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Burnaby Lautier The origins of a surname


Š Lex Polman lexpolman@wxs.nl First edition: January 2012 Translated from Dutch January 2012 Editor: Sandra Winfield

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1. Preface When she asked where the name BURNABY LAUTIER came from, Renée got the following reply from her grandmother1: Well, child, at some point in previous generations there was a young man called BURNABY who wanted to marry a girl whose surname was LAUTIER. Mr BURNABY asked consent from the girl’s father for his son to marry her. But as Mr LAUTIER only had daughters and he wanted to prevent his name from dying out he stipulated a condition: the surname BURNABY had to be coupled with that of LAUTIER to make sure that his surname would survive. And that’s how it happened; the family name BURNABY LAUTIER was born as a result of that marriage. However when Emile asked his grandfather2 the same question, he received a different answer: My grandmother, Mary Harriot PANTIN, suddenly added BURNABY to her son Henri’s surname LAUTIER after her husband died. The most likely reason seems to be that someone called BURNABY was actually Henri’s real father. Your father never accepted this theory because he was a bit of a Francophile, and didn’t want to believe he might be descended from a damned Englishman. Moreover, it appears that the Civil Administration also had trouble with the name. Is BURNABY in the name Henry Burnaby Lautier a surname, or a Christian name? And how exactly should it be spelled: Henri, Henry or Henrij? Transcribing handwritten records led to even further interpretations and possibly introduced new errors: over the years, BURNABY appears as both a Christian name and a surname in the records. Nonetheless, despite the many recorded variations, the name somehow survived intact into the 21st century.

Illustration 1: From the Residency records of Djokjakarta3 in the Administration-Almanac 1841

In this article, known facts have been intermingled with fiction. Things may have happened as suggested here; on the other hand, in reality they may have been rather different.

1

Marie Henriëtte Elisabeth BURNABY LAUTIER 1878-1945, see Family tree p 21. Emile BURNABY LAUTIER 1879 - 1941, see Family tree p 21. 3 YogYakarta, Indonesia. 2

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2. The Huguenots When the French King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes4 in 1685, he eliminated all future prospect of religious freedom for many French Protestants. Since 1679, these ‘Huguenots’ had already been persuaded or forced to convert to Catholicism, and their religious practices had been banned. After a period of over 100 years of relative religious tolerance, the prospect of a holy war, with its associated burning of church buildings, looting, rape, persecution, galley slavery and prohibition of Huguenot church services, meant that to flee from their homeland, although prohibited, seemed the only possible means of securing safety and religious freedom. Even escape was not without its dangers, as informers often looted any seized goods and many refugees were imprisoned, wounded or worse. In the period from 1650 to 1710 between 170,000–200,000 Huguenots fled France, with this exodus reaching its peak in the years immediately following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. Existing trade routes were used as escape routes.

Illustration 2: Destinations of refugees from France during the reign of Louis XIV Many refugees were members of the bourgeoisie, or were wealthy citizens or craftsmen. They took with them to those countries who accepted them (by some of whom they had even been officially invited, for example to Germany by the Edict of Potsdam5) many newly-developed techniques, materials and methods. Most fleeing Huguenots had suffered confiscation and theft of their goods or

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In 1598 King Henry IV issued the ‘Edict of Nantes’ which awarded the Huguenots religious freedom. Henry IV had himself previously been a Huguenot, but converted to Catholicism in order to be able to ascend the French throne. Despite this freedom of religion France was not really safe for Huguenots. From 1660 onwards an increasing number decided to flee the country. 5 Elector Frederick William I of Brandenburg issued the Edict of Potsdam at the end of October 1685, three weeks after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. This held out to Huguenots the prospect not only of tax and financial advantages, but also of freedom of religion and language.

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paid heavy bribes in order to obtain safe passage and therefore had to rely on help for such basic essentials such as housing, food and clothing when they arrived in their new homes. For Protestant silversmiths, reasons for leaving were economic as well as religious. In 1686, Louis XIV decreed that all silver in France had to be handed over to the authorities to help finance the war against the Netherlands. This decree even applied to churches, with the only exceptions being sacred vessels and cutlery for individual use. For most silversmiths, this decree meant a collapse of the future market for their wares.

