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Self-Drive Guide

NAMIBIA

Travel Africa Informed


NAMIBIA Self-Drive TRAVEL GUIDE

Travel Africa Informed


How to use this guide Towns or destinations Facilities available in towns or at destinations

@ Hospital

Doctor

Embassy

Gas rfill

Tyre repair

Tyre sales

Mechanical repairs

Tow-in services

Basic supplies

@

ATM

Laundromat

Bank

ATM

Foreign exchange

Butchery

Bakery

Liquor

Airstrip

Car rental

Lodging

Camping

Police

Cell reception Cell reception Cell reception GOOD intermittent bad

Internet access

Tourist info office

Petrol

D Diesel

Comprehensive Department supplies store

Restuarant

Airport

Pharmacy

Airfield

Please note that these facilities are not necessarily indicated on the town maps as they might not have been marked on our T4A GPS maps. If some facilities are listed but not indicated on the town map, just ask around town to find it. Accommodation Listings Lodging Search this name on the T4A GPS Maps or your Android or Apple application and get directions to drive there.

Rates are indicated per person (pp) and/ or per unit (pu) and the valid date in brackets (2013). Please note that rates are subject to change by the proprietors.

The town map reference number on the listing refers to the number on the town/ destination map.

4 Lodge w239883 NAD 1165.00 to 2236.00 pp (2013)

Lodging is distinguished with a blue band.

Emanya@Etosha Game Lodge Lodging subcategories are: Apartment Backpackers Hostel Bed and Breakfast Boutique Hotel/Spa Cottage Game/Safari Lodge Guest Farm Guest house Hotel Houseboat Hunting Farm Inn Lodge Resort Self-catering Tented Camp

22km or 20min E of Namutoni Gate (Etosha) Tel: +264(0)61 222 954, Fax: +264(0)61 260 458 bookings@emanya.com www.emanya.com

Emanya@Etosha offers 20 luxury air-conditioned en-suite rooms, laundry services on request, a stylish bar, African cuisine with grill and buffet and a rejuvenating foot spa. A variety of wildlife can be viewed at the waterhole.

This number is referred to as the Padkos ID or Spatial ID. You will also find this number on the T4A GPS Maps and our website. In remote places the landlines are often out of order therefore cell phone numbers may be a more reliable way of contacting lodges/camps.

Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

@

Where we have this information available, we indicated the languages spoken by the hosts.


...continue Lodging facilities Where the following icons are shown, it indicates that the facilities are offered on the premises of the listing. Please note that the landing strip could also be located nearby and not on the premises.

@ Child friendly Conference facilities

Foreign currency

Camping

Public telephone

Internet

Pet friendly

Biker unfriendly

A VIS Fuel

Restaurant

A VIS

Basic food supplies

Cell reception good

Landing strip

Credit card accepted

Accommodation Listings Camping If accommodation is situated in a town or city, we provide the street address. For accommodation in the countryside, we provide the nearest town and the distance, time and direction from it. The distance and time is calculated using T4A GPS Maps and is a fair indication of how long it will take you to drive from the nearest town. Where you see 4WD in the address line, it means that the lodge/camp is only reachable by 4x4. Where 4WD is not indicated, a sedan vehicle may in some cases be sufficient to gain access, but in some cases you may need a 4x2 to reach the lodge/camp. No self-drive access means that guests are not allowed to or are unable to drive to the lodge.

Camping listings are distinguished with a green band.

Camping subcategories are: Camping (ordinary camp) 4WD Trail Camp Caravan Park Community Camp Farm Camp Hiking Trail Camp Holiday Resort Lodge Camp Park Camp Tour Operator Camp Transit Camp Wilderness Camp

Treesleeper Camp Camp Treesleeper

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Community Camp NAD 60.00 to 100.00 pp (2013)

w142643

64km or 47min NNE of Tsumeb Tel: +264(0)67 221 752, Cell: +264(0)81 331 3988, Fax: +264(0)67 221 752 info@treesleeper.org, www.treesleeper.org

A variety of campsites are available at Treesleeper. Some have decks and private ablutions while others share ablutions. All have water taps, solar lights and braai facilities. Basic camping equipment is provided. Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

@

The yellow paw indicates that this listing is a community camp or wildlife foundation. Tracks4Africa supports community efforts and conservation therefore we would in this way like to give extra free exposure to them.


How to use this guide

...continue

Camping facilities

@ Laundry

Kitchen area

Showers (hot & cold)

Showers Child friendly (cold)

Conference facilities

Shaded campsite

Public telephone

Internet

Power point

Foreign currency

Pet friendly

Wood is available

Ice is available

A VIS Fuel

Restaurant

A VIS No drinking water

@

Basic food supplies

Cell reception GOOD

Landing strip

Credit Card accepted

Biker unfriendly

Please note that the descriptions are highly summarised. For more information you can go to our other information platforms like the T4A Travel Guide on your GPS (it comes with your T4A maps), our website or our Nokia, Android and Apple applications

Lodging and camping activities Please note that the activities indicated may not necessarily be offered by the lodge/camp itself, but may be offered in the nearby vicinity, eg. balloon trips.

@ @ Wildlife to view

Game drives Guided walks Quad biking Balloon trips

Swimming

Hiking

Horse trails

Fishing

All the information about towns and listings in this guide book is listed on www.tracks4africa.co.za. Please post any corrections, comments or photos on this website. We have done thorough research on all towns and listings, but as you know change is inevitable. Wherever you see this icon in the book, we have given you a noteworthy tip. THE USE OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HERIN IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.


Travel Africa Informed

All regions are colour coded for quick reference. Colour strips make it easy to find a specific region when you page through the book.


contents Preparing for your Trip General Information

18 19 20 20 21 21 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 27 28 29 29 29 30 31 32 32 32 32 33

safety and precaution

35 35 36 36 36 37

Climate Best time to visit Money Language People Conservation Fauna and flora Useful contact numbers Food and drink Road conditions The rules Advice Driving on gravel roads Driving in thick sand Driving over rough terrain Driving in mud Fuel Camping etiquette Camp in designated areas Honour bookings Fires Waste management The toilet Fairy circles in Namibia?

Rule number one Beware of group travel Carry with you Travelling remote areas Personal safety

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...continue

Insurance Driving through long, dry grass Wild animals Taking photographs

37 37 38 39

Trip planning

40 40 40 41 41 41 41 41 41 42 42 43

Navigation

45 47 47 48 49 51 52

Decide what you want How flexible is your itinerary? Do you want to travel in a group or on your own? What are your personal capabilities? What type of accommodation do you want? How safe are your destinations? What problems can you expect? Do you have time for all this? Can you pay for all of this? Planning Trip planning checklist Navigation using a GPS Which GPS? Before you go On the road Navigation using a paper map Be an eco-traveller

Preparing your vehicle for overland travel

Choosing your vehicle Preparing your motorbike Extra fittings to your bike Tools and spares Camping equipment

54 55 55 55 57 57 11


contents Preparing for your Trip continue....Personal items Water and hydration backpack Preparing your sedan or SUV Preparing your vehicle for travel into remote areas Basics More than the basics Buying additional equipment Packing your vehicle Camping checklist

57 57 57 58 58 60 61 69 70

Communication

72 72 73 74

Border post red tape

75 77 78 78 79 79 81

Two-way radio Cell phone Satellite phone

Documents required Customs A special note on meat, fruit and vegetables Visas Border posts International airports

Veterinary fences and foot-and-mouth disease

What is foot-and-mouth disease? Import restrictions Veterinary fences

Health Burns Malaria

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82 84 85 85 87 88 88


...continue

Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Traveller’s diarrhoea Rabies Cholera Typhoid Yellow fever Tick-bite fever Bilharzia Scorpions Snakes Sleeping sickness Heat exhaustion or heat stroke Medical insurance First aid kit

Pitfalls to renting a 4x4 with camping equipment Insurance Extra charges Table of rental companies

90 90 91 92 92 93 93 94 94 95 97 97 98 98 99 100 101 101 552

Add more flavour to your holiday

Tables of tour operators

104 556

Don’t go without

105

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contents Regions BOESMANLAND

106 108

CENTRAL NAMIBIA

112 114 118 122 126 130 134 142 146

DAMARALAND

174 178 182 188

ERONGO

194 196 200 208

ETOSHA

212 214 226 234 242

Tsumkwe

Aranos Dordabis Gochas Kalkrand Maltahรถhe Mariental Rehoboth Windhoek

Khorixas Twyfelfontein Uis

Karibib Omaruru Usakos

Etosha National Park Area Kamanjab Outjo Tsumeb

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...continue

GOBABIS

248 250 254

KAOKOLAND

262 266 270 274 278 282 286 292

KAVANGO

298 300 306 310

NAMIB-NAUKLUFT

316 320 324 328 332 338 344 350 354 362

Buitepos Gobabis

Epupa Falls Opuwo Otjinhungwa Palmwag Puros Ruacana Sesfontein

Divundu Khaudum Game Reserve Rundu Aus Betta Gamsberg Helmeringhausen L端deritz Namib-Naukluft National Park Namibrand Nature Reserve Sesriem Solitaire

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contents Regions continue....North Namibia Grootfontein Hochfeld Okahandja Otavi Otjiwarongo

370 372 378 382 390 394

Ovamboland

404 406 410 414

Skeleton Coast

418 420 428 432 436 452

South Namibia

460 464 468 472 476 480 486 490 496 500 504 508 512

Ondangwa Oshakati Oshikango

Henties Bay Langstrand Skeleton Coast National Park Swakopmund Walvis Bay Ai-Ais Aroab Aussenkehr Bethanie GrĂźnau Karasburg Keetmanshoop KoĂŤs Mata Mata Noordoewer Seeheim Warmbad

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...continue

Sperrgebiet

516 518 522

Zambezi (Caprivi)

Impalila Island Katima Mulilo Kongola Mamili (Nkasa Lupala) National Park Mudumu National Park

528 530 534 540 544 548

INDEX

568

Oranjemund Rosh Pinah

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GENERAL INFORMATION Glossary We have used certain words in this guide that are lingua franca in Africa but might be unfamiliar to Europeans:

Boma: an outdoor, enclosed entertainment area. Braai: barbeque (frying meat on an open fire). Long drop: a pit toilet.

