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APRIL 2003 April 2003

www.runnersandwalkers.com WWW.RUNNERSANDWALKERS.COM

RAW at the Grasslands In This Issue • Grasslands Trail Run • In Step With…Tosca Engisch • Marathon Madness and More (Austin, Mardi Gras, Cowtown, Texas Ultra Roundup, Hancock/ Chicago, Napa Valley) • New RAW Wear • Foot Problems by Dr. Marybeth Crane • What Would Liz Do? • 5K PR Challenge _________________________

Upcoming Events • • • • • •

April 8, Corporate Challenge April 12, Tax Time Party, home of Bill and Annette Collins April 26, Hound Dog Hustle May 3, Spring Cleanup and Pot luck breakfast, RAW Clubhouse May 16-17, Relay for Life May 31, 5K PR Challenge

RAW members were abundant and noticeable (is that a good thing?) at the Grasslands Trail Run in Decatur, TX on March 22nd. Thirty-three runners and their supporters got up before the crack of dawn to caravan to the race, and some still managed to get lost! (But Doug Noell doesn’t want you to know it was him, so don’t mention it.) Several members achieved significant milestones and as always, it was fun to see how everyone celebrated right along with them. Marty Metzger ran his first 50 miler, and Kelly Woodmansee (K1) set a PR at the same distance. Heather Wallace ran the marathon distance, her first ever trail run. In the half marathon, “Polar Bear” Jon Korte won the men’s overall prize, while Yolanda Hopping won the

women’s division! Chuck Franklin ran well in the half marathon, the furthest distance he had ever covered. A few others ran a little further than they had planned, missing the trail markers and finding themselves facing barbed wire and other obvious dead ends. No one seemed to mind, as this race is known for its camaraderie and low-key, fun atmosphere. The weather was perfect and the trails in great shape. Everyone enjoyed the refreshments being served at “Camp Metzger,” RAW’s temporary home for the day. A special thanks to Mike and Suzi Cope, who once again did a fabulous job as race directors. Not to mention, Mike cooks a pretty mean hamburger!

Saturday Night Live-5:00 pm (First Saturday of the month) Note: check the bulletin board on our website for last minute changes) •

April 5, Baja Grill in Grapevine (formerly Esparza’s Too) • May 3, Mi Cocina in Southlake Town Center • June 7, Scott’s Landing Marina, Lake Grapevine _________________________

Renewals

Your membership expiration date is shown on your Footprint mailing label. When it’s time to renew, just fill out the membership application in the newsletter and mail it back to RAW along with your check.

“Camp Metzger” residents Carl Stipe, Adrienne Stipe, Rick Sanford, Lee Miller, “Cleveland Ray” Paschal, Tia Metzger, Judy Dominiec, Ray Harris, Major Mike Eccleston, K2 (Kelly Richards) 1


Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers Club P.O. Box 2982 Grapevine, Texas 76099

RAW Board and Committees

LGRAW Supports Local Children There were a lots of smiles on Wednesday, March 26 at Parkland Hospital. A group of LGRAW members presented Parkland's Summer Burn Camp with a large check (at least 4 feet long) of $1,250. The money came from race proceeds from RAW's Double Trouble 5K and 10K Race last fall. This is the 2nd year that LGRAW has contributed to Camp I-Thonka-Chi, helping local child burn victims attend a week-long summer camp just south of Cleburne, Texas. There the kids enjoy all the typical summer camp activities in a safe, fully staffed camp which is also a fully equipped medical facility. "This year's contribution was 25% ahead of last year’s," said Terry Marcott, race director both years. "I see a very bright future for even more help this coming year." Burn Camp this year will be held the first week in June. Like last year, LGRAW volunteers will assist in escorting the campers on the hour and a half bus ride to the camp. If you would like to assist in being an escort, please contact Kelly Richards or David Ball for more information.

President Kelly Richards President@RunnersAndWalkers.com First Vice President Tony Dominiec VP1@RunnersAndWalkers.com Second Vice President Terry Marcott VP2@RunnersAndWalkers.com Chief Information Officer Jack Hase CIO@RunnersAndWalkers.com Treasurer Craig Minyard Treasurer@RunnersAndWalkers.com Officers At Large David Ball MAL1@RunnersAndWalkers.com

David Ball, Marty Metzger, Terry Marcott, Camp I-Thonka-Chi Chief Physical Therapist Donna Crump, Kelly Richards, and Team Leader Dawn Ellsworth

Dave Aungst MAL2@RunnersAndWalkers.com

SIT….STAY... ROLLOVER…

Marybeth Crane MAL3@RunnersAndWalkers.com Stacie Sauber MAL4@RunnersAndWalkers.com

...then RUN or WALK to volunteer at the 4th Annual Hound Dog Hustle.

Curtis Woodard MAL5@RunnersAndWalkers.com

We need people to set up, take down, and everything in between. Most jobs allow you to run the race as well as help out.

Rick Sanford MAL6@RunnersAndWalkers.com Footprint Editor Susan Barnett SCMBarnett@aol.com

Saturday, April 26, 2003 Benefiting local animal rescue groups

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To volunteer, contact Eileen Fontaine: 817-424-1756 pitfarken@yahoo.com


Scenes from The Grasslands Run Courtney Noell: As this was my 1st trail run of any sort, I didn't know what to expect. So, when we (1) got lost and arrived 18 minutes late and (2) had to start BEHIND everyone, I figured I'd have some difficulty, since most people run faster than me and would be WAY ahead. Sure enough, before the mile 5.4 aid station, I was lost for about 20 minutes and was sure I was going to have to sleep out there on the trail at the mercy of the random armadillos and bugs. The rest of the race I made sure I had the next yellow spot in my line of eyesight. It was really fun, though, and I'd do it again. Perfect day, too! Heather Wallace: Grasslands was my first trail marathon and actually my first time to ever run trails. All I have to say is, “I am hooked!" I love the variety of terrain, the fact that no one really worries about time and speed, and that you never really know where the heck you are! I felt like it was more of a personal challenge because you have to really focus on the placement of your feet with every step you take. It is easier on your legs but the feet— ohhh my blistered feet!

In hindsight, maybe I should have passed on breakfast or just brought the directions to the run. This was only my second real trail run. I was expecting to need more from my legs than normal, but I was surprised how quickly my calves tightened up. Luckily the rest of my leg muscles and my feet started hurting — so I hardly noticed my calves the rest of the run. The Grasslands Run was a lot of fun both for the challenge of the run and the people there. I highly recommend it.

Evelyn chokes...I mean hugs...Joe There was Tony with a beer in his hand and a big smile as if to say "you should have stayed with me." But the best part of the day for me was when Evelyn finished. What she can do when she is mad! I had failed to inform her that the run was a trail run. Needless to say I'm still in the dog house but I know she loves me.

