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THE MEMORIAL

A PARTNERSHIP AT THE TOP OF ITS GAME.

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE

the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide®

Nationwide shares a commitment with Jack Nicklaus and the Memorial Tournament of giving back to our communities. Through the Tournament and our other sports sponsorships, we raise over $4 million each year for Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

forward to continuing our relationship through the coming years.

Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide and the Nationwide N and Eagle are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance. © 2016 Nationwide CPR-0377AO (03/16)

MAY 30 – JUNE 5, 2016

We’re proud to be in our 6th year as a presenting sponsor for the Memorial Tournament — and we look

MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB n DUBLIN, OHIO n MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2016


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THANK YOU FOR HELPING KIDS EVERYWHERE. Thank you to the Nicklaus family, our dedicated volunteers and Tournament presenting sponsor Nationwide for generously supporting the Memorial Tournament Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Center for Perinatal Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Johnny Miller 2016 Memorial Tournament Honoree

With your support, our physicians and scientists are working hand-in-hand to save the tiniest of premature babies. And what we learn through our research discoveries here is helping newborns everywhere. As America’s largest neonatal care and research network, you make it possible for us to give families what they need most. Hope. Visit us at NationwideChildrens.org/Memorial

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ROBERT T. JONES, JR. 1976

WALTER HAGEN 1977

FRANCIS D. OUIMET 1978

GENE SARAZEN 1979

BYRON NELSON 1980

HARRY VARDON 1981

PATTY BERG 1988

SIR HENRY COTTON 1989

JIMMY DEMARET 1990

BABE ZAHARIAS 1991

JOSEPH C. DEY, JR. 1992

ARNOLD PALMER 1993

GLENNA COLLETT VARE 1982

MICKEY WRIGHT 1994

TOMMY ARMOUR 1983

SAM SNEAD 1984

CHARLES “CHICK” EVANS 1985

ROBERTO DE VICENZO 1986

TOM MORRIS, SR. & TOM MORRIS, JR. 1987

WILLIE ANDERSON 1995

JOHN BALL 1995

JAMES BRAID 1995

HAROLD HILTON 1995

J.H. TAYLOR 1995

JACK NICKLAUS 2000

PAYNE STEWART 2001

BOBBY LOCKE 2002

KATHY WHITWORTH 2002

The Memorial Tournament Honorees 1976–2016

BILLY CASPER 1996

GARY PLAYER 1997

PETER THOMSON 1998

BEN HOGAN 1999

JULIUS BOROS 2003

BILL CAMPBELL 2003

LEE TREVINO 2004

JOYCE WETHERED 2004

CARY MIDDLECOFF 2005

BETSY RAWLS 2005

SIR MICHAEL BONALLACK 2006

CHARLIE COE 2006

LAWSON LITTLE 2006

HENRY PICARD 2006

PAUL RUNYAN 2006

DENNY SHUTE 2006

LOUISE SUGGS 2007

DOW FINSTERWALD 2007

TONY JACKLIN 2008

RALPH GULDAHL 2008

CRAIG WOOD 2008

CHARLES BLAIR MACDONALD 2008

JACK BURKE, JR. 2009

JOANNE CARNER 2009

SEVERIANO BALLESTEROS 2010

NANCY LOPEZ 2011

TOM WATSON 2012

RAYMOND FLOYD 2013

ANNIKA SÖRENSTAM 2014

JIM BARNES 2014

WILLIE PARK, SR. 2014

SIR NICK FALDO 2015

DOROTHY CAMPBELL 2015

JEROME TRAVERS 2015

WALTER TRAVIS 2015

LEO DIEGEL 2016

HORTON SMITH 2016

JOESEPH CARR 2014


ROBERT T. JONES, JR. 1976

WALTER HAGEN 1977

FRANCIS D. OUIMET 1978

GENE SARAZEN 1979

BYRON NELSON 1980

HARRY VARDON 1981

PATTY BERG 1988

SIR HENRY COTTON 1989

JIMMY DEMARET 1990

BABE ZAHARIAS 1991

JOSEPH C. DEY, JR. 1992

ARNOLD PALMER 1993

GLENNA COLLETT VARE 1982

MICKEY WRIGHT 1994

TOMMY ARMOUR 1983

SAM SNEAD 1984

CHARLES “CHICK” EVANS 1985

ROBERTO DE VICENZO 1986

TOM MORRIS, SR. & TOM MORRIS, JR. 1987

WILLIE ANDERSON 1995

JOHN BALL 1995

JAMES BRAID 1995

HAROLD HILTON 1995

J.H. TAYLOR 1995

JACK NICKLAUS 2000

PAYNE STEWART 2001

BOBBY LOCKE 2002

KATHY WHITWORTH 2002

The Memorial Tournament Honorees 1976–2016

BILLY CASPER 1996

GARY PLAYER 1997

PETER THOMSON 1998

BEN HOGAN 1999

JULIUS BOROS 2003

BILL CAMPBELL 2003

LEE TREVINO 2004

JOYCE WETHERED 2004

CARY MIDDLECOFF 2005

BETSY RAWLS 2005

SIR MICHAEL BONALLACK 2006

CHARLIE COE 2006

LAWSON LITTLE 2006

HENRY PICARD 2006

PAUL RUNYAN 2006

DENNY SHUTE 2006

LOUISE SUGGS 2007

DOW FINSTERWALD 2007

TONY JACKLIN 2008

RALPH GULDAHL 2008

CRAIG WOOD 2008

CHARLES BLAIR MACDONALD 2008

JACK BURKE, JR. 2009

JOANNE CARNER 2009

SEVERIANO BALLESTEROS 2010

NANCY LOPEZ 2011

TOM WATSON 2012

RAYMOND FLOYD 2013

ANNIKA SÖRENSTAM 2014

JIM BARNES 2014

WILLIE PARK, SR. 2014

SIR NICK FALDO 2015

DOROTHY CAMPBELL 2015

JEROME TRAVERS 2015

WALTER TRAVIS 2015

LEO DIEGEL 2016

HORTON SMITH 2016

JOESEPH CARR 2014


THANK YOU FOR HELPING KIDS EVERYWHERE. Thank you to the Nicklaus family, our dedicated volunteers and Tournament presenting sponsor Nationwide for generously supporting the Memorial Tournament Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Center for Perinatal Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Johnny Miller 2016 Memorial Tournament Honoree

With your support, our physicians and scientists are working hand-in-hand to save the tiniest of premature babies. And what we learn through our research discoveries here is helping newborns everywhere. As America’s largest neonatal care and research network, you make it possible for us to give families what they need most. Hope. Visit us at NationwideChildrens.org/Memorial

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

108

$5

THE MEMORIAL THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE

MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB  n DUBLIN, OHIO  n M A Y   3 0   -   J U N E   5 ,   2 0 1 6

MAY 30 – JUNE 5, 2016

ON THE COVER:

Johnny Miller (left) joins Jack Nicklaus in lifting the trophy for winning the inaugural Chrysler Team Invitational in 1983 in Boca Raton, Fla. Photo: Brian Morgan

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THE WEEK’S EVENTS/THE MEMORIAL ON TV

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FRIENDSHIPS AND THE HEART OF GOLF A message from Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus

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EXTENDING A RELATIONSHIP THAT SERVES SO MANY A message from Nationwide CEO Steve Rasmussen

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OF LOVE AND RESPECT FOR THE GAME A message from General Chairman Jack Nicklaus II

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BEATING THE ODDS by Bob Baptist Life-saving care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital as an infant and child inspires a young man to follow his dream

32

MILITARY APPRECIATION The Memorial welcomes our Armed Forces

38

THE CAPTAINS CLUB The distinguished group that guides the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide

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MOMENTS OF TRUTH by Jaime Diaz Johnny Miller stopped playing competitive golf at a relatively young age after a brilliant run, and then he created a second career analyzing the game that he loves with pure honesty

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DOUBLE MAJORS by John Antonini Memorial honors two golf greats posthumously

THE MEMORIAL

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

170

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THE MEMORIAL CLUB Securing the Tournament’s future

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DUO OF DISTINCTION by Melanie Hauser and Bob Baptist Rhonda Glenn and John Garrity are honored as the 2016 Memorial Golf Journalism Award recipients 94 

DREAM WEAVER by Gary Van Sickle David Lingmerth wanted to be a hockey player, but the native of Sweden discovered golf and iced his first PGA TOUR win at the Memorial

108 HOW SWEDE IT IS! by Gary Van Sickle Unusual recipe results in breakthrough victory for Lingmerth

206

120 129

NEAR AND DEAR TO HIS HEART by David Shedloski Kenny Perry can trace his long and successful career to his first PGA TOUR victory at the 1991 Memorial Tournament

170

THE BIGGEST YEAR FOR GOLF’S MR. EVERYTHING by David Shedloski In 1966, professional victories, personal hardships, and all things in between went a long way toward shaping the future of The Golden Bearbs

HOLE BY HOLE Course photographs by Jim Mandeville

188

PLAYOFF PAYOFF by Jeff Babineau The FedExCup turns 10 years old this year, and the PGA TOUR is seeing dividends for the game and for its best players

196

THAT AHA! MOMENT by Jim McCabe Johnny Miller won the 1973 U.S. Open after making a swing adjustment on the driving range before the final round; as other PGA TOUR players will tell you, sometimes all it takes is one small change to reap big rewards

206

ESSAY: THE TEAM IN “I” by Bill Fields Golf is still a lonely sport, but the modern tour player relies on an expanded support group to be successful

218

FICTION: BEAR SIGHTINGS by Dan O’Neill Illustrations by Michael Witte A Scottish explorer goes on a determined quest to try to verify a legendary myth

94 218

188

230 1976-2015 The Memorial Tournament Past Winners 232 REFLECTIONS A celebration of golf in verse 6

THE M E M O R I A L

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An annual stop on the PGA TOUR, the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide is One of US. Learn about the Tournament and other organizations that contribute to the success of the Columbus Region at columbusregion.com/OneofUS.

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The Memorial Tournament Committees & Staff Founder and Host

Jack W. Nicklaus President

General Chairman

Steven C. Nicklaus

Chairman Emeritus

Jack W. Nicklaus II

Pandel Savic

THE CAPTAINS CLUB

Peter Alliss • Judy Bell • Peggy Kirk Bell • Sir Michael Bonallack • O. Gordon Brewer, Jr. • The Hon. George H.W. Bush Sir Sean Connery • Trey Holland • Tony Jacklin • Ken Lindsay • H. Colin Maclaine • Charles S. Mechem, Jr. Will F. Nicholson, Jr. • Barbara Nicklaus • Andy North • Hisamitsu Ohnishi • Arnold Palmer • Gary Player • Judy Rankin Fred S. Ridley • Johann Rupert • Carol Semple Thompson • Tom Watson EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Jack W. Nicklaus • Jack W. Nicklaus II • Steven C. Nicklaus • Larry Dornisch • Lon Fellenz Nicholas LaRocca • Paul B. Latshaw • Daniel M. Maher • Andy O’Brien • Daniel P. Sullivan Emeritus: Ken Bowden • John F. Havens • Pandel Savic VICE CHAIRMEN

Donald “Ric” Baird III • Todd Bork • Chris Campisi • John Ciotola • David Lauer • Jeff Logan Nate Miles • Gary Nicklaus • Chip Neale • Dayna Payne • Tom Welker Emeritus: David L. Barnes • Dr. Russell L. Bowermaster • Alphonse P. Cincione • Richard R. Corna • James R. Fabyan • John Keith Paul B. Long, Jr. • James E. Nolan, Jr. • Jim M. Nolan • H.M. “Butch” O’Neill • Fritz Schmidt CHAIRS, DIRECTORS AND ADVISORS

Rich Aldridge • Jo Ann Bigler • Jeff Bordner • Lt. David Buttler • Dan Cacchio • Debby Cacchio • Bill S. Cseplo Dick Curtis • Tony D’Angelo • Tim Doran • Bob Duda • John Ensign • Lt. Steve Farmer • Brett Febus • Cpl. Thomas Gallagher • Rob Geis Chief Deputy Jim Gilbert • Jay Gray • Chris Hale • Everett Hall • Paul Heller • Harold Howison • Deputy Chief Steve Hrytzik Chris Johnson • Travis Kerzee • Bob Laird • Sheriff Russ Martin • George W. McCloy • Deputy Dave McMannis Sean Mentel • Ann Miles • Barb Miles • Chief Deputy Rick Minerd • Nancy Minton • Tony Mollica • John Montgomery • Tom Nolan Jillian Obenour • Dave Peters • Ken Peters • Sgt. Marcus Pirrone • Tina Quinn • Daryll Rardon • Charlie Ruma • L. Jack Ruscilli • Dr. James Ryan John Scott • Sheriff Zach Scott • Bill Shulack • Todd Sloan • Jeff Stavroff • Barb Stieg • John Stieg • Capt. Patrick Vessels • Chief Gary Vest Chief Heinz von Eckartsberg • Jan Wallace • Ike Wampler • Bob Warner • Chris Welker • Joyce Wimmers • Chief Deputy Pat Yankie Emeritus: Jim Bean • Mark Brown • Phil Campisi • Vern Krier • Scotty Patrick • Silas W. Thimmes • Carol Young Chair-Elect

NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL COMMITTEE 2016 Chair

Advisor

Christina Copeland

Paula Ferguson

Marcy Williams

Captains

Anne Bogenrief • Dick Curtis • Beth Czekalski • Angie Fallon • Julie Seiple • Erin Vinci • Marcy Williams Committee

Sarah Anderson • Lisa Colosimo • Suzanne Colwell • Patty Dixon • Cindy Ekert • Dee Dee English • Beth Fitzgerald • Michelle Francisco Jean Gans • Lauretta Godbout • Angie Goff • Courtney Grant • Terri Heaphy • Ann Hunger • Michele Joseph • Linda Kennedy Heather Landers • Laura Lewis • Susan Long • Sharon Morrison • Jessica Ossege • Marigale Rice • Miranda Roberts Kelly Rogers • Joanie Roma • Michelle Scott • Kayra Smith • Lauren Smith • Shirl White • Charlottte Wimmers • SallyWood • Julie Zogbaum TOURNAMENT ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Director, Marketing & Community Relations

Director, Sales

Executive Director

Director, Communications

Tournament Administrator

Heather M. Baxter

Susan Hosket

Daniel P. Sullivan

Thomas P. Sprouse

Chris Stiffler

Tournament Coordinator

Admissions Coordinator

Executive Assistant

Marketing Coordinator

Operations, HNS Sports Group

Denise McBride

Elaine Leffel

Mary Peterson

Pat Ross

Tim Heitmann

Muirfield Village Golf Club President

General Chairman

Jack W. Nicklaus

Jack W. Nicklaus II

CAPTAINS OF MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB

Jack W. Nicklaus (1980-81) • Ivor H. Young (1981-82) • Robert S. Hoag (1982-83) • Pandel Savic (1983-84) • Jack Grout (1984-85) Edwin D. Dodd (1985-86) • John F. Havens (1986-87) • John H. McConnell (1987-88) • H.M. “Butch” O’Neill (1988-89) James E. Nolan, Jr. (1989-90) • Fritz Schmidt (1990-91) • Richard F. Chapdelaine (1991-92) • Ken Bowden (1992-93) • James R. Fabyan (1993-94) Dr. Russell L. Bowermaster (1994-95) • Barbara Nicklaus (1995-96) • Jack Hesler (1996-97) • David G. Sherman (1997-98) Alphonse P. Cincione (1998-99) • David L. Barnes (1999–00) • Dr. Robert J. Murphy (2000-01) • David J. Harris (2001–02) Charles R. Carson (2002-03) • Kerry F.B. Packer (2003-04) • Richard R. Corna (2004-05) • Silas W. Thimmes (2005-06) Charles S. Mechem, Jr. (2006-07) • Carol Young (2007-08) • Paul B. Long, Jr. (2008-09) • John G. Hines (2009-10) • George McCloy, Sr. (2010-11) Phil Campisi (2011-12) • Frank Bork (2012-13) • L. Jack Ruscilli (2013-14) • Jeff Logan (2014-15) • Tom Welker ( 2015-16) Director, Grounds Operations

Paul B. Latshaw

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DEPARTMENT HEADS Head Golf Professional General Manager & Chief Operating Officer

Nicholas LaRocca

Larry Dornisch

Chief Financial Officer

John Jankovic

Executive Chef

Director, Membership

Director, Villa Operations

Director, Dining Operations

Executive Housekeeper

Stephen Demeter

Sandi Karnes

Mike McKee

Nick Smithson

Vicki Miller

TH E M E M O R I A L

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HELP BANKS AND YOU HELP KIDS EVERYWHERE. Meet Banks. Born 16 weeks premature, he weighed just over one pound. Doctors and researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have pioneered new treatments that we share with hospitals across the country to save the tiniest of premature babies like Banks. Your support funds life-saving research and care to help kids everywhere. Visit our website to see Banks today.

Please give at HelpKidsEverywhere.org

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Banks, born 16 weeks premature

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The

Memorial

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

David Shedloski CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Larry Hasak ART DIRECTOR

MONDAY, MAY 30

Matt Ellis

Practice Rounds

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

TUESDAY, MAY 31

Debbie Falcone

Practice Rounds

PRODUCTION MANAGER

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1

Melody Manolakis

Practice Rounds

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Military Appreciation Day

John Antonini • Jeff Babineau

Junior Golf Day

Bob Baptist • Jaime Diaz

Nationwide Invitational at the Memorial – 7:30 a.m.

Bill Fields • Melanie Hauser

Memorial Honoree Ceremony: Johnny Miller Leo Diegel • Horton Smith Driving Range – 3 p.m.

David Shedloski • Gary Van Sickle

Jack Nicklaus Golf Clinic Driving Range – 4:30 p.m.

Jack Nicklaus Museum Archive • Jim Mandeville

Jim McCabe • Dan O’Neill

PHOTOGRAPHY

Getty Images/Sports Illustrated Leonard Kamsler • David Lingmerth Photos

Junior Golf Clinic Safari Golf Club – 5:30 p.m.

Bo Maupin • the Memorial Tournament Archive

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

USGA • Jerry Wisler

PGA TOUR Images • Johnny Miller Photos

Round One

ILLUSTRATION

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

Glenn Harrington (Honoree Illustrations) Michael Witte

Round Two SATURDAY, JUNE 4

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Round Three

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SUNDAY, JUNE 5

Final Round GOLF CHANNEL THURSDAY, JUNE 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 :30-6:30 p.m. (Replays 7:30-10:30 p.m.; 10:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Friday 1:30-4:30 a.m.)

FRIDAY, JUNE 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:30-6:30 p.m.

Daniel P. Sullivan

(Replays 9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday 4-7 a.m.)

ADVERTISING SALES

Daniel P. Sullivan • Susan Hosket

CBS SPORTS and DIRECT TV NETWORK SATURDAY, JUNE 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 p.m.

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PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER

SATURDAY, JUNE 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:30-2:30 p.m. SUNDAY, JUNE 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NOON-2 p.m.

Television Viewing Times

6189 MEMORIAL DRIVE, SUITE 300 DUBLIN, OHIO 43017 • 614-764-4653 HNSSPORTSGROUP.COM

(Replays 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sunday 3-7 a.m. on Golf Channel)

Vince Hoffart • Kyle Geist MAGAZINE PRODUCTION

Heather M. Baxter • Pat Ross

SUNDAY, JUNE 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:30-6 p.m. (Replays 7 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Monday 2:30-7 a.m. and 12:30-6 p.m. on Golf Channel)

THE MEMORIAL

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FROM THE FOUNDER AND HOST

ONE OF THE MOST PERSONALLY GRATIFYING and lasting aspects of my competitive career in golf has been the relationships I have formed with some of my toughest rivals. I am honored to be able to count all of them among my closest friends. It says a lot about the kind of person each is. It also says a lot about the game of golf that it fosters such friendships. I am proud to say that Johnny Miller, this year’s Memorial Tournament Honoree, is among those players who challenged me in my prime yet along the way became a great friend. For whatever reason, Johnny and I hit it off almost right away. I remember meeting Johnny, this slender 19-year-old amateur, before the 1966 U.S. Open at San Francisco’s Olympic Club. We played a practice round together at Olympic, where Johnny was a junior member, and another round at San Francisco Golf Club before that U.S. Open. As fate would have it—better yet, as Johnny’s talent showed glimpses of his enormous potential—we were paired together in the third round of the championship. From the start, I was impressed with his attitude, his golf swing and his aggressive style of play. Johnny went on to finish tied for eighth, easily earning low amateur honors. That aggressiveness carried through to when he turned professional in 1969, and it served him well on many occasions, perhaps none better than in the final round of the 1973 U.S. Open at Oakmont Country Club. That was the same Oakmont where I had won my first major championship in 1962. All Johnny did that day 11 years later was shoot a closing 8-under-par 63, a major championship record, to win his first of two major titles. He also won the 1976 British Open at Royal Birkdale, when he beat the late Seve Ballesteros and me by six shots. There was a period when if Johnny Miller was at his best, no one was better. A terrific striker of the golf ball and possessing a wonderful short game, Johnny was as good as anyone in the game. More important, Johnny is one of the most honest, sincere and open people you’ll ever meet. He is someone who, like me, has a deep-rooted, unwavering love and commitment to family. To Johnny, family took priority over golf—and golf probably just edged out fishing. Johnny and I have spent a lot of time together in the last two decades, fishing together—from chasing trout in Wyoming to Idaho to Utah, to chasing bonefish in the Bahamas. Every trip, I enjoyed the competition, but most important, I enjoyed his company and friendship. Johnny won 25 times on the PGA TOUR, but it’s his 25-plus years on television for which most people know him today. Since Johnny made the decision to take on another career and become an announcer, no one has emerged as more insightful. He calls it as he sees it; tells it like it is; doesn’t pull punches; and that’s why he’s as good as he is. He’s also got a heart as big as his talent. He’s always there to lend a hand, helping Barbara and me with our charitable efforts whenever asked. And never asking for anything in return. Whether it’s talking

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JIM MANDEVILLE

Friendships and the Heart of Golf

TH E M E M O R I A L

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together on air, or on a golf course, or in a quiet moment on a bonefish flat, I always know I have a true friend in Johnny Miller. Let me take a moment here to pause and recognize another close friend, a person who meant a great deal to Barbara and me, as well as to anyone associated with the Memorial Tournament. Last August we lost our good friend Ivor Young, who played an instrumental role in helping me 50 years ago with getting Muirfield Village Golf Club off the ground. More to the point, Ivor found the piece of ground on which the club now sits. Prior to the 1966 Masters, Ivor and I were talking about what a great place Augusta National Golf Club is, and Ivor listened as I mused about what a terrific thing it would be to bring a world-class tournament to Columbus. That was really the genesis of Muirfield Village. Not long after that, Ivor went out on his own and started looking at property and here we are today. I knew Ivor since I was a little kid, and we played golf together from the time I was 11 or 12 years old, until not too long before his passing. Barbara and Ivor’s wife Carol, who was a Tournament volunteer for many years, have been longtime friends, and our families have been very close and shared many great memories. I have always had an enormous amount of respect and admiration for Ivor, and we will miss him greatly. This year is the 41st playing of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, and I am proud of what the Tournament has become since it debuted a decade after Ivor and I walked this piece of ground and envisioned Muirfield Village Golf Club. Not only have we tried to put on a world-class event, but Barbara and I have tried to make an impact, through charity, in our hometown. For that we thank so many people, starting with the tireless members of Muirfield Village Golf Club and our volunteers. We also have enjoyed the success of golf and giving with the support of our presenting sponsor, Nationwide, and our good friend, CEO Steve Rasmussen, whom I respect deeply. Nationwide’s commitment through 2021 helps elevate our status among PGA TOUR events. Finally, of course, we have accomplished all this with the support of the wonderful fans in Central Ohio, who help raise important sums for Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation. Through our special alliance, all of the Tournament proceeds are directed towards helping children right here in Greater Columbus. It’s exciting to see that we have another terrific field here at Muirfield Village Golf Club, and we think they will again find the golf course in impeccable shape. It should be fun to watch the Tournament unfold. Thank you, and enjoy the week.

JACK NICKLAUS Founder and Host the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide TH E M EM O R IA L

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A LETTER FROM NATIONWIDE

Extending a Relationship That Serves So Many WELCOME to the 2016 Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. Nationwide is proud to be part of the 41st playing of the Tournament and our associates and partners are excited to once again experience one of the greatest weeks in golf. For the sixth consecutive year, Nationwide is partnering with the Memorial Tournament to help raise awareness of Nationwide Children’s Hospital. It’s because of generous contributions that the hospital is able to provide critical care for young patients—regardless of a family’s ability to pay—here in central Ohio and across the country. In fact, this year our sports marketing sponsorships, including the Memorial Tournament, will raise more than $4 million to benefit Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s top-ranked clinical care and leading-edge pediatric research. As Nationwide celebrates its 90th year of protecting what matters most and making a difference for families and our communities, we’ve extended our presenting sponsorship with the Memorial Tournament through 2021. Our longstanding relationship with the Tournament reflects Nationwide’s culture of serving others and giving back since we were founded in Columbus in 1926. Nationwide’s mission is to help consumers, businesses and members protect what’s most important and build a secure financial future. We strive to show that we are More Than a Business® by building relationships that can help improve the quality of life in the communities where our associates, partners and members live and work. And, with partners like the Memorial Tournament, we can have a positive impact on generations to come. Thanks for your continued support of the Memorial Tournament and Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Nationwide is On Your Side®.

STEVE RASMUSSEN Chief Executive Officer Nationwide

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Barbara Nicklaus with the 2015 Nationwide Children's Hospital Patient Champions at the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide

TOGETHER, WE’RE MAKING A DIFFERENCE. Nationwide® was founded on the principle of protecting what’s most important to people. So, partnering with an organization focused on protecting the health and potential of children was a natural fit. We’ve been working with Nationwide Children’s Hospital for more than 60 years to help them achieve their mission.

Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide and the Nationwide N and Eagle are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance. © 2016 Nationwide. CPR-0376AO (03/16)


FROM THE GENERAL CHAIRMAN

Of Love and Respect for the Game

JACK NICKLAUS II General Chairman the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide 22

JIM MANDEVILLE

WITH EACH YEAR that my father “matures,” he seems to joke more and more that with each calendar page flipped there seems to be an increasing number of new anniversaries to commemorate. But I think even my father would remove the tongue from his cheek, and save the wink and a smile, when talking about one significant anniversary that represents a seminal moment in the life and career of Jack Nicklaus. That would be this year’s 40th anniversary of the inaugural Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. As we enter the 41st playing of the Memorial, we can’t help but reflect on the very first playing—May 27-30, 1976. That is when the Memorial Tournament debuted to rave reviews, particularly from the players who, upon seeing and competing on Muirfield Village Golf Club’s layout, had never seen such a splendid golf course and in such perfect condition. Having been inspired a decade earlier by the unequalled experience of the Masters Tournament, where my father has become so synonymous, he left nothing to chance when the PGA TOUR came to Muirfield Village. The Memorial Tournament became a standard-bearer for tournament golf, and its place among the top tier of events on the TOUR has never been in doubt. It’s been said that Muirfield Village Golf Club and the Memorial Tournament represent the confluence of so many things important to the legacy of Jack Nicklaus. It celebrates golf played at the highest level; it stands as a gift to the people and fans of Central Ohio, who helped shape his early life; it is a vehicle to significant charitable giving; and it is a showcase for the creative genius of one of history’s most-acclaimed golf course designers. It was the latter, in particular, that inspired me to pursue a career in design and has helped shape my philosophy even today. I think my father put it best 16 years ago this week at his Honoree Ceremony, when he said, “Muirfield Village will forever stand as a representation of my love and respect for the game of golf. And hopefully, the Memorial Tournament will long represent my passion for tournament golf. Through the hard work of a lot of people, I think we continue to add chapters to a success story.” We wrote a new and important chapter to that story, when, in December, our friends at both the PGA TOUR and Nationwide announced a new six-year presenting sponsorship of the Memorial that will further enhance the Memorial’s stature. The purse has been increased to $8.5 million, which makes the Memorial one of the highest-paying events on the TOUR. Furthermore, the winner will receive a three-year PGA TOUR exemption—a bump from the two years awarded at most events. These changes are significant, as we try to ensure that the best players in the world continue to compete here and we bolster our charitable endeavors. Through phenomenal growth, the Memorial has never lost its commitment to the community and to charity. I have been blessed as Chairman to see the Memorial reach new heights, most of that through the support of a like-minded partner in Nationwide. Now, buoyed by the continued commitment of Nationwide and the PGA TOUR, we have the ability to secure an even brighter future for the Memorial Tournament, as well as the lives of the children and families we impact. That future, I believe, is very bright. Last year the Memorial Tournament donated more than $2 million to charity. Included was a record of over $1.6 million for Nationwide Children’s Hospital, our primary beneficiary, through an alliance with the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation. Since that first Memorial 40 years ago, the Tournament has donated more than $26 million to Central Ohio charities, including $14 million to Nationwide Children’s Hospital. I have always been in awe of the things my father could do on the golf course, but nothing has made me more proud than what he has been able to accomplish here at Muirfield Village Golf Club. It is only through the dedicated team around him, thousands of wonderful volunteers and the faithful fans that the Memorial has been so successful in its three-pronged mission of bringing world-class golf to Central Ohio, honoring great figures in the game, and, paramount to my parents, raising money for pediatric healthcare. The Memorial Tournament has always strived for excellence from the very beginning. In closing, what I want to emphasize is that by striving to do great things, it’s truly amazing how many good things get accomplished. I hope you have a wonderful week and enjoy the golf.

THE MEMORIAL

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MEMORIAL BENEFACTION

As an adult, Broc Bechtler works part time as a firefighter and paramedic, but he spent his infancy and childhood being treated at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

BEATING

the ODDS

Life-saving care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital as an infant and child inspires a young man to BY BOB BAPTIST follow his dream

T

HE BIRTH OF Vicky Bechtler’s first child in

BO MAUPIN

1979 brought even more joy than she expected. Not only had she and her husband, Steven, been blessed with a seemingly healthy boy, but the birth meant she could finally be treated for an irritating rash that had broken out on her arms and

upper legs about two weeks before delivery. “It was horrible,” she recalled. “They couldn’t give me anything for it because I still had the baby in there. It itched so bad. When I delivered, they were able to give me medication and it went away.” Her relief, though, was short-lived. Within a few days, Vicky, her husband and others in their hometown of Mansfield, Ohio, were scratching their heads over what was wrong with the baby. Broc was vomiting the milk and other fluids his mother tried to feed him from a bottle, and he was screaming because he was hungry and dehydrated. Several calls and a visit to his pediatrician did not identify the cause. Vicky insisted on going to the hospital. But two days there provided no answers, either. “At that time, they wouldn’t let you stay [overnight] with your baby in the hospital,” Vicky said, “so when Steven and I came back the next day, [Broc] had an IV in his head. I was so upset and devastated. They didn’t even call me and tell me that they were doing it.

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MEMORIAL BENEFACTION

Doctors gave baby Broc a 50 percent chance of survival if he survived the ambulance transfer to Children’s Hospital.

“It scared me. He was in [the intensive care unit] because they couldn’t decide what was going on. My dad finally went to the pediatrician and said, ‘Look, you do anything—anything, I don’t care what it costs— for this baby.’ ” The pediatrician called Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Considering Broc’s symptoms, doctors there had a hunch what was wrong, and arrangements were made to transfer him to Children’s. A physician and nurse came in the ambulance to accompany him there. Vicky never will forget what the physician told her: “If he can [survive] the trip down there, he has a 50-50 chance.” Broc beat the odds. It is one of the reasons he does what he does today as a part-time firefighter and emergency medical technician in Springfield Township, just west of Mansfield in Richland County. Married and a stepfather to two children, Broc also has a full-time job as a maintenance and safety worker at a hospital Avita Health System is building near Mansfield. He estimated he works about 65 hours a week between the jobs, some days from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. “I’ve always had this thought of wanting to know who the physician was that was able to come up and have a huge influence in saving my

life, along with the Lord,” Broc said. “I always wondered who that physician was that was able to guess right that day.” En route to Columbus, Broc was treated for a disorder known as congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH. It prevents those affected from producing enough of the hormone cortisol, which regulates blood pressure and blood sugar in the body and helps it respond to stressful situations. Broc was given doses of the drugs Cortef and Florinef to address the deficiency. “They were so worried about his potassium [level] because his electrolytes were way off,” Vicky said. “Salt was the third thing. His body does not maintain salt, so they had to feed him salt and I had to feed him salt. And the way you do that with a baby is to dissolve it in water and then syringe it in his mouth. That poor baby. I had to do that four times a day.” Salt might be the oldest memory Broc has of his condition, for which he still takes medication and is monitored by a doctor today, at age 37.

Left: As a child, Bechtler had to return to Children’s every six months for assessments. Right : Bechtler with Dr. Carolyn Romshe, the pediatric endocrinologist who cared for him at Children’s during his youth.

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MEMORIAL BENEFACTION

Doctors gave baby Broc a 50 percent chance of survival if he survived the ambulance transfer to Children’s Hospital.

“It scared me. He was in [the intensive care unit] because they couldn’t decide what was going on. My dad finally went to the pediatrician and said, ‘Look, you do anything—anything, I don’t care what it costs— for this baby.’ ” The pediatrician called Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Considering Broc’s symptoms, doctors there had a hunch what was wrong and arrangements were made to transfer him to Children’s. A physician and nurse came in the ambulance to accompany him there. Vicky never will forget what the physician told her: “If he can [survive] the trip down there, he has a 50-50 chance.” Broc beat the odds. It is one of the reasons he does what he does today as a part-time firefighter and emergency medical technician in Springfield Township, just west of Mansfield in Richland County. Married and a stepfather to two children, Broc also has a full-time job as a maintenance and safety worker at a hospital that Avita Health System is building near Mansfield. He estimated he works about 65 hours a week between the jobs, some days from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. “I’ve always had this thought of wanting to know who the physician was that was able to come up and have a huge influence in saving my

life, along with the Lord,” Broc said. “I always wondered who that physician was that was able to guess right that day.” En route to Columbus, Broc was treated for a disorder known as congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH. It prevents those affected from producing enough of the hormone cortisol, which regulates blood pressure and blood sugar in the body and helps it respond to stressful situations. Broc was given doses of the drugs Cortef and Florinef to address the deficiency. “They were so worried about his potassium [level] because his electrolytes were way off,” Vicky said. “Salt was the third thing. His body does not maintain salt, so they had to feed him salt and I had to feed him salt. And the way you do that with a baby is to dissolve it in water and then syringe it in his mouth. That poor baby. I had to do that four times a day.” Salt might be the oldest memory Broc has of his condition, for which he still takes medication and is monitored by a doctor today, at age 37.

Right: As a child, Bechtler had to return to Children’s every six months for assessments. Far right: Bechtler with Dr. Carolyn Romshe, the pediatric endocrinologist who cared for him at Children’s during his youth.

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A RICH TRADITION. A PROUD HISTORY. a commitment to BRINGING OUT THE BEST. Kroger and the Memorial have quite a bit in common. At Kroger, we’re proud to support the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. And we’re also proud of our commitment to bringing out the very best right here at home. We have a long history of supporting the people, businesses and charities in the communities we serve – because our dedication to quality has always extended well outside of our front doors.

© 2016 The Kroger Co.

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4/4/16 3:02 PM


MEMORIAL BENEFACTION

—BROC BECHTLER, ABOUT HIS DOCTOR

Bechtler with his wife Heidi and his stepchildren Owyn and Addison, above, and on duty as a part-time firefighter and EMT (right).

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“I remember my mom would have to mix quite a bit of salt in with applesauce because, with my condition, losing salt was a side effect of that. So I remember the real salty taste of applesauce as a kid,” he said. Vicky still has the “going home” instructions she was given when Broc was discharged. He returned to Children’s every six months through his childhood to be assessed by Dr. Carolyn Romshe, a pediatric endocrinologist there and an associate professor of pediatrics at Ohio State University. “I remember her smiling face to this day,” Broc said. “I remember always being nervous going down to Columbus to see the doctor, and I just always remember her making me feel comfortable and really taking the anxiety out of the visit.” He had a normal childhood otherwise, able to do what others his age did as long as he was mindful of taking his medication. He was a competitive swimmer for 10 years, until he graduated from Ontario High School. A tragedy his senior year there set him on the path to his current occupation. He walked out the door for school one morning in October 1996 and it was the last time he saw his father alive. “I remember he was going to make me waffles. I needed to get to school,” Broc said. “Every child thinks he’s going to see his parents when he gets home from school. That didn’t happen.” While Broc was at school that day, Steven Bechtler died of a heart

attack. He was 52. Broc enrolled at Ohio State after graduation to study computer science, but the terrorist attacks of Sept.11, 2001, further convinced him to follow through with a career change he had been considering since his father died. “That traumatic experience that I had, any way I could help another person not have to feel that, or comfort them in that time of need … really got the gears going to get into that field,” he said. He enrolled at Columbus State in 2002 and was certified to be a firefighter and EMT two years later. For the past 12 years, he has been dispensing some of the same emergency care that once saved his own life. “I’m a woman of faith. I knew God had plans for him,” said Vicky, who has remarried and whose last name is now Varvel. “I still donate to Children’s Hospital; I donate every year. My dad still donates to them. They saved his life, and I will always be thankful for that.” MT Bob Baptist retired from The Columbus Dispatch in 2015 after 37 years as the newspaper’s golf writer.

BO MAUPIN

“... I JUST ALWAYS REMEMBER HER MAKING ME FEEL COMFORTABLE AND REALLY TAKING THE ANXIETY OUT OF THE VISIT.”


MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1

 RECOGNIZING EXCEPTIONAL PEOPLE is one of the primary missions of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. That’s why active and retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces are honored each year at Muirfield Village Golf Club with a day of free admission to the Tournament to watch world-class golf and join in the celebration of the Tournament Honorees. It also gives all of us a chance to simply say to them,

“ T hank You.”

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ALWAYS READY

ALWAYS THERE

The Ohio National Guard supports the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide

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an international group of authorities on the game of golf, has advised on the constitution and conduct of the Memorial Tournament since its inception in 1976. One of the Captains’ primary tasks is to select the person or persons in whose honor the Memorial Tournament is played each year. They have selected Johnny Miller, Leo Diegel and Horton Smith as this year’s Honorees. All members of the Captains Club give of their time on an honorary basis, and, as always, Memorial Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus and the Executive Committee are grateful for their contributions to the Tournament’s success. THE CAPTAINS CLUB,

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PETER ALLISS Three-time British PGA champion; eight-time Ryder Cup player; international television golf commentator.

JUDY BELL Former President of the USGA (1996-97); Curtis Cup player and captain.

PEGGY KIRK BELL Top player and instructor; 1961 LPGA Teacher of the Year; 1990 recipient of the USGA’s Bob Jones Award.

SIR MICHAEL BONALLACK Former Secretary and Captain of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews; five-time British Amateur champion.

O. GORDON BREWER, JR. Chairman of Pine Valley Golf Club; twice U.S. Senior Amateur champion.

THE HONORABLE GEORGE H.W. BUSH Former President of the United States of America.

SIR SEAN CONNERY Academy Award-winning actor; contributor to golf and charity.

TREY HOLLAND Former President of the USGA (2000-02).

TONY JACKLIN 1969 British Open and 1970 U.S. Open champion; member of the World Golf Hall of Fame.

KEN LINDSAY Former President of the PGA of America (1997-98).

H. COLIN MACLAINE Former Captain of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

CHARLES S. MECHEM, JR. Commissioner Emeritus of the Ladies Professional Golf Association.

WILL F. NICHOLSON, JR. Former President of the USGA (1980-81); Masters Tournament Competition Committee Chairman.

BARBARA NICKLAUS Recognized as the “First Lady of Golf” and a tireless worker for charitable causes.

Deceased Captains ANDY NORTH 1978 and 1985 U.S. Open champion; currently a television golf analyst.

HISAMITSU OHNISHI Vice Chairman of the Japan Golf Tour Organization; a leader in the development of Japan’s professional golf tour; and founder of one of its premier events.

W. Ronald Alexander • John D. Ames • J. Paul Austin ARNOLD PALMER Perhaps the most popular golf champion of all time.

William C. Campbell • Sir John Carmichael • Howard L. Clark Bing Crosby • Joseph C. Dey, Jr. • Charles Evans, Jr. Gerald R. Ford • William Ward Foshay • Isaac B. Grainger James Grimm • Hord Hardin • Jay Hebert Totten P. Heffelfinger • Bob Hope • Frederick E. Jones George H. Love • David Marr • Gerald H. Micklem

GARY PLAYER South African winner of more than 150 tournaments around the world.

JUDY RANKIN Winner of 26 LPGA events; member of the World Golf Half of Fame, and ground-breaking television golf analyst.

FRED S. RIDLEY Former U.S. Amateur champion and a former President of the USGA (2004-05).

John D. Montgomery, Sr. • Byron Nelson • James L. O’Keefe Eugene Pullia • Bernard H. Ridder, Jr. • Clifford Roberts Gene Sarazen • Harton S. Semple • Sir Iain Stewart Philip H. Strubing • F. Morgan Taylor, Jr. • Richard S. Taylor Robert W. Willits • Herbert Warren Wind • John W. Winters, Jr.

Retired Captains JOHANN RUPERT Chairman of the South African Tour and Chairman of the South African Golf Development Board.

CAROL SEMPLE THOMPSON Accomplished amateur player and former member of the USGA Executive Committee.

William C. Battle • James Ray Carpenter • William J. Patton TOM WATSON Hall of Fame golfer and eight-time major champion; ardent supporter of junior golf development.

TH E M EM O R IA L

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At Deloitte, we share a tradition of supporting the communities in which we live and work. Deloitte is a proud supporter of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide

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Copyright Š 2016 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited


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2016 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

MOMENTS OF TRUTH Johnny Miller stopped playing competitive golf at a relatively young age after a brilliant run, and then he created a second career analyzing the game that he loves with pure honesty B Y

J A I M E

D I A Z

GETTY IMAGES (2)

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OHNNY MILLER WALKS into his rotunda-style living room on a shimmering morning on the Monterey Peninsula, picture windows offering a panorama of crashing waves so perfectly shaped they seem computer generated. Perhaps because the wiry figure he cut in his playing prime is etched in the memory, Miller in person is a surprisingly big man—6-2, thick shoulders, big arms, strong jaw. He moves stiffly, mostly from too many leg surgeries but also from being, by his own estimate, one of the world’s great sleepers. “You want some water? I’m going to have some,” he offers in a momentarily husky voice.

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2016 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

A 12-year-old Johnny Miller and baseball legend Lefty O’Doul at Harding Park Golf Course in San Francisco in 1960.

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But once Miller clears his throat and settles into a comfortable chair, his words flow freely in the flat intonation that has become so familiar. Talking golf, he’s in his wheelhouse, the game’s preeminent thought leader at 69, pulling from an immense trove of experience and observation he’s been compiling since the age of 5. It’s the stuff that gives Miller, the now 27-year lead golf analyst on NBC, the confidence to surmise a competitor’s mental state, often accompanied by a raw assessment that while speculative, usually rings true. It turns out that Miller can go deepest when the subject is himself. Because he stopped playing regularly in 1989 at the age of 41 (although his 1994 victory at Pebble Beach reigns as the best last career win this side of the 1986 Masters and the 1930 U.S. Amateur), and only competed in one tournament on the then-Senior Tour, most fans know Miller better as a television commentator than as a player. His golf now is relegated to quick 9s with family members, so to some extent, his substitute for tournament golf is reliving it. “It was pretty good,” he says of his 25 victories including two majors and World Golf Hall of Fame enshrinement. It’s a tepid comment, basically a slow practice swing to loosen up. “The regret,” Miller continues, unable to repress his congenital honesty, “would be that I could have done more.” The comment seems to belie so many other markers in Miller’s life. His 46-year marriage to Linda makes him the patriarch of a brood of six children and 23 grandchildren. He has three homes—a ranch in Utah, a condo in the Napa wine country, and the stunner adjacent

to the Pacific Ocean. His design company gets plenty of projects, and his beloved analyst job only requires him to work about a dozen weeks a year. Life is good. But Miller is also a restless searcher for answers and a stickler for order. Over the years, he’s refurbished 15 ranches, taking them from disrepair to trophy properties. He is known to stop on highways near his homes to pick up trash. He’s averse to loose ends. But in some ways, his playing career—distinct in the history of the game—will always be one. Miller will always be best known for the relatively brief moment when he reached a pinnacle of true brilliance that only a handful of players have ever touched. His Sunday 63 at Oakmont that brought him from well behind to win the 1973 U.S. Open has a good argument for finest round ever played. His absolute peak—from January 1974 through January 1975, when he won 10 tournaments, the last three by margins of eight, 14 and nine strokes—is in the pantheon of the greatest 12 months of golf ever played. Yet with his six-stroke victory at the 1976 British

MILLER FAMILY COLLECTION

MILLER WILL ALWAYS BE BEST KNOWN FOR THE RELATIVELY BRIEF MOMENT WHEN HE REACHED A PINNACLE OF TRUE BRILLIANCE THAT ONLY A HANDFUL OF PLAYERS HAVE EVER TOUCHED.

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2016 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

Right and below: Miller won the 1964 U.S. Junior Amateur held at Eugene Country Club

It’s easy for those who never saw him at his best to brand Miller a classic, “the older I get the better I used to be” guy. But listen to a few qualified peers who did. Lanny Wadkins: “Johnny was the best I ever

USGA (2)

in Eugene, Ore.

Open at Royal Birkdale, the golden run ended. In fact, it was followed by a three-year lost period, after which, though he rebounded from it admirably, Miller was never the same golfer. So the question is, what happened? Miller knows best, but even he has trouble discerning between sound reasons and self blame. Because it’s complicated, the subject continues to intrigue him, perhaps as the prism through which he gets his best insights. First, let there be no doubt—Miller, this year’s Honoree of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, was special, anecdotally even more than historically. In his prime, his ability to control his iron shots and uncanny sense of distance would sometimes cause him to raise his arm while his approach shot was in the air, a guarantee that it would land near the pin. “It was kind of a Babe Ruth thing,” says Miller, adding “which didn’t go over real big.” At the 1975 Tucson Open, which he won by nine with a closing round 61, his approaches over the 72 holes hit the hole or the stick 10 times. Miller, with a youthful brashness he has never lost, is happy to elaborate. “From 1972 to 1976,” he says, “my average iron shot was probably at the most 5 feet off line.” Back in 2013, he wondered, “Sometimes I think that when we get up in heaven, God’s going to let everyone be 28, and there’s going to be this great tournament.” The clear implication was that Miller really likes his chances.

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2016 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

“OF ALL THE GUYS I WENT UP AGAINST, JOHN WAS, ARGUABLY, BLESSED WITH THE MOST TALENT.” —JACK

Right: A young Miller is decked out while attending a function at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. Below: Miller (center) poses with fellow members of the “Young Thunderbirds,” so called because their deal with Ford Motor Company provided each with the use of a free Thunderbird. Also pictured, from left: Lanny Wadkins, Grier Jones, Jim Simons

LEFT: MILLER FAMILY COLLECTION; ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES

and Jerry Heard.

NICKLAUS

saw at hitting pure golf shots. I was very fortunate to play with a lot of the true greats: Jack and Trevino and Tiger, sure, but also Snead, Hogan and Nelson, who might have been past it, but not so you couldn’t see what they could do. But I can’t imagine that anyone in history has ever consistently hit the ball as solid and as close to the pin as Johnny did. He had a technique and a sense for returning the clubface to absolutely dead-square that was uncanny.” Lee Trevino: “Johnny’s advantage was damn-near perfect mechanics. He didn’t have to re-route it or hold onto it or practice like hell, like most of the rest of us. He was basically on automatic, where hitting the ball hard and straight and solid was actually easy. He got to a very rare place.” Jack Nicklaus: “Of all the guys I went up against, John was, arguably, blessed with the most talent.” Such testimony gives Miller one of the great “what if” careers in sports. So good was his good, that he falls into that rare category of comets like Sandy Koufax, Gayle Sayers and Bill Walton. Except that all three of those icons were curtailed by injury. Miller had more than his share of physical problems, several knee and shoulder surgeries among them. But what makes his case more intriguing is the way he essentially opted out himself. Miller’s incubation as a golfer in his hometown of San Francisco was nearly ideal. The

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From January 1974 through January 1975, Miller won 10 times on the PGA TOUR.

third of four children, he was doted on by his father, Larry, a Morse code specialist during World War II who in his job in the communications depart of the RCA corporation could blaze 120 words a minute on a manual typewriter, and his mother Ida, the calm family rock from a long lineage of Mormon elders. Larry Miller, himself an avid golfer who began to play as an adult, started Johnny in the game at age 5, hanging canvas tarps in the basement of the family home off Ocean Avenue. There the boy would hit for hours before a big

“I GOT VERY FAMILIAR WITH THE SOUND AND LACK OF VIBRATION OF PERFECT CONTACT. I COULD REPEAT IT OVER AND OVER.” —JOHNNY

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mirror, encouraged by his father to copy the positions of the pictures in instruction books by Snead, Nelson and Hogan. “I got very familiar with the sound and lack of vibration of perfect contact,” said Miller. “I could repeat it over and over.” Miller practiced his putting upstairs on the carpet, aiming at table legs. When he began playing the city’s public courses, Lincoln Park and Harding Park, he was an instant wizard. At age 8 he began taking lessons at San Francisco Golf Club from John Geertson, who had also taught Tony Lema, and at 11, he was offered a junior membership at the Olympic Club, the first time the club had ever given one to a youngster whose father was not a member. In 1964, he won the U.S. Junior Amateur at Eugene Country Club, and the California State Amateur at Pebble Beach in 1968. Miller was lean but strong, following a regimen of pull-ups, push-ups, squeeze grips, and a lot of running. Miller’s auspicious beginnings are why he felt an immediate connection to Tiger Woods. “Tiger and I are the most similar in background of all the great golfers,” says Miller. “We hit all those balls in the garage. Earl and my dad both played a very similar role, providing all those affirmations that we would be special players. Tiger was more possessed with the game than I was. But I always felt like we kind of share a bond, and that as a golfer I understood him.” In order to work with his son in the basement after Johnny got home from school, Larry Miller volunteered for the night shift at RCA. “The amount of time my father devoted to me was incredible,” Miller says. “He was a very creative person, would write poetry and songs, and was really into how to make your psyche work with the game. He would always call me ‘Champ,’ and he would build me up. Because golf can pull you down. When there was something that was praiseworthy, he would really emphasize that and make me feel confident. “The reason I became so knowledgeable about the game is that he would tell me 10 things to try, and nine of them weren’t any good at all. But one of the 10 would be amazing. But in the process of going through the nine, and figuring out why that idea didn’t work, I would learn a lot of things.” Much like Woods, the entire package gave him a clear sense of destiny. “I knew when I was 8 years old that I was going to be a champion golfer,” Miller said. “That was partly my dad. But I could also feel that it was going to happen. It wasn’t like I hoped it would happen.” The success continued into the often problematic post-prodigy stage. Miller was an

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Above: Miller set not only the course record, but also the major championship record when he fired a final-round 8-under-par 63 at Oakmont Country Club to win the 1973 U.S. Open. Bottom right: Miller, holding the ’73 U.S. Open trophy, gets a congratulatory kiss from his wife Linda.

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All-American at BYU, joined the PGA TOUR in 1970, and got his first win—by five strokes— at the Southern Open the next year. He nearly won the 1971 Masters, his first of three runner-up finishes at Augusta. He was part of the so-called Young Lions—which also included Wadkins, Jerry Heard and Grier Jones—all seeking to surpass Nicklaus, Trevino and Tom Weiskopf at the very top of the game. It was a self-assured group, with Miller the cockiest. Wadkins liked to call him “Plastic Arm,” because, Wadkins says, “Johnny could pat himself on the back from any position.” Miller is still pretty flexible. “From 8 years

old to well into my 20s, I never played bad as far as hitting the ball—literally, I always played well,” he says. “It was never, ‘Well I played good today but might not play good tomorrow.’ It was just always good.” With a bit of effort, Miller gets up to better convey the freedom and grace he felt in his halcyon days, and the simulation indeed rolls back the years. “I knew my iron play was better than anybody else,” he says, now fully in his wheelhouse.

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Right: Miller in 1978. Below: Miller shows his son, Andy, some of the finer points of golf. Andy went on to play briefly on the PGA TOUR.

“Nicklaus and Weiskopf were incredible with the 1-iron, 2-iron, 3-iron. But 5-iron through the wedge, that was my forte. On an approach from the fairway I’d always think, ‘I can beat this guy because my irons are better than his.’ “Whether it is true or not, as a player you have to believe something in your game is the best. Tom Kite and Gary Player believed they were the hardest workers. Or you think you’re extra smart, like Tom Watson. Jack and Tiger both had a lot of things that started with their power. I thought I knew more about

“...ALL OF A SUDDEN EVERY IRON SHOT WENT STRAIGHT AT THE FLAG. THAT WAS A BIG TURNING POINT FOR ME, BECAUSE I KNEW I HAD AN EDGE.” MILLER

the swing than anybody. I became a student of impact—what the optimum positions were, a lot of it Hogan stuff—at a time when it seemed like no one was teaching impact. I focused on continuing the hit in the inch or two beyond the ball after impact, really getting through it. I remember my dad always telling me that Rocky Marciano would say, ‘I don’t aim for their chin. I aim for the back of their head.’ “My second year on the TOUR, I had a breakthrough watching Player in the bunker, the way he would get in an impact position at address. It helped my sand game, but then I thought, ‘What if I locked in my address like that all the way down to the 5-iron?’ All of a sudden every iron shot went straight at the flag. That was big turning point for me, because I knew I had an edge. All that study and work helped me feel like I deserved to win. And there is great power in that feeling.” Inevitably, Miller began to measure himself against Nicklaus. They first met at the 1966 U.S. Open, where the 19-year-old Miller finished eighth as an amateur. Before the championship, one of Nicklaus’ friends at Olympic Club, John Swanson, arranged for the reigning Masters champion and the young local qualifier to play together in a practice round. “I don’t remember being nervous particularly,” says Miller, chuckling softly. “I always thought pretty much anybody that showed up at Olympic Club, I could beat them. But we didn’t play for score. I was skinny, and Jack was way longer than I was, but I held my own. He said, 54

LEFT: MILLER FAMILY COLLECTION; ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES

—JOHNNY

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“...THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TO THINK... ‘I CAN BEAT THIS GUY [NICKLAUS]. NOT ALL THE TIME, BUT I THINK I CAN BEAT HIM.’ ” —JOHNNY

Miller teamed with Jack Nicklaus at the 1973 World Cup of Golf in Marbella, Spain.