Lapa: an enclosure where people get together and normally eat together. It is usually thatched with open sides. Mokoro: a type of canoe made by digging out a tree trunk. Rondavel: round house with a thatched roof. Namibia is a beautiful unspoilt country of extremes. This scarcely populated country (2,1 million people) with its vast open spaces and clear, starry skies is the ideal place for beginners who want to discover the beauty and richness of the African continent. Located in South-West Africa, Namibia is a gem for those in search of wilderness. It has a great number of national parks, game reserves and conservation areas where a big variation in landscape, vegetation and animals can be seen. You do not need to stick to these protected areas to experience the beauty of the country. Namibia is the ideal self-drive country. It has a good infrastructure and the people are friendly and welcoming. (Curt Sagell) 18


Namibia is essentially a desert land with wide horizons crying out for exploration. Because Namibia has so much to offer, you can keep your itinerary flexible and just enjoy your road trip!

Windhoek is the capital of Namibia. It is the social, economic and cultural centre of the country and incidentally more or less in the middle of the country. It is a modern city, well worth a visit.

It has an excellent road network that enables you to reach the varied sights and attractions that are spread all over the country. In remote areas you can drive for days without seeing people, and in some places the awe inspiring beauty of the surreal landscapes will simply give you goose-flesh. Namibia offers comfortable accommodation, varying from basic camp-

Climate

During winter (May to September) the temperatures in the interior range from 18°C to 25°C during the day. Below freezing temperatures and ground frosts are common at night. During summer (October to April) the average interior temperatures range from 20°C to 34°C during the day, but temperatures of above

Dooie Vlei near Sossusvlei has a stark beauty. (Hannes Thirion)

sites to well-equipped and comfortable camps, backpackers, tented camps, guest houses and lodges to the most luxurious hotels. However, if you venture into remote areas, you need to be a self-sufficient camper.

40°C are often recorded in the extreme north and south of the country. Namibia is a summer rainfall area during which time floods are common. At the coast the temperature varies 19


less and is seldom higher than 25°C. Heavy fog is quite common, especially at night. The humidity is generally very low in most parts of Namibia, but in the extreme north it can be as high as 80% during summer. In summer you should wear lightweight, light-coloured clothing, good sunglasses, a hat and suntan lotion with a high protection factor. During the winter months and for time spend at the coastal areas, you should take warm clothing and make sure you have enough bedding when you camp. Please note that Namibia’s daylight saving time (GMT+1) is from the first Sunday of April to the first Sunday in September. That means that they turn back their watches with one hour during winter. For the rest of the year Namibia is on GMT +2, like Botswana and South Africa.

Best time to visit

Most people feel that May to October is the best time to visit Namibia because it is cooler than in summer. Most of the rain falls during February and March and in April, after the rainy season, the veld is green and beautiful. If you do go during the hot summer months, look for shade when you camp and do not walk around during the heat of the day. If possible, book accommodation at places with swimming pools. Even though it can be extremely hot, your body will quickly acclimatise to the temperature. Most

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people do not find the heat unbearable and some people prefer to go during this time of the year because there are fewer tourists. During the raining season, the animals might move away from the water holes in the national parks and game reserves, but the bird life is fantastic and the game is widely spread out on the plains. The bush is green and the vistas across the pans are spectacular when lightning storms move in. Also, some of the flowering bulbs will be out if the rains were early enough. Always be very cautious of camping in river beds during the rainy season, as seemingly dry river beds can get flooded unexpectedly due to rains kilometres away. Check the flow of these rivers on the T4A map and be on the lookout for rain clouds on the distant horizon in the catchment areas of the rivers. You are advised to book beforehand if you want to go during June, July or August. A lot of South Africans travel Namibia during their June/July school holidays and many Europeans prefer August. All Namibians flock to the coast during the December holidays, therefore you must book at the seaside if you plan on going during December/January.

Money

Namibia’s currency is the Namibian dollar (N$), which is linked 1:1 to the


South African rand. The Rand is an accepted currency in Namibia and accepted everywhere. Credit cards are accepted in the cities and bigger towns. Just remember to let your bank know that you are travelling and to increase your credit limit for the duration of the trip if needed. In the smaller towns cash is king. Major credit cards like MasterCard and Visa are accepted, but Visa is more widely accepted than MasterCard.

cash for the whole trip, as there are ATMs in most towns. This guide will indicate to you which towns have ATMs so that you can plan ahead. You should be able to withdraw money from ATMs without any hassles. However, it has been reported on overland forums that people have had trouble withdrawing money with their Visa cards at Bank of Windhoek ATMs.

It is advisable to have more than one credit card between your travel party, and if possible, both Visa and MasterCard.

Foreign currency and travellers cheques can be converted to Namibian dollars at any bank or Bureau de Change. Normal banking hours are: Monday to Friday 09h00-17h30 and Saturday 09h00-11h00.

Credit cards are not accepted for fuel, but petrol/garage cards are usually accepted in the bigger towns. In the rural areas they only accept cash. Even places that normally do accept petrol/garage cards, may from time to time experience connectivity problems, so it is best to always have enough cash with you. You do not need to carry enough

Value added tax (VAT) in Namibia is 15% on goods and services and is included in the price of goods. Foreign tourists to Namibia are exempt from paying sales tax and may reclaim VAT at Hosea Kutako International Airport, Eros Airport and Walvis Bay Airport, or at their port of exit provided they have cash slips as proof of payment.

Language

The official language is English, but Afrikaans is more widely spoken; many people also speak German. In total, 16 languages and dialects are spoken in Namibia.

People Himba women and child near Ruacana. (Karin Theron)

Namibia’s earliest known inhabitants were the Khoi San/Bushmen, the

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Nama and the Damara people. The Ovambo, Herero (of which the Himba is a sub-tribe), Caprivian, Tswana, and Kavango people moved into the area later. In the meantime Portuguese seafarers planted their crosses at what is today Cape Cross, just North of Swakopmund and LĂźderitz. Much later, an Afrikaner crossed the Orange River and mission stations were established in the hinterland by Europeans. The Afrikaans speaking Basters are the descendants of Khoi San women and Dutch settlers who arrived in the mid-17th century. Before independence in 1990, the old South West Africa was first under German and then South African rule for just over 100 years. Today Namibia has a rich and diverse culture and the society is mostly westernised. However, if you travel the countryside, you will still see proud Herero women in their beautiful, colourful long dresses with impressive head gear, and the Himba with their red leathery skins. There are even a few Bushmen villages left where they still live the traditional way. You can recognise Nama people by the beautiful click sound in their language.

Conservation

A Herero woman in Gobabis. (Karin Theron)

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About 42% of Namibia’s surface area is under conservation management. This includes national parks, reserves, conservancies and private nature reserves. Local communities


Beautiful flamingos in Etosha. (Lindy Lourens)

were given legislative power to create their own conservancies and to manage and benefit from the wildlife on communal land, allowing them to work with private companies to create their own tourism products. Today one in four rural Namibians are involved in some kind of conservancy activity. Please support community camps and wildlife foundations, as the proceeds go towards the preservation of the natural heritage of Namibia.

Namibia, of which 14 are endemic. A huge number of big game, antelope, reptiles, frogs and 676 bird species are also found in Namibia. Namibia boasts the largest free-roaming populations of black rhino and cheetah in the world. Namibia has 14 vegetation zones and a rich variety of plant species,

Fauna and flora

Namibia has a high level of biodiversity and endemicity. Approximately 75% of the mammal species of Southern Africa is found in

Welwitschia mirabilis plants live 1 000 years or more. (Bjรถrn Rehder)

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of which the most notable is the endemic living fossil plant, Welwitschia mirabilis. These plants live 1 000 years or more; some are said to be even 2 000 years old.

Useful contact numbers

Police: Toll free 10111. Ambulance:Toll free 081924(EMED24) SOS International: +27 11 541 1300 (The nearest assistance centre is in South Africa).

More than 50 countries have Namibian consular or embassy representation in the capital city, Windhoek. For information, contact the Ministry of Information and Communication Technology: +264 61 282 9111.

Food and drink

Daytime in Namibia can be exceedingly hot in summer and hot in winter. You must always carry enough drinking water in case something goes wrong with your car. The quality of water in Namibia is very good. It mostly comes from deep wells and can be consumed without having to add chemicals or boiling it. You should, however, exercise caution if you think the water comes from a running river. As far as possible, do not use water from stagnant sources, definitely not without at least treating it. Boil any drinking water you are unsure about, or drink bottled water.

During the rainy season roads passing through river beds can be flooded. (Johann Groenewald)

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Donkeys are a familiar sight on the roads and can be dangerous. (Karin Theron)

Using water purification tablets is a cheap and simple way to kill bugs in drinking water; just ensure you wait 20 to 30 minutes for the tablets to work before you drink the water. A better tasting alternative is using one of the many water filtration devices available.

ferred to as surfaced or tarred roads). However, almost 90% of the roads in Namibia are unpaved. These are also referred to as unsurfaced, gravel or dirt roads. Namibia’s gravel roads are world famous for their quality, as they are mostly of excellent standard and very well maintained.

Every small village in Namibia has a shop where basic food can be purchased. If you require anything more exotic than the basics, you should stock up at supermarkets in bigger towns.

Roads classified as C-routes, whether they are paved or unpaved, can usually be driven with any sedan vehicle, but a vehicle with high ground clearance is recommended. These roads are well-constructed and wellmaintained, but might be in a bad condition after heavy rains.

Namibia is renowned for good beer, the most popular being Tafel Lager and Windhoek.

Road conditions

Namibia has a very good road network. All national highways (B-routes) and national roads are paved (also re-

D-routes may also be accessible by sedan. However, they do not have bridges at river crossings like C-routes, therefore they are more vulnerable to rain damage. Be aware that the salt roads near the coast are slippery all year round. 25


During the rainy season the roads can be very slippery and roads passing through river beds can be flooded. The smallest little stream can turn into a raging wall of water. Never cross these streams if you are not absolutely sure how deep they are and how strongly they flow. Water passes just as quickly as it appears, you should therefore rather wait a few hours or maybe a day when you are stuck between two rivers. Road signs are international and easy to understand. You should pay special attention to warnings of antelope, warthog and even elephant, as they often graze along the verges of the road and can be unpredictable. Even though most roads are fenced, wildlife, donkeys, goats and cattle may still cross your path, even on the main tar roads of remote areas. Always be on the lookout for animals beside the road. See the section on choosing your vehicle on page 55 You are advised NOT to travel Kaokoland or Damaraland with a trailer – not even the latest and most expen-

sive off-road designs. These roads are not good for trailers and only a lucky few have managed to survive them.