Illustration 3: Huguenots fleeing from the port of La Rochelle6 Although countries accepting refugees saw occasional resistance to what they saw as foreigners who enjoyed homes, tax benefits and work at the expense of the native population, for the most part integration was a success. By the end of the first year Jean-Louis, Marie and Pierre had already been transformed into John Lewis, Mary and Peter; looking back, it appears that full integration was achieved within three to four generations. Among the Protestant refugees from France at the end of the 17th and early 18th centuries were Simon PANTIN and Jeanne MAUBERT from Rouen (76 Seine-Maritime) and their two children, JeanPierre LEAUTIER (LIOTIER) from La Beaume (05 Hautes-Alpes) and Marguerite DEVILLE from Orange (84 Vaucluse).

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“Het weg vlugten der Gereformeerde uyt Vrankrijk�, (Flight of members of the Dutch Reformed Church from France), engraving by Jan Luyken, in Elie Benoist, Geschiedenis van het Edict van Nantes (History of the Edict of Nantes), Delft, 1695.

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3. Pantin Simon (0)7 PANTIN was a member of a large family of silversmiths who were based in and around Rouen in France. When in 16818 he and Jeanne MAUBERT fled to London with their two children Simon (I) and Esther, Esaie PANTIN had already gone before them as a pioneer. Together with Pierre HARRACHE, David WILLAUME, Peter COURTAULD, Abraham BUTEUX, Pierre PLATEL and Paul DE LAMEYRIE, Simon (I) PANTIN formed the first generation of Huguenot-descended goldsmiths working in London.

Illustration 4: Hallmarks of Lewis (I) PANTIN and Simon (I) PANTIN9 Because of the exceptional quality and style of their work, they exerted a strong influence on the development of English art jewellery, making their own transition from the late Baroque to the new Rococo style. Maintaining a close community, they intermarried and acted as mentors to each other's children; as a result this style was also fairly consistent. The first generation line was continued by Simon (II) PANTIN, Lewis (I) PANTIN and Lewis (II) PANTIN, all of whom were jewellers of repute.

Illustration 5: Pair of sauce boats, 1737 Lewis (I) PANTIN

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Most of the PANTIN goldsmiths were named Esaie, Simon or Lewis. Available sources do not provide conclusive evidence of all relationships, therefore for clarity in most works they are usually delineated using Roman numerals (incremented over time). This convention is also adopted here. 8 The first mention of Simon (0) in London dates from 1681 in the Temoinage of Threadneedle Street Church. In 1682-84 support from this church for “Simon PANTIN, goldsmith, with wife and two children� is mentioned. 9 The hallmark of Simon (I) PANTIN contains a peacock, most likely referring to his first work address in London, which was in Peacock Street.

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Lewis (II) PANTIN was born on 6 July 1739 and on 18 February 1769 he married Jane Lambert, whose family originated from Rouen or Saint Quentin. The second child from this marriage was Mary Harriot PANTIN, born on 9 February 1771 at 45 Fleet Street, London, and baptized in the church which lay almost opposite the house (Saint Dunstan-in-the-West, London). Lewis’s company, CROWN & SCEPTRE, was established at the same address, where he worked as a gold- and silversmith, jeweller and toymaker. Mary Harriot had an older brother Lewis (III) (* 1770); she would be followed by six other brothers and sisters10.

Illustration 6: Fleet Street c179211 In 1781 the family moved to 36 Southampton Street, near Covent Garden, where Mary Harriot enjoyed the sounds and smells of the market. However her father was declared bankrupt in 1800, despite the eminent position he had achieved as a goldsmith: he never established a new business and died in 1806. His son, Lewis (III) PANTIN, started his own company before he finally left for the Caribbean (Trinidad and Tobago).

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Henry (*1772), Henry (*1774), Elizabeth (*1775), Charles (*1777), George (*1778) and Frederick (*1780). The first Henry probably died before he was a year old. 11 London Horrowood map (1792-1799): locations of Saint Dunstan-in-the-West Church, 20 Fleet Street (birthplace of Joseph LAUTIER) and 45 Fleet Street (birthplace of Mary Harriot PANTIN) are highlighted.

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4. Lautier Jean Pierre LAUTIER12, the son of Louis LAUTIER and Françoise BERNARD, was born on 26 September 1692 in La Beaume en Dauphiné (05 Hautes-Alpes), about 40 km west of Gap. The LAUTIERS were woolcombers and dyers. But the dragoons of Louis XIV were also carrying out persecutions in the HautesAlpes, and so in the early 18th century Jean Pierre fled to Berlin, his most likely escape route being through the Alps to Switzerland and then via Frankfurt am Main13 to Berlin. The Edict of Potsdam encouraged Huguenots to come to live and work to Berlin.