Lee Miller: When I decided to start running again back in March of 1999, I was talked into running in this race called Grasslands. It was the longest day of my life (over two hours of running). My fitness has gotten much better since then, but my ability to run on trails has not. Even though I still run awkwardly on trials, I enjoy the change of pace. The horse trails of Grasslands proved to be a challenge for me, since the footing was harder than anything I had run on. The second loop had much better footing than the first, but was a lot more lonely. The finish? The only reason I run these races is for the finish. To sit down, eat a hamburger, enjoy the company of your fellow runners, and watch your friends finish—that makes it all worthwhile.

Special congratulations to 50-miler Marty! Cleveland Ray Paschal: Grasslands was a fun run. I enjoyed the peace and quite of running in the Wilderness. I especially liked it when I passed up Lee Miller on the run. Marathon finishers Heather Wallace, Lee Miller He was doing the and Kelly Richards (K2) marathon and I was doing the half, but it still Joe Luccioni: It was a fun day and a gave me pleasure. The other thing I humbling experience. Tony and I ran learned from Grasslands was what a together for about 9 miles, but then I "cattle guard” is. Yes, being a non-Texan, pulled away and ended up getting lost, I did not know what one was. adding a couple of miles to the half. When I finished it was great hearing our Doug Noell: I arrived at the start late, members cheering me on. I tried to put thanks primarily to an Egg McMuffin on a sprint but my legs wouldn't/couldn't craving that separated me (along with respond no matter how hard I tried. Courtney and Eileen) from the caravan. 3

Got Milk? Jack Hase’s post-race beverage of choice


YOUR First Ultramarathon by Marty Metzger

The Three Kelly’s: Eppelman, Richards, and Woodmansee

Half Marathoner Carl Stipes

Everyone’s favorite race volunteer, Chef Michael Cope

I’ve just proven that with a club like LGRAW behind you, anyone who can run a marathon can probably do a 50 mile ultramarathon! This 200 pound, flatfooted guy joined RAW in 1999, running just three miles at a time. Running White Rock 2000 was such an accomplishment for me that running another marathon on pavement hasn't seemed exciting enough -- so I haven’t. After volunteering at the Grasslands Run last year, I thought, "This looks like an ideal trail run – friendly, low-key, fun, affordable (almost twice the miles for the dollar), GREAT shirts, and awesome burgers right off the grill." I was close to being in marathon shape when I mentioned the idea to someone at the club, and suddenly the rumors started flying. “Are you really running 50 miles?” They didn’t say so in words, but their expressions said I’d lost my mind. Experience and Scott Eppelman have taught me that our limitations are perhaps more mental than physical. Believe you can do it, make the physical investment, and God willing, anyone can do this! For the physical side, I used the Galloway marathon training schedule. I learned to carry a waist pack, eat on the run (the trick is to let it melt down your throat instead of chewing), and manage 5 minute pit stops. I actually had a checklist, which drew a few laughs. On the mental side, I’d try to fall asleep at night imagining the event one step at a time, especially crossing the finish line. Unfortunately, the positive images often excited me too much to sleep, and I’d have to get up to jot down another item

Grasslands 50 Milers:

Half Marathoners:

Letha Cruthirds Kelly Woodmansee (PR) Marty Metzger (first 50 mile run)

Jon Korte (Male Winner) Yolanda Hopping (Female Winner) Jack Hase Tom Byno Mark Sparks Scott Decker Curtis Woodard Major Mike Eccleston Cleveland Ray Tom Zack Tina Covington Adrienne Stipe

Marathoners: Kelly Richards Heather Wallace (first trail run) Lee Miller Carl Stipe

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to the growing checklist of things to do or pack. I logically rationalized: anyone can run much further if they simply slow their pace. Taking it to an extreme, I reasoned, “OK, if time were not an issue, just how far could I walk if I had to? Now, suppose I just shuffle.…” I had read Scott Eppelman’s article in the last Footprint, where he described how he set a world record of 116+ miles on a treadmill in 24 hours. Scott is one of the fastest 100 mile runners in the world, so I was surprised that it sounded like he took short walking breaks every hour. I considered asking him to clarify – did he actually walk from the very first hour? He’d probably be too busy to respond to this back-of-the packer, or worse, what if he said, “You know Marty, you really should run a few more marathons before attempting this.” As elite an ultrarunner as Scott is, he still found time to respond right away, explaining that yes, one of the keys to his success is walking a bit every hour, from the beginning. He went on to encourage me, “Your first trail marathon is in the bag. Think bigger, and expect to achieve your goal.” He was there to advise me through the weeks ahead, but most importantly, he gave me the confidence that I could indeed run the entire 50 miles. Next, I factored in the critical time limitation, that all participants must start the last (4th) loop by 5 pm, which is 10 hours and 40 miles into the event. Scott’s biggest warning was to not start out too fast, so I decided to set a “do not (Continued on page 5)

Rick Sanford Ray Harris Thomas Goodwin Dennis Novak Doug Noell Kelly Eppelman Eileen Fontaine Chuck Franklin (first half marathon) Tony Dominiec Joe Luccioni Evelyn Luccioni Michael Cope Courtney Noell Michaelann Agoranos


(Continued from page 4)

exceed” pace for each of the first two loops, hopefully reserving energy and a little time for the third and most critical loop. I plugged it all into a spreadsheet, which also got a lot of laughs at Grasslands: “Hey Marty, are you going to run with that clipboard?” On race day, we arrived at the base camp at sunup. While everyone else was showing up with one duffle bag, it took me four trips to unload everything. Yes, it was immediately obvious to everyone that we were not regulars, and that we were there for the duration — maybe the entire weekend. As I made my way to the back of the pack for the start, I found K1 (Kelly Woodmansee) standing beside me, as if we were going to run together or something. She’s so much faster, there was no way I was going to keep up with her, but I thought it a nice gesture of friendship nonetheless. And so off we went. I was mentally prepared to be alone, so I was surprised that she ran with me the entire first loop of 14.4 miles. This unexpected company was one of the highlights of my day.