The rules • You must at all times carry a valid driver’s licence with you that is issued in English. If your licence is not English, you will have to get an international driver’s licence. • According to the Automobile Asso- ciation of South Africa (AA) it is compulsory for any vehicle, cara van or trailer registered in South Africa to have a ZA sign displayed when it crosses any border. The ZA sign must be placed in a visible position on the rear of each vehicle, caravan and trailer and may not be within 150 mm of the rear number plate. • Drive on the left side of the road. • The speed limit is 60 km/h in urban areas and 120 km/h on tarred roads outside urban areas. On gravel roads, it is 100 km/h. Speed limits are enforced by means of manned speed cameras which are set up in different places, but often closer to major towns. • All passengers must wear safety belts. Road signs (Karin Theron & Johann Groenewald)

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Namibia’s gravel roads are mostly of excellent standard. (Willie Solomon)

• The use of cell phones when driving is illegal. Advice • Never drive at night because of the danger of stray animals crossing the road. • Before you leave on your trip for the day, ensure that your vehicle’s tyre pressures are correct for the kind of roads you plan on travelling, as well as the amount of luggage and passengers that you will be carrying. • If at all possible, carry two spare tyres. • A tyre repair kit can help you out of a lot of trouble. • Keep your lights on at all times, so you can be seen in dusty or low visibility conditions. • If you don’t have any 4WD experi ence, you should seriously consider doing a course before you venture into remote areas.

• You should always drive with a tyre compressor and pressure gauge so you can adjust tyre pressure as needed. Driving on gravel roads If you deflate your tyres to about 1,8 bar, it will soften the ride and ensure better grip on gravel roads. Although the speed limit on gravel roads is 100 km/h, it is advisable to drive at 80 km/h, as they can be unpredictable and one can easily lose control. People with little gravel driving experience should never drive faster than 80 km/h on gravel roads, because they can be very slippery. If you overtake someone on a gravel road, drive to the far right and stay there until you are well clear of the vehicle that you passed. Do not overtake in dust, as your visibility will be impaired. When you encounter badly corrugated roads, do not skirt around on 27


the sides of the road, making it wider and wider and causing what they call vehicle track pollution. Be careful of the road edges; sometimes there is a very abrupt camber that can pull you straight off the road. Driving in thick sand Driving on soft sand like riverbeds require lowering tyre pressure to 1,2 bar, or maybe even as low as 0,8 bar. Do not reduce radial tyres less than 0,8 bar and cross-ply tyres less than 1,2 bar. Note that the pressure depends on the load of your vehicle. You need a 4WD to drive in thick sand. Select first gear, low range. Thick sand requires momentum, you should therefore always keep moving. If you need to stop in sand, don’t use the brakes but rather roll to a halt. Applying brakes will cause a wall of sand to be built up in front

Select first gear, low range when driving over rough terrain. (Johann Groenewald)

of the wheel, which will make pulling away very difficult. If possible, drive thick sand as early in the day as possible. As the day gets hotter, the sand gets softer and

When driving through thick sand you need to lower your tyre pressure. (Frank HĂśpppener)

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your speed is slower and your fuel consumption higher. Driving over rough terrain

There is no clear-cut recommended tyre pressure for driving over terrain with sharp rocks and stones. Reducing tyre pressure can improve traction, but will expose the tyres to possible damage. On the other hand, increasing tyre pressure will protect the tyre but will compromise on traction. Therefore it is best to keep the tyre pressure as recommended by the manufacturer. You need a 4WD to drive rough terrain. Select first gear, low range. It is always best to drive very slowly directly over sharp rocks instead of trying to avoid them, because damage happens when the sidewalls of your tyre, which is only a few millimetres thick, rides up against a knife-edged rock. The tread of a tyre is much thicker and is built to deal with these rocks. Driving in mud Mud usually has a firm base underneath and the trick is to let the tyres cut through the mud to get traction on the firm base underneath. Narrower tyres and high tyre pressure will normally be better than wide tyres that are aired down. You need a 4WD to drive in mud. Select second gear, low range. In most cases driving through mud requires momentum and speed that is high enough to get you through the ob-

stacle but not too high to be unsafe. Do not hold the steering wheel too tightly; feel the feedback from the tyres to the steering wheel and move with it rather than to fight it. (Sources: Enduro Namibia, Association of All Wheel Drive Clubs of Southern Africa, 4x4 Community Forum)

Fuel

Fuel is available in most towns and generally speaking reliable and of good quality. A very good rule is to fill up at each and every fuel station that you pass, regardless of how full your tank is. The distances between towns can be large and sometimes towns run out of fuel or pumps might be out of order. This is especially true when the demand for fuel is highest, like during the holiday season when small places need more fuel than normal to be able to supply in tourist demand. Therefore it is best to always carry at least 40 â„“ of extra fuel with you. Keep in mind that low sulphur diesel (50 ppm) is not available everywhere. You will only find it in main centres. You should in any case only buy diesel from fuel stations with reputable names as some travellers have found, at great cost, that not all diesel sold to them was pure. The fuel price is regulated in Namibia. However, there might be marginal price differences from town to town.

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On date of going to press the fuel prices in Windhoek were: Lead Replacement 93 = 10.96 N$, Unleaded 95 = 11.48 N$ and Diesel 11.65 N$. Please note that, where fuel is sold in containers, prices will be a bit higher.

Camping etiquette in Namibia The landscape, safety and weather in Namibia all contribute to making this a fantastic destination for people who love to camp. Namibia offers a wide variety of camping options, which are all listed in this guide book. There are well equipped campsites in and around every town of Namibia, which allows you to camp in relative luxury such as good ablutions with hot showers Adhere to general camping etiquette. (David Smith)

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and electricity. These are great if you need to clean up and sort your equipment before you go on the next leg of your trip. Many farms also offer camping facilities. These are closer to nature, but as you are on a working farm, the atmosphere may vary from tranquil to busy. The real gems of Namibian camping are the bush camps situated in many of the nature reserves and/or conservancy areas. These may be very rustic with some having absolutely no facilities apart from a designated long drop. However, these camps offer you the solitude that so many people come to seek in Namibia, and they are well worth exploring.


Support local communities by staying in community camps. (Bjรถrn Rehder)

Namibia also has quite a few community camps. These are initiatives by the tourism industry of Namibia to assist local communities to run campsites in their areas. Some are brilliant and others not. Please support these community camps by staying there. You should offer constructive criticism which would enable these entrepreneurs to improve their offering. For most campsites with a reception, it is pretty obvious what the rules for the camp are. Be a good neighbour and remember that people go camping because they want to relax and enjoy nature. They are not interested in listening to your music or generator (ever!).

For bush camping and some of the remote community camps we would like to suggest a few guidelines as these are not always managed properly. If we as campers do not take control of keeping these scenic places in a serene condition, they will deteriorate. Camp in designated areas When you camp you interfere with nature, so try to disturb the environment as little as possible by camping in the designated area only. Never camp near a waterhole. Animals go there to drink and your presence will deter them. The next waterhole may be very far for them. Also be on the lookout for animal trails to the waterholes and do not camp on or near their paths. 31


Honour bookings Some camps may be very remote and un-manned, but still require bookings. There is nothing as bad as arriving at your booked campsite to find a squatter occupying it. Fires Most of these campsites will have a designated fire pit or place where previous campers made fire. Try to stick to one place otherwise the camp will be littered with leftover coals. Bring your own firewood or preferably charcoal. Never collect wood around the camp; it is simply not sustainable. Before you go to bed, make sure your fire is put out completely. A wind during the night could cause the fire to spread. Waste management These camps are in the wilderness and may be visited by officials only once a month. Under no circumstances should you leave your garbage even if bins are provided. Take along strong plastic bags or containers in order to carry your garbage out with you. Leave absolutely nothing behind; do NOT bury your garbage! Also, do not throw the leftover food or bones into the veld, thinking that you are doing the local animal population a favour. They become dependent on these rations and will over time become a nuisance to campers. Rather burn leftovers in your campfire. The toilet These bush camps will most probably

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have a designated long drop and although these are not always the nicest of places to visit, it is in everyone’s interest that you do so. The breakdown of organic matter in these toilets is a natural process which should not be interfered with by adding chemicals like antiseptics, disinfectant or anything else, to reduce bad odours. Designated campsites probably experience quite a bit of traffic; hence if no toilet facility is provided, go into the bush and bury your business. Paper should ideally be burned instead of buried, but be careful not to start a veld fire. It is quite difficult to burn wet toilet paper, therefore it is best to put it in a bag that you can either burn in your campfire or store with the rest of your garbage. If you are big party, consider managing your bush etiquette as follows: 1. Dig a small ditch approximately 150 mm wide (small spade width), 200 mm deep and 5 to 20 m long (depending on the number of people and duration of stay) at an approp riate place. 2. Agree with all campers that this is the ONLY place that will be used to relief yourselves. 3. Start to use it from one side. After using it each member closes the part he/she has used. A toilet chair (toilet seat with legs) can also be used. Cover the whole ditch with sand before your party leaves and within a short time even the toilet paper will have decomposed.


Fairy circles in Kaokoland. (Lindy Lourens)

Fairy circles in Namibia?

