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GUN CULTURE AT LAWRENCE HIGH

06 FOOD PANTRY FOR LHS COMMUNITY

15 SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

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LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL

LAWRENCE, KS

VOLUME 126, ISSUE 6 MARCH 21, 2019


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Students and staff reflect on security issues page 8

Model UN Students take on new roles page 16

Students try chicken nugget challenge page 18

Boys basketball goes to state tournament page 24

Quiz: What coffee shop should you visit?

LAWRENCE, KS

VOLUME 126, ISSUE 6 MARCH 21, 2019

GUN CULTURE AT LAWRENCE HIGH

LHSBUDGET.COM STORIES

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IN THIS ISSUE

LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL

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FOOD PANTRY FOR LHS COMMUNITY

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LHS DIVING TEAM

Weekly Art Feature: Mold

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LHS NUGGET KINGS

SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

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ON THE COVER — After three incidents of students bringing weapons to school, the Lawrence High community and district grapple with how improve security. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SAMI TURNER

INTER-TRIBAL CLUB LEADS SHUTDOWN SUPPLY DRIVE BY CONNOR SCHMAUS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF With families of federal employees struggling to make ends meet following the recent government shutdown, Inter-tribal Club took action to provide aid. The club gathered donations for two Native American reservations, the Navajo Nation of Arizona and the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation of South Dakota. The goal was to meet basic needs for each, depending on climate and circumstance. “Since it was the winter months at the time, we wanted to send warmer clothing items to South Dakota, because it was colder than in Arizona,” junior and Inter-tribal club secretary Nick Kennedy said. “We also sent necessities to both, like shampoo,

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toothpaste, conditioner, stuff like that.” Although this was the first time the club used its funds for an aid project, Kennedy believes similar endeavors will be pursued in the future. “I think that was one of the things we were looking forward to doing, helping people in need,” Kennedy said. “The best part seeing that we were able to contribute in a meaningful way”

HELPING HANDS — Junior Josh Sanchez helps pack donations for the Navajo Nation of Arizona and the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation of South Dakota reservations during an Inter-tribal Club meeting. PHOTO BY ELYZEBETH WORKMAN

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER


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“WHEN YOU DIE OR GET BORED OF THE GAME...YOU’VE JUST KEEP ON THE GRIND. YOU’VE GOT TO GET BETTER.” — SENIOR NATHAN STODDARD (IN ILLUSTRATION ON LEFT), PROFESSIONAL FORTNITE GAMER

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CHANGES HEADED TO DOWNTOWN BY MACY LANDES

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

City planners are actively involving high school students in their master construction plan for Downtown Lawrence. On Jan. 31, Douglas County transportation official Jessica Mortinger came to visit science teacher Lisa Ball’s AP Environmental Science classes to talk about how teens can voice their opinions. There was also a question and answer portion in which students were able to ask about the intricacies of the planning process. Mortinger discussed how transportation will improve as well. “To me, one of the things I really liked hearing about was plans to protect pedestrians and bikers, because we do have a lot of students who walk or bike to school,” Ball said.

Although one of the community workshops available to the public has already passed, the meeting originally scheduled for the evening of Feb. 6 is in the process of being rescheduled. All are encouraged to attend. “I think it’s really important to know that the city would love to get students involved,” Ball said. “They have several committees, including a sustainability committee….You don’t have to be a member of the committee to attend those meetings, but you can get as involved as you want to. And they value the contribution and thoughts of youth as well as the adults.”

CHANGING UP — Master planning for downtown Lawrence could affect local businesses like the Downtown Barbershop. PHOTO BY KATIE WILLIAMS

SAVE THE DATE 5 EVENTS YOU SHOULDN'T MISS 1 2 3 4 5 MARCH 26

LHS VS. MILL VALLEY GIRLS SOCCER 6:30 P.M. SOCCER FIELD

MARCH 27

BAND AND ORCHESTRA CONCERT 7 P.M. AUDITORIUM

MARCH 28

LHS VS. SMS GIRLS SWIM MEET 3:30 P.M. NATATORIUM

MARCH 29

LHS VS. FSHS TRACK MEET 3:30 P.M. FOOTBALL STADIUM

APRIL 12

LHS VS. FSHS SOFTBALL GAME 5 P.M. SOFTBALL FIELD

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CULTURE OF GUNS Access to guns an issue in incidents, students respond with mix of concerns BY ZORA LOTTONBARKER

STAFF WRITER

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ach of the three times that guns made their way to Lawrence High this year, students found those guns at home. Those incidents — twice in February and another in the fall — have pointed to the issue of the easy accessibility of weapons and the culture around guns. “We have to seriously address this as a society — parents and students should not have to worry about guns being brought into our schools,” parent Noreen Spears said. “I don’t know the circumstances surrounding the incidences of the students who brought guns into our school, but I think it is a reflection of our society as a whole. We live in a gun culture that does not command the level of respect that we need to induce for all firearms, or even human life for that matter. Guns are not an accessory, they are not an emotional support device, and they are not a trinket. They are a lethal weapon.” According to the Giffords Law Center, about 4.6 million American children and minors are living in homes with at least one loaded and unlocked

2019 APRIL 9

Firearm found in student’s backpack at Free State

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changed his outlook. “I’m pretty familiar with guns — I mean I shoot guns on a regular basis,” Retter said. “I do a lot of hunting...I don’t really think guns have had very much of an impact really on what I think about the incidents. I mean, I still think it’s pretty messed up to have guns in school, just because I use them outside of school doesn’t mean I think that that’s acceptable at all.” Sophomore Giovanni Ventello says theses incidents may stem from students’ belief in the need for selfprotection. “I believe most of the incidents in which students brought weapons to school were in hopes of defending themselves against other students with weapons,” Ventello said. Retter has a different take. “I guess I would disagree with a lot people that having more guns causes more gun-related incidents,” Retter said. Ventello said recent incidents have made him worried about going to school. “School is hard enough for high schoolers,” he said. “We should be worried about dumb stuff like tests and our social lives, not literally being shot and killed in our classrooms,” Ventello said. “Some of my friends and I were

Events involving firearms at both high schools during the past year

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TIMELINE

firearm. Police said both of the guns brought to LHS in February were loaded. One, which was found in a student’s backpack, had a round in the chamber. The group Be SMART emphasizes the importance of keeping firearms out of reach to prevent accidents. Be SMART presented at the Community Conversation held at LHS in the wake of the most recent incidents. “Every year, 300 children 17 and under gain access to a firearm and unintentionally discharge it, injuring or killing themselves or others,” Be SMART representative Debra Boatright said. “The ‘A’ is for ask, to ask about unsecured guns in the home.” Boatright encouraged parents to ask other parents about guns in the home just as they might inquire about curfews or alcohol. One message was clear from the community meeting: Parents and teachers say safety risks, such as firearms and social pressures, require more regular and in-depth discussion. “There’s certain topics that we discuss with ninth-graders once,” school psychologist Sylvia Trevino-Maack said. “Now we’re realizing that one time in their high school careers is not enough.” Junior Cobin Retter is in regular contact with guns, but said it hasn’t

