many of these institutions, including Stanford, Yale and USC, it’s disappointing to see them fail to recognize these obvious obstacles. As Huffman and Loughlin face possible prison sentences, the implications of their actions, in addition to many others that go unseen, are critical when considering how to address admission equity issues. College admission is historically disproportionate in terms of race, gender and class, and the few anti-discrimination policies in place are still considered controversial. We need to remove the economic restrictions on education. Free college is a major part of both Bernie Sanders’ and Kamala Harris’ presidential platform, and for good reason. If all Americans had equal access to high levels of education, we could make huge strides in battling generational poverty and unemployment. Even though not every person will want to attend college as a part of their life, each one deserves to make that choice without the bur-

APRIL 22, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT

den of financial restriction, but rather based on preference and need. With the American brand of capitalism, those with more money will always have a leg up. It is imperative that we as a country reverse the implications this has on institutions of learning. In a world where so many countries provide free or inexpensive post-secondary education, America stands out as being unwelcoming to the innovation our country supposedly thrives off of. Rather than subsidizing fossil fuels and corn products, the U.S. government needs to begin providing more funding to universities. Although complete privatization allows for the institutions to dictate their own research, the limitations presented by present-day universities damages the future of so many students. Already, many European countries offer free or drastically-reduced tuition fees for post-secondary education. It’s time to work toward that environment, to lobby for education funding and a focus on equity while doing so.


Opinion THE BUDGET

A-FREE EXAMS Costly AP exam fees should be subsidized the school BY GARY SCHMIDT

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

T

he highest level classes offered at Lawrence High almost always fall under the same illustrious and fear-striking designation: AP. Touted as the ultimate way to prepare oneself for college — by taking what are virtually college courses themself — Advanced Placement courses are a chance to academically challenge oneself. And those who do well enough in the courses have the opportunity to distinguish themseves, and if they are lucky, get college credits at a premium discount. Teachers at Lawrence High encourage students to take exams, and more importantly, prepare us to score well on these tests. Nearly all of the AP Exams offered by the College Board are offered at Lawrence High and in many cases, if they are not, there is flexibility for students to structure their own curriculum and take them on their own.

The academic focus is excellent and the tools required to do well are all here, so where is the disconnect? Far too often, the excessive exam fee required at registration becomes a deterrent. Lawrence High is home to a diverse group of students coming from a variety of economic backgrounds, and in an attempt to mitigate differences, there is a fee reduction for students qualifying for free and reduced lunch. I believe this is a great approach and goes a long way toward allowing students of academically high achieving but low income backgrounds the same chances to demonstrate their abilities. However, the cost for each AP exam still stands at $94 or $55 for students qualifying for free- or reduced-price lunches. Multiply this by three or four exams for particularly ambitious students, and students are faced with the proposition of paying upwards of $300 to take a test. Even for families where this is financially feasible, it becomes a

question of whether or not it is worth the price of admission. For a school that is so clearly for students taking these challenging exams, this should never be FAR TOO OFTEN, a question. If the THE EXCESSIVE school financially EXAM FEE backed the great emphasis it places REQUIRED AT on AP, more stuREGISTRATION dents would take BECOMES A more exams, and in many cases, DETERRENT. students would be surprised with how well they do. Lawrence High School must take steps toward funding our AP exams, because despite all the encouragement staff can provide, any initiative can be shaken from its foundation if money is allowed to make the ultimate decision. This would serve as an investment in the students of the Lawrence High as it would save them the worry, save them the money, and prepare more students to do well at the college level.

PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT APRIL 22, 2019

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THE BUDGET Opinion

SUPPORT THE VICTIMS After sexual assault, student says school can do a better job to support victims while implementing education to teach students about consent Editors note: This editorial is being me for a situation like this. I didn’t even RESOURCES published anonymously due to the sensitive know this event to be assault until I nature of the subject and the student’s request for privacy.

I

am a Lawrence High School student, and I am a survivor of sexual assault and rape. Although I wish I could say otherwise, LHS has failed to provide safety and protections for me and many of my peers in the face of sexual abuse. At our school exists a culture of silence and stigmatization in both faculty and students that empowers young predators and threatens potential and past victims. Why do students like me feel afraid when they walk into LHS? They feel afraid because, more likely than not, their abusers are in the school with them every day. Many victims spend their days in class with, in activities with and being forced to interact with the individuals who have assaulted them. I was sexually assaulted by another student in my grade when I was 16. They were drunk, alone and staying at my neighbor’s house. I’m going to spare you of the disgusting details that occurred that night, but to make things clear, understand this: the person (who I considered a relatively close friend) pinned me down and molested me without my consent. Teachers and administrators have failed my classmates and myself in creating an understanding of assault and consent. Health class never prepared

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APRIL 18, 2019

painfully revisited it later. I soon began to recognize other moments in my life when I had been forced into nonconsensual contact, sexually assaulted and even raped. I’m not the only one who’s gone through something like this. Ask any student at LHS if they know of someone who has been sexually assaulted by another student, and the answer will almost always be yes. It took time and help from others to understand what had happened to me, and why it made me feel violated and helpless. But other students should not have to go through assault to understand it, and they should not have to feel unsafe in their own schools. I was helped by many people here at LHS, and I’m so fortunate to have the resources I did, but the reality is that this shouldn’t have happened in the first place. Administrators need to ensure students are better educated on the realities of sexual abuse and violence while we are in the classroom. The first solution to these problems is better, explicit and thorough education on consent and why it’s important in our student body. Our understanding of consent, as students, must come from somewhere more substantial than awkward, and frankly immature, discussions in freshman health class. This is a lesson that should be repeated yearly and with an intense focus, especially as students become older and