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‘Yeah, that was fun,’ and the next day we played San Francisco Club. “In the tournament, I played well the first two rounds and we got paired together on Saturday. I shot 74, which wasn’t that terrible on a very tough course, and didn’t think too much of it. But we kind of became friends there. We got closer when I started challenging him.” When Miller won at Oakmont, “that took me out of Young Lion category, although I still didn’t totally believe I could challenge Nicklaus. But at the end of 1973 we teamed up at the World Cup in Spain, and we played every day from Tuesday through Sunday, and nobody gets to play six days in a row with Jack Nicklaus. As it turned out, I won the individual and Jack and I won the team. And that’s when I started to think, ‘You know, I think I can beat this guy. Not all the time, but I think I can beat him.’ I

started thinking I could be a great player.” Three months later, Miller had won the first three events of 1974 and would go on to eight victories on the PGA TOUR plus the Dunlop Phoenix in Japan. Then he opened 1975 by winning at Phoenix by 14 strokes and Tucson by nine, shooting 49 under in those two events. “That’s the best I ever played,” says Miller. “Byron Nelson on television said I had become the best player in the world. When reporters asked me, I said, ‘Well, right this minute, I might be the best player.’ That didn’t go over well. It was ‘Jack’s won all these majors. What have you done?’ And I would say, ‘Yeah, his record is better than mine. But I’m just saying RIGHT NOW…’ ” Miller laughs and adds, “I definitely got Jack’s attention. And Barbara Nicklaus told him, ‘You better go out and start practicing.’ ” Nicklaus’ answer came at the 1975 Masters, where Miller was the favorite. Miller started badly, 75-71, but then shot 65-66 on the weekend. On Sunday he and Weiskopf, who had a one-stroke lead, watched from the 16th tee as Nicklaus made the uphill 40-foot birdie putt that would give him the lead after Weiskopf bogeyed. Miller birdied the 17th to get within one, but his 20-footer on

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Right: Miller on the 18th green in the final round of the 1976 Open Championship at Royal Birkdale Golf Club and receiving the Claret Jug (above).

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the 72nd hole stayed out on the top edge. “That probably took a little something out of me,” says Miller. “I was playing so well. I remember the shot of electricity that went through me when I birdied 17. The putt on 18, that’s the most nervous I ever felt on a golf course. “That was the difference with Jack. He truly loved that pure competition, when it got tight and the pressure was really on. I know the 1986 Masters was amazing, but I’ll bet that 1975 Masters was the most fun tournament he ever won.” As the years have gone by, Miller and Nicklaus have shared more in common— long marriages, large families and elite fishing, including home-and-home expeditions in the Bahamas and the Rockies. Miller hopes that his connection to Silverado County Club, which he remodeled and plays host during the PGA TOUR’s stop in Napa, will be similar to Nicklaus’ at Muirfield Village Golf Club. Pausing contemplatively, Miller decides to

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Miller, with son, Scott (right) and with Linda and their six children in the early ’80s (from left): Kelly, Scott, Andy, Casi, Todd and John.

“GOLF IS A SELFISH SPORT, AND I JUST WASN’T WILLING TO NOT BE A GOOD FATHER.” MILLER

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—JOHNNY

tell a story he has rarely spoken about. “I had a brother, Ronald, who was four years older,” he says, his voice more somber. “He was a fishing nut. We would fish down at the beach, in the Bay by the Golden Gate Bridge. I’ve always liked fishing more than golf. Which is weird in that you don’t usually find someone who excels and something else is more their favorite thing. We’d go to the practice putting green at Harding Park and end up walking down the slope to Lake Merced and fish. Between golf and fishing, fishing would win. He was great fun to fish with, knew everything about it, and I really looked up to him.” In 1958 when Miller was 11, Ronald was fishing off the rocks below San Francisco’s Cliff House with two friends when he was swept into the Pacific Ocean by a wave and drowned. “The hardest part was we didn’t find him,” says Miller. “As a little kid, I was thinking, ‘He was a good swimmer, he’s not dead. He’s going to come home.’ There was a search for a few days, but they didn’t find him. After 17 days, my father found him on the beach. He never talked about it. That was very tough. “Jack knew about the story. In my mind he’s become sort of like my older brother. And he sort of feels like he’s taken on that role. Because he knows I miss my brother.”

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“IT COMES FROM JACK, AND HE’S THE GUY I ALWAYS TRIED THE MOST TO COPY, IN GOLF AND LIFE.” —JOHNNY

MILLER

Miller began his second career as a broadcaster for NBC Sports in 1990 (shown here with Bryant Gumbel).

“I was very moved when Johnny told me that,” Nicklaus says. “That’s a sign of a big heart and a true friend. I always got along with John. We are both the same way. If you ask us a question, we both give you an answer. We don’t try to dodge the issue, we try to tell the truth. You always know where you stand with Johnny. I’ve always liked that in a person.” The deepening of their relationship makes being chosen the Memorial Tournament Honoree very meaningful to Miller. “It comes from Jack, and he’s the guy I always tried the most to copy, in golf and life,” says Miller. “As a man, I admire him in many ways. As a golfer, he possessed the highest form of genius, which is after beating everybody, still maintaining a desire and love for competition at the highest level. Somehow keeping that edge is what separates the very best. That’s the hardest thing of all.” Miller speaks from profound experience. As he said at the time of his decline, “When I got to the mountaintop, I kind of looked at the scenery and wondered, ‘Now what?’ When Jack got there, he said, ‘Where’s the next mountain?’ ” In retrospect, Miller can see how his decline was almost inevitably brought on by 62

his upbringing and nature. “When I was at my peak, we’d already had four of our children, and I was feeling guilty about leaving home,” he says. “Golf is a selfish sport, and I just wasn’t willing to not be a good father. We have a saying in the Mormon church that no amount of success can compensate for failure in the home.” Brought up on positive reinforcement, he was hurt by the backlash from taking on Nicklaus. “Part of me felt, ‘Why bother if they aren’t going to accept me?’ That contributed to getting burned out.” Miller withdrew to his first ranch in Napa and sought solace in fixing the place up. All the heavy work he did caused him to put on 20 pounds of muscle. “I went from 165 to 185 but kept a 31-inch waist,” says Miller. “But when I picked up the clubs again, they felt like toothpicks and I’d also lost flexibility.” His swing—in his prime so limber and whippet fast—was never quite the same. “I got a little bit prideful as far as practice,” Miller says. “I stopped doing the things that got me there. It was like I’d built up a real nice bank account by putting in the effort, and then I just kept withdrawing from the bank account, and by the time 1977 came along, I was sort of bankrupt.” What followed was a three-year winless drought in which Miller posted only seven top10 finishes in 51 tournaments. “Basically, I was done,” he says. Then he had an epiphany. “This thought came to me, ‘It’s not what you achieve in life, its what you overcome.’ What had I ever overcome? It had all been easy. And that thought drove me forward.” He is proud that he won seven more times in this “second career.” It provided some mental salve for any misgivings about the way his great years abruptly ended, but Miller has the perspective to take it easier on himself now. He sees more clearly that he was engaged in a prolonged fight with the game’s most crucial club—the putter. “I loved golf when I was young, in part because I putted so well,” says Miller. “When I was 12 to 16, I guarantee you I was in the topfive best putters in the world. In high school, it was common for me to have nine or 10 putts for nine holes. On terrible greens. It was uncanny. “That continued until my third year at BYU in 1966, and somebody showed me I was aiming a little left. But when I started aiming straight, I just got all screwed up and for the first time got yippy. Even when I first got out on TOUR, my putting was really borderline. “But in 1973 at the Hawaiian Open, I copied how Jack putted, got my head behind the

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Above: Miller was named the 2014 Ambassador of Golf by Northern Ohio Golf Charities in Akron, Ohio, and received the award during the World Golf Championships-Bridgestone Invitational. Below: Johnny and Linda today with their large family that includes six children and 23

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grandchildren.

ball and used my right arm as a battering ram. Literally in 10 minutes I was a great putter again. That style worked all the way up until the beginning of ’76, when I started getting a little right hand in there again. When I won the British Open I was still Jack Nicklaus, except to keep myself from seeing the ball, which got me yippy, I put some red fingernail polish on the bottom of the grip, and I would just watch that red dot, not the ball. But it got me through the tournament.” The putting problems worsened during Miller’s slump and were never truly resolved. “I tried everything—the longer putter up the arm, looking at the hole, closing my eyes. Everything was a temporary fix where I might squeeze out a win, but nothing lasted. The thought that

maybe my putting wouldn’t work made golf not as much fun. A guy who is having fun, who loves the game, is hard to beat. A guy who isn’t having fun usually isn’t.” Miller in his advanced years can also make what is always a difficult concession for a golfer, and especially a champion. “I didn’t necessarily really like the pressure of teeing it up,” he says. “That was probably my weakness. I could deal with it, but it wasn’t like I loved it. I would never gamble head to head, because I didn’t like that feeling. And I didn’t really enjoy the pressure of being expected to win, which hurt me when I got to the top.” At the same time, his aversion was the source of his many runaway wins. “I never enjoyed tight tournaments,” he said. “My average victory margin in 25 wins is at least three shots, probably the highest of anyone. And people say that’s great, but it really wasn’t, because I was kind of playing out of fear. When I got a shot ahead, I would get really motivated to get a four- or five-shot lead, because I didn’t like it close. “The thing I’m proud of is that I had to do it with my game from tee to green. My putting wasn’t reliable, but I never choked tee to green. When I won at Oakmont, I hit every fairway and every green coming down the stretch. It wasn’t like I got 6 or 7 under and I started hitting some weird shots but scrambled to make par. I just kept hitting it at the flag. Same thing at Birkdale. But it was a really demanding way to play, and I couldn’t sustain it.” Another benefit: All the stress Miller so

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“THEY GET THE WATERED-DOWN VERSION SO OFTEN. THE MOST INTERESTING THING ABOUT ANY SUBJECT IS THE TRUTH.” —JOHNNY

Miller and fellow NBC Sports golf analyst Dan Hicks at the 2011 PLAYERS.

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acutely felt vitally informs his announcing. As a player, he’d always been unsparing in his self-critiques with the media, using the taboo word “choke” liberally. When in his first broadcast at the 1990 Bob Hope, Miller called Peter Jacobsen’s downhill long-iron over water on the 72nd hole “absolutely the easiest shot to choke on I’ve ever seen in my life,” it angered the locker room and saw him labeled a grandstander among more traditional fans. “People thought I was trying to draw attention,” says Miller. “I wasn’t doing any of that. I was just being the same with the way I treated the game in my own mind. I always felt that the real meat of the game is how well a player can handle pressure. The players never admitted it or talked about it, and the TV commentators shied away from it. But I always thought, the last day of the U.S. Open, it’s about how well you handle the pressure. That’s what makes the greats great.” In some quarters, Miller is also criticized for excessively referring to his own career. But

Miller considers his work as an analyst above all a service to the game through expanding the collective knowledge of golfers. He often refers to his own experiences because he happens to be the case study he knows best. “Basically, I think people just really want to know what happened … in golf, in sports, in life,” he says. “They get the watered-down version so often. The most interesting thing about any subject is the truth.” Which, ultimately, is how Miller has resolved the crucial question about his career— he was true to himself. He never entered a Faustian bargain, and he’s come to realize that some of his competitive shortcomings have been strengths in more important areas. “In the most important things, I’ve had an amazing life—wonderful parents, wonderful wife and kids, wonderful experiences as I got older,” he says. “I’ve got a lot to be grateful for. The golf was at times really good but not perfect, but it’s a hard game, and it helps to be wired a certain way. I did pretty well considering.” After Miller gets up to bid his visitor goodbye, he looks out at the waves and finds a phrase to sum up. “The Boy Scouts have a great rule to live by. It goes, ‘leave your campsite better than you found it.’ I think I’ve done that.” No surprise Johnny Miller sleeps so well. MT Jaime Diaz is a senior writer for Golf Digest.

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Johnny Miller’s career record

MAJOR CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORIES

1980 Jackie Gleason Inverrary Classic

1973 U.S. Open

1981 Joe Garagiola Tucson Open, Glen Campbell Los Angeles Open

1976 Open Championship

1982 Wickes Andy Williams San Diego Open PGA TOUR VICTORIES

1983 Honda Inverrary Classic

1971 Southern Open

1987 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am

1972 Heritage Classic

1994 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am

1974

Bing Crosby Pro-Am, Phoenix Open, Dean Martin Tucson Open, Heritage Classic, Tournament of Champions, Westchester Classic, World Open, Kaiser International

1975 Phoenix Open, Dean Martin Tucson Open, Bob Hope Desert Classic, Kaiser International 1976 NBC Tucson Open, Bob Hope Desert Classic

INTERNATIONAL VICTORIES

1973 Trophee Lancôme, World Cup of Golf (Individual title; team title with Jack Nicklaus) 1974 Dunlop Phoenix 1975 World Cup of Golf (Individual title; team title with Lou Graham) 1979 Trophee Lancôme 1981 Million Dollar Challenge OTHER VICTORIES

1983 Chrysler Team Invitational (with Jack Nicklaus), Spalding Invitational

OTHER CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

• PGA Player of the Year 1974 RIGHT: GETTY IMAGES; OPPOSITE: USGA

• PGA TOUR leading money winner 1974 • Ryder Cup 1975, 1981 • U.S. Junior Amateur 1964 • California State Amateur 1968 • Inducted into World Golf Hall of Fame 1998 • Longtime critically acclaimed television golf analyst for NBC Sports

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D ouble Majors Memorial honors two posthumously J O H N

A N T O N I N I

EDITOR’S NOTE: In an effort to ensure that prominent and accomplished golfers who are deceased receive their just recognition by the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, the Captains Club has identified several distinguished figures from the past for designation as Tournament Honorees over the next several years. This year, the Captains Club has chosen to honor a pair of two-time major champions, Leo Diegel and Horton Smith. Diegel won two PGA Championships consecutively in 1928-29, while Smith won the Masters twice, including the inaugural tournament in 1934. The following pages briefly chronicle their accomplishments, which were significant not only as personal achievements, but also as contributions to the rich history of the game of golf.

ILLUSTRATION BY GLENN HARRINGTON

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MEMORIAL POSTHUMOUS HONOREES

Despite struggles with erratic putting,

Leo Diegel

cobbled together an impressive career

L

EO DIEGEL WON AT LEAST ONE PGA TOUR event every year from 1920 to 1930. It’s an impressive streak, accentuated by the fact that Diegel was one of the most nervous and erratic putters of his era. That he would win so often—including two PGA Championships—become a star on the early U.S. Ryder Cup teams, and be known as one of the exemplary match-play performers of his era is a testament to his devotion to the game and to a unique putting stroke he began to employ in the mid-1920s.

Gene Sarazen exclaimed that, “every night [Diegel] went to bed dreaming theory and every morning he awakened with some hot idea that was going to revolutionize the game.” Diegel’s most notable hot idea was a novel putting stroke in which he hunched well over the ball with his putter touching his chin. He spread his

legs and his arms were splayed, elbows parallel to the ground. Taking the wrist out of the stroke, he thought, would limit the extra movement caused by nerves associated with the release of the putter. This last-ditch effort to combat the putting yips was known at the time as “Diegeling,” and he became so successful with this style that he won

28 PGA TOUR events and eventually was honored with a place in the World Golf Hall of Fame. Born in Detroit on April 27, 1899, Diegel got his start in the game as a caddie in 1910. He won the city caddie championship at age 13 and the Michigan Open in 1916 at age 17. Not long after, Diegel joined the fledgling PGA circuit, and his success as a pro was instrumental in ending the British dominance of the game. Diegel and Walter Hagen became America’s professional stars, even appearing together in a golf comedy film called Match Play directed by Hollywood’s legendary Mack Sennett. But it was on the course where Diegel truly shined, winning the PGA Championship in 1928 and 1929. In 1928, Diegel stunned Hagen, the four-time defending champion, in the quarterfinals, ending The Haig’s PGA match-play winning streak at 22. Diegel routed Sarazen in the semis (9 and 8) and Al Espinosa in the final (6 and 5) for his first major title. Diegel won again in 1929, this time beating Hagen in the semifinals and Johnny Farrell in the championship match. That same year, Diegel was a star on the losing U.S. Ryder Cup team, the only American to win both his matches in the U.S. defeat. He played in the biennial event four times, finishing with a 3-3 record. Despite his greatness in match play, Diegel struggled in stroke play, with notable defeats in the 1925 U.S. Open at Worcester County Club in Worcester, Mass. (dropping nine strokes to par over the last six holes to finish five strokes back of Willie MacFarlane) and the 1933 British Open at St. Andrews (three-putting the 18th green to miss the Denny Shute-Craig Wood playoff by one). Forced to take a year off after a December 1935 injury to his right hand suffered in a friendly wrestling match with fellow pro Harry Cooper while on an exhibition tour of Australia, Diegel didn’t have another significant victory upon his return. An auto accident three years later ended his career, and he was diagnosed with throat and lung cancer in 1947. He died in North Hollywood, Calif., on May 5, 1951, at age 52. Diegel and his wife Violet did not have children.

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MEMORIAL POSTHUMOUS HONOREES

First Masters winner

Horton Smith

was one of the game’s great young prodigies

J

ORDAN SPIETH WON FIVE TIMES ON THE PGA TOUR in 2015, becoming, at age

22, the youngest player to win that frequently in one season since Horton Smith won five tournaments in 1929 at age 21. It was a remarkable accomplishment by the likeable young Texan, one that also silently speaks volumes about the player to which he was being compared. Simply put, anyone who held a record for more than 80 years did something right. And Horton Smith did a lot of things right. Remembered today as the winner of the first Masters and as a past president of the PGA of America, Smith was indeed a master of the game. A prodigy in an age when professional golf was still finding its footing, Smith is officially credited with eight PGA TOUR victories in 1929, and 30 for his career. Smith was the last player to defeat Bobby Jones in 1930 before Jones won that year’s Grand Slam, and he beat Jones again in 1934 upon the great man’s return to golf after a fouryear retirement in the first Masters Tournament, then called the Augusta National Invitation Tournament. Smith won the Masters again in 1936 during a week in which so much rain fell—nine inches by one estimate—that the pros officially protested playing conditions. Born in 1908 in Springfield, Mo., Smith took to golf as a caddie and player at Springfield Country Club, which his father joined in 1920. He remained an amateur until 1926, dropping out of college to become an assistant pro at Springfield. He began touring in 1927, and although he won twice in 1928, it was 1929 when his game took off. He won five times in February and March, including three weeks in a row at the Florida, La Gorce and North and South Opens. After a summer sojourn to Europe included an unofficial (as far as the PGA TOUR is concerned) victory in the French Open, he won three times on the West Coast in November and December. Although tall for a golfer of that era—he claimed a height of 6 feet, 1½-inches—Smith had an exceptional short game, and he was believed to be the first professional to use a sand wedge in competition. Byron Nelson thought 74

THE MEMORIAL

Smith was the best putter and chipper of his time, and he was often seen giving advice on putting. According to the PGA of America’s Tournament Record Book for 1935, Smith “employs an upright swing with a very definite hand action with a straight left arm as the control of the stroke, a method which is somewhat individually suited to a player of his height.” His short game

was best on display at the 1936 Masters. Smith trailed Harry Cooper by two strokes with five holes to play, but birdies on holes 14 and 15 (the latter with a 45-foot chip), as well as a 16-foot par putt on the 17th hole, paved the way for Smith to secure a one-stroke victory. Smith also met his future wife, Barbara Bourne, at the 1936 Masters. The daughter of Augusta National member Alfred Bourne, her grandfather was head of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. They married in 1938 before Smith enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1942. He was discharged as a lieutenant in 1945. The Smiths divorced that year. They had one child, Alfred, born in 1943. Smith died of Hodgkin’s Disease in 1963 at age 55 and is buried in Springfield. MT John Antonini is a researcher and writer for Golf Channel and golfchannel.com.


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PHILANTHROPY

The Memorial Club IN 1986 THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ENDOWMENT was established to allow the Tournament to plan prudently for the future and to continue the development and maintenance of needed facilities. Funds generated from the endowment are used to provide new and better facilities for spectators and fans and to assure the Tournament’s support of several worthwhile charities. The members of the Memorial Club are: HAROLD P. ANDREWS GREGORY ANTHES WILLIAM E. ARTHUR ABNER H. BAGENSTOSE DONALD F. BAIRD CURT BANGLESDORF DAVID L. BARNES TIMOTHY J. BATTAGLIA DR. RICHARD BECKETT WILLIAM BRADLEY BENNETT MICHAEL D. BLOCH ROBERT W. BOICH TODD E. BORK KEN BOWDEN RUSSELL L. BOWERMASTER BARRY G. BOYLES GEORGE P. BRAY JAMES G. BROCKSMITH, JR. DAN C. BROWER FRED C. BROWN JAMES B. BURKE RONALD E. CALHOUN THOMAS L. CAMPBELL PHILIP D. CAMPISI STEPHEN P. CASCIANI CRAIG CASSADY RICHARD F. CHAPDELAINE ANTHONY T. CHAPEKIS JOHN J. CHIMENTO JOSEPH A. CHLAPATY GRANT CHRISTMAN RALPH R. CIOFFI DAVID CLARK STEPHEN B. CLARK PETER M. CLARKSON JOSEPH P. COCHRAN RICHARD T. COCHRAN JACK J. CONIE III RICHARD R. CORNA JEG A. COUGHLIN, SR. WILLIAM P. CSEPLO MILLARD M. CUMMINS DOMINIC J. CURCIO ARTHUR J. DeCRANE SCOTT E. DeSANO JON P. DIAMOND JAMES DIDION ALVA N. DOPKING, JR. THOMAS B. DYER JAMES L. EHRET JOHN R. EVANS T. WILLIAM EVANS PHILIP G. FANKHAUSER BRETT A. FEBUS

S. TREVOR FERGER LARRY J. FOX WILLIAM H. FRANZ TAKEO FUKUI R. WILLIAM GARDNER ROBERT P. GARDNER JOSEPH J. GASPER JOHN B. GERLACH, JR. CATHY GERRING LEONARD GORSUCH THOMAS A. GOSNELL KIM D. GREAVES LOWELL “ROCKE” GREER BRUCE R. HAGUE FRANK D. HARMON JOHN R. HARPER ALBERT J. HART, JR. THOMAS A. HASSFURTHER W. HENRY HAUSER JOHN F. HAVENS LEO J. HAWK LAWRENCE J. HAYES PAUL G. HELLER MILAN B. HERCEG KOKI HIRASHIMA WILLIAM E. HOBAN RALPH E. HODGES THEODORE J. HOST J. PATRICK HUBER JOHN B. HUTCHENS J. LAWRENCE HUTTA JAMES T. HUTTA MARTIN INGLIS VICTOR D. IRELAN PETER J. JOCHUMS C. LEE JOHNSON JILL EVANS JOHNSON THOMAS B. JOHNSON FRITZ KAISER JAMES R. KARPAC KEN ARMEN KAZARIAN NEIL E. KELLEY JOHN P. KENNEDY JOHN W. KESSLER BENJAMIN T. KING JACK E. KING SAMUEL B. KING JAMES M. KOSTELAC THOMAS C. KRUSE JOHN KUCHARCZYK ROBERT A. LANDTHORN RICHARD S. LANGDALE DAVID P. LAUER PETER J. LAVERTY

LARRY L. LIEBERT JEFFREY D. LOGAN PAUL B. LONG, JR. PAUL B. LOYD, JR. CHERYL W. LUCKS JACK E. LUCKS CHRISTIAN D. MAHER DANIEL M. MAHER DONAL H. MALENICK STEPHEN J. MANGUM JAMES P. MANOS ROBERT J. MASSEY JAMES A. MAXWELL, JR. MICHAEL W. McCARTY GEORGE W. McCLOY RUSTY McCLURE JOHN P. McCONNELL DAN R. McFARLAND JOHN W. McKITRICK LAWRENCE A. McLERNON ROBERT D. McNEIL JOHN T. McNICHOLAS ROBERT S. MEEDER URBAN MEYER VAIL K. MILLER CAMERON MITCHELL DAVID J. MLICKI JACK MOLL THOMAS E. MOSURE SIGMUND MUNSTER MICHAEL R. MURNANE MASAO NAGAHARA DENISON “CHIP” NEALE, JR. BARBARA NICKLAUS JACK W. NICKLAUS JACK W. NICKLAUS II STEVEN C. NICKLAUS DANIEL M. O’BRIEN H.M. “BUTCH” O’NEILL RICHARD G. ORLANDO TERENCE A. OSBORN NILES C. OVERLY WILLIAM D. PARKER JOHN W. PARTRIDGE, JR. MICHAEL C. PASCUCCI ROBERT D. PATRELLA DARYL L. PETERMAN LOYAL M. PETERMAN CECIL J. PETITTI II MARK PHELAN PERRY E. PIPES BENJAMIN B. PRICE WILLIAM B. PRICE GARY L. RACEY

H.R.”BUSS” RANSOM STEPHEN S. RASMUSSEN MERWIN J. RAY FRANK R. RAYMOND C. MICHAEL REARDON WILLIAM E. ROBERTS JEFFREY A. ROBY BRADLEY H. ROSELY ANDREW J. ROTH L. JACK RUSCILLI LOUIS V. RUSCILLI ROBERT A. RUSCILLI, JR. MICHAEL D. RYAN BRIAN P. SAVAGE PANDEL SAVIC MARTIN L. SAVKO RONALD E. SCHERER FRITZ SCHMIDT GREGORY E. SCHNEIDER GARY L. SCHOTTENSTEIN JOHN J. SCOTT III KEVIN SHANAHAN STEVEN P. SHEPARD J. ROBERT SIERRA CHARLES M. SIMON WILLIAM E. SLOAN SAMUEL E. SMILEY DOUGLAS A. SMITH JEFFREY H. SOPP SCOTT W. STEARNS DAN STERGIOU JEFFREY L. STEWART JOHN C. STIEG NORMAN C. STRAKER JOSEPH W. TAYLOR DAVID T. TERRY RAYMOND J. TESNER JERRY L. TRABUE CHARLES C. UNGUREAN BRUCE L. VOR BROKER WAYNE C. WALKER RAY C. WASIELEWSKI THOMAS B. WEIHE ALFRED J. WEISBROD KENNETH J. WESTERHEIDE RANDY WILCOX JEFF WILKINS EVAN A. WILLIAMS R. MAX WILLIAMSON JAMES L. WILMERS JOHN O. WINCHESTER MICHAEL A. WOLCOTT JIM D. WRIGHT TROY WRIGHT

DECEASED MEMBERS: JAMES M. BEARD ’12 • MICHAEL J. BERKELEY ’01 • L. JOHN BISHOP ’13 • MICHAEL BOICH ’01 • CHARLES R. CARSON ’12 L. PHILIP CARSTENS ’08 • CHARLES P. CONRAD ’01 • FREDERICK DeMATTEIS ’01 • TERRY A. FRIEDMAN ’04 • LOUIS M. HALEY ’06 ZEMPEI HATTORI ’01 • JOHN G. HINES ’14 • ROBERT S. HOAG ’13 • KENNETH HOULE ’98 • JEFF KEELER, JR. ’05 • RICHARD A. LANG ’02 JOHN H. McCONNELL ’08 • JOHN D. MONTGOMERY, SR. ’07 •  ROBERT T. MURNANE ’07 • JAMES E. NOLAN, JR. ’14 • HAROLD T. PONTIUS ’15 S. BRADFORD RYMER ’04 • KEIZO SAJI ’00 • DAVID A. SCOTT ’03 • DAVID G. SHERMAN ’10 • SAM S. STALLWORTH, JR. ’03 • JAMES R. THOMAS ’12 KENNETH D. THOMAS ’13 • R. DAVID THOMAS ’02 • MICHIO TORII ’11 • DALE WADE ’98 • IVOR H. YOUNG ’15 • RICHARD S. ZIMMERMAN ’02