Several LGRAW members looked at me with this look of utter amazement and disbelief on their faces, so that was it — I was pumped up again and ready for another loop. I had more than 4 ½ hours left to make the cutoff for the next loop – that’s an average of 18.75 minutemiles. How hard could that be? I tried to focus not on the 25 miles remaining, but on finishing the 3rd loop before the cutoff time. I took one aid station at a time, trying to eat Gu before the station came into view, so that I’d be ready to wash it down with water without stopping. Yeah, right! A guy with a tall, funny hat talked me into a sip of ice cold beer. “These carbs will do you a world of good!” It was the best beer I’d ever tasted! As I neared another aid station, called, Red’s Bed & Breakfast, volunteers started yelling my name. I figured out it was Kelly Eppelman who had recognized me. She had run the half

A neat thing about this race is that you run through a chute lined with American flags and cross the finish line after each loop, with the crowd cheering like you just won the Olympics! I heard them yelling my name — it sounded like everyone was sharing my amazement that we were finishing the first loop so far ahead of schedule (uh oh, that was mistake number one). I made another mistake when I looked up from the trail to see who I could recognize — and almost fell flat on my face. K1 and I finished the first loop almost 20 minutes faster than my “do not exceed” pace, and after a short break, we took off for the second loop of 10.4 miles. Soon I felt like I was straining to keep up with K1. Checking my watch, and seeing we were now 30 minutes ahead of my “do not exceed pace”, I decided to lose sight of K1 and add some extra walk breaks. There wasn’t enough power remaining to run uphill any more, no matter how slight the grade. “OK, new plan – I’ll run all the flat and downhill portions for a while,” but it seemed like the entire loop was flat or downhill. How could that be? It’s a loop! Toward the end of this 2nd loop, I fought back the idea of calling it a day after the marathon distance. As I ran into base camp around noon, the roar was even louder than the last time.

A jubilant Marty Metzger marathon and then gone out to help others at one of the aid stations. On the next stretch, I tried to keep the stress in balance by enjoying the idea that I was really going to meet all my goals. If I remained injury free, I would easily make the cutoff time. I visualized entering base camp with an hour to spare, and this seemed to give me another lift. The next thing I knew, I was hearing the cheering, and it wasn’t even 3:30 -- I’d made the time cut-off!!!! I was now an ultrarunner! I began the last loop (10.7 miles) knowing that if I had to, I could walk and/or crawl 5

the distance. I could feel some nasty blisters, but I was going to finish this! Again, the LGRAW group pumped me up, and when it was time to depart, Jon Korte shuffled along with me the first half mile. I was running so slowly that he was walking alongside, but it felt great to have his company. As I ran off, he continued to shout out encouragement. Jon Korte, someone I think of as being within reach of Olympic Marathon speed, was standing there in the woods, screaming at me like I was his hero! It was a terrific lift, but even with that, it wasn’t long before I was walking more than running. “Forward progress . . . must keep making forward progress. ” The last 5 miles seemed more like 10 miles. I was hardly able to run at all, but I didn’t care – I was going to make it. I was hobbling along on a painful blister when Jon Korte appeared on the trail. Was I hallucinating? No, hallucinations don’t tell you to “get the lead out.” He turned around and shouted to the base camp that I was coming, and I heard the now familiar roar. I thought, “Wow, they’re shouting for me, Marty Metzger, Ultramarathon Runner.” I felt myself accelerate to a running limp as I rounded the corner to cross the finish line! Thanks to all of you for your friendship and companionship: Tom Zack, for slowing his pace to run with me at the Lake Grapevine Trails Run last year, where we thought, “Hey this is cool. I wonder how far we could run like this at Grasslands?” Suzi Cope, a veteran of 100-mile trail runs for introducing me to the idea of ultramarathon trail runs. Tim Brenner, who, like me, ran his first marathon at White Rock 2000, and went on to do a 50 mile run a few months ago, inspiring us all. K2, who more than lived up to her role as the ultimate cheerleader. She even massaged a painful knot out of my shoulder sometime after mile 25. Kandy, Frances, Jon Korte, K1 and K2, who hung around for hours to cheer my finish. My lovely wife, Tia, who not only supported me through the training, but who got up at 4 am on Saturday to share the excitement of my experience and scream my name loud enough to be heard over the crowd. God, for keeping me injury free, for providing the beautiful weather, and for giving me terrific friends. RAW!!!


Polar Bear Ices the Competition On a beautiful sunny morning, the trails of the LBJ National Grasslands awaited the invasion of a few hundred runners. The course was set in an area of rolling hills, some higher and longer than others. There were five or six streams that required a wide leap to cross. There were no mile markers and no crowd support. The only signs of organized race support were at the start and finish area, and at the aid stations on the course. This would be the first race I had to keep track of where I was by time, instead of distance — a new and interesting concept for me. Trail conditions were mostly good in that the soil was soft from rain earlier in the week. But it was hard not having a firm surface for planting a foot - I slipped on the loose soil and rock throughout my run. The main challenge was in locating a groove to run in. When passing the marathoners, I remember having to jump up out of the "tire track" lane onto the elevated "middle of the jeep” lane. This in itself was a workout. I wondered if my ankle was going to be able to take the beating from the uneven surfaces.

there somewhere, still a long way off. For most of the next 15 minutes, I was running alone, having to pay careful attention to where I was headed. The course was marked by paint blotches on scattered trees, or by posts at the side of the trail. In the quiet scene around me, all I could hear were the birds in the trees and my breath as I plowed through the soft soil of the trail. I reached the first aid station and quickly downed a half cup of electrolyte drink. As I ran on, horsehoof-craters were the only footing I could find. Were all the marathoners behind me now? It would make sense since they would be running at a slower

Early in the race, we encountered a range gate surrounded by muddy water we would either have to run through, or somehow avoid by clinging to the fence or gate. I grabbed the fence and hurled myself over most of the water successfully, but I opened up a decent cut on one of my fingers. As we returned to the start/finish area at about 15 minutes, I was surprised to find myself in third place, with the two leaders within sight.

pace. I started to think about what it would be like to win my first-ever race. Not knowing where I was on the course, what was ahead of me, or how far behind the next runner was, I quickly dashed those thoughts from my mind. I simply told myself to run like tomorrow would never arrive!

At 17 minutes, I caught the leader and decided to pace with him for a while. We pressed forward together, not saying a word, and then – ooops! A wrong turn had us moving into the brush! We stopped, looked at one another, and backtracked. Maybe I could find a better leader somewhere among the runners who had just passed us! We must have dropped about eight or nine places-- as I passed people, clothing and faces were familiar. I began to focus on the opportunity to gain the lead. It was 30 or 35 minutes into the race, and the next hour would be up to me. A scary thought! But I was feeling really good, and my legs seemed to be ready to go. Could I hang on? The finish was out

At about 65 minutes, I reached another aid station, quickly grabbed a cup of water and proceeded to choke on it. I regained my composure, and asked how far it was to the finish. Only 2½ miles ahead! A crazy thought ran through my head-- if I could continue to run strong, I might have a shot at winning the race! A ½ mile passed by… It seemed as though I was flying! Then, in one split second, my hopes crashed to the ground. I came upon another runner cruising along at a good clip. This guy had to be the front half marathon runner. If I had to hang with this guy and sprint to the finish, then I would do it. If he beat me going in, then so be it — at least I gave it my best effort. A few moments went by with