Illustration 7: The Edict of Potsdam In 1704 Theodore DEVILLE and Marie CHARRIER fled with their daughter Marguerite (*1699) from Orange to Berlin. As part of the agreement on the assignment of rights of the Principality of Orange to France14, those citizens who refused to convert to Catholicism were granted passports and made to leave the city. Elector Frederick William I of Prussia agreed to receive them. The journey of 758 refugees by boat on the Rhone to Geneva, and then to Berlin via Frankfurt-amMain, took almost a year.

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At the end of the 17th century we see the following name variations: LAUTIER, LEAUTIER, LIOTIER, LOTIER and the name LAUTIER. 13 Frankfurt-am-Main was for many years a major interchange for refugees to Germany. 14 Fred W. Felix, Die Ausweisung der Protestanten aus dem Fürstentum Orange 1703 und 1711-1713. LIAUTIER. This article standardizes on

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Frederick William I allowed the Huguenot immigrants to preserve their own religion and language, granting them both legal and religious autonomy. As a result the French colony grew and the Huguenots developed a close-knit community, so that by 1700 18% of the population of Berlin was French. In April 1723 Jean-Pierre LAUTIER15 and Marguerite DEVILLE were married in the Französische Kirche in Berlin.

Illustration 8: The French Church at the Gendarmenplatz in Berlin Preceded by five brothers and a sister, Jean-Louis LAUTIER was born on 20 August 1740. LAUTIER Père had by then risen to be owner of one of the most famous trading houses in Berlin, in which capacity he probably met the PANTIN family in London, possibly in the silver market. The business was a success and developed into the trading houses JORDAN&LAUTIER16 and PLATZMANN&LAUTIER17. However the childhood of Jean-Louis was cut short by the death of his father in 1746 followed by that of his mother three years later. Jean-Louis, their youngest child, was only eight years old when he was orphaned. After working in his father's business, he left for London with his brother Jaques François and learned the silversmith’s trade. In 1767 he married Ann PANTIN, and in 1773 Joseph LAUTIER was born at 20 Fleet Street, where the workplace of John LAUTIER was then established. Joseph was naturalised as an English citizen by the English Parliament in 1772. Joseph lived just a stone's throw from his cousin Mary Harriot PANTIN, who was two years older than him and resided at number 4518. They saw each other every Sunday in church and at other meetings of the Huguenot community. However it seems that Joseph felt more at home working in trade, like his ancestors, than in his father’s silversmith craft. In the early 1790s Joseph, his sister Harriot (*1774) and Mary Harriot PANTIN left London for India.

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Also known by the names Pierre and Jean. Traders in gold and silver 17 Traders in silk fabrics, among other things 18 See map in Illustration 6. 16

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5. Burnaby The title "Baronet BURNABY OF BROUGHTON HALL" in the county of Oxfordshire was awarded to Sir William BURNABY19 in 1767 in recognition of his Vice-Admiralship in the Caribbean20. Born in about 1710 in Kensington, he was the son of John BURNABY Esq. from Kensington, and Clara WOOD (16721679), daughter of the British ambassador to Sweden. He purchased the property at Broughton Hall In 1747.

Illustration 9: Broughton Hall, near Skipton in Oxfordshire Henry BURNABY Esq. was born in 1773 (by which time William was 63) from William’s second marriage, to Grace Drewry OTTLEY (1739-1823). Henry was the fifth child in a series of seven and had a twin sister, Harriot Emma. Their father died when they were four years old and the Baronetcy passed to Sir William Chaloner BURNABY, William’s eldest son from his first marriage to Margaret DONOVAN. Seeking to offer her children improved opportunities and international experience, at some point in about 1784 Grace left for India taking with her Henry (11), Georgina (20), Charlotte (15), Harriot Emma (11) and George (9).

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William BURNABY was knighted in 1754. While maintaining order in Belize in 1765, Admiral William BURNABY and Captain COOK set up a number of rules regarding swearing, theft and luring sailors away from their boats. The ruling settled contracts with employees, the collection of taxes and the appointment of police officers. These have gone down in history as "Burnaby's Code". 20

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6. India The BURNABYS arrived in Tranquebar21, India, in 1784. They adapted quickly, joining other Europeans, including many French Huguenots, in the upper echelons of local society. In 1785 Georgina Grace married Jean Ezechiel CHAMIER, a member of the Madras government. Charlotte followed in 1787 by marrying Josias DU PRE PORCHER Esq., a member of a Huguenot family who had fled to Charleston, South Carolina, USA. In 1793 Harriot Emma BURNABY completed the list with her marriage to John RICHARDSON. By this time Henry was 20 years old and a partner in the firm KINDERSLEY, WATTS & CO, a trading company that also dealt in insurance and legal matters.