When you travel Namibia, you might notice inexplicable bald patches in the landscape. These circles can be seen all over Namibia, but more often in western Kaokoland. They are 2 m to 10 m wide and on the edges of these circles grass grows rampantly while on the inside the circles are barren. Tourists have often wondered if these were caused by radio acitivity, meteorites, UFO’s or maybe even fairies. The indigenous San and Himba people believed that these circles may have been caused by dragons that stayed underground, evil spirits or gods. For the past 30 years scientist have also been researching this phenomena. In March 2012 a team of researchers from the University of Pretoria announced that, after intensive

research, they believe that these so-called fairy circles are actually caused by earth gas bubbles which could possibly indicate oil reserves. The research was led by Professor Gretel van Rooyen, a botanist from the University of Pretoria. She discounted the first scientific theory (that these circles were caused by radio activity) by testing the soil. Another theory – that the soil is poisoned by the Damara Euphorbia (Euphorbia damarana), also known as the Damaramelkbos plant – was discounted because they found that certain desert plants like annual rye grass (Lolium multiflorum) indeed flourishes under Damara Euphorbias. A third theory - that Hodotermes mossambicus termites carry the plant material from the circles to their nests - was discounted by dig-

33


ging trenches of 2 m deep inside and around the circles. No significant termite activity was found. Professor Van Rooyen did two more experiments and realised that the soil inside the circles must be toxic and that the source of the toxins must be deep below the surface. The university’s Department of Chemistry did various tests and found that the circles are caused by bubbles of gas underneath the earth that rise to the surface. The gas first moves through cracks and sink holes before it reaches the sandy soil at the top. Because of the homogeneous density of the soil, the gas that filters through small cracks, holes and the earth crust are distributed coniform. It breaks through the soil surface in an almost perfect circle. The earth gas takes the much needed oxygen from the soil and at the same time changes the chemistry of the soil. However, in April 2013 prof. Norbert Juergens, a German biologist from the University of Hamburg, claimed that sand termites (Psammotermes allocerus) are responsible for the fairy rings. According to his research they make the rings as part of their complicated water storage system. The termites kill the grass by eating the roots and that way the water stays in the ground for years.

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According to him the reason why no one figured it out before is that the termites mostly move about at night and don’t build big, noticeable nests. At the same time Mr Walter Tschinkel, a biologist from the Florida State University, said that he was not convinced by either theories because he himself could not find termites or anything toxic in the soil samples that he took. At the same time a botanist from the University of Cape Town, Mr Michael Cramer, was researching his theory that the fairy circles are natural growth patterns caused by competition for scarce resources. It is clear that these fairy circles will keep the romantics guessing and the scientists researching for quite some time! (Sources: Beeld (7 March 2012) and Republikein (3 April 2013))


General safety and precaution An unfortunate incident can really spoil your long-awaited holiday; therefore you need to consider a few general points on safety and precaution.

Rule number one

Rule number one for travelling anywhere in Africa is to be as well informed as possible. Before your trip, read up as much as possible about the areas which you will be visiting. There are various overland forums on the internet where you can ask experienced travellers just about anything you need to know. You would also be wise to make sure that you have a good basic understanding of your vehicle and the equipment which you will be using on your trip. If you’re planning a trip into remote areas, it’s a good idea to do a bush Horse carts are a general mode of transport in Namibia. Be on the lookout for them when driving. (Karin Theron)

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mechanic course, or at least watch some video clips on the internet on how to fix some basic mechanical problems. Make sure that your travel partner can also drive your vehicle, in case something happens to you. Familiarise him/her with the basics of the vehicle, like where to open the bonnet, how to change a wheel, etc. Once again, if something happens to you, does your travel partner know where you keep your important information like emergency contact numbers?

Beware of group travel

Some people prefer to travel on their own and some prefer to travel in a group. Whichever way you prefer, always remember rule number one and stay cautious. Very often people are recommended not to travel alone to remote places like Kaokoland. Group travel is, however, no guarantee for safety! If you prefer to travel in a group because you like the company or find it more convenient or economical, then do so. But never become complacent because you travel in a group. You are still responsible for every aspect of your own safety. Sometimes group travel can be just as dangerous as travelling alone because people tend to do things that they would never have dreamt

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of doing when alone. They seem to be over confident because they feel safer travelling in a group. Also, most damage to vehicles occurs because people want to prove their own driving skills or the capability of their vehicles to the group. Whether you travel alone or in a group, avoid having to admit to yourself afterwards that a disaster happened because of your own stupidity. If you do travel in a group, give the spare keys for your vehicle to another driver in your group, just in case you lose yours. Don’t forget to take it back before you split up at the end of your journey.

Carry with you

Carry your passport as well as copies of all your documents with you at all times. Do not leave it in your tent or wherever you stay.

Travelling remote areas

When you travel remote areas like Kaokoland or Damaraland, a satellite phone is a must. See our special section on Communication on page 72. Apart from extra fuel, it is vital that you take enough extra water and dry food rations, and a few packets of rehydrate solution so that you will be able to survive five extra days in emergency situations. If you really need to, you can ration yourself to 2 â„“ of water per person per day, but remember to take that on top of


your normal daily water ration. Under normal circumstances you could work on 6 ℓ of water per person per day for drinking, cooking and dishes. Ideally you should always travel with at least 40 ℓ of water with you. In case of an emergency, stay at your car as a search party will find it easier than they will find you wandering around, especially if the search is conducted by air.

Personal safety

You should use good common sense when you travel Namibia, like you would when you travel anywhere else in the world. Basically the same can be said for Namibia as for any other country in the world: A lot of people = a lot of crime.Therefore you should be more cautious when you are in cities. Crime is mostly confined to thefts like pickpocketing, luggage theft and burglaries. You are a welcome target if you leave your handbag or camera equipment lying openly in your car, especially if you leave your vehicle unattended. Avoid displaying flashy jewellery and carrying your camera around your neck. Rather carry it in a camera bag over your shoulder. When you camp, you should rather take your personal belongings with you into the tent at night, especially if the campsite is in or close to a village or town. In case you have a breakdown or accident and you can-

not reach your planned destination, it is better not to pitch your tent right next to the road where everybody can see you. It is always best to pack your loose camping equipment away at night as you never know if a wind will come up during the night.

Insurance

Make sure you have appropriate medical and vehicle insurance before you leave, and that your vehicle insurance includes vehicle recovery. You will find the numbers of tow in services in this guide under the towns closest to where you are. Keep the contact numbers for your insurance with you. Remember that you cannot phone other countries’ toll free numbers from Namibia, so ensure that you have direct numbers. It is advisable to contact your medical aid/insurance prior to your trip to obtain a document which states what you are covered for and what the claim procedure is if you are in a foreign country.

Driving through long, dry grass

When driving through long, dry grass, like you often find in Kaokoland and Damaraland, be very aware of the danger of vehicle burn out. ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher in the vehicle and be on the lookout for Grass Burn Out Risk warnings on your Tracs4Africa GPS map. 37


Grass collects underneath the vehicle around the exhaust pipe. In a short time it can catch fire and your vehicle can burn out. This risk is higher for petrol than for diesel vehicles because exhaust temperatures are much higher, although turbo diesel engines also generate a lot of heat. In places where the grass is long, stop every 20 km or so to check for grass collecting near or on the exhaust. The exhaust will be extremely hot, so always have a thick glove, similar to the ones used by welders, in the car. Also, when you stop, don’t stop over grass. Never install any additional electrical equipment to your vehicle without a proper fuse; not only is it better for the protection of the apparatus, but it also ensures the safety of your car. Always verify the safety of any aftermarket work yourself by checking for any loose electric wiring underneath your vehicle. Sparks combined with a hot exhaust pipe and dry grass are like putting a match to a pile of dry wood.

Wild animals

Most community camps in Namibia are unfenced so the wildlife can wander through. Always keep your eyes open for wild animals, especially at night. Remember that wild animals are wild and that you are entering their territory. It is never safe to leave your vehicle in wildlife areas, even if it is allowed. It is not a good idea to swim or cool down in any of the rivers in the north 38

of Namibia as there are many hungry crocodiles. One should treat any abnormally tame actions by wild animals with suspicion because they might have rabies. Children can easily fall prey when they see these nice little ‘doggies’ approaching and they want to play with them. Reports were made of jackal, meerkat and even kudu approaching vehicles and people. Do not leave bones or other food out to attract animals to take photos. You will cause them to become tame and be shot as they pose a threat to humans. Also, don’t leave any refuse bags around your camp as the animals will tear them open. Pack away all food as wild animals, small or big, will help themselves to your food when you go to bed. Sometimes even a little mouse in a plastic bag lying around can be a cause of great concern in the middle of the night. Hyenas are known for carrying off or chewing on anything lying around that is foreign to them. In areas where you might encounter them, rather pack away everything at night and when leaving your camp. In areas where there are elephants, you shouldn’t have fruit (especially citrus) with you as the elephants will do anything to get to it. Be vigilant of baboons and monkeys around your camp, for they will steal your food. Always ask the local camp warden if they have any problems with monkeys or baboons.


Taking photographs

Remember common decency. You should respect people’s privacy; therefore it is always best to first ask before taking photographs of them. Specific groups like the Himba and Herero are especially sensitive to tourists taking photographs of them. It is not uncommon to be expected to pay a fee for each photo you take of someone or his possessions. You have to be vigilant of baboons near your camp as they can be very naughty. (Billy Boshoff)

Never ever sleep with your tent open where wild animals roam free – no matter how hot it is – as predators will drag you out of your tent and make a meal of you. As long as your tent is zipped up, you are safe.

In Africa you should rather not take photographs of official buildings like airports or official residences. Road blocks, guard posts and people in uniform are a definite no. You do not want to clash with anybody who is in a position of power.

The desert elephants that are found in the riverbeds of Damaraland and Kaokoland have a comfort zone of about 500 m. The dry riverbeds belong to them and they don’t like to be disturbed, therefore you should drive slowly and be alert. An elephant encounter requires patience more than skill because these lords of the desert may take a long time to make way. Elephants have already killed people in the riverbeds of Namibia and therefore it is safer to avoid driving in dry riverbeds. In areas where you can encounter hippos, be aware that they come out to graze at night. Never get between a hippo and the water and do not pitch your tent in their path.