Frances Cook and “Polar Bear” Jon Korte

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neither of us saying anything to one another. Then, he offered a compliment about my pace and asked which race I was running. I hesitated, wondering how I should answer. I didn’t want to pick up that pace at that point. After a few seconds of thought, I decided to tell him what he wanted to know. After a brief pause I asked him which race he was in. His answer - THE MARATHON!! Cool! We began to talk a lot more freely and paced one another as we headed home. We came across a range fence where we had to unchain, open, close, and re-chain the gates. We reached a wide stream crossing where I almost fell into some very slippery mud. One more mistake was still to come. We jumped a stream at the bottom of a small valley, conquered the hill coming out, and ran out onto an open area of grassland. We continued straight ahead like we had been shot out of a cannon. What we didn’t see was a course marker off to our right. After cruising 150 meters across the meadow, I didn’t see any markers ahead of us, so we stopped and backtracked, finally spotting the proper course. The final mile was torturous! I had no idea where I was, and my watch seemed to be running slower by the minute. I wanted to hang on to the lead, so I continued to press the pace with the lead marathoner. I actually thought there was another 10 to 15 minutes to go at this point! There were no scouts out in the brush nearby, and no one to tell us it was "almost over", so we just happened upon the finish area. I think it surprised both of us, as we shot out of the brush. I looked at my watch and couldn’t believe my eyes! We would have passed the finish line if people hadn’t shouted at us to change direction. And just like that, it was over! Finishing time: 1:28:28. Placement: 1st overall out of 135 runners, and my first win, ever, in a race! Margin over the second place finisher was 2:01. The remainder of the day was spent at the finish area enjoying the company of those from the Lake Grapevine Runners & Walkers who had made the trip. I wasn’t about to depart until I saw Marty Metzger finish his first 50-mile race. Talk about inspirational--that was the pinnacle of a wonderful day! —Jon Korte (Editor’s Note: The title was my idea.)


K2 To You…. It's Spring Cleaning Time… Time to Clean Out the Procrastination Closet! Over the winter months, have you gotten out of your fitness routine? Waiting for the cold mornings to heat up? Well, they have! It's time to get outside and enjoy the spring. The wildflowers are days away from blooming and the trees are already budding out. April and May are Texas' finest months, and there’s no better time to start (or reestablish!) your commitment to stay in shape. I especially want to reach out to our walkers, and all those looking for opportunities to become more involved with the club. We have several fun-filled events coming up, and all are great opportunities for the whole family: • The Hound Dog Hustle April 26 (racers and volunteers needed) • Potluck breakfast and club house cleaning May 3 • The monthly Saturday Night Live dinner • The 5k PR challenge (this is open to walkers) • Submit an article for the Footprint • Sign up for water duty • Become an escort for Burn Camp As the days have warmed up, we find more and more people lingering outside the clubhouse after our weekend workouts, having a cup of coffee, and just enjoying one another’s company. It’s been rewarding to see so many new members finding a home at RAW. I’m proud of our club, and all it has to offer. I guarantee there's something for you! .

K2

In Step With… Tosca Engisch K2: How long have you been walking for fitness? TE: Since we became owners of a Siberian Husky that needed walking in 1989. K2: Why did you choose walking as a means of fitness? TE: It’s simple, it’ easy, and it's outdoors. K2: How long have you been a RAW member? TE: Two years. K2: What has been your fondest memory of a walking event? TE: A dog walk-fundraiser. K2: What do you consider to be your biggest walking achievement? TE: It's not an event for achievement. That’s why I like it! K2: Where is the most unique or unusual place you've ever gone for a walk? TE: The Virginia Beach Nature Preserve. K2: What do you do when you're not out walking? Tosca as we usually see her TE: Graduate school at the University of Dallas. I like painting, house maintenance, films, water aerobics, yoga, reading, studying, TV, music and museums. K2: What about your non-RAW life would surprise the club members? TE: Alan and I have four children, all living out of state, and we also have three grandchildren. K2: Tell us the story behind the camera we always see you with. TE: I like to capture the landscape in various lights depending on the time and season. I love to photograph the birds, beasts and other animals. [Editor’s note: where do you suppose runners fall in that mix? A special thanks to Tosca and Alan who took many of the terrific Bold in the Cold photos you saw in the last Footprint.]

Coming Soon to a Running Club Near You

New RAW WEAR Featuring Purple Team RAW Shorts and Singlets Cool Max Hats Classic black Shorts and White Tanks with the RAW Logo Available at the Hound Dog Hustle April 26

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Commonly Asked Foot Questions (First in a series for the Footprint) By Marybeth Crane, DPM, FACFAS Running and injuries go together like kids and dirt. A recent study revealed that 90% of runners have experienced injuries that have caused them to stop running for at least some time in their training programs. All injuries do not have to be activity ceasing. What follows is a few “tips of the trade” and answers to common questions to help keep your feet on the trail and off the coffee table. As an athlete, it is important to take special care of your feet. They are your most important piece of equipment! In order to keep your feet healthy, you should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of the most common ills that befall them. Remember, often times self-treatment or, more importantly, delayed treatment can make a minor problem into a major one! COMMON COMPLAINTS Heel pain: The most common complaint I hear from runners is heel pain. 99% are caused by Plantar Fasciitis, inflammation of the ligament that holds up your arch. Simply stated, PF is usually caused by faulty biomechanics and overpronation. Often times it is caused in runners by wearing shoes that are too soft or worn out or from increasing training mileage and speed too much, too soon. Stretching your Achilles tendon, icing, over the counter antiinflammatories, sturdier shoes, and arch supports are usually the cure. If symptoms persist for more than 3 weeks, custom orthotics, injections, and physical therapy are necessary to alleviate a chronic problem. Surgery is almost never needed unless the pain has been present for > 1 year! Neuromas: A neuroma is a pinched nerve between your toes that can cause aching, pain, burning and numbness in the ball of your foot and into your toes. Most commonly it occurs between the 3rd and 4th toes, but can also occur between the 2nd and 3rd toes. Neuromas are caused by faulty biomechanics, “falling of the metatarsal arch” from hammertoes, and too flexible or too tight shoes. They are more common in women (from higher heeled shoes), but are also common in runners who tend to run more on the ball of their foot (Yes, the faster people). Conservative treatment includes a change in shoe gear, padding, orthotics, steroid and sclerosing injections. Surgical excision is indicated if pain is severe and has been present for > 6 months.

Saturday, May 3 SPRING CLEANING DAY and BREAKFAST At the RAW Clubhouse Bring your gloves, elbow grease, and something to eat!