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MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

DUO

of

DISTINCTION B Y

T

M E L A N I E

H A U S E R

HE SUBJECT WAS NANCY LOPEZ and the story was one pulled from her vault of memories. Rhonda Glenn’s eyes were twinkling as she described the snippet, her voice dancing through the details as if it happened yesterday, not decades ago. A few minutes later, she segued to Mickey Wright, another of the greatest female players in the game, another woman Glenn felt blessed to call a friend. The common thread? Lopez had beaten Wright in what started as a five-way playoff at the 1979 Coca-Cola Classic. It was, as it turned out, the last chance Wright would ever have to win. Glenn didn’t skip a beat. Or a detail. Then again, she never did. Journalism, Glenn always said, was her passion, but golf was the music behind it. Especially women’s golf. Recognized posthumously with the Memorial Golf Journalism Award, Glenn literally wrote the book on women’s golf. It took her 10 years and some of her own money, but when The Illustrated History of Women’s Golf was released in 1991, it was the definitive look at the women’s game. After that, Glenn was the go-to historian—think a smiling human Google—at every women’s golf event she attended. “She told me lot of things about myself that I didn’t remember,’’ Lopez chuckled. “I think so many times women in golf or so many sports have kind of been thrown to the side a little bit, and I think she always felt that. So when she wrote about it with that passion in her heart, she thought, ‘Darn, continued on page 84

82

THE MEMORIAL

From saving the world to sports writing —John Garrity’s golf journalism journey is truly one of a kind B Y

B O B

B A P T I S T

J

OURNALISM INTRIGUED JOHN GARRITY from the time

he was old enough to carry his older brother’s golf bag. He spent some of his youth caddieing for Tom, 10 years older, who was a big name on the Kansas City junior circuit in the years before another Tom—Watson—came along. John stood by and watched as Watson was interviewed by a Kansas City Star sportswriter after his wins and thought his job was cool. Garrity later became sports editor of his high school newspaper in West Palm Beach, Fla., and moonlighted covering junior high school football games for the city’s newspaper. “On Thursday nights I’d go to Cooley Stadium and take notes on three junior high school football games,” Garrity recalled, “then get on my bicycle and pedal down Dixie Highway to the Palm Beach Post-Times, stay up past midnight and type up these long reports. Sometimes I might get 15, 20, 25 column inches … and I’d see it in the afternoon paper the next day. “At the end of the season they surprised me with a check for $25, which I thought was just the richest compensation you could ever get. But the real compensation was they gave me bylines. I was thrilled with that.” Garrity decided then he was going to be a “newspaperman,” a dream that died, to an extent, soon after he enrolled in the University of Missouri’s journalism school. “I did not yet recognize newspapermen had deadlines,” he quipped. continued on page 88

ABOVE LEFT: GETTY IMAGES; ABOVE RIGHT: DARREN CARROLL

A former player, Rhonda Glenn never missed a beat covering golf


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Above left: Rhonda Glenn moderates a press conference with 2012 U.S. Women’s Open champion Na Yeon Choi. Above right: Glenn accepts the USGA’s 2010 Bob Jones Award on behalf of Mickey Wright. Right: Glenn prepares to make a shot during the 1997 Senior Women’s Amateur.

they need to have better than this. They need to get more recognition.’ That empowered her to talk about it.” And write those stories. For Glenn, it was always about the stories. Whether she was reporting for a local radio station as a teenager, anchoring ESPN’s “SportsCenter” in the early ’80s or writing a U.S. Women’s Open game story, Glenn, who passed away in 2015 at the age of 68, was all about making her subject come alive and capturing those moments for posterity. She started out as quite a story herself, winning a pair of Florida state high school golf titles. But fascinated by the great players of the day, their passion and their stories, Glenn, who played in 11 USGA events, soon stepped 84

THE MEMORIAL

outside the ropes where she had instant credibility and a knack for drawing out the greats of the game—Wright, Louise Suggs and Arnold Palmer—with her soft-spoken way of talking to players. Glenn cut her teeth in radio and newspapers, but by 1978 she was working for ABC as a golf commentator. Three years later, she became the first female anchor on “SportsCenter” on the midnight and 3 a.m. shows. But being the first never mattered to Glenn, although she did open a door. Doing the job was her focus, and she always found that one thread that led straight to the heart of her subject and never failed to touch her audience. “Some people tell you stories and they make you think about what you’re having for dinner,’’ Lopez said. “She totally captivated you, and she spoke about things that interested you. She would be able to take you to another place instead of where you were at that moment.’’ When Glenn left ESPN and ABC, she transitioned to spokeswoman and historian for the USGA, where she worked for 17 years. There, she not only watched over the women’s game, but she also worked on the oral histories for the USGA’s African-American Golf Archive and helped create the Mickey Wright Room at Golf House. In 2014, the Golf Writers Association of America honored her with the William D. Richardson Award for her contributions to the game. Glenn was the face of U.S. Women’s Open press rooms, dispensing tales and facts, moderating press conferences and detailing special moments in her stories. And, like every writer, she had her own unique process, one that frustrated Pete Kowalski, the director of communications for the USGA, at times.

USGA/JOHN MUMMERT (3)

MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD


Jack and Barbara Nicklaus and the Terlato family have partnered out of a shared commitment to quality, family and philanthropy to create Jack’s House.

LOOK FOR JACK’S HOUSE WINES AT A STORE NEAR YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE JACK’S HOUSE FOUNDATION AND HOW YOU CAN HELP, VISIT WWW.JACKSHOUSEFOUNDATION.ORG


MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

“THERE’S NOBODY I’VE MET IN MY TIME IN GOLF WHO HAD THE DESIRE TO BE AROUND THE GAME AND HAD SUCH PASSION FOR IT.’’ USGA

—PETE KOWALSKI DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

“She’d be in charge of a championship for us and play would be over and Rhonda wouldn’t be in the media center,’’ Kowalski said, “I’d be asking ‘Where’s Rhonda?’ and someone would say, ‘Oh, she’s outside having a cigarette.’ I’m thinking, ‘What’s she having a cigarette for?’ ’’ One day he went outside and found her staring into the distance, cigarette in hand. “I said, ‘Rhonda, let’s go. We need to get the story written,’ ” Kowalski said. “She said, ‘I’m writing it right now. I’m just getting it all in my head. If I have a cigarette while I’m looking at the golf course, I can get it all sorted out and formulated in my head. So leave me alone.’ ” He did and, as always, she delivered. “All of the backspacing and deletions you

do when you first sit down, well, that had all been done already when Rhonda sat down,’’ he said. “She had the story written.’’ Glenn spoke from the heart and wrote from it. She had a passion for the game and for people and put her soul into every detail. Whether it was the definitive book on women’s golf, Judy Bell’s autobiography, Breaking the Mold, or working to put the finishing touches on a book with Lopez, which has yet to be published, Glenn didn’t settle for anything. She kept working until she got it right. “There’s nobody I’ve met in my time in golf who had the desire to be around the game and had such passion for it,’’ Kowalski said. “Passion isn’t a cliché when you talk about Rhonda because she lived it. “All of her friends were people who she met from golf. She had the perfect personality for someone in golf—you play golf with people you like, people you trust, people who are fun. That was Rhonda.’’ MT Melanie Hauser is an award-winning golf writer and secretary/treasurer of the Golf Writers Association of America.

Hollis Stacy (in white visor) and Glenn during the 1984 U.S. Women’s Open, where Glenn worked as a TV

LEFT: COURTESY USGA MUSEUM; ABOVE: USGA/JOHN MUMMERT

commentator for ABC Sports.

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MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

“AT STANFORD IN THE LATE ’60s, BESIDES STUDYING HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE, I ALSO DECIDED IT WAS MY DUTY TO SAVE THE WORLD.”

Above left: Garrity in the media center at a British Open in the mid-1990s. Right: Golfing in Ireland. Below: Garrity with Phil Mickelson at the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral in Miami, Fla.

88

THE MEMORIAL

GARRITY

(continued from page 82) He soon did, decided to become a “historian” instead and transferred to Stanford for his final two years of college. Thus began an eclectic journey that, ironically, circled back to the printed word and to Garrity, 69, being honored this year with the Memorial Golf Journalism Award for his contributions as a writer at Sports Illustrated for three decades and as an author of several books. One, Tour Tempo, an instructional book written with John Novosel, was the top-selling sports book on amazon.com in 2004.

“It’s all kind of accidental,” Garrity said of his career. Serendipitous, might be a better word. “At Stanford in the late ’60s, besides studying history and political science, I also decided it was my duty to save the world,” said Garrity, characteristically self-deprecating. “I got involved in anti-war activities, civil rights, farm workers’ protests, all that.” Wanting out of academia after graduating in 1969, however, Garrity declined postgraduate fellowships and instead moved to New York, where he paid for a room at local YMCAs by working as an editor, first at a trade journal and then at book publisher Simon & Schuster. Eventually, he made enough money freelance writing on the side, on topics as disparate as sports and folk music, to pursue another passion. He returned to the San Francisco area to be a songwriter and play guitar in bands. He tired of that after a few years, too, and returned to, of all places, Missouri, where he enrolled in graduate school and taught a couple of semesters of freshman composition. In 1974, he moved back to Kansas City—except for summers and an occasional Christmas as a boy, he hadn’t lived there since his parents divorced when he was 6 years old—and returned to freelance writing, much of it for Sport magazine in New York, for whom he had written previously.

TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF SPORTS ILLUSTRATED; TOP RIGHT: TOM GARRITY; LEFT: T. R. REINMAN

—JOHN


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MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

Previous Recipients of the

Memorial Golf Journalism Award

1999

Bob Drum Ronald Heager Peter Ryde Lincoln A. Werden

2000

1983

Charles A. Bartlett Pat Ward-Thomas

Dave Anderson Renton Laidlaw Nick Seitz

1984

2001

Tom Scott Herbert Warren Wind

1985

Leonard Kamsler Michael McDonnell Tom Ramsey Robert Sommers

Charles Price

2002

1986

Kaye Kessler

1987

Al Barkow

1988

Marino Parascenzo

1989

Jim McKay

Will Grimsley Leonard Crawley Bob Harlow William D. Richardson

2003 2004 2005 2006

1990

Sadao Iwata

1991

Frank Chirkinian

1992

Ken Bowden

1993

Dai Davies Tom Place

1994

Ron Green, Sr.

1995

Art Spander

1996

Dave Kindred

1997

Bob Verdi

1998

Jaime Diaz

Percy Huggins Dick Taylor Jack Whitaker Peter Dobereiner Dan Jenkins Jim Murray Bob Green Furman Bisher Michael Williams

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

2015

Doc Giffin

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TV personality David Feherty helps Garrity with his bowtie at a Las Vegas fundraiser.

“That’s how I got discovered by Sports Illustrated,” said Garrity, who began freelancing for the magazine in 1979 and in 1989 accepted an offer to became its full-time golf writer. “My first 10 years there, I covered every kind of story of every length. But I only did three golf stories, and they didn’t really know I had any particular interest or background in the game. “My primary motivation was I wanted to see the world, I wanted to travel, and the golf beat was the ticket. I thought this was really going to open up my life and fulfill some dreams—and that was absolutely the case. Saying yes to the golf beat at Sports Illustrated was the best decision I ever could have made.” Garrity brought to the beat a different style than had his predecessors, Dan Jenkins and Rick Reilly. “For a tall guy, I keep a pretty low profile,” said Garrity, who stands 6 feet 7. When he talks about writing, he says, “I need a scene.” “John is as good as anybody ever has been at painting a scene and putting you there and not getting in the way,” said Gary Van Sickle, a colleague at Sports Illustrated for two decades. “He’s like a sofa—he’s just comfortable. Funny, witty, but not harsh. Just a delightful guy.” Garrity retired from the magazine in 2010 but continues to contribute to its pages and website. He also writes a blog, “John Garrity’s Top 50,” which he uses to lampoon golf’s popular

“HE’S LIKE A SOFA—HE’S JUST COMFORTABLE. FUNNY, WITTY, BUT NOT HARSH.” — G A RY VA N S I C K L E

course rankings, which he considers “absurd.” “I started writing the blog when I retired on the notion I wasn’t going to be working that much. I needed an outlet for my silliness,” he said. His top 50 include only courses he has played. So, Pine Valley isn’t on his list because “I’ve never been invited to play there.” Meanwhile, No. 50 is always the last course he has played, unless it’s already on the list. Thus, The Bull Golf Course in Sheboygan, Wis., designed by Jack Nicklaus, made an appearance earlier this year. “Unintentionally, a couple of pretty good courses, not knowing my criteria, have put that I’ve listed them among my top 50 and put it on their website,” Garrity said. “That’s OK. I think my rankings are as good as anybody else’s.” MT Bob Baptist covered the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide for The Columbus Dispatch for 37 consecutive years, from 1978-2014.

ANGUS MURRAY/GOLF MAGAZINE.

1982

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2015 MEMORIAL WINNER PROFILE

DREAM WEAVER David Lingmerth wanted to be a hockey player, but the native of Sweden discovered golf and iced his first PGA TOUR win at the Memorial G A R Y

V A N

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OCKEY WAS HIS DREAM, just like it was for most boys growing up in

Sweden. At 5, David Lingmerth was already playing hockey on any rink, pond or icy stretch of road where a neighborhood game broke out. There was just one problem. The biggest part of a 5-year-old imagining himself as a future Olympic hockey star, or any other superhero, is looking the part. Young David lacked a key part of his costume: padded hockey pants. Every Batman needs a cape. “You look ridiculous playing hockey without hockey pants,” Lingmerth, now 27, recalls. “Kids notice details like that.” Hockey equipment was expensive, of course. David’s father, Thomas, drove a bus for the transportation company that his father—David’s grandfather—helped start. His mother worked at the local post office. Lingmerth was the oldest of four siblings—two brothers, one sister—and the family budget was limited. Most of David’s hockey stuff was pre-owned and bought at auction until one memorable Christmas, the kind a 5-year-old never forgets.

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LINGMERTH SKATED AFTER HIS OWN HOCKEY DREAMS EVERY WINTER UNTIL HE WAS 15. IT’S WHAT YOU DO IN THE NORDEN, AS NATIVES CALL THE NORDIC LANDS OF SWEDEN, NORWAY AND FINLAND. Below: David Lingmerth’s first love was ice hockey, not golf, and he was quite good at the

DAVID LINGMERTH PHOTOS (2)

sport, too.

“I got hockey pants,” Lingmerth says. “I slept in those hockey pants that night. They never came off. They were black and they were so cool, I thought.” Fast-forward three years and it was time for his first real game against a real opponent and his first road trip. It was going to be a special day, no matter what. The chance to play a team of strangers instead of another dreary intrasquad practice game made it an incredibly thrilling voyage into the unknown. Lingmerth doesn’t recall exactly where the game was played, but it wasn’t far from home, which, for him and his young teammates, was Tranas, a picture-postcard town of 14,000-plus about three hours south-southwest of Stockholm nestled near the serene shores of Lake Sommen. It had the feel of an old “Cheers” episode because, as the show’s theme song repeats, it’s “where everybody knows your name.” This game, therefore, was also Lingmerth’s first time representing Tranas. That made it a whole different kind of exciting.

The game itself? It wasn’t exciting at all. Lingmerth’s team won, 21-2, and he scored eight goals. Wait, eight goals? Yes, he says somewhat sheepishly. “It wasn’t impressive,” he says. “Everybody is on different ability levels at that age.” Imagine if he’d kept up that pace. Eight goals a game over 82 regular-season National Hockey League games, let’s see… “Yeah, I should have kept that up,” he says, laughing. He might have become Sweden’s Wayne Gretzky. Or the next Magnus Svensson, a Tranas legend who skated on Sweden’s gold-medal team in the 1994 Winter Olympics. Or another Niklas Hjalmarsson, who grew up about 30 minutes away from Lingmerth’s town and played on some junior hockey and soccer teams against David. Hjalmarsson is a defenseman for the Chicago Blackhawks and, Lingmerth says with a touch of admiration, “He’s won three Stanley Cups.” Lingmerth skated after his own hockey dreams every winter until he was 15. It’s what you do in The Norden, as natives call the Nordic lands of Sweden, Norway and Finland. Fifteen percent of Sweden lies within the Arctic Circle, and the other 85 percent is simply on a different block in the same neighborhood. Life is about embracing the cold and ice. Especially since it’s not an option. Tranas is beautiful in the summer, Lingmerth says. And in the winter? “It is beautiful then, too, when it’s lighted,” he says. “We have a few hours of daylight in the south but most of Sweden is so

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Lingmerth went skydiving for the first time for an episode of “Inside the PGA TOUR” that he co-hosted with his wife Megan.

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dark and cold in winter…” He pauses, perhaps to shiver at the memory since he now lives a world away, in balmy Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. He hasn’t forgotten the Swedish cold or his hockey memories, including the travel tournament where he scored two late goals 30 seconds apart to tie the game and then won it with a shootout goal that carried Tranas to the championship game, which it won against the vile opponent that had upset Tranas in the opening round. “That,” he says, “was an awesome experience.” Wait a minute, hold on. Isn’t this supposed to be a story about David Lingmerth, The Golfer, and his memorable golfing firsts? Like when he shot a closing 62 in his first PGA TOUR event in 2013 to get into his first playoff in the Humana Challenge and then lost to Brian Gay? Or like his first PGA TOUR victory last year at the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, where he beat 2010 Memorial winner Justin Rose in an up-and-down playoff? Or like his first British Open championship last summer and his first trip to St. Andrews, where he birdied every par 4 on the front nine in

the opening round and shot a sizzling 29? Or like his first time hosting the TV series, “Inside the PGA TOUR,” with his wife Megan as co-host and together they went skydiving (for the first time, of course) for a show segment? And all that screaming the ground crew said they heard during the descent? It wasn’t Megan. “Yeah,” David confesses, “that was me.” Or like his chance to make the European Ryder Cup team in 2016 for the first time, since he is clearly one of the game’s brightest rising young stars not named Rory, Jordan or Jason? Yes, this is a story about that Lingmerth. Be patient, you have almost come to the critical fork in the, uh, ice, where Lingmerth The Hockey Player becomes Lingmerth The Golfer after getting a little help from Lingmerth The Football Player. Football? Sorry for the confusion. Meet Goran (pronounced YORE-an) Lingmerth. He is David’s uncle, the brother of David’s father, and the aforementioned football player. Goran set an NCAA placekicking record at Northern Arizona University in 1986 that still stands nearly 30 years later. He is the only player to kick eight field goals in one game, the only scoring in a 24-0 victory over Idaho, and Sports Illustrated named him its National Player of the Week. The milestone wouldn’t have happened except NAU’s sports information director discovered that Goran had tied the all-time NCAA record and called from the press box to tell the coach to take a timeout near the goal line with a few seconds left so Lingmerth could try a kick for history. “It wasn’t a home game and the other team thought we were rubbing it in,” Goran says. “All I heard running onto the field was, ‘Break that effing kicker’s leg!’ I remember I kicked it and ran right to the locker room. Once they found out, they understood, but at the time, it was a little hostile on the field. Afterward, the other team’s coach came into our locker room to congratulate me.” He dismisses the mark as being “a long time ago” but he has made one concession to the milestone—his vanity Florida license plate: FG 848 (Field Goal, eight for eight). “Only my dearest friends know what it stands for,” he says. Well, up until now that is. Goran was invited to the Philadelphia Eagles’ training camp and during preseason action, made an extra point against the New England Patriots. He was released after the third preseason game and went back to NAU to finish his degree. Then he got a call from the Cleveland Browns. The NFL players had gone on strike mid-season. Goran was offered a job as a

DAVID LINGMERTH PHOTO

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Right: Lingmerth and his brother Andreas pose with Swedish hockey great Niklas Backstrom, an All-Star center for the NHL’s Washington Capitals. Below: Lingmerth (back row middle) at his high school graduation.

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replacement player. He was 21, hadn’t been in America long and didn’t know much about work stoppages or what fallout there might be. He was simply excited about a chance to play pro football. The Browns already had a kicker but weren’t confident in his leg strength. They wanted Lingmerth as a kickoff specialist. The records say he appeared in one NFL game and wore No. 3. The more famous his nephew gets, Goran jokes, the worse his own kicking career looks. “Everyone Googles me and says, ‘I know you played in the NFL, why can’t I find you?’ ” Goran says. “Even my kids ask, ‘Why can’t I find any pictures of you?’ I tell them, you’re not going to find any. The strike didn’t last long and neither did I. The funniest part is that since David is getting on TV more, the golf commentators are looking for something to say about him, so they mention that his uncle had a career as an NFL kicker.” Goran laughs heartily. “A very short one,” he says. His time at NAU paid off with a connection to the Solheim family, founders of Karsten Manufacturing and Ping golf equipment. Goran landed a job as a Ping sales rep, traveled the tours and relocated to Miami. The Swedish Lingmerths, already golf nuts once the annual thaw came, visited Goran in Florida when David was 9. Goran took them to Pine Tree Golf Club, where David and his brother Andreas, hit balls on the range with LPGA stars Meg Mallon and Beth Daniel, tour friends of Goran. “When David was done hitting balls, he said, ‘I’m going to be a pro golfer,’ ” Goran says. “That’s kind of crazy and eerie today when you think about it. He had a knack and an ability

you didn’t see in the other kids—the swing, the tenacity. He’s not the tallest in stature—no one in our family is. But the fact that he could play from the men’s tees and hit it as far as us from an early age was pretty amazing.” Goran promised David a set of new Ping irons, his first adult clubs, once David got his handicap down to single digits, which he did by age 12. “It didn’t take him very long,” says Goran. David was still playing hockey but his golf kept improving, too. At 15, he won the Bankboken Cup, the biggest amateur youth golf tournament in Sweden. That earned him an invite to a prestigious high school, where he could train with the Swedish Golf Federation. On the ride home, he and his father knew this was a turning point in his life. David considered his height—5 feet, 7 inches—and decided that hockey wasn’t his best option. He traded in his hockey dream for a golf dream. David wanted to play college golf in the U.S. but wasn’t recruited. He landed at the University of West Florida, a Division II school. When Lingmerth went to Stockholm to apply for a visa to come to college, he bumped into Swedish hockey star Niklas Backstrom at the American embassy. Backstrom had been drafted by the Washington Capitals of the National Hockey League. Lingmerth sat near him in the waiting room and talked hockey, maybe. “I was probably starstruck,” Lingmerth says. “I don’t remember what we chatted about.” A room full of visa applicants waited for the embassy office to open. “Finally, they yell out the first name,” Lingmerth says, “and they announce him like he was playing in a game, ‘Niklas Backstrom!’ He was

DAVID LINGMERTH PHOTOS (2)

2015 MEMORIAL WINNER PROFILE

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2015 MEMORIAL WINNER PROFILE

Top right: Lingmerth played for the University of Arkansas in college after transferring from the University of West Florida. Right: Lingmerth on the golf course in his native Sweden. Below: Lingmerth and Sergio Garcia on the 18th green after the final round of THE PLAYERS in 2013.

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already a star. There were no more announcements like his. After that, it was, ‘OK, next—Lingmerth.’ It was pretty funny.” He and Backstrom keep in touch. Lingmerth has become such a big Caps fan that when he had to go to Washington, D.C., in the spring of 2016 to renew his work visa, he planned it during a Caps’ homestand. David transferred to the University of Arkansas after a year at West Florida, thanks to Goran’s contacts with the Razorbacks’ coaching staff. David didn’t know when he arrived at Arkansas that he would meet his future First Lady there. One of Megan’s friends began dating one of David’s roommates and that resulted in David and Megan seeing each other around the dorm and having occasional cafeteria lunches together. They knew each other for almost a year before they went on a formal date. It was dinner followed by ice skating—David’s idea. “That was the first time I really tried,” David says. “She was from Missouri and grew up doing figure skating. She loves to be on the ice and so do I, which is cool.” Don’t ask the former hockey player who’s the better skater. “They’re different kinds of skating,” David says. “She can’t hang with me if we race, but she’s more graceful and looks way

better on the ice. I’d give her the edge.” They got married at a Jacksonville Beach marina in November 2013. When the couple went skydiving last year while co-hosting “Inside the PGA TOUR,” it came about because David had listed skydiving on his bucket list in the TOUR media guide and Megan liked the idea. “He’s such a level-headed kid, I thought he was crazy,” Goran says when he heard about it. “But he did it with his wife so they did something crazy together, I guess.” After a successful run at Arkansas, David began a steady rise through the pro ranks. He got onto the Web.com Tour, barely kept his card there the first year but made it onto the PGA TOUR the following season. Then, he promptly got into a playoff with Brian Gay and Charles Howell at the Humana Challenge. Gay won and Lingmerth was disappointed because on the first playoff hole, he went for the par-5 green in two and snap-hooked his 4-iron shot into a lake. A few months later, Lingmerth was paired with Sergio Garcia in the final Sunday group at THE PLAYERS. He shot 72 in the final round and tied for second, one stroke behind some unknown named Tiger Woods. The 2014 campaign wasn’t a good one. Lingmerth normally drives it straight and is

LEFT: PGA TOUR IMAGES; ABOVE: DAVID LINGMERTH PHOTOS (2)

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5/3/16 9:28 PM


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Lingmerth made his first appearance in The Open Championship in 2015 at the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland.

a good iron player, but he went into a slump when he became technique-focused. Once he went back to the basics of being a feel player, he enjoyed a breakout year in 2015. He won the Memorial Tournament and shot multiple low rounds last summer. Uncle Goran watched the Memorial while on vacation in Costa Rica, where he’d rented a villa in a remote area.

“Luckily, the landowner had satellite TV,” Goran said. “We watched it in Spanish. We were hooting and hollering down the stretch. I was on the phone with his dad the whole time and when David sank that final putt, it was not quiet in Costa Rica or in Sweden. It was mostly screaming.” After the post-round press conference at Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio, Megan was there and held up a cell phone so David’s father could watch the proceedings on FaceTime and wrangled Tournament Host Jack Nicklaus to the phone so he could surprise Thomas by wishing him happy birthday. In a year of multiple firsts for David—winning, playing the Open Championship, going to St. Andrews, earning a Masters invitation, hanging with Nicklaus and skydiving—guess which one won’t happen multiple times? You got it. The one where he jumps out of a plane. “I’m glad I did it, though,” David says with a chuckle. “Because now I don’t have to do it again.” MT Gary Van Sickle, a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, has covered golf for 35 years.

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2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

HOW SWEDE IT IS! Unusual recipe results in breakthrough victory for Lingmerth G A R Y

V A N

S I C K L E

BEANED SPECTATOR, a stirring finish, a playoff duel, a garish big number posted by golf’s biggest name, and a cell phone—believe it or not, these all combined to make the 2015 edition of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide one to remember, if not one for the ages.

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2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

Below: Justin Rose and David

“HI, THOMAS, THIS IS JACK NICKLAUS,” THE FAMOUS VOICE SAID ENTHUSIASTICALLY INTO THE PHONE. “HAPPY BIRTHDAY! WHAT A GREAT BIRTHDAY PRESENT!”

afternoon? Priceless, as the famous commercial catchphrase says. Yes, Thomas Lingmerth had a good day. So did David, 27. And better still than the luckless spectator standing well right of the 18th green as the leader played the 72nd hole.