Himbas very often expect you to pay for taking photographs of them. (Karin Theron)

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What type of accommodation do you want? You might be a rough-and–tough bush camper or prefer camping with amenities. If you’re not a camper, you can overnight in self–catering chalets or choose to splash out on luxury accommodation. Some people prefer a mix of accommodation options. If Sukses you camp, just remember that you need to take along the same equipment, whether you camp for one night or for two weeks. Your type of overnight accommodation will have a direct influence on

deciding where you’ll need to aim for each night; it will also determine how much time you will need to settle in after arriving at your destination and how long it will take you to get going again. How safe are your destinations? Whether you will be venturing into unfamiliar or familiar territory, it may still pose risks that your party members might not be accustomed to; also check if your vehicle is suited to the kind of terrain. In your planning you must pay attention to the safety of your party and their vehicles. Consider that you may have to recover or repair vehicles. Cultures differ and it will be worth your while to find out more about the people living in the areas that you want to visit. Find out about things like how to approach someone politely for advice and how to obtain permission to camp on communal land. What problems can you expect? If there will be any police or veterinary check points on the way or you will be crossing international borders, you should know what paperwork you need and what items you are allowed to take through and what not. Allow extra time in your itinerary for border crossings and check points. Do you have time for all this? Be realistic about the time you have available for your trip. You might not

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be able to see and do everything you want because of a time limit. Can you pay for all of this? Assuming you would consume the equivalent amount of food and refreshments as at home, you will need extra money for fuel, levies, accommodation, park fees, shopping, activities etc. Draw up at least a rough budget for the trip to make sure you can afford it.

Planning

1. Make a rough list of attractions you want to visit and activities you want to do. This will form the basis of your trip plan. 2. Read up on your destinations. Many excellent reference sources are available; most countries have official tourism websites and vari ous internet user forums are also dedicated to overland travel. These websites and forums are usually easy to find via search engines like Google, but you can also en quire on the Tracks4Africa forum via http://www.tracks4africa.co.za. 3. Update your destinations. Remove the ones you think might be un suitable and add any new or inter esting ones you came across. 4. Now that you have an idea of where you’ll be going, decide how many days of your holiday you are pre pared to travel. You may also want to consider building in a day or two for contingencies. 42

5. Determine how many hours you’ll be able to travel per day, taking into account children, people with special needs, lunch stops and the fact that it will take longer to drive scenic routes. If you camp, plan your day to be at your camp site well before nightfall. It is not pleasant to set up camp in the dark. Limit yourself to five hour’s driving time per day. 6. Mark your destinations on a map. You can use a paper map for this, or create waypoints in a mapping program like Garmin MapSource. This could be useful later – see the section on Navigation. Viewing your route on Google Earth gives you a good indication of the terrain and population density of the area you will be driving through. 7. Connect your destinations on the map to form the route you’ll follow. Try to follow a logical sequence to prevent double-backs that might add unnecessary travelling time. Again, you could use a paper map or something like Garmin MapSource. The T4A paper maps indicate travel time between dis tances and MapSource also cal culates travel time. 8. When you start your detail plan ning, you will address issues like the following: • Accommodation and the best time of the year to go. • Make sure you have identified


where you will replenish fuel, water and food, and if your goods will last until you reach these stops. • Health and safety aspects. See our comprehensive section on health on page 87. • Plan how much and where you will exchange Namibian dollar or South African rand. • Requirements for border crossings. • Current regulations on moving fresh produce. • Apply for guest licences for your communications equipment like two-way radios.

Good planning can contribute hugely to an enjoyable self-drive trip. (Anet Bosman)

Trip planning checklist Money matters

• Make sure you have both a Visa and MasterCard in your travel party. • Notify your bank that you will be using your cards in Namibia during a certain period. • Draw up a budget. • Arrange for adequate amounts of currency from your bank. Contact numbers Ensure you take the following numbers with you: • To report lost or stolen bank cards. • Medical aid and the international SOS number in case you have an

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emergency. Remember to take di- rect dial and not toll-free numbers. • Vehicle insurance in case of an accident. • Vehicle mechanic or service centre closest to where you will stay. • A friend who can assist with any emergency arrangements back home. Paperwork • Make sure your passport is valid for six months after you are due to leave Namibia. • Make sure you have a visa, if you need one. • Make sure you have the correct documents for getting through the border (see page 75 for more infor mation about border post red tape). • Make sure that you have sufficient medical and vehicle insurance cover and you know the claims procedure. • Make sure you have all accomoda tion booking confirmations with you. • Make copies of your passport and all other documents and keep them separate from the originals. • Load digital copies of all important documents on a secure online server in order to be able to access them from an internet café. Medical • Get the required inoculations and prophylactics for malaria if you’re going to the north of Namibia.

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• Make sure your first aid kit is well stocked and that medicines are not past their expiry dates. Technical stuff • Load your route onto your GPS and make sure you have the right maps on your GPS. • If you are taking a two-way radio, make sure it is licenced to use where you go. • If you are going into remote areas, rent a satellite phone if you don’t have one. Vehicle • Make sure your vehicle’s services are up to date. • If you are taking a trailer, have that serviced as well. • If your overland vehicle is in sto rage, make sure it was used from time to time. • Make sure your tyres (for both the vehicle and trailer) are in good con dition and less than five years old. • Check mechanicals like suspen sion and transmission components and steering linkages, or have them checked by a mechanic. • Check tyre pressure, oil and cool ant levels shortly before you leave. • Make sure all fuel and water tanks and containers are filled before you leave. • You need two emergency triangles and a ZA sticker if your vehicle is registered in South Africa.


A good GPS is essential when travelling Namibia by motorbike. (Wouter Brand)

Navigation (By Francois Visagie, Wouter Brand and Johann Groenewald)

Unlike many animal species, few of the human species possess a natural ability to navigate. For us, to know where we are and to navigate from point A to point B usually requires some or other form of intellectual effort to construct or maintain a mental map of where we are in relation with our surroundings. The human mental map at best is only a relative map. It exists relative to known landmarks. Absolute directions (North, South, East and West) play little or no part in the human mental map. Often people will know in which direction some landmark is, without knowing where an absolute direction like North is. A good mental map must include absolute orientation. It must know (more or less) where North is. This is essential when travelling to new and unfamiliar places.

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The ability to maintain and adjust a mental map to some degree can be called ‘navigational skills’. To navigate, one needs to first of all know where you are and then know where you want to go. Fortunately humans, nowadays, have the aid of maps, both on paper and GPS, to help them navigate. Some people prefer paper maps and others GPS maps; in fact there is a place for both when you are travelling Africa. A paper map allows you to orientate yourself better as to where you are in relation to the bigger picture of the country that you are travelling, while the GPS map can zoom in and navigate you within meters of a point. Where a paper map can give you accurate information within 50 m, a GPS can do it within 5 m. Even if you do not like to rely on a GPS, it may be a good idea to have one as a backup in case you need to find your location on the map or simply want to retrace your tracks. Whether you use a paper map or a GPS map or both, invest in the best possible maps that you can get. Before departing, make sure your map has accurate and up-to-date information on the areas you want to travel. This is especially vital if you are travelling remote areas. Even if you have the best GPS with the most accurate GPS maps, the responsible traveller will still use auxiliary navigational aids such as paper 46

maps and a compass. These are to be consulted from time to time to ensure that the mental map stays intact even after the GPS’s batteries have run flat. Whether you use a GPS or paper map for navigation, pay attention to the surroundings that you travel through. Make a mental note when you take a turn, or maybe even mark it on your map. If you find yourself in a maze of tracks, also consider noting the odometer reading at each turn. If you’re using a GPS, set it to voiceguided navigation. Not for letting your mind drift off into day-dreams, but so you can pay better attention to the road and your surroundings. When you pay attention to your changing surroundings, you will have all the information needed to face any decision. If you need to turn back, you will know which way to back-track. If you need to take a detour, you’ll know exactly where you are and how best to plan the detour to your destination on the map. If you do get lost, don’t panic. Although you might have missed an important turn-off, you’re still a lot better off than someone who got dropped there blind-folded. You will remember quite a bit about the terrain you travelled through, for how long, and so on. Use this information to locate yourself. A GPS will provide you with valuable information that enables you to limit


hole with potentially lethal implications for any unsuspecting overnight bush campers.

Navigation using a GPS Which GPS?

Before you can answer this question you have to consider what you will be using the GPS for. A very different set of requirements are to be considered if you want to use your GPS for a self-drive trip into remote areas than for other activities such as hiking, mountain biking or just normal city navigation.

A GPS is a wonderful device, but remember that you cannot solely rely on it for navigation. (Bjรถrn Rehder)

unnecessary risks. If you have a Tracks4Africa map loaded on your GPS, it will for instance warn you that camping at animal watering points in Kaokoland is a NO-NO, as is camping in the way of Himba cattle. They have adapted, over the centuries, to feed as far away as 35 km from water, returning to drink only every second day when heat and dehydration all but overcome them. This return usually occurs at nightfall or even later. In such circumstances, during the last 5 km when the scent of water is picked up by the cattle, the thirsty animals often stampede towards the water-

If you want to travel remote areas, a GPS that can merely get you from point A to B is not good enough. If you are going to use Tracks4Africa GPS maps and want to get the full potential from your navigation system, then you need a GPS that will be compatible with Tracks4Africa maps and display the map in a particular way. If not, you must know and accept that you will not have this information at your disposal when you travel. In the Garmin range you get the Nuvi models which are mainly intended for city navigation. They will do a perfect job to get you from point A to B, but they do not display road labels or points of interest (POI) on the map screen. The information is embedded in the map, but not displayed. On the Tracks4Africa maps, road labels will carry information such as

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“off-road” or “deep sand” which is critical for your decision making. The map also carries POIs which provide additional information, for example seasonal flood warnings or dangerous sections on a trail. You would want to see this type of information on the map as you drive or when you plan a route. If you intend to record your route with your GPS, then you need a GPS that can record and manage the tracks for the length of your trip. GPS tracks can be used for your trip report afterwards and are also very welcome at Tracks4Africa in order to update or improve our maps. If you plan to venture into areas which are not covered in detail by the maps you have installed, then you might want to import tracks and waypoints to your GPS which can be used as a guide. This feature is normally only associated with outdoor type GPS units. You will be using your GPS inside your vehicle and a high sensitivity GPS receiver is required to ensure that your GPS receives signals from the satellites in order to calculate its position. If your GPS does not pick up a signal in your vehicle, consider fitting an external antenna. On a motorbike you also need to consider that your GPS is water resistant and dust proof and that you will be able to read the maps in direct sunlight. 48

There is one Garmin model which will tick all of the above boxes. At the time of going to press the Garmin Montana seemed to be a very good choice. It is rugged, has a big enough screen and is a true outdoor GPS which displays all map features and allows superior track management. It is, however, an expensive device and if you are merely looking for routing instructions from A to B on known roads and tracks, then any of the entry level Garmin Nuvi devices will do at a fraction of the price.