SEPT. 10

Two LHS students arrested for taking part in a gun sale on school grounds

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

SEPT. 20

Firearm found under a seat in a student’s vehicle at Free State, allegedly left after a hunting trip

FEB. 6

Firearm found in a student’s backpack at LHS


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even uncomfortable just going to school with so many gun-related incidents happening recently.” Sophomore Erin Doyle also experienced apprehension. “It’s so crazy,” Doyle said. “I mean, really. It’s crazy to think that we are more in danger of witnessing or experiencing gun violence in school than

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Firearm found on a student at LHS, reported by a student

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we are walking down the street.” Ventello’s discomfort is matched by frustration at the slow pace of gun reform in America. His cousins live in Sandy Hook, Connecticut, where 26 elementary school students and staff members were killed by a gunman in 2012. His family members lived only few miles away.

LHS student reports a SnapChat from a Free State student in which they said the Free State student threatened to shoot the reporting student at LHS

FEB. 14

Taser brought from home confiscated at LHS after a staff member reported hearing it discharged

“It’s like after all of these events, nothing has been done,” Ventello said. AT HOME — About 4.6 million American children and minors live a home with at least one loaded and unlocked firearm, according to the Giffords Law Center. Three guns brought to LHS this school year came from home. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SAMI TURNER

FEB. 21

LHS in lock down part of the morning due to an armed robbery at 23rd and Louisiana

FEB. 21

Superintendant Anthony Lewis hosts a Community Conversation to discuss public safety

PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET News

WE FEEL... Lawrence High community reflects on security issues at LHS REPORTING BY EMILY GORDON-ROSS & CONNOR SCHMAUS PHOTOS BY KATIE WILLIAMS

SOPHIE BRACKER STURM, SOPHOMORE I feel kind of scared, kind of alarmed that I come to school and that there is danger of a gun being in school. I think it should be safe to come to school and get my education, not be afraid all of the time. I think that we should get metal detectors, so there can’t be guns at school in the first place.

JAYLYNN COLUMBUS, JUNIOR I do not feel good about it. I feel like students having guns at this age isn’t appropriate at all and I feel like they should not have been able to get into the school. It’s just really nerve-wracking. I don’t really think about it that much anymore but when it first happened, I know that a lot of people were shaken up about it, being scared to come to school because you don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s really scary, and it’s also hard because you don’t know the reason why the kids have guns, you don’t know what they’re thinking. You don’t know their mental state, so that’s nerve-wracking as well.

DANE REINSCH, SENIOR I feel like I probably should be more worried, but honestly it’s been quite a while since then. I know there were a lot of instances within those two weeks, but there hasn’t really been that much since, so I’m less worried than I was. I know that there is a big issue around the nation, and I feel that with the issues that have been going on in LHS and Free State that more caution should be used, by the administration, by teachers if they are actually informed by the administration. I feel like I should be more tense, but I’m fairly relaxed right now. I don’t know if it’s mainly because I’m a senior and I’m not going to be here next year to deal with it. I’m just not too sure how to feel.

AIDAN ZIMNEY, FRESHMAN I’m a little bit nervous about the firearm issues — not because I’m afraid that like people are going to get hurt with it, but because I just think that people are getting the wrong idea and I think it is a polarizing issue for our school. I don’t like the divide among the students, but I’m not worried about any potential injury just because I know that LHS has a plan in place, and I trust the teachers and administration that we have. I think that we just need more gun control overall.

HUNTER JONES, SENIOR Honestly I think it’s a problem that needs to be addressed, and I’m really glad to see Dr. [Anthony] Lewis, [USD 497 superintendent), and others taking steps to make sure that students feel safe in a school environment. Because really there’s nothing that we can do that’s within our control right now to prevent kids from bringing guns into the school like has been happening, but what we can do is make it so that more kids feel content with the situations.

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LYNISHA THOMAS, SOCIAL WORKER I believe there are some things that can be put in place now until they are able to actually maybe fix the problems that may take more money to do so...We need someone to lock the doors and we need to follow through with that... I also believe that we should have an app to use like Free State is using and I think Billy Mills is using as well that can notify staff when things are going on as well as students..It’s Remind 101. I know many students that are familiar with it as well as staff. It could be easily implemented,... I’m frustrated by the delayed response. Urgency, not there. Seems like we’re just waiting for something horrible to happen for us to actually step up and do something about it.

ZACH CASEY, SCIENCE TEACHER I feel not great. I think it shows that we have a problem in the school and in the community that we need to solve. I’m not really sure exactly how we are going to do it. I think it is going to take the whole school and community to figure that out. One of the biggest things is working on our communication so that people feel safe communicating that. I think it did work out these last couple of times somebody did communicate it. It just seems that it got to a breaking point before somebody said something. I think we need to start improving our relations with teachers and students, counselors and students, and administrators and students so that if something is happening outside of the school they will come and talk to someone about it rather than do something about it. I think that it’s been a concern, and there are things that we can do about It.

BARBARA THOLEN, JOURNALISM ADVISER I feel frustrated. Shortly after our problems, gunfire hit the Shawnee Mission school where my mom teaches and my niece and nephew are students. I try to keep things in perspective. I believe we’re generally safe. But I’m also shaken up by the pictures my 5-year-old nephew is drawing of “bad guys.” And while I appreciate the training teachers have gone through to respond to emergencies, I wish we would do a better job preventing guns from getting into the wrong hands. If teachers are going to be trained on how to throw school supplies at possible intruders, I’d like to see smart people make these incidents less likely. I also am grateful to the students who shared their concerns. You are my heroes. It’s up to all of us to make this the school we want it to be.

ROBIN, LHS PARENT I feel our school district is very overdue for metal detectors! This would obviously require a single entrance to each building; and securing all other always has exits only. I understand this will be expensive. However, I believe the parents would get behind the effort and help with fundraising if that would move the process along. We are past the point of trying to figure out “counseling“ solutions. Start with detectors at the high schools and then work down from there. Once the buildings are physically secure, we need to consider enclosed walkways between the buildings so students do not have to exit the building to get to the annex or satellite gym.

KEATON HOY, JUNIOR I feel a little impatient or more anticipatory of what change is going to come. I do think we have an administration that will find a solution in due time, but there are some ways as a community I wish were doing more to educate people on what really should be done. I frankly don’t feel anxious or nervous that anything will happen to me. I feel like there are a lot of people out there with my best interest in mind. But I think when you’re not a student, when you’re far removed from these issues, it’s harder to realize how urgent a lot of us feel the change needs to be... Like, it would be nice to know there was some sort of metal detector to know when people were bringing guns to school or any other preventative measures...You never want to know when it’s too late.