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Lingmerth on the 18th green.

This is not the usual recipe to cook up an unforgettable golf event, so kids, don’t try this at home. Let’s start with the cell phone. Megan Lingmerth, like most wives, was two moves ahead of everyone else. Her husband, David, had just scored his breakthrough PGA TOUR victory, a moment so thrilling that all the normally stoic Swede could think of to tell Peter Kostis of CBS as the telecast signed off was, “I’m so happy I don’t know where to go.” Luckily, Megan did. After her husband sat through a press conference with reporters, where he was joined by Tournament Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus, Megan was ready to pounce. Besides being the day her husband scored a career-shaping victory, it was also the birthday of David’s father, Thomas Lingmerth. So as the official duties on the stage of the media room ended, she dialed the elder Lingmerth’s number and held up the phone so he could talk to the man of the moment. His son, David? Nope. Surprise—the Tournament Host himself. A brief word of explanation tipped him off and he graciously grabbed the phone. “Hi, Thomas, this is Jack Nicklaus,” the famous voice said enthusiastically into the phone. “Happy birthday! What a great birthday present!” Winning the Memorial Tournament? That’s $1.116 million. Getting a phone call from Jack Nicklaus AND a victory by your son on the same

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2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

Above left: Masters champion Jordan Spieth shot a final-round 65 to tie for third place. Above right: Francesco Molinari almost made it a three-man race but found water on the 16th hole to end his bid. Below: Rose had a close encounter with patrons on Sunday when his approach shot from a bunker on the 18th hole hit a spectator

Justin Rose of England was ahead after 54 holes and on this Sunday afternoon amusement park thrill ride, he lost the lead three times and found it again three times. At the 18th, Rose drove it into an awkward lie in a fairway bunker and then shanked—yes, shanked!—his approach shot WTHR, or Way The Heck Right as it’s known in polite company. Rose’s ball beaned Mr. Luckless Fan. You could say Rose skulled the shot, but that would be a cruel turn of phrase, so let’s not. When the Englishman arrived to survey the situation, the two shook hands and shared a laugh. So he lived to tell the tale.

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The pro still faced a dicey 55-yard shot from the rough after the cranial carom. Justin rose to the occasion (pun intended) and dropped a wedge shot that stopped 2 feet from the hole. Rose turned and pointed his club at the unlucky fan and smiled, perhaps giving him the message, “That one’s for you, buddy.” Rose then made the par putt to force a playoff with Lingmerth. It capped quite a finish, too, since Rose had three-putted the 16th hole for bogey but birdied the 71st hole to draw even with Lingmerth, playing in the group ahead. The pair completed 72 holes in 15-under 273, Lingmerth after a 3-under 69 and Rose a 72. The real fun began in the playoff. Lingmerth found the fairway bunker at the 18th while Rose found the fairway. When Lingmerth missed the green left, it looked as if Rose might have one hand on the trophy. Then he pulled his approach shot long and left and had a difficult pitch. Lingmerth’s chip ran 10 feet past. Uh-oh. Then Rose’s flop shot careened 20 feet beyond on the cup. Another uh-oh. Advantage Lingmerth. Rose’s putt was so fast, it curled around the cup and dropped in from the back side— unbelievable! Nicklaus, watching from the hillside, threw his hands up in amazement while Rose’s young son, Leo, shouted in delight. Advantage Rose. Then Lingmerth poured in his par putt to keep the playoff going.

PGA TOUR IMAGES (3)

instead of the green.

THE MEMORIAL

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5/5/16 10:39 PM


THE 2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE FINAL RESULTS

1

David Lingmerth

67

65

72

69

273

$1,116,000

2

Justin Rose

68

67

66

72

273

$669,600

3

Jordan Spieth

68

70

72

65

275

$359,600

Francesco Molinari

68

67

69

71

275

$359,600

Marc Leishman

69

67

71

69

276

$226,300

Hideki Matsuyama

64

71

71

70

276

$226,300

Jim Furyk

69

66

70

71

276

$226,300

8

Tony Finau

71

66

73

67

277

$179,800

Kevin Kisner

67

71

69

70

277

$179,800

Keegan Bradley

68

74

65

70

277

$179,800

Billy Horschel

70

68

71

69

278

$148,800

Vijay Singh

71

67

71

69

278

$148,800

George McNeill

72

71

67

69

279

$116,250

Kevin Na

71

71

66

71

279

$116,250

Dustin Johnson

72

71

65

71

279

$116,250

5

11 13

Andy Sullivan

70

64

72

73

279

$116,250

17

Brendon Todd

67

68

71

74

280

$99,200

18

Russell Knox

66

74

73

68

281

$78,120

Bill Haas

70

71

71

69

281

$78,120

Robert Streb

73

67

71

70

281

$78,120

Harris English

67

71

72

71

281

$78,120

Ryan Moore

67

67

75

72

281

$78,120

Kevin Streelman

71

70

65

75

281

$78,120

24

Rory Sabbatini

72

67

71

72

282

$57,040

Jason Dufner

66

67

74

75

282

$57,040

Graham DeLaet

69

69

72

73

283

$45,880

Jeff Overton

71

71

67

74

283

$45,880

Matt Kuchar

70

69

70

74

283

$45,880

Patrick Reed

72

68

68

75

283

$45,880

Thomas Aiken

69

68

70

76

283

$45,880

26

114

So the duo returned to the 18th tee for a third time. Lingmerth’s approach came up short and left. Rose found the right fairway bunker, the same place where he shanked that earlier shot off the spectator’s noggin. This time, he played a beautiful shot to the middle of the green, 40 feet away. Lingmerth showed good touch, hitting a sand shot to three feet from the lower bunker and Rose lagged close as both players made pars again. The playoff moved to the 10th for the third playoff hole. Lingmerth got his approach on the green, 30 feet away. Rose had tree trouble in the right rough and tried to play a low slice that ended up behind the left greenside bunker. He pitched to 22 feet and missed the par attempt. Lingmerth ran his first putt 4 feet past but he holed the comebacker for par and the win. “When I made that putt on the first extra hole, I thought, ‘Wow, I’m going to steal this one,’” said Rose, whose seven PGA TOUR wins include the 2010 Memorial Tournament and the 2013 U.S. Open. “It wasn’t to be. David did everything he needed to do.” Lingmerth had done what he needed to do the previous season when he finished sixth in the Web.com Tour playoff series and got himself back onto the PGA TOUR. He had passed up a big European Tour event in his home country of Sweden to play instead at Muirfield Village Golf Club, which proved to be a tough but smart decision. He claimed he remained mostly calm during the playoff. “My heart did start beating a little harder once I got over that final putt,” Lingmerth admitted. “But other than that, I thought I handled myself pretty well.” A three-man playoff looked possible for a while. Italy’s Francesco Molinari was tied for the lead with Rose and Lingmerth when he arrived at the par-3 16th tee, a hole that Nicklaus redesigned a few years ago and molded into a more difficult and more dangerous version of Augusta National’s beautiful par-3 16th. Molinari discovered the dangerous part, pulling his iron shot into the pond and making a double bogey that ended his chances. Five-time Memorial champion Tiger Woods provided some drama of his own during the week, but not the good kind. He was already having a bad third round when he struggled to an 8 on the 18th hole, resulting in a 13-over-par 85 that was the worst score of his career. Woods was first off the tee Sunday, a rare circumstance for him. He played without a marker and shot a quiet 74. Woods made no excuses for his frustrating week. “The course kicked my butt pretty hard,”

PGATOUR IMAGES

2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

THE MEMORIAL

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5/5/16 10:39 PM


The 2010 Memorial champion

he said matter-of-factly. A Jack Nicklaus-designed course can do that. A little more drama, the good kind, was provided on the weekend by Masters champion Jordan Spieth. He drove it beautifully and closed with six birdies and a chip-in for eagle to shoot 65 and tie Molinari for third. “This was exactly what I needed going into the U.S. Open,” said Spieth, who two weeks hence would go on to add the Jack Nicklaus medal at Chambers Bay to the green jacket he had won in April. That’s how you call your shot, folks. In summation, it was a week not to be forgotten, especially for Lingmerth, who became the second straight winner to earn his first PGA TOUR title at Muirfield Village and the sixth overall in the Tournament’s 40-year history, joining Keith Fergus (1981), Kenny Perry (1991), Tom Lehman (1994), Justin Rose (2010) and Hideki Matsuyama (2014). MT

congratulates the 2015 winner after their memorable threehole playoff.

Gary Van Sickle, a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, has covered golf for 35 years.

PGA TOUR IMAGES

2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

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116

THE MEMORIAL

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5/5/16 10:39 PM


ESSAY

TH THEE M MEM EMOORRIA IALL 109 109

MEM16_2015_RECAP_6.indd 109

5/5/16 10:39 PM


2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

Below: Justin Rose and David

“HI, THOMAS, THIS IS JACK NICKLAUS,” THE FAMOUS VOICE SAID ENTHUSIASTICALLY INTO THE PHONE. “HAPPY BIRTHDAY! WHAT A GREAT BIRTHDAY PRESENT!”

afternoon? Priceless, as the famous commercial catchphrase says. Yes, Thomas Lingmerth had a good day. So did David, 27. And better still than the luckless spectator standing well right of the 18th green as the leader played the 72nd hole.

PGA TOUR IMAGES (2)

Lingmerth on the 18th green.

This is not the usual recipe to cook up an unforgettable golf event, so kids, don’t try this at home. Let’s start with the cell phone. Megan Lingmerth, like most wives, was two moves ahead of everyone else. Her husband, David, had just scored his breakthrough PGA TOUR victory, a moment so thrilling that all the normally stoic Swede could think of to tell Peter Kostis of CBS as the telecast signed off was, “I’m so happy I don’t know where to go.” Luckily, Megan did. After her husband sat through a press conference with reporters, where he was joined by Tournament Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus, Megan was ready to pounce. Besides being the day her husband scored a career-shaping victory, it was also the birthday of David’s father, Thomas Lingmerth. So as the official duties on the stage of the media room ended, she dialed the elder Lingmerth’s number and held up the phone so he could talk to the man of the moment. His son, David? Nope. Surprise—the Tournament Host himself. A brief word of explanation tipped him off and he graciously grabbed the phone. “Hi, Thomas, this is Jack Nicklaus,” the famous voice said enthusiastically into the phone. “Happy birthday! What a great birthday present!” Winning the Memorial Tournament? That’s $1.116 million. Getting a phone call from Jack Nicklaus AND a victory by your son on the same

110

THE MEMORIAL

MEM16_2015_RECAP_6.indd 110

5/5/16 10:40 PM


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2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

Right: Masters champion Jordan Spieth shot a final-round 65 to tie for third place. Far right: Francesco Molinari almost made it a three-man race but found water on the 16th hole to end his bid. Below: Rose had a close encounter with patrons on Sunday when his approach shot from a bunker on the 18th hole hit a spectator

Justin Rose of England was ahead after 54 holes and on this Sunday afternoon amusement park thrill ride, he lost the lead three times and found it again three times. At the 18th, Rose drove it into an awkward lie in a fairway bunker and then shanked—yes, shanked!—his approach shot WTHR, or Way The Heck Right as it’s known in polite company. Rose’s ball beaned Mr. Luckless Fan. You could say Rose skulled the shot, but that would be a cruel turn of phrase, so let’s not. When the Englishman arrived to survey the situation, the two shook hands and shared a laugh. So he lived to tell the tale.

112

The pro still faced a dicey 55-yard shot from the rough after the cranial carom. Justin rose to the occasion (pun intended) and dropped a wedge shot that stopped 2 feet from the hole. Rose turned and pointed his club at the unlucky fan and smiled, perhaps giving him the message, “That one’s for you, buddy.” Rose then made the par putt to force a playoff with Lingmerth. It capped quite a finish, too, since Rose had three-putted the 16th hole for bogey but birdied the 71st hole to draw even with Lingmerth, playing in the group ahead. The pair completed 72 holes in 15-under 273, Lingmerth after a 3-under 69 and Rose a 72. The real fun began in the playoff. Lingmerth found the fairway bunker at the 18th while Rose found the fairway. When Lingmerth missed the green left, it looked as if Rose might have one hand on the trophy. Then he pulled his approach shot long and left and had a difficult pitch. Lingmerth’s chip ran 10 feet past. Uh-oh. Then Rose’s flop shot careened 20 feet beyond on the cup. Another uh-oh. Advantage Lingmerth. Rose’s putt was so fast, it curled around the cup and dropped in from the back side— unbelievable! Nicklaus, watching from the hillside, threw his hands up in amazement while Rose’s young son, Leo, shouted in delight. Advantage Rose. Then Lingmerth poured in his par putt to keep the playoff going.

PGA TOUR IMAGES (3)

instead of the green.

THE MEMORIAL

MEM16_2015_RECAP_6.indd 112

5/7/16 4:54 PM


Š2013 General Mills

The right gear is everything.

We start with the best ingredients from Nature naturevalley.com Official Granola Bar of the PGA TOUR


THE 2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE FINAL RESULTS

1

David Lingmerth

67

65

72

69

273

$1,116,000

2

Justin Rose

68

67

66

72

273

$669,600

3

Jordan Spieth

68

70

72

65

275

$359,600

Francesco Molinari

68

67

69

71

275

$359,600

Marc Leishman

69

67

71

69

276

$226,300

Hideki Matsuyama

64

71

71

70

276

$226,300

Jim Furyk

69

66

70

71

276

$226,300

8

Tony Finau

71

66

73

67

277

$179,800

Kevin Kisner

67

71

69

70

277

$179,800

Keegan Bradley

68

74

65

70

277

$179,800

Billy Horschel

70

68

71

69

278

$148,800

Vijay Singh

71

67

71

69

278

$148,800

George McNeill

72

71

67

69

279

$116,250

Kevin Na

71

71

66

71

279

$116,250

Dustin Johnson

72

71

65

71

279

$116,250

5

11 13

Andy Sullivan

70

64

72

73

279

$116,250

17

Brendon Todd

67

68

71

74

280

$99,200

18

Russell Knox

66

74

73

68

281

$78,120

Bill Haas

70

71

71

69

281

$78,120

Robert Streb

73

67

71

70

281

$78,120

Harris English

67

71

72

71

281

$78,120

Ryan Moore

67

67

75

72

281

$78,120

Kevin Streelman

71

70

65

75

281

$78,120

24

Rory Sabbatini

72

67

71

72

282

$57,040

Jason Dufner

66

67

74

75

282

$57,040

Graham DeLaet

69

69

72

73

283

$45,880

Jeff Overton

71

71

67

74

283

$45,880

Matt Kuchar

70

69

70

74

283

$45,880

Patrick Reed

72

68

68

75

283

$45,880

Thomas Aiken

69

68

70

76

283

$45,880

26

114

So the duo returned to the 18th tee for a third time. Lingmerth’s approach came up short and left. Rose found the right fairway bunker, the same place where he shanked that earlier shot off the spectator’s noggin. This time, he played a beautiful shot to the middle of the green, 40 feet away. Lingmerth showed good touch, hitting a sand shot to three feet from the lower bunker and Rose lagged close as both players made pars again. The playoff moved to the 10th for the third playoff hole. Lingmerth got his approach on the green, 30 feet away. Rose had tree trouble in the right rough and tried to play a low slice that ended up behind the left greenside bunker. He pitched to 22 feet and missed the par attempt. Lingmerth ran his first putt 4 feet past but he holed the comebacker for par and the win. “When I made that putt on the first extra hole, I thought, ‘Wow, I’m going to steal this one,’” said Rose, whose seven PGA TOUR wins include the 2010 Memorial Tournament and the 2013 U.S. Open. “It wasn’t to be. David did everything he needed to do.” Lingmerth had done what he needed to do the previous season when he finished sixth in the Web.com Tour playoff series and got himself back onto the PGA TOUR. He had passed up a big European Tour event in his home country of Sweden to play instead at Muirfield Village Golf Club, which proved to be a tough but smart decision. He claimed he remained mostly calm during the playoff. “My heart did start beating a little harder once I got over that final putt,” Lingmerth admitted. “But other than that, I thought I handled myself pretty well.” A three-man playoff looked possible for a while. Italy’s Francesco Molinari was tied for the lead with Rose and Lingmerth when he arrived at the par-3 16th tee, a hole that Nicklaus redesigned a few years ago and molded into a more difficult and more dangerous version of Augusta National’s beautiful par-3 16th. Molinari discovered the dangerous part, pulling his iron shot into the pond and making a double bogey that ended his chances. Five-time Memorial champion Tiger Woods provided some drama of his own during the week, but not the good kind. He was already having a bad third round when he struggled to an 8 on the 18th hole, resulting in a 13-over-par 85 that was the worst score of his career. Woods was first off the tee Sunday, a rare circumstance for him. He played without a marker and shot a quiet 74. Woods made no excuses for his frustrating week. “The course kicked my butt pretty hard,”

PGATOUR IMAGES

2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

THE MEMORIAL

MEM16_2015_RECAP_6.indd 114

5/5/16 10:46 PM


I VOLUNTEER

FOR MY COMMUNITY

FORTHEGAME AND FOR

Nationwide Children’s The Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide is proud to recognize the passion of our volunteers. In partnership with Advanced Drainage Systems, Incorporated, we celebrate the thousands of dollars raised each year through volunteer hours for Nationwide Children’s Hospital.


The 2010 Memorial winner

he said matter-of-factly. A Jack Nicklaus-designed course can do that. A little more drama, the good kind, was provided on the weekend by Masters champion Jordan Spieth. He drove it beautifully and closed with six birdies and a chip-in for eagle to shoot 65 and tie Molinari for third. “This was exactly what I needed going into the U.S. Open,” said Spieth, who two weeks hence would go on to add the Jack Nicklaus medal at Chambers Bay to the green jacket he had won in April. That’s how you call your shot, folks. In summation, it was a week not to be forgotten, especially for Lingmerth, who became the second straight winner to earn his first PGA TOUR title at Muirfield Village and the sixth overall in the Tournament’s 40-year history, joining Keith Fergus (1981), Kenny Perry (1991), Tom Lehman (1994), Justin Rose (2010) and Hideki Matsuyama (2014). MT

congratulates the 2015 winner after their memorable threehole playoff.

Gary Van Sickle, a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, has covered golf for 35 years.

PGA TOUR IMAGES

2015 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

COMPLETE LAKE & POND MANAGEMENT • Customized Algae & Weed Treatment Programs

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• Floating Fountains & Aeration • Biologists, Aquatic Specialists on Staff • Serving Ohio Waters Since 1983

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116

THE MEMORIAL

MEM16_2015_RECAP_6.indd 116

5/5/16 10:50 PM


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T H E M E M O R I AL


RETROSPECTIV E ES:S  1A9Y9 1 M E M O R I A L

NEAR DEAR AND

TO HIS HEART

Kenny Perry can trace his long and successful career to his first PGA TOUR victory at the 1991 Memorial Tournament B Y

D A V I D   S H E D L O S K I

O THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE

THER THAN JACK NICKLAUS, the Founder and Host of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, no PGA TOUR player likely holds Muirfield Village Golf Club and the Tournament nearer to his heart than Kenny Perry. Twenty-five years ago, the Kentucky native used a playoff victory over two-time Memorial winner Hale Irwin to launch a career that was merely a dream before that sunny June afternoon. “If one tournament really got me started, this was it,” says Perry, 55, who appropriately chose the 2015 Memorial Tournament to make his last official start on the PGA TOUR. “For me to kind of end it here is perfect, to get my first win here in ’91 and then to kind of end it here I thought would be a special place and a good way to do it. “All I wanted to do was come here and say thanks to Jack. I wanted to come up and shake his hand, sit and talk to him a little bit. He’s been a big inspiration to me in my life and my career, him and Barbara. When I got out on

TOUR in ’86, he was still playing a little bit competitively, so I got to play some with him. And that was always exciting for me.” Perry, who turned professional in 1982 and didn’t earn his TOUR card until ’86, was still just a journeyman when he shocked Irwin, who had won his third U.S. Open the year before. Though a long hitter—Perry remained so even when he turned 50 and began competing on the PGA TOUR Champions—he hadn’t yet unlocked the secret of how to win. And even after beating Irwin with a birdie on TH E M EM O R IA L

121


RETROSPECTIVE: 1991 MEMORIAL

Right: Corey Pavin, who would finish the Tournament in third place, was the first-round leader with a 6-under-par 66. Far right: Two-time Memorial winner Hale Irwin shot 66 on Sunday to Perry’s 71 to force a playoff.

Huge crowds came out on Sunday to see the Tournament

oldest winner in Tournament history. Only Tiger Woods, with five titles, has won Jack’s event more. He also played on two Presidents Cup teams—both captained by Nicklaus—and on the winning 2008 Ryder Cup team that triumphed at the Nicklaus-designed Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville. That week was the highlight of his career; earning a berth in his only Ryder Cup was made possible by his two-stroke victory three months earlier at Muirfield Village. Coupled with that was the fact that Perry beat Henrik Stenson to help

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE

go into a sudden-death playoff.

the first extra hole after Irwin hooked his tee shot into the trees at the par-5 15th, Perry needed a few more years to truly establish himself as a regular contender. “I’m a slow learner,” he jokes. “[But] to be able to survive 30 years out here, competitively and not lose my card, I’m very proud of that.” The amiable Perry, who was born in Elizabethtown, Ky., and now lives in Franklin, has many reasons to be proud. He won 14 times on the PGA TOUR, and 11 of those came after he turned 40, when his kids had grown and he was more focused on his career. That period included his second and third Memorial titles in 2005 and ’08, the latter making him the

MEM16_1991_RETROSPECTIVE_5.indd 122

5/5/16 11:03 PM


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RETROSPECTIVE: 1991 MEMORIAL

“I WOULDN’T CHANGE A THING. I’M NOT GOING TO SACRIFICE MY CHILDREN FOR THE HALL OF FAME. FOR ME, MY FAMILY WAS THE NO. 1 THING IN MY LIFE.”

THE 1991 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT FINAL RESULTS

1

Kenny Perry

70

63

69

71

273

$216,000

2

Hale Irwin

73

69

65

66

273

$129,600

3

Corey Pavin

66

71

67

71

275

$81,600

4

Mike Hulbert

73

67

72

67

279

$52,800

Craig Stadler

71

70

70

68

279

$52,800

Ian Baker-Finch

69

73

69

69

280

$41,700

6

Chip Beck

70

66

74

70

280

$41,700

8

Larry Mize

72

69

73

67

281

$30,000

David Frost

69

71

73

68

281

$30,000

John Cook

72

72

69

68

281

$30,000

Jay Don Blake

69

71

72

69

281

$30,000

Andy Bean

69

69

72

71

281

$30,000

Doug Tewell

69

69

72

71

281

$30,000

Ted Schulz

69

71

67

74

281

$30,000

15

Fuzzy Zoeller

68

69

75

70

282

$20,400

Tom Watson

68

73

70

71

282

$20,400

Jack Nicklaus

71

68

69

74

282

$20,400

18

Scott Simpson

76

71

71

65

283

$16,800

Billy Andrade

69

71

71

72

283

$16,800

Dave Rummells

67

74

68

74

283

$16,800

Steve Pate

69

75

72

68

284

$13,920

John Huston

74

69

70

71

284

$13,920

23

Bob Tway

69

70

74

72

285

$11,040

Fred Funk

76

68

69

72

285

$11,040

Tom Purtzer

71

69

71

74

285

$11,040

Curtis Strange

80

70

73

223

$10,000

21

124

T H E M E M O R I AL

PERRY

Team USA win back the cup in his home state. Of course, by then he was an established winner. In the 16th edition of the Memorial, in 1991, he was still grinding out a living when he shot 15-under-par 273, highlighted by a Tournament-record 63 in the second round that included an ace at the par-3 16th hole. Irwin, who won the 1983 and ’85 Memorials and lost to Roger Maltbie in a playoff in the inaugural event in 1976, nearly spoiled Perry’s party when he shot 65-66 on the weekend to catch him at the tape. But his poor drive in the playoff was his undoing, and Perry became the second player (after Keith Fergus in 1981) to earn his maiden TOUR victory at the Memorial Tournament. A collector—and sometime racer—of muscle cars and other vintage automobiles, Perry is content now to concentrate on PGA TOUR Champions competition. Among his eight senior victories are three majors, including the 2013 U.S. Senior Open, a bit of a salve for the disappointment of two near misses in majors. He painfully lost a playoff to Mark Brooks in the 1996 PGA Championship at Valhalla and another playoff in the 2009 Masters to Angel Cabrera when he was 49 years old. He doesn’t dwell on those disappointments—or the fact that he didn’t put as much into his golf in his prime because of his devotion to family. He still enjoyed the ride. “I wouldn’t change a thing,” he says firmly. “I’m not going to sacrifice my children for the Hall of Fame. For me, my family was the No. 1 thing in my life. If I needed to take some weeks off and spend time at home with the family, that’s what I was going to do.” His future plans are simple. “Rest, relaxation, go to the lake house, do whatever,” he says. “Yeah, I just want to sail away off into the sunset; that’s kind of what I’m after.” MT Author and award-winning writer David Shedloski is editorial director of The Memorial.

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE

—KENNY


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THE

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MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB COURSE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM MANDEVILLE TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 129

129

5/2/16 9:58 PM


JONES TOPSOIL_TEMPLATE_Layout 1 4/25/14 12:41 PM Page 1

ย‰ย”ย‡ย‡ยย‡ย”ยŽยƒย™ ย™ยย•วกย„ย”ย‹ย‰ยŠย–ย‡ย”ฦชย‘ย™ย‡ย”ย•วก ย‘ยย‡ย•ย‘ ย‘ย’ย•ย‘ย‹ ย‘ ยŽย„ย”ย‹ยย‰ย•ย‹ย–ยŠย‘ยย‡ย–ย‘ย›ย‘ย— อ•-อœ อ•-อœอ”อ”-    วค


HOLE 1 PAR 4 YARDS 470 A SLIGHT DOGLEG RIGHT FROM AN ELEVATED TEE to

a wide fairway, which slopes from right to left. Bunkers in the driving area can catch a sliced or pushed drive, and a hook or pull might find a creek threading through the woods that line the left side of the hole. The green is the largest on the course, with four bunkers guarding it at left, right and rear. H O L E 2015

4.060

AVG SCORE

7TH

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.129

AVG SCORE

8TH

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 131

131

5/2/16 9:49 PM


FAN FM_TEMPLATE.qxp_Layout 1 4/9/14 11:30 AM Page 1

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HOLE 2 PAR 4 YARDS 455 A CREEK FLANKS THE ENTIRE RIGHT SIDE of the hole from

100 yards out and abuts the right edge and rear of the green, but challenging the right side of the fairway is the best play because trees impede the approach from a drive hit too far left, and the green is bunkered at front right and rear left. Accuracy is at a premium on one of the tougher par 4s. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

3.990 11TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.175

AVG SCORE

2ND

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 133

133

5/2/16 9:49 PM


HOLE 3 PAR 4 YARDS 401 A DOWNHILL DRIVE to a generous fairway, then an

approach over a lake to a small, two-tiered green cut into a hillside. A drive too far left might find a creek running along the woods line, leaving nowhere to drop that permits a clear shot to the green. Water awaits the weak approach and sand the over-bold shot. One of Muirfield Village Golf Club’s most scenically spectacular holes and tougher than it looks. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

3.969 12TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.066 14TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 135

135

5/3/16 7:46 PM


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HOLE 4 PAR 3 YARDS 200 THIS FIRST OF THE FOUR par 3s slopes gently down-

hill to a long, narrow, heavily bunkered green cut into a hillside. The disaster area is the depression left of the green. Rolling hillsides framing the entire right side of the hole offer ideal viewing areas for spectators. A strong test of medium- to long-iron play. H O L E 2015

3.152

AVG SCORE

4TH

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

3.167

AVG SCORE

3RD

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 137

137

5/2/16 9:50 PM


HOLE 5 PAR 5 YARDS 527 DOWNHILL AGAIN from the tee, between wooded

hillsides to a wide, level fairway. Some 300 yards out, a creek bordering the left side of the hole swings into the fairway, which it then bisects all the way to the green. The creek finally becomes a moat around the entire left side of the green, which is bunkered at right and left rear. The green is small and one of the most undulating on the course. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

4.677 16TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.753 17TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 139

139

5/2/16 9:50 PM


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HOLE 6 PAR 4 YARDS 447 A CLUSTER OF BUNKERS cut into the left hill-

side and a strategically placed fairway bunker to the right puts a premium on the tee shot. The ideal line is the left-center of the fairway, leaving a clear shot over water and sand to a medium-size green. A challenging hole that can require a long-iron or even a metalwood second shot when it plays against the wind. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

3.966 13TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.096 12TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 141

141

5/2/16 9:50 PM


HOLE 7 PAR 5 YARDS 563 AN EXPOSED, ELEVATED, bunker-lined, double-dogleg

hole, reachable in two by only the longest hitters. A roughgrassed swale sweeps in from the right side across in front of the green. Bunkers guard the front left, right and rear right of the putting surface, which breaks severely off to the left towards a wooded ravine. Not an easy hole to birdie, but the farther left the conservative player is on his second shot, the easier his third becomes. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

4.651 17TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.779 16TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 143

143

5/2/16 9:50 PM


BMW Financial Services proudly supports the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide.