Make sure that the latest version of Tracks4Africa’s GPS maps is loaded on your GPS before you leave. (Hannes Thirion)

Before you go Never leave the preparation of your GPS and associated maps to the last minute. If you did proper trip planning, you should already have selected which maps to take on your trip and you would also have studied these maps to make sure that the places you intend to visit are indeed indicated on these maps. If you intend using a GPS for naviga-


tion on your trip, then here are a few things to consider when preparing: 1. Get to know your GPS and all its peripherals before you go into unfamiliar territory. Test the features and maps and consider a basic training course in the use of your GPS. 2. Make sure your GPS is running on the latest firmware from the manu facturer. 3. Get the latest maps installed on your GPS and computer. 4. Make sure the route calculation method of your GPS is set to the desired setting. This would normally be fastest time with no avoidances selected. 5. If you are going to record tracks and your GPS has limited track ca pacity, you will not be able to record your entire trip. You can download tracks to your computer if you take one with you, otherwise set the recording method to ‘wrap’ when full. This way the latest recording will remain intact in case you need to track back on your steps. 6. Transfer all waypoints and tracks you would like to use for naviga tion from your trip planning to the GPS and make sure you can find them under ‘favourites’ before you set off. 7. Get a secure mounting bracket for your GPS and find a suitable position in your vehicle. You should be able to glance at the screen without having to look away from the road ahead for too long. It should also be out of the way of

other controls of your vehicle. Some units are prone to over heating if left in direct sunlight. 8. The GPS will most probably have to be powered from your vehicle’s battery and the most common power supply is via the cigarette lighter plug. For a GPS with an in ternal battery this will be sufficient. However, an outdoor GPS without a rechargeable battery will be problematic on corrugated roads as the power supply from this con nection is intermittent. Therefore it is better to have a permanently wired connection for your GPS. If you are going to use the ciga rette lighter plug, take an extra fuse for it. It is all good and well that you know how to operate the GPS. Now get one of your fellow travellers trained as well, just in case something happens to you or if you want someone to help navigate when you are driving.

On the road By now your trip planning should have been done and your GPS equipment should be checked and installed properly. You should also have familiarised yourself with the operation of your GPS and associated maps. Your GPS can serve as more than just a navigation device on the road. Loaded with the correct maps and travel guides, it is a great source of travel information. If, for instance, you are using the Tracks4Africa SD card, you will also have access to 49


the T4A Africa Travel Guide. This is a rich source of information specially designed with the self-drive traveller in mind. When you search for a place, go to ‘Extras’ and there you will find the guide. POIs in this guide are categorised and the points nearest to your current location will be listed according to category, like for instance picnic spots, accommodation, etc. You can scroll down and explore the places near you. If you set your destination, your GPS will also display useful information like ‘time to destination’ and ‘distance to destination’ provided you have set up your map screen accordingly. These are very handy when the kids start asking the inevitable question. It is also useful for planning lunch stops. Operating a GPS while driving is very dangerous. It can be seen in the same category as texting while driving. Rather pull over when you are looking up information on the GPS or let one of your passengers operate the GPS.

used. The default should be ‘Fastest time’. De-select ‘All avoidances’. 3. Find the desired destination. This is based on your trip planning. You will either look up intermediate destinations or waypoints from your ‘Favourites’. Then select ‘Go’ to start navigation on your Garmin device. 4. Review the calculated route to make sure that it takes you on a suitable route. Pay attention to the time to destination. If this is very long in relation to the distance, then you are probably going to do some 4x4 driving. Use your common sense and do not be led astray by technology. 5. Now you can follow the route in structions, but pay careful atten tion to major turn-offs and always correlate information from the road with what your GPS is suggesting. For instance, does the road sign indicate the same distance as your GPS?

If you do not already have accommodation booked, you would want to start looking for a place to sleep in the afternoon. You can find accommodation around you by simply browsTo navigate to a desired destination, ing the contents of this book or you follow these steps: could scroll down to the accomoda1. Make sure the correct map, and tion category on your GPS to find only that map, is selected. Your GPS the accommodation nearest to you. will not configure correctly if you Keep the direction of these places in have more than one map selected mind as some may be behind you. Note that the distance indicated is at a time. 2. Know which route calculation a straight line distance and you first method is selected and that you have to set your GPS to navigate to specifically want this method to be a particular place before it will calcu50


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Many people consider navigating with a paper map much more exciting than merely following a GPS. This is true, because with a paper map you do not have a GPS signal indicating your position on the map like you have on the digital map of your GPS.

NAM

Map

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37

Navigation using a paper map

2011/12 Edition

Edition

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D2338 30.1/0:31

When you are on holiday, you and your family do not necessarily want to hear the GPS guidance voice. You can still use the routing function, but with the voice guidance switched off. You now need to pay attention to the screen to get routing instructions.

Traveller’s Map

Traveller’s

:15 24.1/0

There are two ways to set up the map screen of your GPS when it comes to direction. You have north-up where the screen will always position the map with north aligned with the top of the screen, similar to a paper map view. Then there is track up where the map will be rotated to always have the track you are supposed to be following pointing to the top of the screen. Whichever way you decide to use, is personal preference.

MOZAMBIQUE & MALAWI

NA BOTSWA

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Also note that when you are stationary, your GPS will not show you which way you should be driving. It is only when you start moving that the GPS will pick up in which direction you are going and can orientate the map accordingly.

MOZAMBIQUE

late the proper distance and, more importantly, drive time. In this book we have given distance as well as time on the road.

1: 172/0

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If you use a paper map, you need to be able to correctly orientate yourself on the map. If you are driving major routes it is easy as they all have signs. However, when you are travelling in remote areas where the landscape is unfamiliar and there are no road signs, it becomes much more difficult to plot your exact position on the map. If you are going to rely only on a paper map for navigation, you must study the map well before you set off for the day. Look for prominent features that can help you to orientate yourself along the way. These could be things like river crossings, major intersections, villages or mountain passes. As you drive, plot your progress and mark the last position that you are absolutely sure of on the map. Also 51


keep an eye on the distance you have travelled and jot down odometer readings if necessary.

Get yourself to the last known position on the map and then start your route planning all over again.

Pay careful attention to where north is and determine if you are driving in the correct direction.

Be an eco-traveller

If you are using a Tracks4Africa paper map, you will find travel time in addition to travel distance indicated on the map. These are handy when planning your trip ahead. If you get lost, stop and try your best to orientate yourself. You should be able to follow your tracks back by remembering prominent features you have just passed or by even following your own vehicle tracks. We trust that you have stayed on a designated track!

Tracks left by vehicles can cause irreparable damage to the environment. It can take hundreds of years for nature to repair the scars of vehicle track pollution. These tracks can be seen clearly from an aeroplane and even on satellite photos. Responsible travellers not only stick to existing tracks, but to the right tracks. Do not cause track pollution and unnecessary damage to fauna and flora. There are numerous dead-end tracks leading into unspoilt areas. This is the result of indiscriminate leisure driving

Be an eco-traveller and don’t cause track pollution. (Johann Groenewald)

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Take special care when you are near Welwitschia mirabilis plants. (Johann Groenewald)

and people getting lost over many years. The problem is then made worse where time and time again travellers follow previous erroneous tracks.

share your tracks and experiences with fellow travellers on one of the many forums designed specifically for that purpose.

Navigating by means of a route or using a routable GPS map is a far safer and environmentally friendly option.This is the only way to ensure that you are indeed taking the right track and therefore limiting track pollution. Eco-travellers share information so that they can learn from each other’s travel experiences. This is the only way in which we can protect and preserve the environment for future generations. If you love travelling Africa,

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Preparing your vehicle for overland travel (By Francois Visagie, Johann Groenewald and Bessie Brand)

When you embark on an overland trip, it is important to realise that you are actually undertaking a vehicle dependent trip. This means that the selection and preparation of your vehicle is critical. For overland travel you need to make sure that your vehicle is safe and capable of traversing the kind of terrain you plan to cover and carrying all the supplies you need to take along. It also needs to be equipped for camping if you plan on camping. Experienced riders believe that a motorbike is the best way to tour Namibia. (Wouter Brand)

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Choosing your vehicle

You can tour Namibia in a sedan vehicle if you feel comfortable driving your car on a gravel road. Most of the roads in Namibia are good gravel roads, but a vehicle with a high ground clearance and larger wheels will travel far better than a normal sedan or even a small 4WD like a SUV. The comfort of bigger wheels on gravel roads makes a pick-up or a 4WD the preferred choice of vehicle. The standard tyres on 4WD vehicles are also better suited to gravel roads. You can go far with a 2x4 when it is dry. However, in the rainy season, it would be advisable to use a 4WD.

roads than a four wheeled vehicle does. You can even take your bike over a river on two mokoros tied together if a ferry has broken down! Also you don’t need to plan for weeks and make lists of all the things that you need to take with, because you simply don’t have space. However, you need to be an experienced biker before you venture into Africa on your iron horse. Remember that motorbikes are not allowed in the national parks of Namibia. In spite of this Namibia is an exciting motorbike destination and offer many other nice places where motorbikes are welcome. The public roads offer enjoyable driving.

With your sedan you should stick to Namibia’s B and C routes and make sure you don’t travel any remote D routes unless you are absolutely certain that it is in good condition. Before you leave, speak to the lodge/ camp owners to get the latest update on road conditions.

Preparing your motorbike

Obviously a capable 4WD is the best vehicle for touring the gravel roads and parks of Namibia. If you venture into remote areas, you must have a 4WD.

To prepare for a biking expedition, you would prepare more or less like you would for a multi-day hiking trip. Go and look what hikers use for camping, cooking and clothing when not on the bike. You need to drastically cut down on the weight of your equipment.

You cannot travel Kaokoland, Damaraland, the Skeleton Coast and Khaudum Game Reserve without a 4WD. Keen bikers believe an off-road bike is the best way to travel. A motorbike is economical and flexible because it gives you access to more

If you travel by bike, all you really need is money and your documents. The rest are luxuries.The less weight you carry, the better your motorcycle will handle and the less chance you have of falling and damaging yourself and your bike.