Congratulations RAW! Our club newsletter, the Footprint, has been selected by Road Runner Clubs of America (RRCA) as the BEST medium-sized running club newsletter in the nation! We were automatically entered into this contest after winning the award for the Southern Region. Kelly Richards and Susan Barnett will be going to Washington, D.C. to accept the award at the RRCA national convention. Thanks to everyone for their contributions to the newsletter. It is truly a team effort!

Tendonitis: Most tendonitis is caused by overuse. Too much, too soon, too fast….This includes Achilles tendonitis, Posterior tibial tendonitis, Peroneal tendonitis, ileotibial band syndrome, Patella tendonitis (runner’s knee), and others. They are all treated similarly: Relative rest, ice, stretching, strengthening (often forgotten), and antiinflammatories. If symptoms persist > 3-4 weeks, orthotics, physical therapy, Traumeel injections or steroid injections may be indicated. NEXT ISSUE….Sprains, Strains, Fractures and of course…. Fungal toenails. Questions? Write dr.crane@verizon.net….. Courtney, Susan & Eileen Celebrate! 8


Beltline Boondoggle 150K Another chapter in the Scott Eppelman book of extreme running was written on January 25, 2003. The concept was simple: Scott and his friend Blade Norman wanted to run all the way around Beltline Road. Fellow North Texas Trail Runners Paul Tidmore and Mark Dick agreed to be his crew, although they may not have known what they were getting into. Imagine being cooped up in a van for 19 hours watching a couple of guys run 93 miles in cold and wet conditions! Letha Cruthirds got up early and caught a plane from New Orleans to DFW to join the crew team. To make the run as safe as possible, the van was fully equipped with safety lights and signs, and all the clothing, food, and drinks the runners would need.

midnight. They were bundled up against the cold, including black face masks. The female attendant inside a convenience store at Beltline & Hwy 67 was looking a little nervous as Scott and Blade approached! We’ll try to get Doesn’t Scott have that “Let’s climb Mt. Scott to tell us a Everest” look about him? little more about his adventure, but you know Scott—it’s hard to get him to talk about himself. In the mean time, you can see more photos at http://www.nttr.org/html/beltline_boondoggle.htm.

Scott and Blade departed from the corner of Beltline and Moore in Coppell at

New Start Time for weekend training sessions

Spring Has Sprung!

7:00 a.m. Beginning Saturday, April 5

Celebrate by getting together with other LGRAW members for an evening of fun

Saturday, April 12, 6:00 pm Bill and Annette Collins BYOB and a dish to pass. Directions will be available at the clubhouse, or email Bill and Annette at ajcwdc@attbi.com.

RSVP appreciated

Proud Sponsor of the 2003 Hound Dog Hustle 9


Marathon Madness and More Motorola Marathon Austin, TX February 16, 2003 Steven Sepeda 2:59:02 Carol Novak 5:34:58 Lucian Cojocaru 3:4:26 Scott Conard 4:17:59 Lee Reebodos 3:08:50 PR Stacie Sauber 3:10:19 39th overall; 3rd in her age group; PR Alan Walker 3:20:24 Boston Qualifier; PR David Ball 3:24:05 PR Scott Decker 3:28:37 PR Major Mike Eccleston 3:47:17 Dennis Novak 3:50:20 Mel Crafton 3:51:54 PR Hélène Walker 3:55:22 Boston Qualifier; PR Cleveland Ray Paschal 3:56:02 Susan Barnett 4:40:07 First Marathon! Lisa O'Brien 3:52:07 PR Ted Amyx 4:18:03 Mike Murphy 4:07:32 Dennis Shanahan 3:09:00 Austin the Half Yolanda Hopping 1:28:43 Relay Eileen Fontaine & Tina Covington 3:51:45 3rd place Female Masters

The Pride of RAW: Stacie Sauber 3rd place age group (out of 369)

By Hélène Walker Austin 2003 … What memories will it forever evoke in me? Susan’s first marathon, of course; she had trained so hard to get there. Austin 2003 will also remind me that I ran under four hours for the very first time, allowing me to qualify for Boston. But Austin 2003 will forever be “Making a Scene at Dinner” vivid in my memory Back row: Sam Barnett, Scott Decker, Hélène and Alan Walker, because I ran it mainly for my dad, who passed Cleveland Ray Paschal, Eileen Fontaine, Dennis Novak away two weeks before Middle row: Elizabeth, Sarah, Andrew and David Ball, Susan and Jim Barnett marathon day. I know Front Row: Stacie Sauber, Susan and Major Mike Eccleston that he was with me all along, watching over me, for 4 hours, what I need for Boston. I making sure that I did not get asked how Susan was doing, and she said discouraged. My dad was not an athlete, pretty well. Good. Around mile 24 I he never went to the gym, never biked heard my name again. K2, of course! This nor ran, nor played any other sports. time, she was cheering from her car. She And I know that talking PRs, weather must have been exhausted! Later on, K2 conditions, or race courses with him was told me that she had never seen absolutely futile because he just did not someone so happy to go to Boston. She understand why on earth anyone would was expecting me to be exhausted too want to torture his/her body and soul by the long run. But between the that way, but he was very proud of my excellent race, the easy course and the accomplishments. And somehow he emotion of running in memory of my squeezed his way in during Austin, and dad, I was all pumped up. stayed with me the whole race. Every time I thought about him, I started crying, Austin will live in my memory forever. It and I am sure that many spectators must will always evoke emotional memories: have thought that I was hurting from the sadness, success, and achievement. long run. Oh yes, they were right, I was hurting, but not physically. I was hurting because we never got to say good-bye. Since we were going to celebrate his 79th birthday after the marathon, we kept putting the long transatlantic flight off, thinking that he was okay, and that he would wait for us. But he never did. The race itself: What else do I remember? Madame la Présidente, seemed to be everywhere at once encouraging us. The first time I saw her was at mile 11, during a slight uphill in a residential area. It was so nice to be recognized among the running crowd— “LN! LN!” K2 ran a few steps with me, asking me if I needed anything, and how I felt so far (pretty good, I must say). I remember telling her that I was on time 10

No wonder she was so “cheery” in Austin!


Marathon Madness and More By Susan Barnett Running my first marathon (especially at my age!) truly ranks among the highlights of my life. I never in a million years pictured myself doing such a thing, but here I was at the starting line, very nervous but confident that I could do it. When I think back to the experience, one aspect dwarfs everything else, and that is how touched I was by the incredible support I received. I wish I could find the words that are as special as the feelings I want to express. I’d like to thank many people, but I’m especially blessed to have had three great friends encouraging me along the way: Eileen, Hélène and Kelly. You’re the best! Stacie gave me a book of marathon quotes after the race, and I love what one runner said: “Running a marathon is a feeling that you can’t buy. You have to earn it.” Well said.