The Sexual Trauma & Abuse Care Center stacarecenter.org (785) 843-8985 National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673 Willow Domestic Violence Center: (785) 843-3333 At Lawrence High School Counselors are in Student Services. School psychologists are in Student Services and in the 100 hallway. Active consent defined Active consent means affirmative, honest, conscious, voluntary, sober and ongoing agreement to participate in sexual activity. Each person involved is responsible for ensuring that there is active consent to engage in each sexual act. —New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

more likely to have sexual encounters. More comprehensive consent education programs can be found online than are delivered to students at LHS. A better consent education can help potential victims identify warning signs and protect themselves from assault, while also teaching potential young predators about boundaries, permission and coercion. I attend school every day with students who have assaulted me, and there is little to nothing I can do about it, beyond filing a police report. Because


Opinion THE BUDGET

of many extenuating and personal reasons, getting the law involved is not a possibility for many assault survivors. It’s time for LHS to do better for not only victims of sexual violence, but every other student who walks through the doors because education is supposed to happen here. This can be avoided. We need to open dialogue about this topic no matter how uncomfortable we may feel. It’s time for change. GRAPHIC BY JAYLYNN HICKS PAGE DESIGN SAMI TURNER APRIL 18, 2019

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THE BUDGET Opinion

LIFEGUARD

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APRIL 22, 2018 PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT

BY MAYA WESLANDER


Opinion THE BUDGET

EDITORS WEIGH IN: WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO IN THE SPRING?

“Mosquito bites.” —Nikki Aqui, managing editor

“I’m looking forward to graduation. High school has been a wild ride, and I think I’m finally ready for what’s coming next. I’m excited to recharge over summer and start stepping toward my future.“ —Emily Kruse, photo editor

I’m looking forward to spring because my family has a lot of spring birthdays. Not mine, but it’s still always been a celebratory season.” —Macy Landes, editor-in-chief

“Getting to wear my Chacos every day and driving with the windows down.” —Anna Parnell, design editor

“I’m ready for comfortable walking weather, so I don’t have to drive around so much. I’ll be attending college in town so it’ll be good to get accustomed to walking again.” —Connor Schmaus, editor-in-chief

“I am excited for new beginnings. New, warm weather, new opportunities, new phases of life. Spring is all about rebirth and being at the precipice of the most exciting time of my life yet is such an amazing feeling.” —Gary Schmidt, editor-in-chief

“I am looking forward to the weather. Normally I do not mind the cold, but this year I am sick of it. Everything in the spring seems so much more happier than in the winter. I feel like everyone could use some good vibes this time of year.” —Sami Turner, design editor

THE JOURNALISM STAFF MISSION STATEMENT The Budget newspaper is committed to providing the Lawrence High community with objective, inclusive news coverage that ensures relevance to its spectrum of readers. The staff devotes itself to the exercise of First Amendment rights and upholding the highest of journalistic standards. While the paper is a tool to publish student voices, it also works to help students grow as journalists and help readers access information.

newspaper’s goals are to inform, entertain, and present a forum of expression for students, faculty, administrators and community members. The newspaper is financed through advertising and staff fundraising. The editorial staff is solely responsible for the content of this newspaper, and views expressed in The Budget do not necessarily reflect those of the administration of Lawrence High School or USD 497.

ABOUT US The Budget is published every four weeks and distributed free of charge to students and faculty at Lawrence High School, 1901 Louisiana, Lawrence, Kan. 66046-2999. The Budget is produced by students in the Digital Journalism and Digital Design and Production courses with occasional contributions from 21st Century Journalism and guest columnists. The

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Sanders, Alex Stark, Fynn Stovall, Riley Unekis, Andrew Williams, Katie Williams, Elyzebeth Workman, Cooper Wright, Jackson Yanek THE BUDGET NEWSPAPER EDITORS Macy Landes...............................Editor-in-Chief Connor Schmaus ����������������������Editor-in-Chief Gary Schmidt...............................Editor-in-Chief Emily Kruse.....................................Photo Editor Sami Turner...................................Design Editor Anna Parnell.................................Design Editor Nikki Aqui................................ Managing Editor LHSBUDGET.COM EDITORS William Yanek.............................Editor-in-Chief Anahita Hurt.................................Editor-in-Chief Aidin Manning ����������������� Social Media Editor Nadia Sanburn ������������������������������������Assistant Online Editor Freeman Spray..............................Webmaster/ Copy Editor David Obadare ������������������������������ Video Editor

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PHOTO OF THE MONTH

SPOONING IT IN — Freshman Spencer Lewis competes in the cereal eating contest during the pep assembly on April 4. The freshman took on a different approach to the contest by smashing his head into the bowl. He was named the contest winner. ”You just think, ‘I’m in it this far, so you just got to power through,’ ” Lewis said. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

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