Extra fittings to your bike Fuel tank You should seriously consider fitting a long range fuel tank. If you have a

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You will need to fit good off-road tyres if you plan on driving the thick sand between Puros and Sesfontein. (Wouter Brand)

range of 400 km, you will be able to cover most distances between fuel stops. If you need to carry extra fuel, a bladder system is better than extra fuel containers, because it can be easily stored when not in use. Safety features Fit hand guards and a bash plate to protect the sump. Electronics Fit a dual battery system with two external power outlets for your GPS and other electronic equipment. Most modern bikes have electronic starters; therefore it is best to protect the main battery from possible drainage.

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Luggage carrier The carriage system that you choose should be dust and water proof, and packed as low as possible. Using dry-bags is a better option than rigid boxes. If you fall, a rigid box can get damaged so badly that you cannot use it for the rest of your trip.. The best option is to strap waterproof dry-bags onto the carrier. It is crucial that once your luggage is strapped on and secure, there should be no loose straps hanging off that can be caught in the chain or wheels. Tyres You will inevitably ride a lot of gravel roads in Namibia, therefore you


should rather fit off-road tyres. If your itinerary consists of mostly tar and good gravel roads, a dual purpose tyre will be adequate. Get specialist advice on tubeless tyres. Tools and spares The basic equipment for every bike includes a toolset with the right sizes specific to your bike. A tyre repair kit includes spare tubes, tyre levers, tube patches, valve spanner and, of course, an air pump. Spares include an assortment of nuts and bolts, a sparkplug, spare clutch and brake cables, epoxy glue and a chain breaker. Camping equipment For camping you will need to take a good lightweight and waterproof tent, small but warm sleeping bag, thin inflatable mattress and a groundsheet that can double as an emergency blanket. For cooking, you need a basic pot and pan set, a small gas stove and basic cutlery. Personal items You only have space for the bare minimum when it comes to toiletries. You should invest in good protective riding and rain gear. Take one set of riding gear and one set of clothes to wear in the evening. Water and hydration backpack You must always carry at least three

litres of water and a hydration pack in your backpack. The best way to carry water, is in a plastic bladder in your backpack.

Preparing your sedan or SUV

If you are going to travel in a sedan car, SUV or a 4x2 pick-up you are most likely not going to venture into rough or remote terrain but will stick to the main roads. This may lead you to think that you do not need to prepare for every eventuality. This may be true, but we urge you to at least consider the following aspects. Make sure you have a proper spare tyre, not one of the narrow types many vehicles are kitted out with nowadays. Make sure all your tyres are in good condition. Remember that the mileage on your tyres is not necessarily a prediction of their fitness to travel gravel roads. Bear in mind that tyres have a limited shelf life of about five to six years, irrespective of their mileage. Ensure that your vehicle’s service schedule is up to date before you leave. If you tow a trailer, make sure that its tyres are also in good condition, that you have a spare wheel and that the trailer has been serviced as well. Always have a container of at least 20 ℓ of drinking water and some dry food rations with you, in case of emergency.

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Preparing your vehicle for travel into remote areas

If you plan on venturing into remote areas, preparing your vehicle is of the utmost importance. You have to make sure that you and your fellow travellers travel safely and that you will be able to survive the ordeal if you do get into trouble. Basics You will have to be a self-sufficient and preferably experienced camper. If you have never done an overland trip before, we recommend that you consider renting camping equipment and try it out closer to home first. That is the best way to figure out if you and your travel companions really like camping and what you need and what you don’t need. Camping equipment is expensive, and one

can easily be lured into buying a lot of unnecessary paraphernalia that will cost you dearly, not only money wise, but also in terms of space and weight. Make sure you can use all your equipment. Don’t take off with stuff you’ve never used. When the day of reckoning arrives, you don’t want to find out it doesn’t work for you, or is defective or missing some essential part.

When preparing your vehicle for a trip, the first and utmost important point is to make sure that the manufacturer’s services are up to date. If your overland vehicle is kept in storage, you will have to make sure that it is used and serviced regularly. Ensure that the tyres are of good quality, in good condition and prefer-

Preparing your vehicle well is of the utmost importance. (Johann Groenewald)

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ably not older than six years, even if they still have enough tread. Take at least one, but preferably two, good spare tyres and a puncture repair kit. Invest in a good quality kit (not the plastic ones) and make sure you know how to use it. Take your tyre compressor and pressure gauge along so that you can adjust tyre pressure as needed.

ages, healthy engine operation, etc. If you don’t have the time, ask your favourite mechanic to do it. If you have any aftermarket products or equipment fitted to your vehicle, make sure it is in line with your vehicle’s specifications. Pay particular attention to electrical equipment that could interfere with the vehicle’s safety systems. Also test drive your vehicle to see if you’re happy with any non-electrical and non-mechanical equipment fitted to your vehicle, like roof racks. Make sure everything is fitted securely. Always take cable ties to refasten things that rattled loose. Take duct tape and a basic tool kit as well as a few basic spares like a fan belt and filters. Also take spares for parts that are possibly prone to failure on your vehicle model. Take at least one spare of all the fuses on your vehicle, even for the cigarette lighter plug that you use for your GPS, mobile phone, etc. Always have a fire extinguisher in your vehicle and make sure that it is full and in working condition.

A puncture repair kit, tyre compressor and pressure gauge are essential tools on your trip. (Karin Theron)

Thoroughly check your vehicle’s mechanicals just before the trip. This is especially important if you haven’t used your vehicle much since the previous service. This is a good time for the proverbial “bumper-to-bumper” check of suspension and transmission components, steering link-

Prepare your vehicle for specific conditions that you know you will be facing. If you intend driving through long grass, take along a seed screen to protect your radiator from being blocked. Try to use a net that is long enough to cover the radiator at the bottom as well, as most of the seeds are sucked up from below. Don’t leave it on your vehicle all the time as

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with a bit of silicon spray in the bag it will last for many years. It is, however, good practice to replace rubber components after a few years as they do become brittle.

A seed screen will protect your radiator from being blocked. (Peter Levey)

it could increase your vehicle’s fuel consumption by almost 10%, especially for turbo-diesels that rely on cool intake air. If you expect having to ford deep water, take along a plastic or tarpaulin radiator cover and consider fitting a snorkel. A snorkel also helps to reduce the amount of dust being sucked into your air filter. Knowledgeable advice can help ensure you’re on the right path without wasting your money. More than the basics If you plan on travelling seriously remote areas, you should prepare yourself adequately to be able to repair your vehicle yourself. If the belts and hoses on your vehicle are more than a few years old, seriously consider taking along replacement belts and hoses. They do not take up a lot of space and can be packed into a sealed plastic bag;

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Take along the following: • Extra tyre valves, both the inner and the entire unit. When running in thick mud, it is not uncommon for the valves to get damaged, and all the tyre repair kits in the world won’t fix that. • Spare light bulbs for every light on the vehicle: head lights, running lights, indicators, brake lights. • Fuel filter and oil filter. Air filters are easy to clean, so you can re use your air filter. However, if you plan on crossing rivers, take a spare one in case yours gets damp. It is better to replace it with a dry one, even if only temporarily. • Spare oil for the engine, and a couple of litres of gearbox and differential oil. • If you have a long range fuel pump, get a small spare pump with a hose that you can put into the long range tank and pump over to the main tank should the pump, elec trics or switches fail. • Take spare wire, connectors, fuses and electrical tape, and tools to apply them. • Tow strap. If you’re planning on driving muddy areas, you need a strap longer than 15 meters. Make sure your tow points are sufficient ly strong to be towed out of thick sand or mud. The standard ones are inadequate.


• • • • • • •

Bow shackles. Make sure they are double the minimum specification required for your vehicle. Bottle jacks for changing tyres. A hi-lift jack. Make sure you know how to use it as this is a dangerous piece of equipment. Plates to prevent the jack from sinking into sand/mud (improvise!). Jumper cables to charge a rundown battery. Make and take a small wire tool with a ’rake’ on the end (about 1m long) for cleaning out the grass from areas around the radiator and under the vehicle. If travelling in cold weather, make sure you take along sufficient emergency type gear to keep people warm, dry and visible.

Buying additional equipment If you decide on fitting any accessories to your vehicle, remember to check your vehicle’s warranty terms and conditions. Also consider that any after-market products do not go through the same quality checks as your vehicle which means that they often become the weakest link in your system. Equipment can make one’s life a lot more comfortable. In some cases equipment could even be crucial for survival. But, equipment comes at a price. The price for equipment is paid in extra weight, more space taken up, adding to the bulk of your vehicle if fitted outside and, of course, money. Extra weight increases your vehicle’s

fuel consumption and stopping distance, and especially when carried on the roof-rack can make your vehicle significantly more unstable. Extra weight can also take your vehicle or trailer close to – or over – its legal weight limit. Additional equipment taking up more space inside could make your vehicle cramped, or could force you to leave behind other equipment you actually want to take with you. Equipment mounted outside your vehicle – especially bulky equipment – increases its aerodynamic drag and therefore fuel consumption. This means more of your trip budget will go towards fuel, and less towards the activities you have in mind. With increased fuel consumption, you’ll also need to watch the distances between refuelling points more carefully than before. If you don’t want to waste money on equipment, don’t buy anything you’re not 100% sure you will use again. You can consider borrowing or renting equipment until you’re sure that you really can’t do another trip without it. You will learn what works for you as you become more experienced. Additional advantages and disadvantages specific to particular equipment: Packing systems Advantages: Packing systems make it easier and quicker to get to out-

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of-reach items otherwise packed far behind or deep underneath other luggage. Disadvantages: Packing systems usually become permanent fixtures and occupy their space permanently. For the same amount of luggage, the total weight carried by your vehicle is increased by the weight of your packing system itself. Because they’re built with straight lines and square corners, they usually also leave odd spaces around them that are more difficult to utilise effectively. Some people complain of noisy rattling from their packing systems. Suggestion: If you’re considering buying a packing system, look for one that has a deck covered in nonslip material with tie-down points for securely transporting your luggage stored on top. Roof-racks Advantages: Roof-racks make it possible to carry awkward, dirty or dangerous items outside of the vehicle cabin. People typically use them to transport items like camping equipment, firewood or gas cylinders. Disadvantages: Items are more difficult to reach on a roof-rack and can increase your vehicle’s fuel consumption. Many types of roof-racks significantly add to wind noise while travelling. The sturdier types may not be able to flex as much as your vehicle on very uneven terrain and could damage your vehicle’s roof or its pillars, especially when mounted too rigidly. Any items on the roof-