PAGE DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER MARCH 21, 2019

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CONSTRUCTING

COMMUNICATION District works to improve emergency communication and discipline BY MACY LANDES

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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hree incidents of students bringing weapons onto Lawrence High’s campus and at least two threats of violence have been investigated since the start of February, and state and school board policy dictate how administrators respond. The consequence for bringing a weapon on campus, as outlined in state statute KSA 72-6132, is a one-calendar-year expulsion from school. Though the state doesn’t allow school boards to have policies varying the punishment, the superintendent is allowed to adjust punishment in special situations. “Absolutely nothing would motivate me to override that,” superintendent Anthony Lewis said. “I don’t care what the circumstance is...I won’t do something that puts 1,600 kids and almost 200 adults in danger. As long as I’m here, I will not overturn that.” Many students, when asked, didn’t know the punishment for bringing a weapon on campus. “I feel like that’s something I should know and should all be aware of just so we know what’s going on,” senior and SAFER member Julian Weslander said. Some support changing the policy all together. “I think there are smarter ways to help that [expelled] student,”

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senior Braden Augustine said. “I don’t think expelling them is really the smartest way. Maybe OSS where there’s still like online classes a student can do because if they’re like expelled from this high school they don’t’ really have many options.” Another student suggested continuously monitoring a student who has brought a weapon on campus after their return to school. “They should be monitored after [bringing a weapon] for safety purposes for all of the students,” junior Jasper Mumford said. Others, still, have expressed dissatisfaction with how administrators handle communication when these events occur. “I think we should know about it right when it’s happening, not an hour later,” freshman Ali Jones said. Lewis is hoping for communication between administrators and students to be quicker in the future. “We’re thinking of modeling something off of colleges and universities in a text that students will get simultaneously,” he said. “The hard part is getting a system that can alert every stakeholder involved and then deal with the follow-up.” If an administrator does not follow policies, a supervisor will investigate and consult the superintendent about appropriate next steps. Associate principal Margene Brohammer cites board

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER

policy regarding weapons, which can be found in the student code of conduct. “As with any violation of school rules, there has to be an investigation,” she said. “And then, getting the facts, [knowing] if it involves administrators, if it involves law enforcement [and] following what we know about investigation and then looking and making sure that consequences match what we can do. That’s not very glamorous, but we have a student code of conduct for a reason.” The best way to ensure everyone’s immediate safety, school board president Jessica Beeson said, is to practice safety with and around guns. “Secure your guns, unloaded, in your homes and vehicles and secure ammunition separately,” she said in an email. “Model responsible behavior around guns. Tell others about gun safety.”

SPEAKING UP — USD 497 Superintendent Anthony Lewis speaks at the Community Conversation meeting in the Lawrence High cafeteria on Feb. 21. The meeting collected perspectives from the community regarding school safety and provided information on how to be a smart gun owner. Lewis will lead the next community conversation on March 26 at Free State High School. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE


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Source: 2016-2017 Kansas Department of Education data

Number of students in Kansas who got out of school suspension (OSS) based on a weapons incident during the 2016-17 school year

Number of students in Kansas who got in-school suspension (ISS) based on a weapons incident during the 2016-17 school year

508

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QUICK TAKE Number of students in Number of LHS students Kansas expelled based on who faced OSS because a weapons incident during of illicit drugs or a violent the 2016-17 school year incident during the 2016-17 school year

50

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Number of LHS students facing OSS, ISS or expulsion at LHS because of weapons during the 2016-17 school year

0

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SEARCHING FOR

SOLUTIONS

Lawrence community brainstorms ways to improve school safety BY CONNOR SCHMAUS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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ith the safety of staff and students in mind, the Lawrence community is continuing to search for solutions after multiple weapons were discovered on campus. Since the incidents in February, the district has emphasized putting the safety of families first. On Feb. 21, Superintendent Anthony Lewis hosted a meeting at Lawrence High to hear feedback from these families. One clear issue being addressed from these findings is student and staff relationships. “We want to focus on nurturing relationships between students and staff, but that’s just one step,” Lewis said, “For me, it’s about taking a moment to check in on our students.” The issue of relationships has been the focus of Lewis’ immediate solution while the district analyzes feedback data from students and parents. He hopes identifying staff that provide safe environments will translate that success to a larger scale. “I think one of the things that teachers across the country struggle with is how to build those relationships with students, Lewis said. “[We’re looking] at the teachers that were named numerous times as trusted adults and find out what they’re doing to build meaningful relationships.” Some students are also using a data-centered approach to make schools safer. Junior Siona Baker created an

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Instagram account called LHS Polls, from which she surveyed dozens of students on issues ranging from safety to recognizing school administration. “One of the things we focused on was overall how safe students felt in school,” Baker said. “We found in the responses that the majority feel unsafe just walking in the halls because of how vulnerable it feels.” Baker hopes that the creation of the polls will better incorporate student voices during these discussions, but encourages students to continue voicing specific concerns within their communities. “If you have an opinion, talk to someone,” Baker said. A lot of teachers especially are willing to listen so you just need to vocalize it.” Even with a pragmatic approach, some students and staff feel the response should be more apparent, with a structured district plan being less important. “The only thing I’ve heard are teachers asking things like whether the doors were going to be locked,” science teacher Zach Casey said. “Not sure we need to wait entirely for the district to do something, but that’s just what’s happening right now.” Another pressing concern is that physical changes that will restrict outside access to the building and connect the main building and annex won’t be made until after the construction. “[Teachers] haven’t heard much in terms of fixing things before the construction,” Casey said. “We’ve only heard things like, ‘Once the construc-

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY SAMI TURNER

tion is done, the building will be secure,’ but that’s three years away.” Lewis worries that a rushed physical solution would prove ineffective. Similar to mental health solutions, he wants to rely on research findings. “We’ve had things thrown around like metal detectors and clear book bags,” Lewis said.“The thing is, we’ve spoken to districts with these things in place, but there were still incidents where a student was still able to get a gun into the school.” While no specific long-term changes will be made until after the second community conversation in late March, many hope the district will take action with the information gathered so far. In the end, teachers like Casey want solutions to include student voices and advocate for students to continue bringing concerns to trusted adults. “This is a huge concern and there are 300 staff members and 1,600 students,” Casey said. “You guys are going to have more ideas than we are, and one of them is going to be the right one.” PROBLEM SOLVING — Science teacher Andy Bricker sits with other participants at the Community Conversation on Feb. 21 in the Lawrence High cafeteria. The district gathered input at the meeting about how to improve school safety. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE


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POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS LOCKING MORE ENTRANCES

IMPROVE & BUILD STUDENT-STAFF RELATIONSHIPS

MORE MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

METAL DETECTORS

STUDENT SECURITY BADGES

INSTANT MESSAGING

CHESTY LION

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FOOD PANTRY OPENS Just Foods partners with school to provide food for LHS community

BY CUYLER DUNN

STAFF WRITER

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ust Foods, based in Lawrence, opened a school food pantry last fall for LHS students and families. The food bank had reached out to schools throughout the district with the goal of setting up food banks on campus to offer new grocery and snack options for everyone. The food pantry is open to all LHS families for groceries or snacks during the school day. “Some people don’t have enough to eat at home and so it helps to supplement until other food can come in. It’s not the sole source of food for most people,” WRAP worker Suzanne Nicolet said. “We have kids who come by and get snacks, so it helps when you’re hungry and again I think it just helps support families that need a little extra help here and there.” The food pantry has continued to grow throughout the school year. “We’re doing very well actually; our numbers are continuing to increase,” Nicolet said. “I’m not sure everybody is still aware we have this in terms of the students and families, so we’ve been slowly trying to advertise, and word of mouth helps tremendously.” The pantry is located by the main gym and is open during school hours.

Any student can contact the office staff in students services to take them down. The main goals of the project are to help families if a food crisis strikes and to provide snacks for students who miss a meal. “Most people have experienced a time where they’ve struggled to make ends meet because bills are never ending,” social worker Lynisha Thomas said. “It’s awesome that we have this available to supply that need for anyone that needs it, too.” Students have taken advantage of the snacks. Some are taking bigger items so their families are able to cook at home. The staff encourages all students to reach out for help whatever their situation is. “It’s OK to reach out for help,” social worker Carissa Welsh said. “Everyone in Student Services is here to assist students in whatever way will help them be successful. I take about three to four students to the food pantry per week. That’s just how many I take. I know the other mental health team members take students as well. I think, and hope, the word is getting out more that the food pantry is available to all students.” Students telling their families will help it grow in popularity, something staff members involved are pushing for. “It’s kind of new, but I think what’s most successful is telling the parents,” said school psychologist Sylvia Trevino-Maack. “I think what students need to know is that this is for anybody and everybody, and you need

to check out what they have because it just saves money.” Any students and their families are welcome to visit the food bank. The goal is to stop food from creating a barrier that makes learning more difficult. “You don’t have to be completely out of money,” Trevino-Maack said. “This is for if your parents want to save $20 and would rather get some free stuff. Many of these products are going to go bad before anybody takes them, so we’re actually helping by consuming things instead of just wasting.” The pantry gets new food every week, so there’s always a variety of choices. It’s intended for all students to be able to save money or grab a snack during the school day. “I think it’s worth going and looking at,” Trevino-Maack said, “and if you don’t find anything, at least you looked. You can come back the next week and see if they have anything new. That’s the surprise element, and I think it’s cool.” RESTOCK — Shelves are restocked in the Lawrence High food pantry. This restock happens weekly to keep the options for students and families fresh. Some of the things you can have at the pantry include canned and boxed goods, bread, eggs and fresh produce. PHOTO BY SAMI TURNER

PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET Features

Features

MODEL S Freshman takes on leadership role of BY FREEMAN SPRAY

STAFF WRITER

W

ith two conferences in the bag, freshman Kate O’Keefe has survived her first stint as an officer in Model UN. The Topeka conference took place on Feb. 25 and 26 and involved a full-day of meetings and debate for schools across Kansas. This might seem daunting for some, but for O’Keefe and other LHS students, it was routine after their trip to Chicago University for Model UN. The conference in Topeka was by the books, which is opportune for a first-time officer. In her third year participating in the Topeka UN, this was O’Keefe’s first

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MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE

experience in the role of secretary, an officer in charge of role call and minutes. It’s a simple job, but it allows for greater involvement in the program. “The officer stuff is not as much fun,” O’Keefe said, “but I do enjoy Model UN, so that’s why I wanted to participate.” Everyone’s Model UN experience is different due to the variety of roles each person can take on. “There’s crisis committees and then there’s the regular general assembly one, which is more orderly,” O’Keefe said. “I was in a general assembly one, so it was very organized and structured.” O’Keefe hopes that her position as secretary will lead her to become a vice president or president in subsequent years. “It would be fun [to be vice president or president] but secretary is a lot less responsibility,” O’Keefe said. “So we’ll see how it goes now.” Although O’Keefe had prepared adequately


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STUDENT secretary at Topeka Model UN beforehand in several officers’ preparatory meetings, she said she did not anticipate how much she would need to do. This year’s conference turned out to be a hectic one. O’Keefe’s group passed 42 amendments, which are formal adjustments to resolutions, for only 20 resolutions. Eighteen of those resolutions were “unfriendly,” meaning they had to be put up for debate. “A lot of the amendments were little things, so [the resolutions] ended up being friendly,” O’Keefe said. “But we talked a lot about education and about global warming. Those were the main [issues].” With such a large number of issues to sort out, the secretary role became essential to the function of the group. As the number of new amendments piled up, it was O’Keefe’s responsibility to continuously fetch more. Some of the most problematic amendments were set aside

entirely, in favor of simply sparing time and moving on. “We got an amendment that included eating kids, so that was fun,” O’Keefe said. “We didn’t really want to deal with that, so we sent it to the security council.” Despite the heavy debate and the differences of opinion in the council, O’Keefe reflected that being in the group was a positive experience. “Being an officer, you’re leading the charge,” model UN sponsor Micah Temple said. “Corralling that many kids and trying to come up with an actual document at the end that everyone can agree on is a very cool process. It’s an incredible learning opportunity”

PEARLY WHITES— Kate O’Keefe poses after the Topeka conference for Model UN on Feb. 25 and26. This was O’Keefe’s first year as an officer, in the role of secretary. PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

PAGE DESIGN EMILY KRUSE MARCH 21, 2019

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THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS

Lending a Lion Paw Supporter

HEDGES INSURANCE LAWRENCE

Red & Black Supporter The Ramaleys Keller Williams Integrity-Tim Devine, Realtor McDonalds Dale & Ron’s Auto Service Inc.


THE BUDGET Features

NUGGET

PHOTOS BY ANNA PARNELL

KINGS Thousands of chicken nuggets bought and distributed to students and staff

PREPARATION — Burger King employees work to bag hundreds of nuggets. Even with prior notice, the monstrous order was not easy to complete.