Illustration 10: Indian Coromandel Coast At the end of the 18th century Tranquebar was a prosperous trading centre which had been under Danish rule since 1620. The district was situated in the province of Madras on the Coromandel Coast, about 140 km south of the French trading post Pondicherry. Trade was under the control of the Danish East India Company, which had expanded and prospered up until that point. To prevent the seizure of valuable cargo ships, Denmark aimed to maintain its neutrality during armed conflicts. What made Tranquebar unique for trade after 1772 was its admission of private 21

Tharangambadi, Danish colony since 1620, founded by the Danish East India Company.

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commercial flag vessels not controlled by the Danish East India Company. Many private traders scented an opportunity there, as did Joseph LAUTIER, who arrived in Tranquebar with Mary Harriot PANTIN in around 1794. The Danish enclave within the city walls at that time had only around 3000 inhabitants, including 300 Western Europeans, 250 of whom were Danes. Tranquebar was a small community with close social bonds.

Illustration 11: Tranquebar, c1733 Joseph LAUTIER and Henry BURNABY soon came to know each other. Joseph began as a ship-owner22 and captain; Henry had a role in a trading company23. Specific trade routes existed between Manila, Malaysia, Sumatra, India, China, Singapore and Batavia; trade consisted mainly of silver, silk and cotton. Joseph had good customers for silver in the PANTIN family in London, and silk could be delivered by his own family from Hamburg. A key location for trade was Ile de France24, where at the beginning of the 19th century 70,000 slaves ensured a constant supply of sugar, coffee, cotton and cloves. Mary Harriot also came to know Henry, and was a constant companion of his younger sister Emma Harriot, the two girls being about the same age. Mary Harriot was attracted to this charming 22

Ships were the Juno, Venner, Eugene, Courier, and Transfer. KINDERSLEY, WATTS & CO, later HARRINGTON & CO. 24 Which became Mauritius after being conquered by the British in 1810. 23

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Englishman, yet remained aware that she was in India with and because of Joseph. In 1797 Charles LAUTIER, the first child of Joseph and Mary Harriot, was born, but the couple’s marriage did not take place until later, on 4 December 1799.

Illustration 12: Marriage of Joseph LAUTIER and Mary Harriot PANTIN, 4 December 1799 Tranquebar was occupied by the English in 1801, but surrendered back to the Danes in 1802. Paradoxically, in 1802 Mary Harriot's brother25 arrived as a British Naval officer serving in India. The occupation by the British affected the neutrality of Tranquebar. Trade was in decline, making it difficult for the Europeans to maintain their status. In 1801 William Alfred LAUTIER was born, followed by Emilie Augusta LAUTIER26 in 1804. But the feelings that Mary Harriot had for Henry BURNABY did not diminish over the years, and as a ship-owner and captain it often occurred that Joseph was away from home for months at a time. During one such period of absence Mary Harriot finally submitted to the charms of Henry and became pregnant. Even before the birth of Henry LAUTIER in 1806, Joseph had realised that he could not possibly be the child’s father; moreover, he knew who was, but as a sober sailor did not want to provoke any gossip in the small community, and so the secret was kept within the family. In 1801 Denmark remained neutral in the Napoleonic wars, but this ceased to be possible following the bombardment of Copenhagen by the British in 180727, and in 1808 the British again occupied Tranquebar. This presented a serious blow to trade, and an increasing number of merchant ships now fell into British hands. It would appear, however, that the war in the Indian Ocean was focused more on prizetaking than on military achievements: from each ship seized, the value of the booty

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Charles PANTIN (1777-1808), Naval lieutenant in 1808. She married Etienne François WHITE in Pondicherry in 1824. 27 Destruction of the Danish fleet in Copenhagen harbour, to prevent it from falling in French hands. 26

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was distributed (in cash) to the conquering crew in amounts according to a certified list. In 1808 the following message appeared in a local newspaper:

Illustration 13: Madras News28, 1808 The end of Danish neutrality carried a high price: Joseph LAUTIER did indeed keep his life, but he lost his ship, the Venner. 1811 saw the birth of his last child, Rosa Carolina LAUTIER. Life was becoming harder as the market declined, and more and more Europeans were leaving Tranquebar. In 1817 Joseph LAUTIER again voyaged to Mauritius with his brig Eugene to collect merchandise and slaves, whom he trained as crews for his ships. Mary Harriot PANTIN accompanied her husband on this journey, but died in Mauritius at just 46 years old on 19 February of that year. Both Joseph LAUTIER and Henry BURNABY felt defeated. They agreed that the elder Henry should take charge of his son Henry, and that to underline their relationship the name BURNABY would be added to the boy’s name. The new family name thus became BURNABY LAUTIER. In 1818, Henry BURNABY left with his son Henry BURNABY LAUTIER (aged 12) for Semarang in Java (Dutch East Indies29). Joseph remained in India with the other children. However in 1822 he was back in Mauritius, along with his eldest daughter, Emilie Augusta. For her 18th birthday a servant was purchased in order to help with preparations for her wedding30 to Etienne WHITE in 1824. But even before this marriage had taken place Joseph had moved to Padang on Sumatra (Dutch East Indies) together with his youngest daughter, Rosa Carolina.

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Lt. Panton is Charles PANTIN; Mrs. Lautier is Mary Harriot PANTIN; taken as prize by HMS Mayflower as Danish property; Tapanooly is located on the North-West coast of Sumatra. 29 Indonesia. 30 Marriage to Etienne François WHITE on 23 February 1824 in Pondicherry (French India).

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7. Indonesia

Henry BURNABY and his son Henry BURNABY LAUTIER needed to become accustomed to their new situation and the all-male household (apart from the servants) in which they now lived. At fourteen, the young Henry fathered a child with Mina, one of the servants, and on 3 February 1821 Emma BURNABY LAUTIER was born, the first child to bear the family name BURNABY LAUTIER. Mina took care of the child, who died at the age of four, while Henry continued his school career. In 1826, when his son was 20 years old, Henry BURNABY left Semarang to serve in the British Royal Navy31. In the same year, Joseph arrived with his ship Transfer in Batavia to take on cargo. He did not leave. On 3 December 1826 Joseph LAUTIER died in Batavia, aged 53 and the trading company FORESTIER & CO was appointed as his executors. In 1828 Henry BURNABY LAUTIER moved from Semarang to Padang, Sumatra, where his youngest sister Rosa Carolina lived. Here, also, Henry became too intimate with one of the servants so that in 1829 Siam became mother of Jacoba32. Henry clearly followed the example of his father: he assumed responsibility and this child also bore his family name.

Illustration 14: Map of Sumatra

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Henry BURNABY served in the British Navy until his retirement, when he moved to the residence of his nephew Sir William Edward BURNABY at 24 Montpelier Place in Brighton, where he died in 1854 at the age of 81. 32 Jacoba Elisabeth BURNABY LAUTIER, born on 17 September 1829 in Padang, Sumatra.

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Rosa Carolina LAUTIER married33 Isaac Moritz PELTZER and Henry became a partner in the Trade and Commission House PELTZER & LAUTIER. Business was good, Rosa and Isaac were blessed with three children34 and Henry came to know Anna, fourteen years his junior, whom he married35 in 1836. The couple moved to Djokjakarta and shortly thereafter to Batavia. Two children were born, Oscar Arend36 and Eugène Henri37, so there were now two heirs. Both had careers in the public sector, resulting in a number of Residency posts38 for Oscar Arend, and an Administrator post39 for Eugène Henri after serving in the Army as a captain.

Illustration 15: Sugar company Bandjardawa in Pemalang, Java Oscar Arend was married first40, to Marie Louise Emelie BÉDIER DE PRAIRIE who originated from a family of traders and planters in Réunion. This marriage was initially opposed by her parents so that Oscar had to abduct her, although with witnesses to preserve her honour and virtue. Marie Louise Emelie was a cousin of the writer Eduard DU PERRON’S mother41. Oscar Arend, as Resident in Central Java, acted as her guardian for some time, at the request of her parents, to prevent her from marrying. He was to discharge himself of this undertaking with complete effectiveness. In the novel Het land van herkomst42 (1935) DU PERRON gives an account of this, including a beautiful and atmospheric description of the family’s perils and life in the colonial Dutch East Indies during this period. 33

Rosa Carolina LAUTIER married Isaac Moritz PELTZER in Padang, 1832. Elodie (1833), Alfred (1834) and Matilda (1835); their mother died in 1842 at only 31 years of age. 35 Marriage in Padang to Anna Louise Florentia VAN DEN BERG on 20 April 1836. 36 Oscar Arend BURNABY LAUTIER, born in Padang on 26 February 1839. 37 Eugène Henri BURNABY LAUTIER, born in Batavia on 4 February 1843. 38 Assistant Resident of Soerabaja and Buitenzorg/Batavia and Resident of Bali and Lombok, Bagelen and Soerakarta. 39 Administrator at the sugar company Bandjardawa in Pemalang, Java. 40 Oscar Arend BURNABY LAUTIER married Marie Louise Emelie BÉDIER DE PRAIRIE on 28 November 1868 in Soerakarta, Java. 41 Marie Mina Madeline BÉDIER DE PRAIRIE, mother of Charles Edgar DU PERRON. 42 "The country of origin". 34