Fort Worth Cowtown Marathon February 22, 2003 Dana Bullard 3:12:16 First Place Female! JW Keeling 5:00:23 Bruce Herndon 4:41:48 First Marathon! Mike Murphy 4:07:31 (two marathons six days apart within 1 second of each other!) Terry Marcott 3:03:10 Bob Smeby 3:19:22 Relay Teams: The First Noell- Alan/Lisa/Courtney 5:08:12 B-Batt '91-Doug Noell and two work buddies 4:15:12 RAW-Jeff Brown, Melanie Davies and Rick Fogle 3:38:05 10k: Duncan Stewart 36:26 Tina Covington 52:30 Tom Zack 58:55 5k: Coby Bullard 16:02 Kat Loewen 22:28

different event formats: 50k, 50 mile, 100k, 100 mile, and timed runs. This was to encourage racers to try the various race types, and to reward versatility. There were also bonus points for winning races. For rules and details on the 2003 series go to www.InsideTexasRunning.com or E-mail Scott Eppelman at runs2x@earthlink.net.

Hurtle up the Hancock (aka The Vertical Marathon) Chicago, IL February 23, 2003 Marsha O'Loughlin ran up 94 floors of the John Hancock building in 21 minutes! (at the age of 58, no less!)

Napa Valley Marathon Napa, CA March 2, 2003 By David Aungst

RAW Member "Lethal Letha" Cruthirds wins The Toughest Series in Texas

Eileen and Susan wondering what the @*#&! they’re doing here (at the start)

Nokia Sugar Bowl Mardi Gras Marathon New Orlean, LA February 16, 2003 Bryon Benoit 3:04:15 Stan Ujka 2:57:22 13th overall, third in his age group

The great state of Texas has more to offer in the way of ultra-marathons than many runners realize. Scott Eppelman wanted to correct that, so he created the Texas Ultra Roundup (TUR), a new race series that scored and tracked race outcomes. For 2002, the results of all ultras held in the state were eligible for inclusion in the TUR. The inaugural year had no series entry fee and no awards, just bragging rights as big as Texas. The results of all ultradistance runs of 50 kilometers or longer or any timed run counted toward series scoring. A maximum of six races counted toward each participant's point total for the year. Letha won the series with an impressive total of 525 points. The scoring system used a percentage of the runner's time or distance compared to the event winner. Bonus points were awarded for scoring in four or five of the 11

Damn you, Jimmy Buffet! Several years ago Jimmy Buffet wrote a bestseller entitled “A Pirate Looks at 50”. In it he recalls many significant events in his life. These events had led him on this “long, strange trip” that had become his life. A passion that he had developed over the years was salt water fly-fishing. After long deliberation he finally decided to do something to commemorate his first 50 years on this planet. He arranged a fly-fishing safari throughout Central America, feeding his true passion while visiting old friends. After reading this book, I started reflecting on my own upcoming “landmark” birthday and wondered if I could come up with an activity that combined my true passion in life while visiting old friends. After checking various web-sites I found my answer…I came up with the screwball idea to run a marathon on both the East coast and the West coast to commemorate my 50 years on this rock. (Continued on page 12)


Marathon Madness and More (Continued from page 11)

My first choice was a no-brainer. The Kiawah Island marathon was a race that I had heard about for years from a running buddy in Charleston, SC. The December 15 date worked into my schedule nicely, being just over a month after my birthday. The second marathon that caught my eye was the March 2 running of the Napa Valley marathon. As it turned out both of these marathons were celebrating their 25th anniversary. Two marathons were celebrating 25 years and I was celebrating 50. Coincidence? I think not…. December 15th was a rotten day to be running a marathon on the East coast. The weather was rainy, mid 30’s and 2025 mph wind! Being a double loop course, we ran 6 miles of each half into the wind. Since I hadn’t ran a marathon in 9 ½ years, my goal was to finish near four hours. I passed 20 miles at 3:00 and then the wheels came off—both calves cramped and the wind kicked up. It got so bad I even began singing Margaritaville the last few miles to take my mind off my legs. I blew out a flip flop and hobbled across the finish in 4:21.

I knew that I could do better… March 2nd started very early. At 3:30 am I drove from San Francisco to Napa to catch the bus to the start. At 7:00 a.m.

What Dave won’t do for a glass of wine!

the race began in Calistoga, heading down the Silverado Trail. This time I was ready… Ray Harris had ridiculed me into more training miles and I was packing enough GU for two marathons! It was an absolutely beautiful day to run. 48° at the start with no wind or clouds. All morning long, if I wasn’t taking in Napa Valley’s beauty, I was watching the hot air balloons drifting by. At about 20 miles I realized that I was on pace for a 3:53 flat. That might not excite a lot of you, but that was 36 seconds better than my 10 ½ year-old PR! I held the pace as long as these old bones would stand it, but I came in at 3:54:11. I was elated with my time. The rest of the afternoon was spent in the outdoor patio at Downtown Joe’s, enjoying the local amber ale and swapping stories with other runners. (Did I mention the amber ale?) The day ended back in my motel room, reflecting on the day’s accomplishment, the improvement over the Kiawah Island marathon and the sense of personal satisfaction from finally completing that personal “bet” with myself. Thank you, Jimmy Buffet!

Saturday Night Live! The first Saturday of every month, our club meets at a local restaurant for an informal get-together. This is the perfect opportunity to introduce your nonrunning friends and family to RAW in a warm, casual environment. Last month, over 50 people were there, and everyone seemed to have a wonderful time. We hope you’ll take advantage of this opportunity to get to know your fellow club members. Plus, it’s fun to see what they look like when they’re not sweaty! Check the front page of the Footprint, or our website at runnersandwalkers.com to find out the location of the next Saturday Night Live!