BY SYDNEY PRITCHARD

STAFF WRITER

T

he setting is Lawrence High School, the sun is out and shining as three brave students unload 2,700 chicken nuggets to give to hungry LHS students. Sophomores Samuel Gordon-Ross, Avery Wilcoxson and junior Charlie Nigro got to work as they prepared for the arduous task of buying, carrying, as well as delivering the tiny fried delights. Preparation for this challenge took a week as they called upon 27 students as well as two teachers to pitch in $11 each, while also calling the Burger King on Sixth Street in advance for the order of a lifetime. With about $290 in hand, GordonRoss, Nigro and Wilcoxson piled into the car with the help of a fourth friend on their way to Burger King during their lunch break on Feb. 13. “I really didn’t join in on the challenge until really in the middle of it, this was after my two partners had taken on the challenge of buying about 300 nuggets a little while before,” Gordon-Ross said. “I would say that anyone trying to take on this challenge as we did, should be aware of any deals going on as well as since we bought the nuggets ‘10 for $1,’ they aren’t going to be the best quality, so don’t think they will be mindblowing.” Going around the school to deliver the chicken nuggets took an hour and a half of making sure every person got their share of the loot, as well as payments, were made. At the end of the day, Nigro described the challenge in one sentence: “No matter how many times you call ahead, they will never be ready.” The trio plan on doing another challenge to the same degree next year, but don’t know which establishment they will conquer next.

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MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

TO DIP OR NOT TO DIP — Each order of 10 nuggets comes with 2 sauces, making a total of 5,400 sauces of different varieties.

READY TO GO — Junior Charlie Nigro carries a box full of nuggets out of the Burger King.


Features THE BUDGET

DISTRIBUTION — Sophomore Avery Wilcoxson begins the distribution process by handing sophomore Logan Hayes his share of the loot.

NUGGET CHAOS — Students began grabbing bags of nuggets as soon as they arrived in the rotunda.

NUGGET FANS — As junior Charlie Nigro unload the goods onto an industrial cart, nugget buyers gather round and alert their fellow nugget fanatics.

CHECKING THE LIST — Junior Charlie Nigro crosses off names, ensuring every nugget lover’s dreams come true.

NUGGET LOVE — Sophomore Mason Anderson enjoys his nugget delivery, thanks to the Three Nuggeteers.

SEE THE THREE NUGETEERS IN ACTION WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/WATCH?V=VCSXAL20MQC PAGE DESIGN ANNA PARNELL MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET Sports

Sports SNEAK PEAK BASEBALL

Strong group of returning seniors

SPRINGING

INTO A NEW SEASON Spring sports teams promise another successful season BY COOPER WRIGHT

SOFTBALL

New, younger players step in

GIRLS SWIMMING Finished 4th at state last year

BOYS TENNIS

Growing numbers and more experience

BOYS GOLF New coach Steve Rampy replaces Dirk Wedd

GIRLS TRACK

2018 state champions

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STAFF WRITER

T

he spring sports season features different expectations and goals for teams as some look to reload and others aim for state championships. While new players will contribute, veterans are looking to close out their LHS careers with strong performances.

BASEBALL

The baseball team was eliminated in the first round of the playoffs last year, but looks to use that as fuel for this year. The team returns several senior starters, including first baseman and pitcher Hank Dobson. “It’s a new senior class, and we have some experience, but not a lot so the key will be figuring out our pitching staff,” Dobson said. The Lions annually face one of the toughest schedules in the state with stiff competition in and out of the Sunflower League. Despite this, Dobson remains confident that the team may surprise some people and be successful. “We’ve got a lot of talent, and we’ll definitely win some games,” Dobson said.

SOFTBALL

The softball team also looks to replace key starters from last year with promising young talent. Junior Karly Johnson, who is an Emporia State commit, will lead the way for the Lions from the shortstop position. “I’m looking forward to having new faces on varsity and having new connections with new teammates as well as the old one’s I’ve had with returning varsity players,” Johnson said. Reloading the starting line up will be a challenge and a key for the Lions this spring.

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL

“We lost Zoe Brewer and Morgan Husman, which is our pitcher and catcher duo, and so now we have to find a new pitcher/catcher duo and that is going to be a key this year,” Johnson said.

GIRLS SWIMMING

The girls swimming team comes into 2019 with high expectations after coming off a fourth-place finish at state last year. A senior leader who will certainly help the Lions is Maddie Dean, who has committed to Southern Connecticut State for swimming. “[Our team goal] is definitely second at state and maybe we can win league,” Dean said. A strong senior class will lead the team, but talented underclassmen determine how good this team ultimately is. “We’ve got two new freshmen coming in that will definitely be point scorers at state, and there’s a lot of seniors, so we really want to do well in our last year,” Dean said. The senior class on this team has seen improvement every year and is optimistic that this year they will go out with a bang. “I think we can do really well at state, and this will be our best year yet,” Dean said.

BOYS TENNIS

Expectations are as high for the boys tennis team as they have been for awhile. After placing 12th and only sending one doubles team to state last year, the Lions look to do much better in 2019. “We have many more players this year than last year, and we also have a stronger group of players,” junior Kanak Masten said. Masten also looks to improve on last season’s strong finish after placing ninth in doubles at state. “My goal this year is to finish top five in the state for doubles,” Masten said.


Sports THE BUDGET

BOYS GOLF

The boys golf team will look to reload this year after losing most of its varsity lineup from the previous season. The team returns senior Ross Brungardt and junior Jack Malin but will have to replace the rest of the varsity spots. While some will be playing in varsity tournaments for the first time, Malin has hope the transition will be smooth. “I remember when I was new, I was accepted right into the team, so I think we can accept the newcomers and help improve their scores right away,” Malin said. The team will also feature a new coach in Steve Rampy after long-time golf coach Dirk Wedd retired last year “I’m looking forward to playing some golf with my friends and getting out there and improving my game as well as seeing how everything will change under Coach Rampy,” Malin said.

GIRLS TRACK

The girls track team’s goals are sky high once again. After bringing back a state championship last year, the team returns almost everybody that was a state qualifier in 2018 but will have a different mindset this year. “This year is different because we are state champions now so we have pressure on us to keep getting first in everything,” junior Asjah Harris said. Harris who was a key piece in the 4x100 team that brought home first at state this year has even higher goals for herself this season. “I want to get first in the 200 [at state] and then I want to get first in the 4x100 at state again,” Harris said. With almost all state qualifiers returning and experience from last year, the team will certainly be a contender for the state title once again.