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The marriage of Oscar Arend BURNABY LAUTIER remained childless. Three years later, Oscar Eugène Henri married Maria Theresia HOEDT, producing eight children43, among them Marie Henriëtte Elisabeth BURNABY LAUTIER and Emile BURNABY LAUTIER, grandparents respectively of the Renée and Emile referred to in the Preface. Eugène Henri died44 young, aged 44 and still working at the Sugar Company in Bandjardawa. His brother Oscar Arend reached the age of 55,45 at which point he was still active as Resident of Soerakarta. In the end, only one son (Emile, son of Eugène Henri) contributed to the survival of the family name: on 29 October 1909 Emile married Theodora MONOD DE FROIDEVILLE in Djokjakarta.

Illustration 16: Resident Oscar Arend BURNABY LAUTIER in Soerakarta. From this marriage there were three children: Theodora46, Emile Jacques47 and Eugene Charles48. Of these, Emile Jacques married49 Dina RAPHAËL from Amsterdam; he was the only one to produce a son and heir. Until the present day the family name BURNABY LAUTIER has always been passed on by one heir, yet this has been sufficient to produce the first five generations.

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Louise Eugénie Isoline Emilie (1871-1975), Oscar Karel (1873-1873), Jeanne Adriënne (1874-??), Oscar Arend (1877-1927), Marie Henriëtte Elisabeth (1878-1945), Emile (1879-1941), Géraldine Elbertine (1882-??), and Jacqueline (1883-??). 44 Eugène Henri BURNABY LAUTIER died on 26 November 1887 in Pemalang, Java. 45 Oscar Arend BURNABY LAUTIER died on 9 June 1894 in Soerakarta, Java. 46 Theodora BURNABY LAUTIER, born on 12 September 1910 in Semarang. 47 Emile Jacques BURNABY LAUTIER, born on 15 September 1912 in Semarang. 48 Eugene Charles BURNABY LAUTIER, born on 21 August 1918 in Cheribon. 49 Married on 4 July 1940.

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8. Pantin family tree

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9. Lautier family tree

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10. Burnaby family tree

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11. Burnaby Lautier family tree

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12. Geography

Henry BURNABY 4 departs to INDIA c1784 Jean-Louis and Jaques 3 Franรงois LAUTIER travel to LONDON c1765 Mary Harriot PANTIN leaves for INDIA in 1790, together with 5

Joseph LAUTIER

Henry BURNABY dies in BRIGHTON in 1855 14

1704 Jean Pierre LEAUTIER and Margarite DEVILLE flee to BERLIN 2

1681 Simon PANTIN and 1 Jeanne MAUBERT flee to LONDON

Mary Harriot PANTIN dies in MAURITIUS in 1817 8

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6 1799 Mary Harriot PANTIN marries

1806 birth of Henry (BURNABY) LAUTIER

Joseph LAUTIER

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1846 Henry BURNABY LAUTIER dies in BATAVIA 13

1826 Joseph LAUTIER dies in BATAVIA

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1818 Henry BURNABY LAUTIER moves with his father to SEMARANG

1836 Henry BURNABY 11 LAUTIER marries Anna Louisa Florentia VAN

9

DEN BERG

1843 birth of Eugène Henri BURNABY LAUTIER 12

1878 birth of Marie Henriëtte Elisabeth BURNABY LAUTIER

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1879 birth of Emile BURNABY LAUTIER in 16 PEMALANG

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1887 Eugène Henri 17 BURNABY LAUTIER dies in PEMALANG

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13. Timeline 1680 – 1950

 

?

birth death best estimated date parent/child relationship

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14. Sources and bibliography People Henri MAUREL (France) Dierk LOYAL (Berlin, Germany) Emile BURNABY LAUTIER (The Netherlands) Renée POLMAN-VAN VUUREN (The Netherlands) Lady SERIÈS (Mauritius) Bishop H.A. MARTIN (Tranquebar, India) Lars POLMAN (The Netherlands) Ellen VERSANTVOORT (The Netherlands)