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HOLE 8 PAR 3 YARDS 185 BACK TO WOODED COUNTRY, this time dogwood, beech

and hickory trees almost completely surround the shortest of the par-3 holes. The tee shot is appealingly downhill, but the plateau green is almost entirely surrounded by sand, including a pot bunker guarding the back left. The valley between tee and green adds to the difficulty of club selection by making the hole look longer than it is. H O L E 2015

3.010

AVG SCORE

9TH

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

3.082 13TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 145

145

5/2/16 9:51 PM


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HOLE 9 PAR 4 YARDS 412 ONE OF MUIRFIELD VILLAGE’S most challenging driv-

ing holes. Too far right from the tee and trees block the approach. Too far left and a steep, wooded hillside threatens even more serious trouble. The tilted green is spectacularly framed by a lake, a creek and a bold hillside and must often be approached from an angled lie, even off a good drive. A strong par 4 demanding courage and finesse from tee to cup. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

3.945 14TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.109 11TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 147

147

5/2/16 9:51 PM


Presentation is everything. Verso’s portfolio of printing and specialty papers helps customers present their brands at the highest level. When every shot matters, Verso is there to help you tee it up. Visit versoco.com to learn more about our broad offering of printing and specialty papers that fits any project, from direct mail and printed marketing communications to labels and packaging, plus our consistent high level service, shot after shot.

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HOLE 10 PAR 4 YARDS 471 COMPARATIVELY OPEN terrain and, along with the 15th

hole, one of only two uphill drives at Muirfield Village. Sand guards both sides of the driving zone and a large, many-ďŹ ngered bunker fronting the green threatens the under-hit approach. A rugged hole demanding both power and precision, and one of the toughest par 4s on the second nine, especially when played into the wind. H O L E 2015

4.226

AVG SCORE

2ND

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.157

AVG SCORE

4TH

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 149

149

5/2/16 9:51 PM


THE PERFECT POST TOURNAMENT HANGOUT IS CLOSER THAN YOU THINK!

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HOLE 11 PAR5 YARDS 567 RUNNING THE LENGTH of a lovely valley between high,

wooded hills, this hole is the arena for a huge amphitheater capable of accommodating a great many spectators. The drive is enticingly downhill to a wide fairway, but a creek cuts diagonally across the fairway at about 320 yards from the tee, then hugs it on the right before swinging left again in front of the small, elevated green. An inviting hole to gamble on, but two perfect shots are necessary to get home. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

4.803 15TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.906 15TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 151

151

5/2/16 9:52 PM


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HOLE 12 PAR3 YARDS 184 MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB’S favorite hole among

photographers features the course’s largest lake. The tee shot is played from a wooded hillside entirely across water to a two-tiered, kidney-shaped green cut into another hillside and set diagonally to the line of play. Bunkers flank the right front and rear left of the green. Miss it and the ball will generally find either sand or water. H O L E 2015

3.100

AVG SCORE

6TH

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

3.142

AVG SCORE

7TH

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 153

153

5/2/16 9:52 PM


FRESH STYLES FOR THE 19TH HOLE!

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HOLE 13 PAR4 YARDS 455 THE DRIVE IS DOWNHILL to level ground, through a

wooded chute to a narrow but normally fast-running and gently curving fairway. Finding the right half of the fairway sets up the best angle into the long and narrow green, which runs away from the player. Bunkers stretching almost the full length of the green on either side demand a precise approach shot, generally with a mid- to long-iron. H O L E 2015

4.021

AVG SCORE

8TH

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.117 10TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 155

155

5/2/16 9:52 PM


2016_mem_tourn_ad_outlines.indd 1

5/2/16 11:36 AM


HOLE 14 PAR4 YARDS 363 ANOTHER DOWNHILL TEE SHOT, once again into a wide,

tree-lined valley. About 245 yards from the championship tee, a creek emerges from the left woods to border the fairway for some 40 yards before angling across it and then on down to flank the right side of the green. The green is long and narrow and heavily guarded left by several bunkers. A definite birdie opportunity, but only for the very accurate player. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

4.008 10TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.124

AVG SCORE

9TH

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 157

157

5/2/16 9:53 PM


FULL PAGE AD TEMPLATE 15 FINAL.qxp_Layout 1 4/30/15 11:12 AM Page 1


HOLE 15 PAR5 YARDS 529 AN INTRIGUING PAR 5 cut arrow-straight through the

heart of a forest. The ideal drive is to the crest of the hill, from where the long hitter should be trying to get home in two. Thwarting him will be the steep slope fronting the green, a couple of deep bunkers and the small size of the target—not to mention the trees crowding in left and right. There will be many birdies here, but there also will be some disasters. H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2015

4.617 18TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.688 18TH

AVG SCORE

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 159

159

5/2/16 9:53 PM


Buy Phil’s blue hat and make a difference On the course and in the community, Phil Mickelson stands out. Now you can own the same blue hat he wears on Tour. But this is also an opportunity to make a difference. Because when you buy a hat, KPMG will make a donation to First Book to help put new books in the hands of children in need. Which means wearing Phil’s blue hat not only makes you look good. It makes you feel good. We invite you to join us. To see how you can help, visit PhilsBlueHat.com Follow us @MickelsonHat

For one year, beginning April 1, 2016, KPMG will donate 100% of the net proceeds ($7.50) from each hat to First Book, with a guaranteed contribution of $50,000, enabling the donation of three books to children in need for each hat. © 2016 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International.


HOLE 16 PAR3 YARDS 201 A FINE PAR 3 IS NOW an even better and more visually in-

timidating hole and already has produced added excitement. Redesigned in 2010 with The Presidents Cup in mind, this hole now features a pond guarding the length of the green on the left. The putting surface also is smaller and turned more horizontally to the teeing ground. A front hole location is very difficult sitting between the water and two bunkers. H O L E 2015

3.186

AVG SCORE

3RD

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

3.147

AVG SCORE

6TH

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 161

161

5/2/16 9:53 PM


Find a new favorite.

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HOLE 17 PAR4 YARDS 478 STRETCHING 478 YARDS, this strong hole offers

a stiff test off the tee. Twenty yards separate two bunkers midway up the fairway, leaving a mid- or short-iron to the green. A lay-up off the tee leaves a mid-iron, or, depending on the wind, a long-iron approach. The green itself is slightly elevated with bunkers along the right and back left. An approach to the left side of the green allows for an easier putt. H O L E 2015

4.115

AVG SCORE

5TH

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.157

AVG SCORE

4TH

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 163

163

5/2/16 9:53 PM


We’re up to speed, so you can go full speed. SEE CHALLENGES BEFORE THEY’RE CHALLENGING. To make confident decisions about the future, middle market leaders need a different kind of advisor. One who starts by understanding where you want to go and then brings the ideas and insights of an experienced global team to help get you there. Experience the power of being understood. Experience RSM. rsm us.com

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HOLE18 PAR4 YARDS 484 AN INVITING DOWNHILL drive leads to an ample fairway,

though bunkers threaten at the corner of the dogleg to the right. A long drive hit too far left can find the creek threading the tree line or can be blocked by a cluster of black walnut trees. The approach is uphill across a swale to a large two-tiered green bunkered at front left, front right, left and rear right. A spectacular finishing hole capable of accommodating more than 20,000 spectators. H O L E 2015

4.241

AVG SCORE

1ST

S T A T I S T I C S

DIFFICULTY

1976-2015

4.241

AVG SCORE

1ST

DIFFICULTY TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM 16_HOLE BY HOLE_4.indd 165

165

5/2/16 9:54 PM


.

12 11

. 13

.

.

15

. .

.

10

14

16 17

. 9

. 18

Par and Yardage

.

Hole Par Yardage Hole Par Yardage

1 4 470 10 4 2 4 455 11 5 3 4 401 12 3 4 3 200 13 4 5 5 527 14 4 6 4 447 15 5 7 5 563 16 3 8 3 185 17 4 9 4 412 18 4 Out 36 3,660 In 36 72

471 567 184 455 363 529 201 478 484 3,732 7,392­

166 THE MEMORIAL

MEM16_COURSE MAP.indd 166

5/6/16 9:37 AM


. 6

5

7

.

.

8

.

2

9

. . 4

1

. . 3

TH E M EM O R IA L

MEM16_COURSE MAP.indd 167

167

5/6/16 9:38 AM


E N J O Y

O U R

Where your neighborhood eats, drinks and laughs! Call ahead seating available. Great kid’s menu! Gluten-free Friendly Menu Available. RUSTY BUCKET RESTAURANT AND TAVERN 10 Columbus Locations DUBLIN

Two miles south of Muirfield at Avery Road & Route 33/161 Turn east into the Giant Eagle Center (614) 889-2594 BEXLEY CLINTONVILLE EASTON TOWN CENTER GAHANNA HILLIARD NEW ALBANY UPPER ARLINGTON WESTERVILLE WORTHINGTON

HAPPY HOUR Join us for the Happiest Hours at the Bucket! Monday–Friday 3–6 p.m. in our Bar $1.00 off all draft beer & wines by the glass $8.00 handcrafted artisan pizza

T O U R N A M E N T !

Dublin’s only authentic Irish Pub Built in Ireland & located in the Dublin historic district. GREAT PATIO & LIVE MUSIC! Join us on our patio or on any of three levels enjoy the best selection of draft & craft beers in Dublin Menu Favorites chips & garlic sauce bacon fried almonds rippin’ hot wings hand smashed guacamole pulled pork tater-tots Irish egg-rolls w/Guinness mustard Atlantic cod fish & chips California grilled lemon-salmon salad buffalo chicken wedge salad bourbon barrel mushroom burger grilled cheese w/pears & walnut pesto Come Early to Where Your Friends Hangout & Stay Late! BRAZENHEAD DUBLIN 56 N. High Street (614) 792-3738 Visit hdrestaurants.com for more information.

Voted best sushi, four stars— The Columbus Dispatch SUSHI EN Shrimp tempura, eel, cream cheese, asparagus and cucumber with spicy sauce. CATERPILLAR

Spicy tuna roll wrapped in thin slices of avocado topped with masako. SPIDER

Soft shell crab, asparagus, crab and cucumber with spicy Japanese mayo. FIESTA

Shrimp tempura, crab and jalapeno peppers with tenkatsu. CHERRY BLOSSOM

California roll wrapped in fresh yellow fin tuna and topped with spicy crab salad. HURRICANE

Extra-Spicy baked salmon, king crab meat and tenkatsu.

Visit myrustybucket.com for hours, menus & directions!

And, if you’re looking for a place for your next meeting or event, go to makeitcolumbus.com. Our free services help with that, too. EXPERIENCE COLUMBUS (614) 221-6623

FIGLIO 3712 Riverside Drive (614) 459-6560 & 1369 Grandview Avenue (614) 481-8850

SAMURAI

SUSHI EN 1051 Gemini Place, Columbus (614) 430-9887 sushi-en.com

Welcome to the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. For help finding great places to eat, see and be seen, find us on Twitter @expcols or visit experiencecolumbus.com.

Enjoy fine wine, salads, entrées and desserts on our patio or dining room for dinner six nights a week at 5 p.m.

Eel, cucumber, avocado and cream cheese lightly battered and deep fried, served with assorted roe and eel sauce. Plus varieties of tempura, teriyaki, noodles and Korean dishes.

PRIVATE DINING

Private dining rooms available at select locations

“Pizza and pasta heaven otherwise known as Figlio” – The Columbus Dispatch Voted “Best Gourmet Pizza” – Columbus Monthly “This is a major pasta restaurant… …passion and excitement in food” – The Columbus Dispatch

Take a break from the Memorial Tournament and stop by Cucinova to create your very own custom pizza, pasta or salad for just $7.99. With toppings like hand-rolled meatballs, made from scratch pizza dough and roasted mushrooms – you can create a new masterpiece every day of the Tournament! Skip the line and order online at Cucinova.com. Open Daily at 11 a.m. CUCINOVA 7721 Sawmill Road Dublin, OH 43016 (614) 943-4111

WEEKLY LINE-UP Happy Hour Monday through Friday from 4 – 7 p.m. enjoy $1 off beer, $4 glasses & $10 bottles of house wine, $6 specialty cocktails, $6 small plates, and $10 pizzas. Tuesday: Retail Wine Night Come unwind with a bottle of wine. State minimum prices all night on most of our 180 labels! Wednesday: Live Music Come sing along and smile to great live music in the bar area from 6 – 9 p.m. Thursday: Extended Happy Hour Food & drink specials extended to 9 p.m. in the bar area. PRIVATE DINING Host your gathering in our beautiful private dining room. Please visit us online or call for details and availability. MEZZO 12 W. Bridge Street, Dublin (614) 889-6100 MezzoDublin.com


E N J O Y

O U R

T O W N !

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All Bruegger’s Bagels bakeries make bagels fresh all day in the century-old authentic New York-style, first kettle boiling and then baking them in a stone hearth oven for a soft, chewy inside with a crispy golden brown exterior. Stop in and experience a tradition you can taste!

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Menu Favorites always fresh specials buffalo oyster tostadas, blue cheese Thai calamari, peanuts, lime, cilantro steak sticks, peppercorn horseradish kale caesar, romano bread crumbs walleye & crab sauce scallops & caper brown butter crispy salmon, shrimp fried rice rare tuna w/wasabi mash veal & shiitake mushrooms filet w/stilton blue cheese 40 day ribeye and hot onions baby back ribs, jalapeno slaw daily vegan menu selection Don’t miss the best food in Dublin Reservations accepted Open lunch & dinner OSCARS RESTAURANT & BAR 84 North High St, Dublin (614)792-3424

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the Biggest Year for golf’s “Mr. Everything” In 1966, professional victories, personal hardships, and all things in between went a long way toward shaping the future of The Golden Bear B Y

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that contributed more than any other to shaping, in tandem, the life and career of Jack Nicklaus and molding his future ambitions, it was 1966. Some might argue that it was 1950, when he began learning the game under the tutelage of Jack Grout at Scioto Country Club. Or 1959, perhaps, when he captured his first national championship, the U.S. Amateur. Or 1960, when he proved both lucky and good by convincing the effervescent Barbara Jean Bash to marry him. Or 1962, when he won his first of 18 professional majors at the U.S. Open at Oakmont. F EVER THERE WAS A YEAR

One highlight early in the year 1966 was Jack’s back-to-back win at the Masters in April.

But no. Nothing was quite like the season of ’66. Nothing. Nearly the entire span of the calendar was consequential and impactful, and not solely because of what happened on the golf course. In fact, it could be argued that events off the course turned out to be far more meaningful. Nonetheless, having said that, two epic victories that year remain prominent in framing his status as one of the great champions in history, and they helped firmly establish him as the golfer to beat in the next 40-plus major championships. In April, as the 4-1 favorite, Nicklaus won his third Masters and became the first man to win the green jacket in consecutive years.

And in July, on a course set up to penalize his conspicuous length advantage, the Golden Bear, a 7-2 favorite this time, steered irons between the framing thigh-high rough at venerable Muirfield, in Gullane, Scotland, for his first Open Championship conquest and the completion of the career grand slam. He was only 26 years old. And he owned the competitive golfing world, even with Arnold Palmer still such an almighty celebrity presence and contender and the likes of Gary Player and Billy Casper a threat at every major. But Nicklaus that year truly had blossomed into a complete golfer. More on that later. However, as previously asserted, there was much more that occurred 50 years ago, events of unquestioned significance: • Jack earned his PGA membership, making him eligible—finally—for the U.S. Ryder Cup team. And few have ever impacted the Ryder Cup more than Nicklaus eventually did; • An idea that had been percolating for more than a year—to start his own PGA TOUR event in Columbus —he began to make a reality with the help of good friend Ivor Young; • He first contemplated retirement from competitive golf, feeling that he was meant for more than just “chasing a small white ball around a big green field.” He’d be proven right; • He got his first taste of golf course design thanks to fellow Ohioan Pete Dye, paving the way for a second career perhaps more prolific than his first; • A terrifying family health emergency shaped his and Barbara’s charitable philosophy. Meanwhile, an encounter with unspeakable heartbreak also inspired them to respond with a gesture of remembrance and giving; • Finally, Jack and Barbara moved the family’s primary residence from Columbus, Ohio, to North Palm Beach, Fla., largely for the sake of their children’s educational stability. “I was still a relatively young person at the time, so taken as a whole I suppose these were things that were going to make some impression on me,” says Nicklaus when reminded of the full array of life experiences he encountered that year. “Were there challenges? I would say there

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winner on tour for the second straight year with $152,246.88 in earnings, Nicklaus couldn’t escape being the indisputable favorite at every event he entered. The newspaper headlines that year reflected his dominant status: “Nicklaus Top Choice in Citrus Open” “Jack Nicklaus Is Man To Beat In Greater Jacksonville Open” “Nicklaus Cast in Role of Masters Favorite” “Jack Ruled Favorite in U.S. Open Tournament” “Nicklaus 7-2 Favorite at Muirfield”

“YOU DON’T THINK ABOUT ALL THE THINGS THAT YOU ENCOUNTER IN A SET PERIOD OF TIME LIKE THAT, BUT WHEN I LOOK AT ALL OF THE DIFFERENT THINGS GOING ON, MY FIRST THOUGHT IS, HOW DID WE REALLY GET THROUGH IT ALL?” —BARBARA

Jack, called “Mr. Golf” in one newspaper report at that time, hits out of the natural sand trap of the beach in the Bing Crosby National Pro-Am Tournament in Pebble Beach.

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were. But everyone is going to face challenges. It was certainly a time when my golf was good, but golf wasn’t the only thing going on.” “At that point in our lives we were just two young kids raising a young family and doing the best we could,” Barbara adds. “You don’t think about all the things that you encounter in a set period of time like that, but when I look at all of the different things going on, my first thought is, how did we really get through it all? And secondly, it really was a year that had an impact on us in a lot of different ways—and still has an impact on us.” Because he had won his second Masters title in 1965 with a tournament record 17-under 271 total and had been the leading money

“Mr. Golf Enters Crosby Pro-Am,” read the January 20 headline from a United Press International story that began: “Jack Nicklaus, golf’s Mr. Everything, makes his first and only appearance on the western winter tour today in the opening round of the $104,500 Bing Crosby National pro-amateur tournament.” In another story leading up to the start of the British Open at Muirfield, where Nicklaus practiced for six days ahead of tournament week, the Golden Bear was referred to as “the blonde master.” And another moniker was “the golden power man of professional golf.” And so it went. In the month before his Masters defense, Nicklaus made his first trip to South Africa to face his friend Player in a six-day, 108-hole challenge match for $50,000. He took Barbara and their parents and enjoyed the sojourn immensely, despite the fact that Player ended up winning the Challenge of the Champions by 14 strokes. But the Golden Bear’s appearance was of such significance that on March 8 wire stories even reported his departure from Johannesburg. Prior to his journey abroad, Nicklaus spent five days in San Antonio at the PGA of America business school. His attendance gave him a year’s credit towards his five-year apprenticeship needed to become a Class A PGA member, which he officially earned on March 30, thus making him eligible for the U.S. Ryder Cup team. He wouldn’t debut in the biennial competition, however, until 1969. Nicklaus would go 17-8-3 in the Ryder Cup and captain the U.S. team twice, winning in 1983 at PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens and losing in 1987 at Muirfield Village when his U.S. squad fell to a powerful European contingent

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1966

that included Seve Ballesteros, Nick Faldo and Bernhard Langer. Mind you, it was a European Team made possible by Nicklaus’ plea to Lord Derby and the British PGA in 1977 to include players from continental Europe to make the Ryder Cup more competitive. Mission accomplished there. And in his 1969 debut at Royal Birkdale, Nicklaus conceded a 2-foot putt to Tony Jacklin to halve their final singles match, which resulted in the first tie in the event’s history. His gesture is considered one of the greatest acts of sportsmanship in the game’s history. Above, below and overlay:

     

Jack referred to his third Masters, where he set a record for the first to win consecutively,

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as “winning at its hardest.”

NICKLAUS HAS REFERRED to his 1966 Masters victory as “winning at its hardest.” It was that and more. A bit unsteady with his vaunted power game after breaking his driver in South Africa, Nicklaus nonetheless exuded confidence heading into the

30th Masters, just as he had for many years, regardless of his form. “I always felt that Augusta set up well for me,” the six-time champion says. “I didn’t expect to win, but I felt like if I did the right things I would give myself a good chance every time.” On the eve of the tournament, Nicklaus had gone to bed in good spirits. Earlier that evening he had engaged Young in a conversation about finding suitable land in Columbus to build a golf course. Nicklaus had been contemplating starting his own tournament in his hometown that might in many ways emulate the Masters, and after having witnessed the success of the 1964 PGA Championship at Columbus Country Club, he was certain that the city would support an annual PGA TOUR event. Young had his marching orders. The first seed of Muirfield Village Golf Club was planted. The Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, has been one of the premiere events in all of golf since its inception. The following day, Nicklaus played his opening Masters round in agony. Barbara had awoken him in the early morning hours with horrific news; one of his closest friends from Columbus, attorney Bob Barton, had perished

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1966

“I’VE BLOWN THREE CHANCES TO WIN THIS TOURNAMENT. I DON’T INTEND TO BLOW ANOTHER.”

Jack almost withdrew from the 1966 Masters after learning one of his closest friends, Bob Barton, had died.

in a plane crash with his wife and another couple on their way to Augusta. Barton’s black and white Beechcraft that he was piloting had gone down near Johnson City, Tenn., after he radioed that an engine had iced up. A fine amateur golfer, Barton, 33, had won the club championship at Scioto Country Club in 1965. He recently had accompanied Nicklaus on a hunting trip. Also perishing were his wife Linda and friends James and Jeretta Long. Nicklaus’ immediate reaction was to withdraw, but when speaking with Barton’s sister, 178

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Margie, she exhorted Jack to play in her brother’s honor. Inspired by that notion, though admitting to being “sick to my stomach” all during the round, Jack opened with a 4-under-par 68 to take a three-shot lead in cool, damp and windy conditions. “I am determined to play well for him,” Nicklaus said of his friend. The lingering affects of the shocking news and a much more difficult course setup—cool weather, firm greens and overseeded fairways that slowed down tee shots—conspired to bring Nicklaus back to the pack and make it a battle to the wire. And beyond. A second-round 76 that included a trio of three-putts resulted in his worst score in 22 Masters rounds and threw the tournament wide open. He trailed Paul Harney and Peter Butler by a stroke, while Palmer, with a 70, joined Nicklaus at 144. Twenty-seven players stood five strokes apart. More struggles ensued in the third round as Nicklaus forged ahead by four shots through 10 holes only to struggle coming home. A double-bogey at the 12th sent him on the way to a 72, but he still held a share of the 54-hole lead with Tommy Jacobs. “We’re all just choking up in a tournament nobody wants to win,” Nicklaus said after posting 216, then the highest 54-hole score to lead in the Masters. “Or I guess everybody wants to win so badly they can’t put a game together.” Another 72 resulted in a three-way tie with Jacobs and Gay Brewer, and the necessity for an 18-hole Monday playoff. Said Nicklaus after his 25-foot birdie putt at the last missed by inches for the victory: “I’ve blown three chances to win this tournament. I don’t intend to blow another.” With four birdies offsetting two bogeys, Nicklaus was as good as his word, firing a 70 to beat Jacobs by two and Brewer by six. He became the first man to place the green jacket on himself. A little more than two years later, on Oct. 30, 1968, Nicklaus established a scholarship in the College of Law at Ohio State University in the name of Robert K. Barton. His only stipulation was that the recipient should have an active interest in golf.

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—JACK


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1966

Above: Jack had hoped to follow

     

up his Masters victory with his second major of the year at the U.S. Open at Olympic Club, but it was not meant to be. Above right: Jack closed out 1966 by winning the PGA National Team Championship with Arnold Palmer, an event famed for being the world’s richest golf tournament at that time.

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IF THE MASTERS and the sad events around it weren’t difficult enough, there were further tribulations Jack and Barbara had to weather. As Nicklaus wrote in My Story, other personal struggles ensued: “The tragic deaths of the Bartons and the Longs … began the first period in our lives where Barbara and I had to face and deal with the emotional stress that mortality and illness among family and friends creates. Within a matter of weeks, one of Barb’s uncles dies suddenly of a heart attack, Steve had to be rushed to the hospital for an emergency tonsillectomy, and we were deeply concerned that Jackie would need major surgery on both legs to

correct a toeing-in problem that special shoes did not seem to help. Then our baby daughter began choking and passing out, which the doctors discovered had been caused by her inhaling a piece of crayon. Delicate surgery was necessary, a bronchoscopy, following which she contracted pneumonia and, during the week of the U.S. Open, became seriously ill. As she was beginning to recover, my dad was ordered into the hospital for abdominal surgery.” It was the traumatic experience of Nan’s health scare that inspired Jack and Barbara to pledge assistance, both materially and personally, to children and their health care needs, which is why Nationwide Children’s Hospital has been the primary beneficiary of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide since its inception. Worth noting is that when the first Columbus Pro-Am was staged at Scioto Country Club in

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AFTER A DISAPPOINTING FINISH IN THE U.S. OPEN AT OLYMPIC CLUB... NICKLAUS SET HIS SIGHTS ON THE ONE CHAMPIONSHIP THAT HAD ELUDED HIM.