GIRLS SOCCER

The girls soccer team will look upon

young talent to mix with experience in 2019 as they hope to improve off of last year. The Lions will be led by two Baker commits in senior forward Anna Chieu and junior center back Banner Williams. “We graduated a lot of seniors, so we have a pretty young team this year, but everyone is hard working so I’m excited for the season,” Chieu said. After many freshman last year got significant playing time, the Lions will expect them to take a step forward this season as Chieu has high expectations for all her teammates. “I expect all the girls to work hard and never give up,” Chieu said. STARING DOWN THE COMPETITION — Several athletes prepare for their respective spring sports. On the front row is Maddie Dean, swim; Anna Chieu, soccer; Ashley Wildeman, track; and Karly Johnson, softball. On the back row are Hank Dobson, baseball; Jack Malin, golf; and Kanak Masten, tennis. PHOTO BY KATHERINE WILLIAMS

PAGE DESIGN BY ANNA PARNELL MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET Sports

RUNNING HOME

After involvement in four sports, senior runner to attend KU for track BY GARY SCHMIDT

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

L

ao Tzu once said that the journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. This is a mantra that the Lawrence High track and field program lives by. Ironically enough, the journey for one of the greatest athletes to ever come through their program began late. Later than most runners begin, later than most runners begin to prioritize it and later than most fall in love with the sport of running. Fortunately enough, good things come to those who wait. Senior Evann Seratte began running in the seventh grade, more or less as a social activity. However, it was clear right away that this was something Seratte was going to continue to pursue. “I tried it out in the seventh grade just to do a sport really,” Serrate said. “It turned out that running came pretty naturally to me, and I enjoyed getting exercise and making friends through it so I decided to continue it in high school.” Fast forward five years, one school record and one state championship, Seratte stands with a world of opportunities left in her last season. However, the University of Kansas track and field signee, did not even consider collegiate running until a short time ago.

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“It wasn’t until close to senior year that I really became comfortable with the idea of running at the collegiate level,” Seratte said. “I guess winning a state championship and breaking a school record helped me see that I was capable of competing at a D1 level.” Another huge factor of this decision, was saying goodbye to one of her childhood loves: playing soccer. Despite her involvement in four sports at Lawrence High (track and field, cross country, basketball and soccer), the hardest one to let go for Seratte was undoubtedly soccer. “Choosing track over soccer was a very hard decision for me,” Seratte said. “Soccer was my favorite sport, but I finally realized where my future was.” However, for teammates and coaches alike, it was always apparent that Seratte was destined to shine in whatever she chose. “Evann has added a certain standard of intensity and work ethic to the program,” Leslie Ostronic, a teammate of Seratte’s in all four of her sports, said. “She also contributes a positive approach to everything.” In every season, every game and every practice, Seratte is a consistent, positive presence. “Evann’s energy uplifts everyone else on the team,” Ostronic said. “Not a negative thing can be said about her. All of the team trusts, admires and respects her.”

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT

Similarly, her state championship coach, Jack Hood, was quick to comment on not only the quality of athlete she is, but the quality of a person she is. “She has been a great teammate and leader,” Hood said. “She has been willing to sacrifice personal glory for team success.” Despite all of her success, Hood insists that his expectations for his star athlete remain the same. “I expect her to continue to do what she has done for the past three years: be a top tier competitor and a great teammate,“ Hood said. Regardless of any hype around her, Seratte is focused on improving herself and preparing for her final year. “It’s crazy to think that I only have one more season as a Chesty Lion,” Seratte said. “Personally, I want to win state in both the 400 and 800 this year.” Above all, however, Seratte wants to end her career on top. “This next sentence isn’t so much a goal, more like me telling you what’s going to happen because I’m confident,” Seratte said. “We’re winning state.” FOCUS — During the Emporia Invitational on Sept. 8, senior Evann Seratte focuses ahead. She paced the Lions on the day, finishing 45th overall, as the team took sixth. PHOTO BY MCKENNA WHITE


Sports THE BUDGET

SERATTE’S

SPORTS

TRACK

400: 57.45 800: 2:16.09

CC

CROSS COUNTRY PR: 20:40

SOCCER

Outside Defender

BASKETBALL

Small Forward PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT MARCH 21, 2019

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STATE STUNNER THE BUDGET Sports

After qualifying for unprecedented fifth-consecutive state tournament, Lions are shocked in first round BY DANIEL DAVIDSON

SPORTS EDITOR

S

enior Clarence King took the shot to tie the game only to have the buzzer-beater circle the rim before popping out. The Lions ferocious comeback streak in the second half of their game against Wichita Southeast was not enough to prevent them from being sent home the first day of the 6A state basketball tournament in Wichita. Fighting till the end, the boys ended an impressive sea“I WANTED TO son with DO EVERYTHING I pride. For its COULD TO WIN, AND fifth conEVERYONE ELSE HAD secutive apTHAT MINDSET TOO.” state pearance, —ZEKE MAYO, SOPHOMORE the team came in with a 19-3 record, snagging the fifth seed. One of these wins was an unsparing 72-46 game against the very same Golden Buffalos they would ultimately fall to in Wichita. “Basketball is anybody’s game,” sophomore Zeke Mayo said. “Whenever you beat a team by 20, you might automatically think you’re going to beat them again.” The opposition had learned from last time. Trey Quartlebaum and King were closely guarded to make sure the Lions did not get any open shots.

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Behind 32-30 at halftime, the boys knew it could go either way, and needed to make it past the Buffalo’s defense. “I was thinking that since this could possibly be the end of our season,” senior point guard Trey Quartlebaum said, “I would go the hardest I went all season. I wanted to do everything I could to win, and everyone else had that mindset too.” Just into the third quarter, Southeast managed to grab a 15-point lead before the Lions stepped up with sophomore Zeke Mayo and Quartlebaum within the last three minutes to narrow to a 50-48 gap. The fourth quarter saw Southeast keep up the heat, leaving the Lions with only half a minute to bridge a six-point gap. They were not going to let the opposition win this game easily. In the last seconds, King rebounded a shot from Quartlebaum and ran to attempt a triple to tie the game from 70-67. “The last few seconds, it was a battle,” King said. “I was just telling myself, ‘Someone hopefully make this last shot.’ ” With the season over, the first LHS champions of the Sunflower League were awarded several accolades. Most notably Mayo was sophomore of the year and Mike Lewis as coach of the year. “Him winning that award is awesome to see,” Chapple said of Lewis. “He sacrificed hours upon hours into us seniors… It’s nice to see him rewarded with something he deserves.

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT

He made me a better man throughout the years he coached me.” Trey Quartlebaum and King were also named first team All-Sunflower League. Besides an abrupt to an otherwise stellar season, junior Mayson Quartlebaum is only thinking about next year’s finals. “We could have definitely gone to the state championship,” Mayson Quartlebaum said. “But we’ve just got to take it one game at a time.” HIGH FIVE — Sophomore Zeke Mayo reaches out to high five a teammate after a home victory. Mayo was named as the Sunflower League sophomore of the year. PHOTO BY MCKENNA WHITE


Sports THE BUDGET

GIRL’S GLORY Despite falling just short of a state appearance, losing in the substate championship to Derby, the girl’s basketball team had another successful year, finishing 12-10. Three of the players were honored in the All-Sunflower League Team.