Bibliography Dutch  Charles Edgar Du Perron, Het land van herkomst. EM Querido, 1935.  Pierre van Enk, Frankrijk en de Hugenoten. Boekencentrum, 2009.  Bronnen voor Indisch genealogisch onderzoek, IGV (Indische Genealogische Vereniging), 2008 (DVD)  De Nederlandsche Leeuw 1883-1983 100 jaargangen, Koninklijk Neerlandsch Genootschap voor Geslacht- en Wapenkunde, 1998 (3 DVD) 8  Regerings-Almanak van Nederlandsch-Indië 1915-1942, CBG (Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie), 2008 (2 DVD) German  Fred W. Felix, Die Ausweisung der Protestanten aus dem Fürstentum Orange 1703 und 1711/13. Verlag der Deutschen Hugenotten-Gesellschaft e. V., Bad Karlshafen und Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Hugenottengeschichte, Bern, 2000.  Gerhard Fischer, Die Hugenotten in Berlin. Hentrich&Hentrich Verlag, 2010.  Eva Heinzelmann e.a., The Oldenburg Monarchy (Der Dänische Gesamtstaat). Verlag Ludwig, 2000.  Michael Lausberg, Hugenotten in Deutschland. 2008.  Wolfgang Scheffler, Berliner Goldschmiede. Verlag Bruno Hessling, 1968.  Helga Schultz & Jürgen Wilke, Berlin 1650-1800. Akademie-Verlag, 1987.  Rolf Straubel, Kaufleute und Manufakturunternehmer. Franz Steiner Verlag, 1995. French  M.M. Eug. & E.M. Haag, La France Protestante, Tome VI. Joël, Cherbuliez, 1856.  Francis Reverdin, Passage à Genève des réfugiés protestants d’Orange en 1703. 1924.  M. de Saint-Allais, Nobiliaire Universel de France, Tome Neuvième. Valade, 1816.  Francis Waddington, Le Protestantisme en Normandie 1685-1797. 1862.  Bulletin de la Commission des Antiquités de la Seine-Inférieure, Tome VIII 1888-1890. Espérance Cagniard, 1890.  Bulletin de la Société de l’histoire du Protestantisme Français, 1858.  Bulletin Historique et Littéraire, Volume 39, Tome XXXIX, Société de l’Histoire du Protestantisme Français, 1890.  Mémoires de l’Académie de Vaucluse, Tome Ier, année 1882. Séguin Frères, 1882. Burnaby Lautier

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English  Kenneth Ballhatchet, ‘Changing South Asia: City and culture’, Changing South Asia Volume 3. London: University of London Centre of South Asian Studies, 1984.  Judith Banister, ‘Three generations in silver’, Country Life, 3 June 1982.  Rev. William Betham, The Baronetage of England, or, The history of the English baronets, and such baronets of Scotland, as are of English families; with genealogical tables and engravings of their armorial bearings, Vol. III. London: W.S Betham, 1803.  Niels Brimnes, Constructing the colonial encounter: Right and left hand castes in early colonial South India. London: Routledge 1998.  Edmund Burke, The Annual Register, or a view of the history, politics and literature of the years 1784-1785. London: J Dodsley, 1787.  Edmund Burke, The Annual Register, or, a view of the history and politics of the year 1854. London: Longmans Green and Co, 1855.  John Burke, A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. IV. Henry Colburn Publisher, 1838.  John Burke, General and heraldic dictionary of the peerage and baronetage of the British Empire (6th edition). London: Henry Colburn, 1839.  G.E. Cokayne (ed.), Complete Baronetage, Vol. V 1707-1800. Exeter: Wm Pollard & Co., 1906.  D.C. Coleman, Courtaulds:, An economic and social history, Vol. I: The nineteenth century silk and crepe. Oxford University Press, 1969.  John Debrett & William Courthope, Debrett’s Baronetage of England; With alphabetical lists of such baronetcies as have merged in the peerage, or have become extinct, and also of the existing baronets of Nova Scotia and Ireland. 7th edition, 1835.  Robert P. Dod, The Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland for 1864: including all the titled classes. London: Whittaker and Co., 1864.  East India Company, Sessional papers, 1812-1813 Vol. VIII.  East India Company, The Asiatic Journal and monthly miscellany.1816, 1818, 1819, 1825, 1830, 1833.  Ole Feldbæk, Indian Trade under the Danish flag 1772-1808: European enterprise and AngloIndian remittance and trade. Scandinavian Institute of Asian Studies monograph series, no 2. Lund: Studentlitteratuur, 1969.  Paul Corby Finney, Seeing beyond the word: Visual arts and the Calvinist tradition. Grand Rapids: Wm B Eerdmans Publishing, 1999.  Arthur G. Grimwade, London goldsmiths 1697-1837: Their marks and lives from the original registers at Goldsmiths’ Hall and other sources. London: Faber & Faber, 1976.  Robin Gwynn, The Huguenots of London. Brighton: The Alpha Press, 1998.  Robin Gwynn, Huguenot heritage: The history and contribution of the Huguenots in Britain. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2011.  Walter Hamilton, Esq., A geographical, statistical and historical description of Hindostan and the adjacent countries, Vol. II. London: John Murray, 1820.  Walter Hamilton, East-India Gazetteer, Vol. II. 1828.  Sir Ambrose Heal F.S.A., The London goldsmiths 1200-1800: A record of the names and addresses of the craftsmen, their ship signs and trade-cards. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1935.  Henry Davison Love, Vestiges of Old Madras, 1640-1800: traced from the East India Company’s records preserved at Fort St George and the India Office, and from other sources (4 volumes). London: J. Murray, 1913.  Otto van den Muijzenberg, Four centuries of Philippine-Dutch social relations 1600-2000’, Bijdragen tot de Taal- Land- en Volkenkunde, 157, 3, (2001): 471-509.  T.V. Murdoch, The quiet conquest: Huguenots, 1685-1985. London: Museum of London, 1985.  James Allen Park, Esq., A system of the law of marine insurances, Vol. I . Strahan, 1817.