Volunteers are needed! Stephanie Ruyle is the captain of the American Cancer Society Relay for Life “RAW” Team. Teams walk or run an all night vigil on May 16 to raise awareness and money to fight cancer. The intent is to have a team member running or walking on the track at all times throughout the night. This year’s event will take place at Colleyville Heritage High School. This is a wonderful way to show your support for cancer survivors, to remember loved ones, and to raise funds to wipe out cancer. You can help by joining the team or making a donation. Our goal is for each team member to raise $100, and we’d like to have the team filled by April 25. For more information, contact Stephanie Ruyle: smruy@yahoo.com. 12


5K PR Challenge by Rick Sanford In the past two months, I haven’t run nearly as much as I would like to. I’ve been incredibly under-motivated and I think I know why. I believe my lack of motivation stems from not having a running goal. I’m not training for a specific race, nor am I running toward any particular milestone. Don’t misunderstand me. I enjoy going out for a mind clearing, stress busting calorie burner, but running just for the sake of running won’t get me out the door consistently. I need a goal to work towards. I need to put a plan in place and hold myself accountable for executing the plan. So, in the interest of boosting my motivation, I’ve set a running goal for this spring. My goal is to run a 5K PR (personal record), and I want to challenge other RAW members to join me and set their own 5K PR. The target race for our 5K

PR CHALLENGE will be the Plano Pacers 5K on Saturday, May 31st. Race entry is only $5, a real bargain considering that they give out awards and door prizes. We will have about 8 weeks to plan and train for the race. There are lots of training plans to choose from out there. A sample plan from www.halhigdon.com appears here. Not interested? Let’s up the ante. All 5K PR CHALLENGE participants will put $5 into the pot and we’ll award the pot to the two people who better their previous PRs by the widest margin. Your total financial contribution is only $10, still cheaper than almost every race out there. You’ve got a chance to win a bit of cash and set a new PR. Now you’re interested. While I’m sure that no RAW members would sandbag for a little extra green, we’ll have to put some rules into effect.

Novice Training Schedule

* For our CHALLENGE purposes, you should use your best 5K time as your PR. * If your PR was established way back in the first running boom or if you have been slowed by advanced age, then you can use your best 5K time since Jan 1, 2002 as your PR. * If you have never run a 5K or can't remember running a 5K, run one in the next week or two and establish a PR. The two participants who beat their PR by the largest margin will split the pot. Pretty simple. Please let me know if I’m leaving out something obvious. So, there it is. I’ve set my goal and I hope you’ll join me on May 31st for camaraderie and friendly competition. If you wish to join the CHALLENGE, please see me at the clubhouse.

Advanced Training Schedule

Week

1

2

3

4

5

6

Week

1

2

3

4

5

6

MON

rest

rest

rest

rest

rest

rest

MON

3

3

3

3

3

3

TUE

2

2

2.5

2.5

3

3

TUE

6 x 400 8 x 200 7 x 400

WED

rest or easy run

rest or easy run

rest or easy run

rest or easy run

rest or easy run

rest or easy run

WED

rest or easy run

THUR

2

2

2.5

2.5

3

3

THUR

30 min 35 min 35 min 40 min 40 min 30 min tempo tempo tempo tempo tempo tempo

FRI

rest

rest

rest

rest

rest

rest or easy run

FRI

rest

rest

rest

rest

rest

rest or easy run

SAT

cross train

cross train

cross train

cross train

cross train

rest

SAT

3

3

3

3

3

rest

5-K race

SUN

SUN

30 min 35 min 40 min 45 min 45 min

Training schedules are written by Hal Higdon 13

rest or easy run

rest or easy run

10 x 200 rest or easy run

8 x 400 6 x 200

rest or easy run

60 min 75 min 80 min 85 min 90 min

rest or easy run

5-K race


5K Race and 1-Mile Fun Run/Walk & Dog and Vendor Expo When: Saturday, April 26th, 2003 Where: Oak Grove Park in Grapevine, Texas Race Day Itinerary: 6:30 - 7:45 a.m. Registration 7:00 - 11:00 am Dog and vendor expo 8:00 a.m. 1-mile fun run/walk 8:30 a.m. 5K run 10:00 am Award ceremony and door prizes! Dogs will be allowed to participate in the 1-mile fun run/walk only

Registration:

REGISTER BY MAIL:

Brochures available at DFW Petco stores and area running stores Mail forms to: Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers PO Box 2982 Grapevine, TX 76099 (Postmark by April 19, 2003 to receive lowest registration fee) REGISTER ON LINE:

Register online at www.signmeupsports.com For more information go to www.runnersandwalkers.com or call 817-424-1756. WALK-IN REGISTRATION AND PACKET PICK-UP:

Grapevine Petco at 1250 William D. Tate Ave. Thursday, April 24 and Friday April 25 from 3:00 – 8:00 pm RACE DAY REGISTRATION:

Race site from 6:30 – 7:45 am

our Gold sponsors:∑ Petco Nestlé Purina Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Man’s Best Friend

Star Telegram Greenies Petropolitan

last name:

Awards: •M ∑ edals for all child finishersl • A∑ wards for top three male and female finishers 5K Race: • $∑ 50 Gift certificate to Fort Worth Running Company •M ∑ asters, this is the race for you! Wine tasting party

1-Mile:

for 35 people from Tony's Wine Warehouse to masters male and female winners • A∑ wards for top 3 male and female finishers in the following age groups: 8 and under, 9 - 10, 11-12, 13-14, 15-18, 19-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70 and over

Hound Dog Hustle Entry Form

first:

address: state:

Fabulous door prizes! • S∑ ony PlayStation, XBox, and Nintendo Cube from GameStop •∑ F∑ urrari 450 Kennel from Doskocil •∑ V∑ isit to Wag the Dog Daycare •∑ W ∑ ine tasting for 35 from Tony's Wine Warehouse! ‘Ask the vet’ booth– • b∑ y Dr. Gene Giggleman, DVM Exciting Demonstration groups– • G∑ rapevine Police Department K-9 Unit •∑ C∑ anine Companions •∑ F∑ irst Response Search and Rescue (and paramedics) •∑ K∑ -9 Friends Visiting Therapy Dogs •∑ M ∑ cGruff, The Crime Dog •∑ P∑ aws for a Cause∑ •∑ U∑ SDA Beagle Brigade Free Stuff ! • W ∑ ienerschnitzel hot dogs to all registered participants • R∑ unning analysis courtesy of Fort Worth Running Company • Coca-Cola, Frito-Lay and Breadhaus products • Race packets filled with goodies for you and your canine

city: zip:

Check box: ❏ Male ❏ Female Race choice: ❏ 5K ❏ 1-Mile ❏ Both races [Extra $5 entry fee for both events allows for one shirt only]

Enclosed fees: $

birth date: T-Shirt size: ❏S ❏M ❏L ❏ XL ❏ XXL (add $1) ❏ Youth L [NOTE: T-Shirts are guaranteed to the first 550 entrants]

age on April 26, 2003:

RACE FEES:

Saturday, April 26, 2003

LGRAW member or Student (19 and under)

Single event postmarked by April 19,2003 ❏ $10 Single event April 20–25, 2003 ❏ $12 Single event Race Day ❏ $15 Group Rate (5 or more by April 19, 2003) ❏ $10 Additional fee to enter both events ❏ $5 XXL T-Shirt ❏ $1 LGRAW Membership ❏ $20 indiv, ❏ $30 family (optional) , donation to rescue leagues (optional) $ , TOTAL $