1st Team Chisom Ajekwu

Honorable Mention Hannah Stewart

Honorable Mention Sammy Williams

PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET Opinion

Opinion

SPEAK UP

Students were right to report concerns BY NIKKI AQUI

OPINION EDITOR

BY ARIANNA MYERS-ARENTH

REPORT IT Here are some ways to report safety issues: Share concerns with school staff members. Call the Douglas County Crime Stoppers hotline, 785-843-TIPS (8477). Call the Kansas School Safety Hotline, 1-877-626-8203. Call 911 in the case of an emergency.

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I

never thought I would need to spread word to students that it is important to leave your guns at home. But last month, two students brought firearms to Lawrence High School. This should be a gun-free zone — and not just because the law says so. But also because too many things can go wrong. We are a student body made up of 1,600 teenagers walking around, and there is immaturity and impulsivity lurking in every corner. The root of the problem here seems to be either ignorance to or disregard for the schools safety policies since the district has emphasized that there were no threats. However, it is clear to me that many students have no idea how to handle a situation when they learn a student could be putting other students and faculty in danger. First, if you want to have a safe school where you and your peers feel comfort-

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE

able returning five days a week, everyone has to be on board with doing whatever it takes to make this the safest place possible. Even if that means you have to “snitch.” If you know someone is carrying a weapon, no matter who it may be, you need to tell faculty or an SRO as soon as possible. They are here for your education and protection. There is no student that is excused from the gun-free zone policy, and you can’t cross your fingers and hope they aren’t a threat. If you are unsure what the best way to tell faculty about a situation like this is, you aren’t alone. Pull a teacher or SRO aside where other students can’t hear and tell them exactly what the concern is. Doing this will avoid panic. Feeling open to talking to an administrator, faculty member or SRO is not just limited to when a firearm is involved. If you hear something sketchy or have a bad feeling about something, tell someone. It does more good than you may think. We deserve to be in a safe school and should be thankful to the students who spoke up.


Opinion THE BUDGET

SPARKING WORRY GRAPHIC BY FREEMAN SPRAY AND EMILY KRUSE

Student comments on communication issues during taser incident BY NADIA SANBURN

ASSISTANT ONLINE EDITOR

I

t was a Friday night when I found out that a fellow student had brought a taser to my school. Surprisingly, more than 24 hours had passed since the event, and I hadn’t heard anything about a taser. A friend texted me with the message sent out by district communications director Julie Boyle, saying, “This is the email that my mom got.” That was the first I had heard about it. More than a day since the weapon had been confiscated. The first emotion that I felt was surprise. Why hadn’t I heard about this earlier? Apparently, because the district had no intention of telling us. As the Lawrence Journal-World reported, the district hadn’t meant to put out a report at all. It viewed the taser as not a threat to the student body, therefore, found

should have been informed it unnecessary to inform about the confiscated taser, parents and students. In and not have had to rely on fact, the district only shared “Why hadn’t I rumors from the student information about the event heard about body and the article put out after being pushed to do so this earlier?” by the Lawrence Journal World. by the Journal-World. LHS students and According to the Journal- —Nadia Sanburn, assistant online editor parents are unsettled by World article, USD497, “... the frequency of weapons disputed the characterization being brought to school, and of a Taser as a weapon.” it is important to have a steady flow The Journal-World, after more research, of information, even with a miniscule found that isn’t true according to the chance of conflict. This also could state’s Weapons Free Schools Act. Also, have been a chance for the district to USD497 school board policy says the communicate about types of weapons same thing. not allowed at school, but instead of Soon after the Journal-World began taking the opportunity, they decided to reporting on this, the district sent out not inform the LHS community. a message to parents informing them Parents should have been informed of the taser. It’s unclear whether or about the taser much sooner, instead of not the district would’ve told the LHS an email a day later. I realize it did not community what had happened, if not pose an immediate threat to students, for the investigative journalism done by but it is the district’s duty to inform us the Journal World. of potential danger, however small. This situation appalls me. With the tense climate currently at LHS, students PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET Opinion

Opinion

DARK TIMES Darkroom fading into the darkness with renovations BY SYMON KNOX

STAFF WRITER

B

ond renovations are gearing up and wonderful additions are being added in the next few years, but no one seems to be talking about what is being taken away. For the art department, one of the biggest losses coming is the darkroom. Designers and administrators “AFTER I TOLD have decided that PHOTO TEACHER it is an unnecessary expense, but there ANGELIA are a large majority PERKINS I WAS of artists in this GOING TO QUIT, building that think otherwise. SHE DRAGGED The darkroom ME INTO THE changed my life. After high school DARKROOM... I am planning I FELL IN LOVE.” on pursuing photography at —SYMON KNOX, Fort Hays State. STAFF WRITER I want to spend the rest of my life making people feel things through my photography. But without access to this darkroom and all of its resources, this would never be the case. Halfway through Photo 2, I was ready to give up. All I wanted to do was quit because I had not grasped the techniques that all my classmates had,

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and I was falling behind. After I told photo teacher Angelia Perkins I was going to quit, she dragged me into the darkroom and made me try photograms again. But this time she made me use digital photos printed out in addition to any new materials that I could gather, and I fell in love. The darkroom gave me the opportunity to be hands-on, I failed over and over again while learning the new processes. But that learning made my successes even sweeter and pushed my work to an even more advanced level. My time with digital photography hasn’t offered the tangible trial and errors that the darkroom did. Running around a darkroom trying to get something right over and over again beats staring at a computer screen any day. This issue is important because athletes do the same thing but their skills are valued higher than artists. They run drills repeatedly in order to get stronger, they run plays in order to perfect their technique. But because their results are more entertaining and automatically rewarding, the arts get overshadowed. Why are athletes prioritized over artists when in reality we do some of the exact same things? Now, what is my tangible proof that the darkroom actually benefits? With my images, I was able to form a portfolio full of darkroom photograms.

MARCH 21, 2019 PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE

With this portfolio, I received college credit through an AP exam, and I was granted a solo exhibition downtown with a Final Friday opening. I stood out to colleges and scholarship curators because my portfolio offers something unique and new. Photography is my sport, but the past four years have helped me realize how little that matters to the Lawrence High community. We live in Lawrence, one of the most sportscentered communities in Kansas, but Lawrence is also one of the most artinspired communities in the country. So why is Lawrence High any different? Why are we so strong in one but not the other? And once I was told that the remodel did not include a darkroom, one of the three in Lawrence, my realizations became impossible to deny. The remodel of this building is important and seriously needed. But overwhelmingly flawed. I have watched


Opinion THE BUDGET

the architects completely glaze over the art department and ignore student and teacher input. I have been told over and over that the arts matter and we are important, but have yet to see any tangible proof. Words are nice, but actions create change. I have been fortunate to have access to the darkroom for all four years of my education at Lawrence High. But it makes me angry to see my friends who are having this wonderful space taken away from them. It

makes me angry to think that future photography students won’t have this fantastic opportunity that I was given. But most of all, it makes me so incredibly sad to see the years of time Ms. Perkins has taken in order to build lessons and a curriculum to create successful artists be taken away by people who haven’t even taken the time to realize what this room offers. This seemingly meaningless room for the rest of the school changed my entire future. But no one seems to care.