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1966

“UNTIL THIS WEEK I BELIEVED THAT GOLF WAS A COMBINATION OF LENGTH AND ACCURACY. THIS WEEK IT HAS BEEN ACCURACY WITH LITTLE ADVANTAGE IN BANGING THE BALL A LONG WAY.” —JACK

NICKLAUS

1966, it was co-sponsored by Columbus Children’s Hospital as well as The Columbus Dispatch. The Columbus Pro-Am was the forerunner of the Memorial Tournament, with the 1975 edition held at Muirfield Village as the rehearsal for the debut of the Memorial in 1976. And the Nicklauses not only have continued their personal cause of children’s health care, both in Columbus and in their adopted Florida home, but have continued to strengthen and grow their commitment via the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation.

Nan’s health had been a source of constant worry, but she was on the mend when Jack left a week before the 106th Open Championship. He headed first for a televised match against Peter Alliss at Wentworth, and then on to Scotland and the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers at Muirfield, scene of his debut in the British Isles as a member of the 1959 Walker Cup team. But when he arrived, Nicklaus hardly recognized the course, which featured rough that had grown past knee high lining narrow fairways. “A hay field,” is how Nicklaus remembers it. This meant a complete readjustment of his strategy for the championship. His advantage with the driver nullified, he settled on a game plan heavy on the use of irons to ensure he avoided the rough. This required discipline. On only one hole, the 516-yard par-5 16th, did Nicklaus hit driver

      Below and right: Jack returned to Muirfield, in Gullane, Scotland, the site of his 1959 Walker Cup appearance, to win his first of three British Open

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championships.

AFTER A DISAPPOINTING FINISH in the U.S. Open at Olympic Club, where he battled within a stroke of leader Casper after 54 holes before a sloppy final-round 74 ended that year’s grand slam bid, Nicklaus set his sights on the one championship that had eluded him.

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1966

“HE’S NOW ONE OF THE WORLD’S GREATEST GOLFERS AND IS DESTINED TO CARRY ON WINNING MAJOR TITLES, FOR UNDER PRESSURE HE IS QUITE SUPERB.” —SIR

With his win at the 1966 British Open, Jack became the fourth, and youngest, golfer to complete the career grand slam and the only one to have won the four majors and the U.S.

COTTON

all four days. On the other two par-5s, the ninth and 17th, he never once used driver. In his final two practice rounds, Nicklaus, one of just 10 Americans in a field of 130 golfers, toured Muirfield in handsome scores of 67 and 68 employing his more conservative game plan. Player joined him both days, and on the eve of the championship the two men squared off in a match against a pair of teenagers, Bobby Cole of South Africa, who was also the British Amateur champion, and Peter Townsend of England. Jack made six straight 3s en route to he and Player winning the match, 2 and 1. Jack was ready for the championship, as one newspaper wrote, “so that the British Open will not become the jinx for him that the U.S. Open has always been for Sam Snead.” He immediately set the tone with a 1-under 70 that gave him a share of the lead with British Ryder Cup player Jimmy Hitchcock, but the most

JACK NICKLAUS MUSEUM

Amateur championship.

HENRY

important stroke was his very last one, a 20-footer for a huge par save. A second-round 4-under 67, thanks to birdies on two of the last three holes, gave him a one-stroke lead over England’s Peter Butler, while Phil Rodgers, Harold Henning and 1960 winner Kel Nagle were three behind at the halfway mark. Just like the Masters, however, things got dicey. With an inward 39 in the third round, Nicklaus slipped to a 75, and his 212 total trailed Rodgers by two strokes after Rodgers shot a “weird tennis score” of 40-30. The Golden Bear seemed to right the ship in his opening nine of the final round, played on a Saturday, going out in 33 for a two-stroke lead. But when he missed a 15-inch par putt at 11, sweaty palms time resumed. He followed with bogeys at 13 and 14. “That’s when I decided I’d better start playing golf again,” he says. Newly determined, he toured the final four holes in 1 under, with a two-putt birdie from 15 feet at the par-5 17th the decider. His 2-under 282 total was two strokes better than Doug Sanders and Welshman Dave Thomas. In the aftermath, Nicklaus offered an observation that resonates to this day. “Until this week I believed that golf was a combination of length and accuracy,” he told reporters. “This week it has been accuracy with little advantage in banging the ball a long way.” More recently, the Golden Bear admitted that there was a transformation in his game, saying: “In the ’60s, I won with power. In the ’70s, I became a better golfer.”

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Jack and Pete Dye (far right) joined forces to create Harbour Town Golf Links in Hilton Head, S.C., spawning a second career for Nicklaus that has been as successful as his competitive golfing career.

Shirley Povich of the Washington Post took note, writing, “It may seem odd to suggest that a fellow who has won as many major tournaments as Nicklaus is showing signs of maturity as a golfer, but there was indeed evidence of it in the manner he won the British Open.” Sir Henry Cotton, the British great, submitting his report of the championship for the London News of the World, made this assessment of the new Champion Golfer of the Year: “He’s now one of the world’s greatest golfers and is destined to carry on winning major titles, for under pressure he is quite superb.” Nicklaus, the fourth and youngest to complete the career slam, said that is exactly what he intended to do. “I’ll try for all the major titles again,” he said. “This victory, although it does not carry a big prize [first place paid a paltry $5,800 compared to $20,000 for his Masters win], means a great deal to me.” But as Povich pointed out, Nicklaus made history as the first man to win the four professional majors and the U.S. Amateur, “the five biggest diadems in golf.” For that, Povich wrote, “Nicklaus stands in solo grandeur,” and confirmed that not only does he “belong among the titans Walter Hagen, Bobby Jones, Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Sam Snead and Harry Vardon … but perhaps he was just a bit ahead of them all.” He always seemed to be ahead of things.       ONE HAS TO WONDER if Jack Nicklaus isn’t

clairvoyant. Upon winning his third Masters and fifth major, he took the opportunity to muse about his future.

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“I’m interested in building new courses and remodeling old ones,” he said in the immediate aftermath, draped in his green jacket. “I don’t expect to get so involved that it interferes with my playing golf. Naturally, if I hope to spend some time as a golf course architect I’ll have to cut down a bit on my tournament schedule.” The following month his phone rang, and on the other end was fellow Ohioan Pete Dye, who had begun a career in golf course design and was working on a layout east of Columbus, in New Albany, simply called The Golf Club. An outstanding amateur golfer who had won an Ohio High School state championship in 1943, Dye sought Nicklaus’ honest critique of his design. He incorporated Jack’s suggestions on two holes. That introduction to the business spawned a second career that Nicklaus continues to this day. It couldn’t have come at a better time, for Nicklaus had around that same period fleetingly contemplated retirement. As he wrote in My Story, he enjoyed tournament golf, but “after five years on tour I kept finding myself more and more concerned about the stresses the lifestyle imposes on the family unit. Also, I had been growing increasingly concerned … that I wasn’t challenging or using my brain sufficiently. “It certainly was a strange time for such musings,” he added. Not at all. Soon he was working with Dye on a few projects, including the critically acclaimed Harbour Town Golf Links in Hilton Head, S.C. The challenge of Muirfield Village was commencing, and it would finally open in 1974, with the Memorial Tournament following two years later. Those endeavors continue, and although he did bow out of tournament golf in 2005 at the British Open, he can proudly declare, “Well, if I gave any thought to retiring back then it must have been a very brief thing, because I still haven’t retired.” Reason enough for all golf fans to celebrate 1966, a year full of golden anniversaries. MT Author and award-winning writer David Shedloski is editorial director of The Memorial.

NICKLAUS ARCHIVE

1966


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2007 TIGER WOODS

2008 VIJAY SINGH

2009 TIGER WOODS

2010 JIM FURYK

PLAYOFF

Payoff

The FedExCup turns 10 years old this year, and the PGA TOUR is B Y J E F F B A B I N E A U seeing dividends for the game and for its best players

2011 BILL HAAS

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2012 BRANDT SNEDEKER

2013 HENRIK STENSON

2014 BILLY HORSCHEL

2015 JORDAN SPIETH


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FEDEXCUP TURNS 10

U.S. PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY ONCE SAID that change is the law of life, and those who

look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future. But change on the PGA TOUR? Occasionally, it can be agonizingly glacial, often resisted, and usually arrives in sporadic drips, never buckets. It’s now been a decade, believe it or not, since the PGA TOUR implemented a radical makeover to the structure of its season—establishing a yearlong points race that culminates in four playoff events and delivers a hefty bounty of $10 million to its champion. The competition is the FedExCup, and there have been plenty of shifts, adjustments and tweaks along the way, all designed to improve the product for players and fans.

In 2009, Phil Mickelson won the TOUR Championship, while Tiger Woods took home the FedExCup.

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Though constantly evolving, the foundation upon which the concept was built remains fundamentally the same: Keep the top stars playing deeper into the season and give them relevant events in which to play. In doing so, some of golf’s most riveting moments are saved for last.

In that regard, the FedExCup, which turns 10 this season, has delivered in a big way. Before 2007, the PGA TOUR had a campaign that moved to the beat of a strange rhythm: The most significant events were played April through August, and once the last putt fell at the PGA Championship, the season would quietly, and slowly, fade to black. What sport has its apex in the middle of its schedule? By Labor Day, there were footballs flying in the air and less attention for golf. The TOUR yearned for a meaningful encore to punctuate a long campaign. That is no longer the case. The FedExCup champion is crowned in September, and though a few bigger names occasionally bypass a playoff event, the game’s top guns now have 10 million reasons to stick around. These guys are good, yes, and wealthy, too—but an eight-figure, lottery-like carrot will garner anybody’s attention.


PGA TOUR IMAGES (4)

Ten years in and the FedExCup also has something that could not be bought or waved into being with a wand on the front end: Each year’s playing of the FedExCup creates new chapters, new stories and new champions. A tradition has taken root and has started to bloom. Tiger Woods captured the first FedExCup in 2007, and two autumns later came a prized snapshot: Woods and Phil Mickelson, golf’s two rocket ships, shared the stage on the 18th green at Atlanta’s East Lake Golf Club. Woods raised the cup as FedExCup champion, while Mickelson held the trophy as victor of the TOUR Championship presented by Coca-Cola. There’s also the image of Jim Furyk, a past winner of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, his hat worn backwards in a pelting rain, putting to win his FedExCup in 2010. That incredible save Bill Haas made from shallow water left of the 17th green at East Lake on his way to a TOUR Championship victory and an improbable FedExCup title in 2011? (He’d entered the TOUR Championship seeded 25th and needed many dominoes to fall just right; he and Furyk are the only champions to have started the final week outside the top five.) Haas gets asked about that watery save at 17 (he splashed out to 3 feet) almost on a weekly basis. “In the golfing world, that’s what I’m thought of, and I’m fine with that,” said Haas,

whose father Jay was a nine-time winner on the PGA TOUR and now competes on the PGA TOUR Champions. “I hope people keep remembering it, because it was a special day for me and my family. I’d like to win a major and win other golf tournaments, and then that would become another step for me, but as for now, I’m pretty happy having won the

Neither wind nor rain could keep Jim Furyk from his 2010 FedExCup victory at East Lake.

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“IN THE GOLFING WORLD, THAT’S WHAT I’M THOUGHT OF, AND I’M FINE WITH THAT. I HOPE PEOPLE KEEP REMEMBERING IT, BECAUSE IT WAS A SPECIAL DAY FOR ME AND MY FAMILY. ” —BILL

HAAS

Bill Haas won both the TOUR Championship and the FedExCup in 2011.

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FedExCup. I’m pulling for it to stick around a long time—and why wouldn’t it?” The entire FedExCup Playoffs bonus pool is $35 million ($3 million to second, and on down to $32,000 for No. 150), which falls on top of four playoff events (The Barclays, Deutsche Bank Championship, BMW Championship and TOUR Championship) that place another $34 million on the table. Billy Horschel was muddling along in 2012, having not won, and he didn’t get to his second playoff start outside Boston (Deutsche Bank) with much room to spare, sitting 82nd in points when the top 70 would advance. Then he heated up in a big way. A runner-up showing at TPC Boston was followed by victories at Cherry Hills (in the BMW) and East Lake. His run delivered the FedExCup title and almost $13.4 million, and with his first child on the way, three tournaments not only changed Horschel’s life, but the

lives of others, too. Horschel’s caddie, Micah Fugitt, was handed a check for $1 million. Perhaps the most surprising upside of the FedExCup’s success is that the PGA TOUR made such an impactful change at a juncture when things were motoring along quite nicely. Woods still was winning majors, chasing Jack Nicklaus’ record, and his supporting cast was growing from all corners of the globe. But any corporation worth its weight peers into the mirror and poses this question: How can we get better? Andy Pazder, PGA TOUR executive vice president and chief of operations, remembers those early discussions of golf shifting into a NASCAR-like points race. The players were skeptical that it would work. “I’ve heard the commissioner [Tim Finchem] say this: ‘The time to change is when things are going the best,’ ” Pazder said. “You look at a company like, say, Apple, which wasn’t satisfied with making those big desktop computers. It was clear we were the only sport where, as the season went on, interest waned. And the commissioner and our board, I think, were visionary in challenging the status quo. You look back and say, ‘Gosh, if we hadn’t done that, where would the TOUR be?’ ” PGA TOUR player Jason Bohn, a current member of the PGA Tour’s Policy Board, said he wasn’t in favor of such drastic change and a new system, but he acknowledges seeing the TOUR’s need for it from a financial view. “I think from a business perspective and what it’s done for the TOUR, it’s been phenomenal,” Bohn said, “and it seemed like it wasn’t really broken when we started it. But I think that’s what good corporations do—they make changes at good times.” The FedExCup system is evaluated constantly to identify potential improvements to the product. Early on, even the players didn’t understand the points structure, so the TOUR provided its own traveling points guru, Tom Alter, to give players (and often, players’ wives) the rundown on what each needed to do to advance. (Barclays has a starting field of 125; 100 compete at Deutsche Bank; 70 get to the BMW; and 30 make the TOUR Championship). At varying stages, the points system has been criticized for lacking volatility (Vijay Singh, with two wins, wrapped up the 2008 FedExCup before the TOUR Championship started) and too much volatility, but the TOUR seems to have found the proper balance. Today, points are reset before the TOUR Championship, and any player in the top five

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FEDEXCUP TURNS 10

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FEDEXCUP TURNS 10

can win the FedExCup by winning at East Lake, something each of the last after his win at Augusta. six winners have done. “It’s exciting. I think it does a great job of getting the best guys playing the big events late in the year, play great venues, and it’s produced a lot of drama,” said 2012 champion Brandt Snedeker. Even 13 events into the 2015-16 wraparound schedule, the TOUR announced that the nines at East Lake would be flipped in hopes of creating even more closing drama. Instead of ending on a par-3 hole, the FedExCup will finish with a par 5 (previously No. 9) that could yield eagles and two-way traffic on the scoreboard. The FedExCup never sleeps. All in all, the tweaks and slight alterations enhance a product that has been declared an unqualified success. “We like the system pretty much the way it is,” Finchem said last year at East Lake. “I think that you get to a point where you could have a debate about should you legislate this or legislate that, and I think the FedExCup clearly stands on its own two feet now. It’s something that players want to be a part of. It’s the biggest prize in golf. But it’s also a big stage.” One of the game’s biggest. That was the goal. MT

Jordan Spieth led the 2015

Jeff Babineau is a senior writer for Golfweek.

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PGA TOUR IMAGES

FedExCup race all season


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RANGE WORK

THAT

Aha! MOMENT

Johnny Miller won the 1973 U.S. Open after making a swing adjustment on the driving range before the final round; as other PGA TOUR players will tell you, sometimes all it takes is one small change to reap big rewards

PGA TOUR IMAGES

B Y

J I M

M c C A B E

G

IVE AN INCH and he’ll take a mile. Or so goes the famous idiom. Now, being a Swede, something may have gotten lost in the translation for Jonas Blixt. He was given an inch and he took home a $225,875 prize at the Farmers Insurance Open in mid-January.

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When Jonas Blixt, also pictured on the previous page, shot a 77 in the first round of the Farmers Insurance Open, he headed straight to the range to work with his swing coach, and went 66-66 the next two days.

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And anyone will tell you that $225,875 spends better than a mile. In the wide world of sports, nearly every game claims to be “one of inches,” but listen to how Blixt went from shooting 77 and sitting on the cusp of missing his sixth cut in seven starts to finishing tied for sixth at Torrey Pines and making his bank account far healthier: “An inch closer to the ball. That’s it.” As in standing just slightly closer? That’s it? Blixt, a two-time PGA TOUR winner, nodded his head, and immediately he saw quizzical looks coming his way. It was as if the silence could be translated thusly: “If it’s that easy, why wouldn’t you do it all the time? Why would you be missing cut after cut?” He finally put the inquisitive crowd at ease. They could cease with the questions. Blixt suggested that sometimes the newest problems are solved in the most old-fashioned of ways. What did Hogan say? The secret’s in the dirt. Blixt, in the thick of the hunt through 54 holes, explained that a few days earlier, he signed for 77 and went straight to the range. His swing coach, Jorge Parada, was by his side. “We had been working pretty hard with it all off-season, and I was hitting it pretty good going into the first couple of tournaments,” Blixt said. Then he shook his head, because golf being a fickle game, things went sideways with a string of bogeys that left him puzzled. He didn’t think it could be that bad— and he was right. Before darkness fell Thursday, “I just hit a couple golf balls at the driving range and figured it out.” After Parada told him to move a little closer, that is. “It was kind of weird,” Blixt was forced to admit. Not weird. Just golf. Blixt just needed a trusted pair of eyes and some diligent work on the practice range to get things rotating on the right axis

again. If the rounds of 66-66 that not only lifted Blixt inside the cut but into contention seemed a minor miracle to the assembled media, to the Swede they were part of the landscape. To him, what happens on the course is so often dictated by what happens on the range—and sometimes it’s that smallest slice of practice that unlocks the mystery. “We figured it out afterwards. I was standing a little too far from the golf ball and just tightened things up a little bit and things have worked out pretty well,” Blixt said. The fix was even trustworthy in his final round, even though you’d look at the score, 77, and think that Blixt struggled. On the contrary, with ferocious wind enveloping Torrey Pines Sunday and Monday, the two-day final round saw scores skyrocket. Blixt’s 77 was about the norm, which is why he finished in a share of sixth. No one asked Blixt if he knew the story of Johnny Miller from nearly 43 years ago. The one about the famous tune-up on the range that Miller took onto Oakmont Country Club for Round 4 of the U.S. Open and shot 63

PGA TOUR IMAGES

...WHAT HAPPENS ON THE COURSE IS SO OFTEN DICTATED BY WHAT HAPPENS ON THE RANGE— AND SOMETIMES IT’S THAT SMALLEST SLICE OF PRACTICE THAT UNLOCKS THE MYSTERY.

THE MEMORIAL

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Butch Harmon worked with Tiger Woods on adjusting his wrist slightly in the late ’90s.

to win, long considered one of the greatest rounds of all time. It might be the most epic case in PGA TOUR annals of fixing something on the range and reaping major championship benefits on the golf course. So consider Blixt as having secured his spot in a long line behind notables such as Miller. Oh, and Tiger Woods. Butch Harmon has famously told the story of working many years ago with Woods, trying to get the young phenom to “bow” his left wrist

WOODS MASTERED THE “STINGER 2- AND 3-IRONS,” FOUND FAIRWAYS, HIT GREENS IN REGULATION, AND WON AND WON AND WON ... ALL BECAUSE SOMETHING “CLICKED” ON THE RANGE.

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at impact. He had won the 1997 Masters, but Woods wanted to re-tool things and Harmon guided him. Skillful as he was, Woods struggled with what Harmon suggested. Finally, Harmon turned to a picture of the legendary Ben Hogan. “See,” Harmon said, pointing to the wrist. “This is where I need to get you, but you’ve got to get stronger to get to there.” Months later, Harmon was on the other side of the country, working at his golf school in Las Vegas when he got a call from Woods, back on his range at Isleworth Country Club, outside of Orlando. “Butch, I’ve got it,” Woods said into the phone. “I know what you’ve been talking about.” What followed was as dominating a stretch of golf as the game has ever seen—four straight wins in the majors, starting with the 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach—and an unprecedented run at No. 1 in the world. Woods mastered the “stinger 2- and 3-irons,” found fairways, hit greens in regulation, and won and won and won … all because something suddenly “clicked” on the range. Taking a thought to the range and “finding it,” a la Miller in ’73, paid dividends for Woods and, on a much smaller scale, for Kevin Streelman in 2014. He wasn’t the world’s greatest golfer, nor was he stalking a major championship, but like Miller and Woods, not to mention Blixt and so many others, Streelman was by himself on the range when … “Eureka.” He knew what coach Wayne DeFrancesco wanted from him. “The only switch was to get my weight from my heels to the toes,” Streelman said. He had played two pedestrian rounds at the Travelers Championship at TPC River Highlands in Cromwell, Conn., after having missed four straight cuts no less. So this session before Round 3 was not at a time when Streelman was rolling along beautifully. But as he hit balls, he remembered what DeFranceso had told him about his weight distribution. Streelman stopped “leaning back” as he had been doing and started leaning into the shot instead. “All of a sudden it absolutely transformed my ball-striking,” Streelman said. “It was just different right away.” He shot a third-round 64. That did remarkable things for his psyche and he wasn’t greedy enough to think that things could get better. Only, they did. On Sunday, Streelman birdied each of his last seven holes to win the tournament. Such a rich reward (a check for $1.116 million, more PGA TOUR status and a spot in the

PGA TOUR IMAGES

RANGE WORK


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RANGE WORK

Left: Kevin Streelman’s small adjustment on the range after two lackluster rounds in the 2014 Travelers Championship brought him a third-round 64 on Saturday and a trophy on Sunday. Right: Brant Snedeker wasn’t happy with his performance at the start of 2013, so he hit the range until he figured it out and proceeded to finish second, joint second and first

2015 Masters), with such a minute adjustment. Streelman shook his head. “Usually, fixes are so small. Ball position, probably simple stuff. But the hard part is finding it on the range.” There are those times, like with Streelman or Blixt, when the light comes on fairly quickly. Then there are those times, as Woods showed Harmon, when you need to pound ball after ball, bucket after bucket, until you get it. That’s where Ben Curtis was during the 2008 PGA Championship at Oakland Hills. “I was on the driving range for two hours because I couldn’t hit a freaking driver,” Curtis said. “I was panicking after my practice round. I had shot like 3 under playing the back nine, and the I think I shot 44 on the front nine. I went straight to the range and started banging drivers, nothing but drivers.” It’s not a blueprint Curtis deeply believes in. Like a lot of players, he said he doesn’t prescribe such a rigorous approach; the feeling is, you should head to the range with a specific purpose, one swing thought. But at that particular time, on the eve of the season’s final major, and with it being the last week to earn qualifying points for the Ryder Cup, Curtis saw no other options. “A lot of times [banging driver after driver] doesn’t work very well, but I found a little key and I was able to groove it,” Curtis said. “I went out and played really well [tied for second] and made the Ryder Cup team.” Curtis’ search for a swing fix was born 202

THE MEMORIAL

out of a sense of panic. Brandt Snedeker’s discovery in early 2013 came wrapped in pure frustration. The personable Snedeker had opened nicely at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, a share of 13th, when he surprisingly played poorly at the Humana. It didn’t make sense to Snedeker, who annually piles up great tournaments on the West Coast Swing, so when he arrived at Torrey Pines he moved right to the practice range. “I seem to always be one swing thought away,” he said. “Especially early in the year.” “I didn’t play particularly well [at the Humana], and I had this one swing thought on the range. Finally, it clicked.” Snedeker went on a tear—he was second at the Farmers Insurance Open, tied for second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, then he won the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. “That one swing thought stayed with me for a month and I played great,” Snedeker said. “Then I got hurt.” The record shows that Snedeker came back from a few weeks off to finish T-6 at the Masters, then T-8 at THE PLAYERS, only it doesn’t reflect that he returned minus that “one swing thought.” Why? “I couldn’t really remember what it was, but it never worked again,” he said, shaking his head. “I know. Crazy. I don’t know what changed.”

PGA TOUR IMAGES (2)

in his next three starts.


RANGE WORK

Right: Kevin Streelman’s small adjustment on the range after two lackluster rounds in the 2014 Travelers Championship brought him a third-round 64 on Saturday and a trophy on Sunday. Far right: Brandt Snedeker wasn’t happy with his performance at the start of 2013, so he hit the range until he figured it out and proceeded to finish second, joint second and first in his

2015 Masters), with such a minute adjustment. Streelman shook his head. “Usually, fixes are so small. Ball position, probably simple stuff. But the hard part is finding it on the range.” There are those times, like with Streelman or Blixt, when the light comes on fairly quickly. Then there are those times, as Woods showed Harmon, when you need to pound ball after ball, bucket after bucket, until you get it. That’s where Ben Curtis was during the 2008 PGA Championship at Oakland Hills. “I was on the driving range for two hours because I couldn’t hit a freaking driver,” Curtis said. “I was panicking after my practice round. I had shot like 3 under playing the back nine, and the I think I shot 44 on the front nine. I went straight to the range and started banging drivers, nothing but drivers.” It’s not a blueprint Curtis deeply believes in. Like a lot of players, he said he doesn’t prescribe such a rigorous approach; the feeling is, you should head to the range with a specific purpose, one swing thought. But at that particular time, on the eve of the season’s final major, and with it being the last week to earn qualifying points for the Ryder Cup, Curtis saw no other options. “A lot of times [banging driver after driver] doesn’t work very well, but I found a little key and I was able to groove it,” Curtis said. “I went out and played really well [tied for second] and made the Ryder Cup team.” Curtis’ search for a swing fix was born 202

out of a sense of panic. Brandt Snedeker’s discovery in early 2013 came wrapped in pure frustration. The personable Snedeker had opened nicely at the Hyundai Tournament of Champions, a share of 13th, when he surprisingly played poorly at the Humana. It didn’t make sense to Snedeker, who annually piles up great tournaments on the West Coast Swing, so when he arrived at Torrey Pines he moved right to the practice range. “I seem to always be one swing thought away,” he said. “Especially early in the year.” “I didn’t play particularly well [at the Humana], and I had this one swing thought on the range. Finally, it clicked.” Snedeker went on a tear—he was second at the Farmers Insurance Open, tied for second at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, then he won the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. “That one swing thought stayed with me for a month and I played great,” Snedeker said. “Then I got hurt.” The record shows that Snedeker came back from a few weeks off to finish T-6 at the Masters, then T-8 at THE PLAYERS, only it doesn’t reflect that he returned minus that “one swing thought.” Why? “I couldn’t really remember what it was, but it never worked again,” he said, shaking his head. “I know. Crazy. I don’t know what changed.”

PGA TOUR IMAGES (2)

next three starts.

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RANGE WORK

“I HIT ONE BALL AND IT FELT REALLY GOOD. AND I THOUGHT, ‘MAYBE I’M ON TO SOMETHING.’ THEN I HIT ANOTHER. I HIT 30 BALLS AND THEY WERE ALL THE SAME.” —KENNY

PERRY

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Sure sounds crazy, but Kenny Perry can appreciate Snedeker’s story because something similar happened to him years earlier. He said he was struggling mightily in 1994—“I couldn’t find the club face,” he said—and on the eve of the New England Classic, Perry was still pounding balls on the range at Pleasant Valley Country Club. “It was 7:30 at night, I’m beating balls and getting more frustrated. Nothing is working. Finally, I just stuff my clubs in my bag, lift the bag over my head and just slam it to the ground.” His first thought? “I was hoping I had broken the clubs,” Perry laughed. “But they survived.” Next morning, Perry was back on the range

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before his early tee time. “I was still hitting it badly.” But having calmed his emotions, Perry thought things through and came up with an idea, one little swing thought. “I hit one ball and it felt really good. And I thought, ‘Maybe I’m on to something.’ Then I hit another. I hit 30 balls and they were all the same. It was something I could take out on the golf course with confidence.” While Miller in 1973 took his fix onto the course for a blistering fourth round, Perry’s swing endured through four days at Pleasant Valley. Rounds of 67-66-70-65 earned Perry the second of his 14 PGA TOUR victories, a most compelling turnaround from where he had been that Wednesday evening on the range. “How about that?” he said. Well, how about sharing the secret? Perry laughed and just shook his head. As with Snedeker, the fix is a blur. “I don’t even remember what I did,” Perry said. He just knows he found it on the range and took it to the course. MT Jim McCabe is a senior writer for Golfweek.