NON member

❏ $15 ❏ $17 ❏ $20 ❏ $10 ❏ $5 ❏ $1

How did you hear about the Hound Dog Hustle? Make check payable to "LGRAW" and mail with entry to: LGRAW, P.O. Box 2982, Grapevine, TX 76099

WAIVER STATEMENT: Entry invalid if not signed. I know that participating in events can be potentially hazardous. By my signature I assume full and complete responsibility for any injury or accident which may occur to me during the event or while I am on the premises of the event, and I hereby release and hold harmless Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers, Inc., the USATF and all sponsors from all claims of liabilities of any kind arising our of my participation in this event. signature:

Signature of participant or parent if participant is under 18

print name:

date:


Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers Club Membership Application Name: ___________________________________________

____ Male ____ Female

DOB:____/____/____

Address: _________________________________________

____ New Membership

____ Renewal

City: ____________________________________________

Is it okay to publish this information in the club directory?____

State: ______________________

Participating Family Members: Name:_______________________ Name:_______________________ Name:_______________________ Name:_______________________

Zip Code: _________

Home Phone: (____)_______________________________ E-Mail Address: __________________________________

___M ___F ___M ___F ___M ___F ___M ___F

DOB:___/___/___ DOB:___/___/___ DOB:___/___/___ DOB:___/___/___

I know that participating and volunteering to work in club events can be potentially hazardous. I assume all risks associated with running, walking, and volunteering to work in club events. Having read this waiver and knowing these facts, and in consideration of your acceptance of my application for membership, I, for myself and anyone entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release the Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers, Inc., United States of America Track and Field, and all sponsors, their representatives and successors from all claims of liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation in club activities. I grant permission to all of the foregoing to use any photographs, motion pictures, recordings or any other records for any legitimate purpose.

Membership Dues: _____ $20 Single _____ $30 Family

Mail to: LGRAW P.O. Box 2982 Grapevine, TX 76099

Check here if you need two membership cards: _____ Signature____________________________________________________

New Members Michaelann and Paul Agoranos Ron Alvey Kathy Anthon Marty Elliott Kim and Jimmy Hale Diane Hernandez Doug and Mary Keeffe Robert Kolbaba John Nail C. Anthony Patrick Dennis Shanahan Jenny Steffes

Welcome to LGRAW!

Date:_____/_____/_____

Personal Touches

Renewals Dan Banse Judy and Larry Branigin Tanya Bubash The Bush Family Dr. Marybeth Crane Letha Cruthirds Mike Doud The Eccleston Family Rick Fogle Wade Hampton Jack Hase Rich Hendler Bruce Johanns JW Keeling Katherine Loewen The Luccioni Family Lee Miller Marsha O'Loughlin Chris Reyher Rianne Rhead Kelly Woodmansee

15

Dee Stephens is in Baylor Hospital in Grapevine with a very rare form of pneumonia (1 in 1,000,000 get it!) Her spirits are good, and we know that will help her to get back on her feet soon.

Katie Woodard is doing well and adjusting to her new lifestyle of dialysis three times a week. She’ll continue dialysis for at least a year and then she may be a candidate for a kidney transplant. It’s been great to have Curtis back on the trails with us.

Jack Hase’s father Jim is coming home to continue his rehabilitation and recovery, following a serious car accident

Congratulations to David Lane on his new home in Plano. He would like to announce to his fellow RAW members: “I am accepting donations for any of your services including, but not limited to, moving, painting, mowing and cleaning. All are welcome to visit (work is not required).”


LakeGrapevine Grapevine Runners and Walkers Lake Runners and Walkers P.O.Box Box2982 2982 P.O. Grapevine, 76099 Grapevine, TXTX 76099

4th Annual Hound Dog Hustle and Dog Expo

PRSRT PRSRT STD STD AA U.S. Paid U.S.Postage Postage Paid Grapevine, TX Grapevine, TX Permit 243 Permit No. No. 243

April 26

8:00 am

RAW Clubhouse

W.W.L.D. ? By Dennis Novak As we strive to become better runners, many wish us well, but we occasionally come across the scolds, the nay sayers, the skeptics – those who tend to discourage our running efforts. Our spouses (“You’re going to be gone again THIS Saturday?”); our children (“… and we have a soccer tournament this weekend in Alpine”); our bosses (“…and if you come to work again smelling like that …”); even friendly SUV drivers (“HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONK”) seem to conspire against us. The worst of the killjoys, however, works at, of all places, Runners World Magazine. Her name is Liz Applegate and her job appears to be to tell us all what we must eat if we are to become the runners we were meant to be. Now I have to let this sink in because I’d always thought that I ran so that I could become the eater that I was truly meant to be …. but alas, I am apparently mistaken. Ms. Applegate (and if memory serves correctly, isn’t that the same last name that Satan uses in Damn Yankees? Coinci-

dence? I think not.) has decreed that the road to running salvation is routed through the extremely narrow, sugar – free, low-fat, high-fiber gate. If that’s so, you’re going to see me wearing the goathorns of the running damned. A brief web-stroll through a number of Liz’s nutritional articles yields such tempting tidbits as: - the various forms of soy. You got your tofu, your soy flour, your miso, your tempeh, your natto (apparently similar to miso, only smellier). - Hearty lunches like a garden burger with a side of baby carrots - Can’t forget dessert! Well there’s fruit, Powerbars, “frozen treats” (I think you freeze the tempeh and then dip it into melted carob), and then there’s fruit. - Not to mention Liz’s “25 best snacks” which include carrots, cereal (at least she approves of Cap’n Crunch), prunes, green soybeans, rice cakes and (drum roll here) ….. hummus on Wheat Thins!!!!!!! It sounds like a commercial for bulimia. 16

I see no mention of the cornerstones of my diet: Mickey D’s Spanish Omelet Bagel, home-fries, Milwaukee Joe’s frozen custard, Little Debbie granola bars, chile rellenos, Sam Adams Boston Lager or my own special home-made pizza. Is this what dooms me to the middle (if I’m lucky) of the pack? … why there’s no running-biography out there titled “NOV”? Liz (the wicked nutritionist of the West) would have you think so. Or maybe a miso is as good as a mile. This morning, my bathroom scale registered a pound heavier than yesterday. Must be the weight training – or I’m a little better hydrated. Truth is – I’m a lot of pounds heavier than when I raced in my early 30’s. (I think it’s called trading in the 6-pack abs for the entire keg). I really should be pulling out the old cruciferous vegetables (maybe mixed with lentils). Liz would be proud of me. Then again, my daughter’s a Girl Scout and we have this pantry full of Thin Mints. I’ll just go long this Saturday morning. [Editor’s Note: Is there any question that this guy is slightly demented?]

April 2003  

The FOOTPRINT is Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers club newsletter. Each issue features articles showcasing members' adventures, fitness ti...

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