Our administration needs to open up their eyes and realize how important the dark room is to our art program and its students. And it needs to happen now because it is already almost too late.

IN SOLUTION — A portrait of Symon Knox developing with her camera in darkroom solution. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY EMILY KRUSE

PAGE DESIGN BY EMILY KRUSE MARCH 21, 2019

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THE BUDGET Sports

By BY Emily EMILY Kruse KRUSE

EDITORS WEIGH IN: HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE CURRENT CLIMATE AT LHS AFTER THE GUN ISSUES ?

“I think that it has been an interesting turn of events on how people have reacted and taken action in advocating for the school in using their voices to fight stupid idiots who bring guns to school.” —Nikki Aqui, managing editor

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“I feel that with the recent events, more people are realizing that it’s not beyond the realm of possibilities for a shooting to happen on our campus. While I don’t like the events that have occurred, I think it’s a reality check for those who don’t take this sort of thing seriously. The district has started taking steps in the right direction, but I feel it’ll be a while before it’s all resolved.“ —Emily Kruse, photo editor

MARCH 21, 2019

“I’m really proud of the students and staff who have addressed the issues in a mature and realistic manner. I’ve had conversations about what we can all do to make Lawrence High a safer place in many of my classes, though we still have a long way to go.” —Macy Landes, editor-in-chief

“Though these events are concerning, I’m glad students and staff are taking time to address our school’s safety issues now. I hope these conversations will continue, and we’ll see some effective changes in the near future.” —Anna Parnell, design editor

“Given the recent events, people need to stop assuming that nothing would ever happen here. I feel that administration, both here and at the district, needs to work with students around the clock until this is solved, not just waiting until the construction is done. Listening to students is key.” —Connor Schmaus, editor-in-chief

“I have a lot of feelings about the school. I am proud of many the efforts we have made as a community to address our issues. However, the presence and prevalence of these issues to begin with is both concerning and disheartening. Above all, I am optimistic that Lawrence High will continue to take steps in the right direction. —Gary Schmidt, editor-in-chief

“I feel that there has been a great absence from our school’s administrators regarding the safety issues. We have seen Dr. [Anthony] Lewis but not our schools’ leading adults addressing the issue. I am also concerned about safety during construction. I wish we had more answers.” —Sami Turner, design editor


Sports THE BUDGET

BY MAYA WESLANDER

THE JOURNALISM STAFF MISSION STATEMENT The Budget newspaper is committed to providing the Lawrence High community with objective, inclusive news coverage that ensures relevance to its spectrum of readers. The staff devotes itself to the exercise of First Amendment rights and upholding the highest of journalistic standards. While the paper is a tool to publish student voices, it also works to help students grow as journalists and help readers access information.

newspaper’s goals are to inform, entertain, and present a forum of expression for students, faculty, administrators and community members. The newspaper is financed through advertising and staff fundraising. The editorial staff is solely responsible for the content of this newspaper, and views expressed in The Budget do not necessarily reflect those of the administration of Lawrence High School or USD 497.

ABOUT US The Budget is published every four weeks and distributed free of charge to students and faculty at Lawrence High School, 1901 Louisiana, Lawrence, Kan. 66046-2999. The Budget is produced by students in the Digital Journalism and Digital Design and Production courses with occasional contributions from 21st Century Journalism and guest columnists. The

STAFF Kennedy “Ken” Bigham, Cuyler Dunn, Aubrey Fischer, Noah Ginsberg, Emily Gordon-Ross, Amaya Harris, Jaylynn Hicks, Mikayla Kaufman, Sophia Kaufman, Symon Knox, Alex Lane, Nola Levings, Andrew Liebegott, Zora Lotton-Barker, Kenna McNally, Everett Middleton, Caitlin Mooney, Arianna Myers-Arenth, Leslie Ostronic, Callia Peterson, Sydney Pritchard, Meriel Salisbury, Sydney

Sanders, Alex Stark, Fynn Stovall, Riley Unekis, Andrew Williams, Katie Williams, Elyzebeth Workman, Cooper Wright, Jackson Yanek THE BUDGET NEWSPAPER EDITORS Macy Landes...............................Editor-in-Chief Connor Schmaus ����������������������Editor-in-Chief Gary Schmidt...............................Editor-in-Chief Emily Kruse.....................................Photo Editor Sami Turner...................................Design Editor Anna Parnell.................................Design Editor Nikki Aqui................................ Managing Editor LHSBUDGET.COM EDITORS William Yanek.............................Editor-in-Chief Anahita Hurt.................................Editor-in-Chief Aidin Manning ����������������� Social Media Editor Nadia Sanburn ������������������������������������Assistant Online Editor Freeman Spray..............................Webmaster/ Copy Editor David Obadare ������������������������������ Video Editor

Mia Robinson................................. Video Editor RED & BLACK YEARBOOK EDITORS Emma Howard............................Editor-in-Chief Skylar Steichen...........................Editor-in-Chief Maya Weslander �����������������������Editor-in-Chief McKenna White ����������������������������Photo Editor Megan Drumm ..........Assistant Photo Editor Addie Thornsbury �������������������������Photo Editor Izzy Hedges..................................... Copy Editor Pam Vue................................ Senior Ads Editor JOURNALISM EDITORS Shayla Brillhart.........................Captions Editor Daniel Davidson ��������������������������Sports Editor Allison Ramaley ������������������������ Head of Sales Gage Miller.......................Ad Design Manager Sophia Rogers..................sales development manager Barbara Tholen �������������������������������������� Adviser

PAGE DESIGN BY GARY SCHMIDT MARCH 21, 2019

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PHOTO OF THE MONTH

SERENADING ­— Sophomore Joohye Oh performs at Prairie Park Elementary School for Cherrie Preut during Serenade Your Sweetheart on Feb. 14. Orchestra were hired to play songs at businesses and homes for the fundraiser. “I thought [Serenade Your Sweetheart] was awesome,” Oh said. “I loved interacting with the community. It was a really good experience.” PHOTO BY EMILY KRUSE

Profile for LHS Budget

Issue 6, The Budget, 2018-2019  

Issue 6, The Budget, 2018-2019  

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