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Golf is still a lonely sport, but the modern tour player relies on an expanded support group to be successful B Y

B I L L

F I E L D S

Jordan Spieth openly credits his caddie, Michael Greller, for contributing to his success on the golf course.

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who came out of nowhere to win the 1993 PGA Seniors’ Championship and went on to have a tidy career on the 50-and-older circuit, had a distinctive style of explaining his play. He would say things like this: “We hit a 7-iron from 160 yards.” “We didn’t think the green was that fast.” “We knew we had to start making birdies.” He was an athlete competing in an individual sport, yet his conversational tic made it sound like there was an invisible elf squaring his clubface. Wargo wasn’t the first golfer to use “we” in describing what had occurred on the course, but he did it a lot— likely more—to my observation, than anybody else. It amused and perplexed me back then, but Wargo might just might have been ahead of his time. MIDWESTERNER NAMED TOM WARGO,

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Above: Tom Wargo would often refer to what “we” did on the course during tournament play. Left: Eighteen-year-old LPGA phenom Lydia Ko has worked with a team of experts for years. Below: Jason Day with caddie Colin Swatton during The Presidents Cup at Jack Nicklaus Golf Club Korea in 2015.

PGA TOUR IMAGES (3)

First-person plural is big in golf these days, and it’s not just the talk but the walk. Some of golf’s current best players—including the winners of last year’s men’s major championships, Jordan Spieth, Zach Johnson and Jason Day—are big believers in the “team game.” So is Lydia Ko, the teenage phenom making history on the LPGA Tour, who has had experts tending her mind, body and technique for years already. After winning two majors and seriously threatening to win the other two while becoming the top-ranked player in the world in 2015, Spieth’s preferred pronouns weren’t hard to figure out. “When I look back on this year,” the young Texan told reporters at the PGA Championship, “the consistency that we have had this year and especially being able to step it up in the biggest stages, that’s a huge confidence builder, and that’s what’s allowed us as a team to become No. 1-ranked, and I believe right now, the best in the world.”

More than their mode of travel to tournaments, the equipment they use and the grass they play on, a reliance on significant and formal support groups might be the largest difference between elite golfers in the 21st century and their predecessors. Every sport has evolved and become more sophisticated because of technology and the times. (Can you imagine NFL great Johnny Unitas not calling his own plays?) Yet it is tournament golf, long thought to be among the most solitary of athletic challenges, where collaboration has become so common and so detailed as to boggle the mind of those who competed successfully without it. I was on the phone with an all-time great female golfer a decade or so ago, and when the interview was over we began talking about the tours. The player watches a lot of golf on TV, and by this point on-course microphones that pick up golfercaddie chatter were a regular part of broadcasts. “Can you get Bones to shut up?” she said. Her question about Phil Mickelson’s longtime


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ESSAY

Above: Phil Mickelson relies on caddie Jim Mackay for input. Above right: Zach Johnson uses a 10-person team, including his caddie Damon Green, to help him perform at his best. Below: Tiger Woods with former swing coach Sean Foley and his

credits—for help, a cadre consisting of Greller, coach Cameron McCormick, performance coach Damon Goddard and agent Jay Danzi. “We’re competing together all for the same goal,” Spieth explained during his breakout season. “And I try to align myself with the best at what they do in the world, because then that will free me up, I won’t have to worry about any other parts of my life on and off the course. It seems to be working. We got a great team and no one’s been scared of the next level, and that’s why we are where we are right now. So, I believe that on and off the course, it’s not just me.” For a decade, Johnson has been relying on the coordinated contributions of his 10-person

PGA TOUR IMAGES (3)

longtime agent Mark Steinberg.

caddie, Jim Mackay, startled me. To this independent champion of an earlier era, however, the lengthy back-and-forth between Lefty and his looper prior to most shots was as mystifying as someone poring over a yardage book before playing a chip shot. But Mackay wouldn’t be that talkative if Mickelson didn’t want him to be, and their partnership has been remarkably successful. I believe I know how this legend would feel about the pre-shot sequences between Spieth and his caddie Michael Greller, whose talks can be so involved and animated as to make Mickelson and Mackay seem like two ill-matched people on an awkward first date. Greller is a former sixth-grade teacher who has gone from encouraging students to providing guidance for one of the hottest names in sports. Spieth’s on-course sideman is only a portion of the team that he counts on—and freely

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“THERE IS A FREEDOM THAT COMES WITH HAVING SUCH A GREAT GROUP THAT ALLOWS ME TO JUST PLAY.”

Eddie Lowery (bottom center above) was only 10 years old when he caddied for Francis Ouimet (inset) during Ouimet’s famed 1913 U.S. Open victory at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass.

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team—including advisors on strength, strategy, statistics and spirituality—to maximize his talents. As he turned 40 years old earlier this year, Johnson could look back on two major titles among a dozen PGA TOUR victories and more than $38 million in career earnings. And as with Spieth, Johnson has no apologies for the breadth of assistance he receives. “In order for me to practice, work out and just play golf, I need these individuals along the way,” Johnson told ESPN.com. “There is a freedom that comes with having such a great group that allows me to just play.” Given how most of today’s top players are tethered to a supporting cast, there is pleasure in imagining golfers of yesteryear competing with the self-sustaining grit of someone traveling coast-to-coast on a horse. The truth in this vision of the past co-exists with no small amount of myth. Take caddies. Certainly to some golfers

JOHNSON

they were porters carrying a golf bag instead of a suitcase, but long before the role evolved into that of essential, well-paid wingman, they could offer valuable assistance. No one will ever confuse Eddie Lowery for Michael Greller, but was what the 10-yearold did for Francis Ouimet during the 1913 U.S. Open at The Country Club that different from Greller’s role for Spieth when he won the national title 102 years later at Chambers Bay? Lowery was skipping school instead of having taught it, but like his counterpart in a different century was a steady, sustaining source for his player as he defied long odds and upset British stars Harry Vardon and Ted Ray. “You’ve just got to beat those fellows, Francis,” Lowery said to Ouimet before the 18-hole playoff. “They never can take the championship across the water with them.” Ouimet followed directions well, as did Gene Sarazen two decades later when he

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ESSAY

BEN HOGAN IS WRONGLY PERCEIVED BY SOME AS TO HAVING TAKEN A SINGLE-FILE ROUTE TO SUCCESS... successfully teamed with aging English caddie Skip Daniels in the 1932 Open Championship at Prince’s Golf Club in Sandwich, England. “I had encountered no really rocky passages because I had the excellent sense to listen to Daniels at every puzzling juncture,” Sarazen wrote in Thirty Years of Championship Golf. “Through his brilliant selection of club and his understanding of my volatile temperament, I had been able to keep my resolution to go no more than one over par on any hole.” As instinctively wonderful as Sam Snead was, his success in the North and South Open and Greater Greensboro Open—11 of Snead’s PGA TOUR-record 82 wins came at those two North Carolina tournaments—was aided by Pinehurst caddie Jimmy Steed. In those days before yardage books, Steed was uncannily good at picking clubs for his boss, who surprisingly

lacked confidence in that important aspect of the game. Snead never won a U.S. Open for a variety of reasons, including feeling snakebit after a couple of rough defeats and missing fairways by just enough to be penalized by unforgiving rough. But it isn’t much of a stretch to think that Snead could have claimed an Open had he been able to partner with Steed, his dependable and savvy caddie. I was reminded of the importance of the player-caddie bond during this year’s Waste Management Phoenix Open. After a rocky finish, PGA TOUR player James Hahn tweeted about Mark Urbanek: “I have the best caddie. When things go from extreme high to extreme disappointment, he lets me know I don’t have to go at it alone. #thankful” Decades before Twitter, golfers were grateful to have others on their side. Ben Hogan is wrongly perceived by some as to having taken a single-file route to success, but he might not have survived on tour much less achieved greatness without the confidence-building assistance of his friend and mentor, Henry Picard. The sound fundamentals that Jack Grout taught

Although being backed by a team of experts wasn’t common in Jack Nicklaus’ early years, few would question the impact of Jack Grout’s tutalege on the

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Jack Nicklaus remained with the Golden Bear throughout his fantastic career, which was also enhanced by the nurturing of Nicklaus’ father, Charlie, and Jack’s wife Barbara. Arnold Palmer never strayed from the ideal grip that his dad Deacon showed him. “I don’t think that individual sport can been seen as a lone-wolf sport,” McCormick, the 2015 PGA Teacher of the Year, told me. “There is support personnel behind every individual athlete, and that can be as simple as two parents who are behind someone’s career. People have got social groups or club cultures

Bill Fields has written about golf since the mid-1980s and covered more than 150 major championships in men’s, women’s and senior golf.

GETTY IMAGES

AMID THE PRESSURE OF THE FINAL ROUND, STEWART KEPT REMEMBERING WHAT [WIFE] TRACEY HAD TOLD HIM ABOUT BEING MINDFUL OF AN OLD FLAW.

that help them. Bubba Watson might not have had any paid professional instruction, but he’s had tips, coaching of some sort along the way. Someone can say he is self-built when the reality is much different.” The late Payne Stewart’s career didn’t take off until 1988, when he began working with Dr. Richard Coop, then a professor of educational psychology at the University of North Carolina and one of golf’s pioneering mind coaches in the last quarter of the 20th century. At first reluctant to go down this avenue, Stewart greatly improved his mental fundamentals under Coop, whose tutelage helped Stewart capitalize on his athletic gifts. Stewart won three majors before dying at age 42 in an aviation accident, the last his dramatic 1999 U.S. Open victory at Pinehurst where he holed crucial putts on the final three holes. That tense Sunday against an all-star cast of contenders—Mickelson, Tiger Woods, Vijay Singh—Stewart wasn’t relying only on the wisdom of Coop and swing instructor Chuck Cook, and the steady hand of longtime caddie Mike Hicks but on an observation of another member of his “team,” his wife Tracey who had noticed in the third round that her husband was moving his head while putting. Amid the pressure of the final round, Stewart kept remembering what Tracey had told him about being mindful of an old flaw. “I did it, Lovey. I kept my head down all day, I did it,” Stewart told his wife on the 18th green. Golfers, every single one of them, are on a team before they’ve been chosen for a Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup or Solheim Cup. Whether it’s a family member offering a simple tip or a paid consultant detailing an elaborate workout regimen, no one achieves success without help. That was as true in 1916 as it is in 2016, but now there is more information to manage and more people to help manage it. “We’re a very, very close team,” Day said of his support group after winning the 2015 PGA Championship. “And I don’t have a bunch of ‘yes men’ around. I’ve got people that are very honest and care about not only my golf game but who I am as a person.” Golf is still difficult, just not as lonely. MT

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A Scottish explorer goes on a determined quest to try to verify a legendary myth


H

E HAD SPENT MOST OF HIS ADULT LIFE this way, going from place to place, golf course to golf course, determined to turn myth into a scientific fact. There have been others like him. They traverse the forests of the Pacific Northwest, scouring remote corners, reading over-sized footprints and searching for a large, hairy humanoid named “Sasquatch.” They keep vigil in the Scottish Highlands, camped on the shores of Loch Ness, believing a lake monster named “Nessie” has survived centuries in the dark, murky depths. They focus on Puerto Rico and the mountainous areas of South America, where a goat-eating, blood-sucking “Chupacabra” is said to exist, where scratchy eyewitness reports have yet to produce conclusive evidence. They go to great lengths, these dedicated crypto zoologists, embracing the latest technology, pursuing every lead, sparing no expense. Misidentifications, hoaxes and professional skepticism notwithstanding, they insist these are more than cryptic figures of the imagination. They exist, they are sure of it. Likewise, Sir Phillip Howley was convinced the fanciful stories about the “Golden Bear” were true.

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He first heard tales of the giant omnivore as a young boy, growing up in Musselburgh, Scotland, on the coast of the Firth of Forth. The son of a railroad engineer, Howley was insatiably curious and determined. He graduated from Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh with a degree in podiatry, tops in his class. As part of his senior dissertation, Sir Phillip developed the “Howley Holster,” a bootie that all-but-eliminated the bunion epidemic sweeping across Scotland in the early 1980s. In postgraduate studies, Howley earned letters in mechanical engineering at the University

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of Glasgow. An accomplished archer and avid adventurist, he had explored the Burrup Peninsula in Australia and hunted wild boar on the Greater Sunda Islands. As a philanthropist, he raised millions for conservation and scientific research in the UK, for which he was honored with knighthood in 2005. At age 52, his thick mustache and long sideburns were now tinted with white hair. Crow’s feet branched out from the corners of his eyes, behind his round steel spectacles. Despite the advancement of age, he was still a picture of health, a sturdy 6-foot-2, 200 pounds. And he was still a man of action, never prone to whim or foolishness, but never slow to commit to a cause. “Fear is the glue that keeps you stuck,” Howley told his close associate, Jack Higby. “Faith, my dear Higby. Aye, there is the solvent that will set you free.” Higby was a short, stocky man, with a receding hairline and an optimistic nature. He met Howley


FICTION

in college and became his lifelong companion, assisting him in his eccentric endeavors, sharing his crusading spirit. Among all of Sir Phillip’s many interests and pursuits, golf held a special place. He embraced the game as a young boy, caddying at Musselburgh Links. The site of the 1874 and 1889 Open Championships, Musselburgh is a living museum to the game, the oldest continuously played golf course in the world. For an impressionable young lad, it was a second home, a learning laboratory for many endearments and admonitions. Young Phillip became an enthusiastic student and skilled practitioner, proficient in the various shots a course might demand, accomplished with any club in his hand … with one glaring exception. No matter how he tried, no matter how often he changed grips, altered stances, tweaked his thoughts, Phillip Howley never was comfortable with a 3-iron in his hand. “I had an audience with the pope some years ago, Higby,” Sir Phillip once told his friend. “And you won’t believe it, but his eminence assured me there was golf in heaven.” “By God, that’s wonderful,” Higby replied. “Don’t get too excited,” Howley added, on cue. “There also are 3-irons.” To conquer his demon, Sir Phillip put his engineering skills to work and developed the “Howley Hybrid,” a club with all the aerodynamic characteristics and ball-flight qualities of a 3-iron, but a club that looks and feels like a 7-iron. Sir Phillip christened it a “37-iron.” As he became more immersed in the game, Howley delved deeper into its rich history and became infatuated with its narrative. From Old Tom Morris, to Walter Hagan, to Arnold Palmer; the sport presented him with an extensive list of intriguing tales and heroic figures. But the accounts of the “Golden Bear,” a powerful creature that dominated golf’s distinguished fields and intimidated its most accomplished players especially captured Howley’s fancy. The more he read about the Golden Bear, the more he believed it existed. As legend tells it, the mythical creature was first seen in Columbus, Ohio, during the late 1950s, in and around the campus of Ohio State University. An early sighting was reported in 1959 at the Broadmoor Golf Club in Colorado Springs, and another in 1961 at Pebble Beach Golf Links near Monterey, Calif. The Bear supposedly appeared in 1960 at Cherry Hills, in Colorado. Among those who claimed to have encountered the creature was golfing great Ben Hogan. “He was just a cub,” Hogan reportedly said afterward. “He could have overpowered the place if he knew what he was doing.” But according to accounts from the same episode, a “King” was able to fend off the raging beast with two strokes of a mighty club. There had been many additional reports of confrontations and near misses over the years, 19 in all. But there were many circumstances in which the Bear couldn’t be restrained. One family in particular had been tragically victimized by the fearsome mammal—the Majors. According to legend, the voracious Bear had devoured 18 of the Majors over the years, six of them in one area alone—Augusta, Ga. In fact, the only thing the Bear was said

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FICTION

...MORE STORIES OF THE BEAR SURFACED FROM ST. ANDREWS IN 1978, WHERE SUPPOSEDLY HE WAS LAST SEEN CROSSING THE SWILCAN BRIDGE. to find more irresistible than a Major was butter pecan ice cream. “I say, Higby, a Golden Bear … can you even imagine?” Howley proclaimed one day. “We must find him. We must see this creature for ourselves ...” “But Sir Phillip,” Higby protested mildly, “I believe that’s just a sobriquet, a description the press used for a great golfer named Jack ...” “Nonsense, man,” Howley interrupted. “There is such a bear. Aye, I’m sure of it.” So he made it his mission, to separate fiction from fact, to capture the Golden Bear and show the world it truly existed. With the faithful Higby by his side, Sir Phillip Howley set out to investigate each incident. His explorations began in Scotland, where residents reported a “Golden Bear” wreaked

havoc at the Open Championship in 1966. Four years later, the blonde beast had migrated south to St. Andrews, where he reportedly overpowered one man—Doug Sanders. There were additional sightings at Muirfield and Royal Birkdale, and more stories of the Bear surfaced from St. Andrews in 1978, where supposedly he was last seen crossing the Swilcan Bridge. Still unable to find him, Howley and the faithful Higby moved their expedition to the United States. They traveled along the eastern corridor, where incidents had been reported in Oakmont, Pa., and Springfield, N.J. They spent time at the Dallas Athletic Club, where a Golden Bear was said to have left his mark. They tracked their way through Pebble Beach, Calif.; Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.; Beachwood, Ohio; Akron, Ohio; and Rochester, N.Y. Residents often confirmed seeing the Bear and described his activities with remarkable detail and clarity. “We had him cornered one Saturday at Oak Hill Country Club,” said a witness, Gil Morgan. “But on Sunday, he just ran away.” Howley and Higby spent nearly a year

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in Augusta, where most recent sightings had occurred in 1986, when it was said the Bear devoured another major, six years after he was thought to have disappeared. At each stop, the diligent Scotsmen baited the trap, played the golf courses and hoped to entice the Bear to appear. They employed sophisticated tracking devices, advanced sonar and explored every possibility … nothing. No tangible evidence of the “Golden Bear.” Reaching wit’s end, Sir Phillip concluded there was but one last hope. If the Bear truly existed, if he was to be found nowhere else, he must be in Dublin, Ohio. “I’ve heard they have adopted the legend there, embraced it as their own,” Sir Phillip told Higby. “The place is practically a shrine to the Golden Bear.” So they arrived in Muirfield Village and immediately went to work, talking to the people in town. “Oh yes, he’s been seen round here quite often,” said one. “In fact, he always makes an appearance during the Memorial Tournament.” Howley’s spirits were lifted. It was May 28, the timing was perfect. With practice rounds for

THE GROUND BEGAN TO RUMBLE WITH INCREASING INTENSITY. THE SOUND OF SNAPPING LIMBS AND CRUNCHING LEAVES GOT LOUDER AND LOUDER . . . the annual Memorial Tournament to begin the following Monday, Sir Phillip arranged a Sunday morning tee time, at the crack of dawn. “That’s when bears are known to be most active, Higby,” he told his sidekick. “If ever we’re to see him, man, this could be it.” To enhance their chances, the men walked the course ahead of their tee time, dripping ice cream along the fairway edges. With the Saturday morning sun peaking through the tree limbs, they were ready to head out. As always, Howley was well prepared for an encounter. He carried a dart-loaded rifle in his golf bag, hoping to euthanize the Bear and secure it for all to see. As they stood on the first tee, their senses were heightened, anticipation was in the air. Howley put his tee in the ground, stepped back to gather himself and then he heard it,

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seemingly off in the distance, a muffled but distinctive growl. “Did you hear that? Did you hear it, Higby?” he asked excitedly. Looking a bit embarrassed, Higby replied, “Uh, yes, sorry about that Sir Phillip. Must have been the pork sausage and what for breakfast, a bit of gastric comeuppance, if you will.” Undaunted, Howley teed off and the men began their jaunt around the majestic Muirfield layout. At No. 2, Howley surveyed his approach shot to the green, when he heard a loud rustling off to his left. He turned to study the trees along the fairway. “Did you hear that Higby?” he called to his associate. At that moment, a sheepish Higby came walking out from the thicket. “Uh, yes, sorry about that Sir Phillip,” he said. “Not my best effort, but I think I got it back on the short grass.” Undaunted, they pressed on. But as they came to the turn at the ninth tee, circumstances were weighing on

Howley. He had traveled halfway around the world, listened to story after story, played golf hole after golf hole, tried everything he knew … but still no sign of the Golden Bear. Now he was in the midst of another fruitless round, another dead end, another discouraging result, and his focus was waning. His mind elsewhere, he swung haphazardly with a driver, pulling his shot down the left side of the tight par 4. The ball missed the fairway and came to rest in the rough, just outside the tree line. Higby’s shot was not quite as far, but straight down the middle of the fairway. Howley hitched up his bag and set forth. When he arrived, he found his ball buried deep in the tall grass. But as he sized up the situation, he again heard a rustling sound, emanating from the trees. He peered back toward the fairway and, sure enough, there was Higby, some 30 years away, calculating his distance, sizing up his next shot. “That’s not Higby, not this time,”

Sir Phillip thought. “By God, what is it?” Common sense suggested it was nothing more than a foraging squirrel. Nonetheless, Sir Phillip reached for the tranquilizer gun. He’d come too far to be careless now. As he walked deeper into the trees, he heard more movement and followed the sound. In the distance, Howley thought he saw something flash between the trees. He walked further into the thicket and came to fallen trunk, dark and rotting, nearly covered in mushrooms and green moss. He set the gun down, pulled a handkerchief from his pocket, removed his glasses and wiped the sweat from his brow. And that’s when it happened. The ground began to rumble with increasing intensity. The sound of snapping limbs and crunching leaves got louder and louder, closer and closer … And in one explosive instant, the disturbance arrived. The magnificent creature came to a halt, rose up on his hind legs and let out an ear-piercing roar.

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      

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FICTION

AS THE BEAR BEGAN TO POUNCE, HOWLEY GRABBED THE CLUB AND SWUNG, HITTING THE FEROCIOUS BEAST DIRECTLY ON THE SNOUT. IRON MOUNTAIN_1/2 PAGE AD_15.qxp_1/2 PAGE AD 4/28/15 10:25 AM Page 1

The rush of adrenaline was equal parts fear and excitement. Momentarily paralyzed, Howley stood spellbound, confronted by something that confirmed he was not crazy after all, something that changed fiction into reality, something almost eight feel tall, with four paws, long claws and thick, blonde-colored fur ... The Golden Bear. “Speak o’ the devil!” Howley muttered to himself. Instincts kicked in. Regaining his senses, he scrambled to retrieve the gun he had set aside. But as he did, he lost his balance and his left foot slid into a hole, wedged under the fallen tree trunk. The gun flew from

his grasp and caromed to the ground several feet away. “Help, Higby!” he yelled. “Help!” Hearing the commotion, the erstwhile Higby frantically reached in his golf bag, grabbed the first club his fingers found and let out for the trees. “Hold on Sir Phillip, I’m coming!” The Golden Bear now hovered over the entrapped Howley as Higby raced to the seen. But as he approached the tree line, Higby inadvertently stepped on Sir Phillip’s golf ball, turning his right ankle and collapsing to the ground in pain. Unable to get to his feet, he realized there was no time. “Sir Phillip, catch,” he yelled. And with that, he flung the

golf club through the trees toward the fallen Howley. The club landed on the ground short of the mark, but it was just within the desperate stretch of Howley’s reach. As the Bear began to pounce, Howley grabbed the club and swung, hitting the ferocious beast directly on the snout. Stunned, the Golden Bear reared back, pawed at its muzzle and retreated. As quickly as it had arrived, it disappeared into the trees. With that, Sir Phillip used the club to wedge his foot free, got to his feet, gathered himself and attended to the injured Higby. “Good work, Higby,” he said, wrapping his friend’s ankle and helping him up. “Are you all right?” “Never mind that, Sir Phillip,” said Higby, struggling to his feet, awestricken by what he had witnessed. “By God, do you realize what this means? You were right. You were right all along. You found him—the Golden Bear! What a story this will make.” But Howley said nothing. Instead,

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FICTION

he looked back toward the woods and the direction the Golden Bear had fled. He looked down at the golf club he still held in his hand, the weapon with which he had fended off the beast. And for a moment, he contemplated. He had spent most of his adult life, going from place to place, trying to turn fiction into scientific fact. He had defied the critics, ignored the naysayers, spared no effort or cost in his quest to prove the Golden Bear existed. But at that moment, he realized the story would never fly, the tale of his harrowing, faceto-face meeting with the Golden Bear would never be accepted.

“It was quick thinking on your part,” Howley finally said to his friend. “You saved my life, man. But if we tell people about what happened here, no one will ever believe it.” “What?” replied a baffled Higby. “But why not.” Howley then turned the club upside down, displayed the bottom of the sole to his bewildered associate and shook his head incredulously. “Everyone knows I can’t hit anything with a 3-iron.” MT Dan O’Neill is a feature writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the author of four books.

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1976 – 2015

The Memorial Tournament Past Winners

ROGER MALTBIE 1976

JACK NICKLAUS 1977

DAVID GRAHAM 1980

HALE IRWIN 1983

JACK NICKLAUS 1984

HALE IRWIN 1985

HAL SUTTON 1986

CURTIS STRANGE 1988

BOB TWAY 1989

GREG NORMAN 1990

KENNY PERRY 1991

DAVID EDWARDS 1992

PAUL AZINGER 1993

TOM LEHMAN 1994

GREG NORMAN 1995

TOM WATSON 1996

VIJAY SINGH 1997

FRED COUPLES 1998

TIGER WOODS 1999

TIGER WOODS 2000

TIGER WOODS 2001

JIM FURYK 2002

KENNY PERRY 2003

ERNIE ELS 2004

BART BRYANT 2005

CARL PETTERSSON 2006

K E I TH F E R GUS 1981

RAYMOND FLOYD 1982

DON POOLEY 1987

STEVE STRICKER 2011

230

TOM WATSON 1979

JIM SIMONS 1978

THE MEMORIAL

TIGER WOODS 2012

K.J. CHOI 2007

MATT KUCHAR 2013

KENNY PERRY 2008

HIDEKI MATSUYAMA 2014

TIGER WOODS 2009

DAVID LINGMERTH 2015

JUSTIN ROSE 2010


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REFLECTIONS

Only a Game It’s a game you know Just keep saying so Repeatedly beneath a breath When best intentions come to rest In places they should never go A game, you know Sometimes beautiful Glorious when least expected Spiritual but unprotected Departing when the next wind blows A game that flows Like a parable Contested from the inside out Theater of trust and doubt Resolved between the mind and soul A haunting, though Irresistible Lost inside the pristine garden Baptized by unspoken pardon It’s just a game... you know?

GETTY IMAGES

—DAN O’NEILL

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THE MEMORIAL

A PARTNERSHIP AT THE TOP OF ITS GAME.

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE

the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide®

Nationwide shares a commitment with Jack Nicklaus and the Memorial Tournament of giving back to our communities. Through the Tournament and our other sports sponsorships, we raise over $4 million each year for Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

forward to continuing our relationship through the coming years.

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MAY 30 – JUNE 5, 2016

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