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Om Prakash, European commercial enterprise in pre-colonial India, New Cambridge History of India Part 2, Vol. 5. New York and Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. E. Samuel, The Asiatic Annual Register, or, a view of the history of Hindustan, and of the politics, commerce and literature of Asia. For the years 1799, 1800, 1802, 1804, 1807, 1808. Sonja Andrea Schwake, The social implications of ritual behaviour in the Maya lowlands: A perspective from Minaha, Belize. University of California, San Diego, 2008. Irene Scouloudi, Huguenots in Britain and their French background 1550-1800. Contributions to the Historical Conference of the Huguenot Society of London September 1985. MacMillian Press, 1987. S. Jeyaseela Stephen, The Indian trade at the Asian frontier. New Delhi: Gyan Publishing House, 2008. James Hingston Tuckey, Maritime geography and statistics, Vol. II. London: Black, Parry & Co, 1815. Sylvanus Urban, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review. Vol. XLIII, 1855. Huguenot families, 2, 2000. The Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Lloyd’s Register of Shipping, 1808, 1809, 1813, 1820. Reports of cases argued and determined in Court of Common Pleas and other Courts, 1811, 1816. Slave Trade, Vol. XXII, 1826; Vol. XXV, 1828. Steel’s original and correct list of the Royal Navy. 1790, 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794, 1815. The Navy List. H.M. Stationary Office, 1850. The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, Vol. IX, 1823. The New Navy List. London: Simpkin, Marshall & Co, 1844, 1850, 1852, 1862.

Illustrations Illustration 1 – Residence record of Djokjakarta 1841 in the RA of Dutch Indies Illustration 2 – Robin Gwynn, Huguenot heritage Illustration 3 – Elie Benoist, Geschiedenis van het Edict van Nantes Illustration 4 – Sir Charles James Jackson, English Goldsmiths and Their Marks, 1921 Illustration 5 – Silverman London - http://www.silverman-london.com Illustration 6 – Motco Image Database - http://www.motco.com/map/81005/ Illustration 7 – Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:EdiktPotsdam.jpg Illustration 8 – Helga Schultz & Jürgen Wilke, Berlin 1650-1800 Illustration 9 – Jean-Pierre-Montauban - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pixiepics2008/3197962084/ Illustration 10 – Colombia University in the City of New York http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00routesdata/1700_1799/coromandel/coromandel maps/coromandelmaps.html Illustration 11 – Langkaer Gymnasium Tilst, DK - http://www2.langkaer.dk/laerer/tj/vg3/Tranquebar/ Illustration 12 – Photograph of Microfilm in London Family History Centre Illustration 13 – Madras News, 1808 Illustration 14 – Jan Dikker, Photobucket http://media.photobucket.com/image/wandkaart%20sumatra/Jandikker/Stanvac/KaartvanSumatra.jpg Illustration 15 – http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl Illustration 16 – http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl Illustration 17 – . 5 July 1923, Dutch Royal Library

Burnaby Lautier

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Illustration 17: Advertisement in

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The Daily News for the Dutch Indies 5 July 1923

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The origins of a surname

Burnaby Lautier


Burnaby Lautier