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rack, but especially heavy ones like a second spare wheel or toolbox, raise your vehicle’s centre of gravity and reduce handling stability. Suggestion: Any gap between the front of your roof-rack and the roof of your vehicle can snag low-hanging branches. If this becomes a problem, consider fitting branch deflector cables. Rooftop tents vs. ground tents A rooftop tent is the easiest way to sleep off the ground. This is helpful when your campsite is uneven, overgrown or water-logged or the soil too soft to anchor a tent. In these circumstances a ground tent would be less than ideal. Especially in wilderness areas, many people also prefer rooftop tents for putting some distance between themselves and wild animals lurking around at night. However, this is a false sense of security. Rooftop tents are quick and easy to open. However, you have to close your rooftop tent every time you need to use your vehicle. Ground tents can be left behind in your campsite but the non-pop-up types take longer to erect than rooftop tents. There can be a significant cost difference between entry-level ground tents and rooftop tents – a budget two person dome tent is far cheaper than the cheapest rooftop tent. If your vehicle doesn’t yet have a roofrack or luggage bars, it will add to the cost of fitting a rooftop tent.


Rooftop tents and ground tents both have advantages and disadvantages. (Karin Theron)

Ground tents come in a greater variety of sizes for larger groups while most rooftop tents cater for only two people. Very few cater for up to four, and those tend to become heavy and bulky. Being fitted to the vehicle, rooftop tents can withstand wind speeds for which ground tents might need to be anchored. The canvas covers most rooftop tents are fitted with, can get damaged by low-hanging branches, as can ground tents packed on the roof-rack. To resolve this problem, you can consider getting a hard-shell rooftop tent or a luggage carrier for your ground tent. Together with a roof-rack, a rooftop tent can increase your vehicle’s fuel consumption by as much as 10%.

However, much the same applies to a bulky ground tent transported on the roof-rack. Off-road trailers and off-road caravans Advantages: These can be life-savers for larger families. Off-road trailers and caravans provide additional packing space and also offer more flexibility. For instance, you can store your clothing, camping gear and groceries in the trailer or caravan, leaving only recovery gear and the picnic basket in your vehicle. You can even fit your rooftop tent (or an additional one) to some trailers. This way you can leave your whole camp behind when going on day-trips. Disadvantages: When towing, your vehicle will be more unstable, especially in cross-winds. Before departing, make sure you are familiar and comfortable with your vehicle’s hand63


ling when towing. A trailer or caravan increases the combined weight of your vehicle, which increases fuel consumption, makes overtaking and manoeuvring in tight off-road situations more difficult and will also increase braking distance. Make very sure that when laden, your trailer/caravan + vehicle combination complies with legislated weight limits. Individual and combined weight limits are determined by: your vehicle’s specifications, your trailer’s or caravan’s specifications as well as your driver’s licence! Suggestion: In addition to other factors to consider when buying a trailer or caravan, the ideal is to buy one with the same track width and tyres as your vehicle. The matching track width minimises drag off-road and matching the wheels and tyres means you have more swapping options in case of punctures. Awnings Advantages: Awnings provide shelter against sun and rain. They can make an exposed campsite pleasant – or at least bearable – and can also provide impromptu protection against rain and sun for roadside stops like lunch breaks or even repairs. Most available awnings are fairly easy to set up and stow away. Disadvantages: Depending on their size and construction, awnings can be bulky and heavy. A heavier type can upset your vehicle’s levelling unless balanced by a similar weight on the opposite side. Exposed awnings or those fitted with fabric covers are 64

susceptible to damage from low-hanging branches. When an awning protrudes from the front of the vehicle, branches can also snag between the awning and roof-rack or the roof of the car. Suggestion: To prevent the awning from getting damaged by branches, fit one with a metal cover. Correctly fitted branch deflector cables will help prevent the front of the awning snagging branches. Camp showers For the utmost in quick-and-clean simplicity, some people wash up from a basin. To carry and set up a camp shower is considered a luxury. If you will be camping at sites with facilities you do not need to take one along. About 80% of the campsites in Namibia do have shower facilities. Advantages: Camp showers are the easiest way to wash long hair and otherwise offer an enjoyable way of cleaning up after a hard day out. Various types are available – the most basic ones consist of a suspended water container with shower head. Many ttypes include a water pump, there are models that also provide warm water and some come with their own collapsible enclosures; you could also buy the bits and pieces separately. Some of the basic suspended showers are made of black plastic so that it can also warm your shower water when put in the sun. Disadvantages: Showers can be cumbersome to set up, especially


the more complex ones that provide hot water and a collapsible enclosure. These will be less than ideal when you break camp every day, but are great when staying over for a few days. Showers can waste precious drinking water if you’re not careful. Suggestion: If you’ll be on the move daily and will mostly be using secluded or private campsites, you could make do without an enclosure. You can also warm your water on the fire if you have a fire bucket, or in hot weather you can even get by without warmed water altogether. Inverters Advantages: A 220 V inverter makes it unnecessary to take along a 12 V power supply for every one of your electronic accessories – simply plug their 220 V adapters into the inverter. Disadvantages: Being dependent on an inverter to power or charge your accessories, introduces an additional potential point of failure. Quality and reliability vary widely, so pay some attention to back-up plans. The more powerful inverters also have significant ’stand-by’ consumption – the power used when the inverter is on but not powering equipment. Suggestion: Make sure your inverter is securely mounted, with enough ventilation to prevent heat build-up and protection against dust.The latter is especially important with inverters that have internal cooling fans. Mobile fridges/freezers Advantages: Mobile fridges/freezers

make it possible to be self-sufficient in terms of perishables for extended periods of time, or to keep drinks cool. Disadvantages: They are generally fairly bulky. Construction materials have improved but many still tend to be quite heavy. However, the most common complaint in overlanding communities is that fridges/freezers drain battery power. With a mobile fridge/freezer your battery will need regular monitoring and when standing over for a couple of days, you’ll probably need to start the engine for a few minutes every day. Suggestion: If your fridge doesn’t have a freezer compartment, create one on top yourself by laying a newspaper sealed in a plastic bag across the frozen goods. If you’re catering for a larger group, instead of buying a large dual fridge/freezer or two separate units, you can save money by rotating ice packs between your freezer and cooler box. To minimise the power consumption of your mobile fridge/freezer, open it as little as possible and keep it well insulated. Ensure there is enough ventilation space around the fridge/freezer (especially around its ventilation outlet). Where possible, cover up windows against the sun; when stationary, keep your vehicle in the shade as much as possible and open some vents and windows for ventilation. Try to buy a dual 12 V/220 V freezer and use its 220 V inlet wherever you find a supply.

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Dual battery systems Advantages: With a dual battery system, your mobile freezer can run off its own dedicated battery. This way the vehicle’s starter battery will not be drained. Any other 12 V accessories like camp lights, inverters, electrical compressors, etc. can also be moved to the auxiliary battery. Disadvantages: Although dual battery systems are quite simple in operation, they do add to the complexity of your vehicle’s electrical system, and failures – although not common – are not unknown. Conventional systems need to have the auxiliary battery close to the starter battery to prevent cable power loss. More advanced systems are available that provide the convenience of having the batteries further apart, but they cost more and cannot charge the auxiliary battery as quickly as conventional systems. What many people also don’t realise is that battery capacity is like a bank loan. Even if you increase your battery capacity (loan), your sustainable power consumption (spending) is still limited by your alternator power (income). Most batteries will not fully recover their charge on a trip once drained; vehicle alternators simply weren’t made to recondition batteries. Therefore, although dual battery systems do protect your vehicle’s starter battery, they are not a blank cheque for unlimited power usage. Suggestion: Look for a dual battery system that has at least a lowvoltage alarm, and preferably also a so-called bridge function, with which 66

you can connect your starter and auxiliary batteries together in emergencies. This is useful for winching or for when the starter battery is flat. Solar panels Advantages: If you carefully manage your power consumption, with the right solar panel and enough sunshine you could run your freezer almost indefinitely. With a good regulator working in tandem with the alternator, a solar panel can even help keep your auxiliary battery better charged than the alternator on its own. As electricity sources independent of the vehicle, solar panels could also have some emergency use like charging a flat starter battery. Disadvantages: The more powerful panels are bulky and fragile and need to be carefully mounted out of harm’s way. The more robust panels are less powerful. Solar panels either take up space permanently (usually on the roof-rack), or need to be moved each time you pitch and break camp. Shade or overcast weather significantly reduces the output of most solar panels. Suggestion: A good solar panel regulator integrates with your dual battery system in such a way that the solar panel operates in tandem with the vehicle’s alternator, without requiring you to remember or do anything. Portable generators To take a generator along is way too luxurious. The whole idea is to get away from it all!


Rather leave this at home as you will be very unpopular in a campsite if you start up a generator. Most people go to remote areas to experience peace and quietness. Most of the campsites at lodges or in towns will have electricity which means you can recharge your electronic equipment when you stay over at one of these. In Namibia 39% of all campsites do have electricity. Long-range fuel tanks Advantages: Long-range fuel tanks enable your vehicle to carry more fuel and travel further before needing to refuel. Normally being fitted underneath the vehicle, long-range fuel tanks could actually improve a vehicle’s centre of gravity, especially compared to jerry cans on the roofrack. Also, you do not need to take along extra fuel containers or pipes and funnel to get the fuel from the containers into your tank. Disadvantages: Once fitted, longrange fuel tanks contribute to the permanent weight of your vehicle. They increase the vulnerable area underneath your vehicle and, depending on shape, might even decrease its ground clearance. They also add complexity and more potential points of failure to your vehicle’s fuel system. Some chassis mounted long-range fuel tanks may require a transfer fuel pump to transfer fuel to the main tank. Failure of this fuel pump is a very real potential problem resulting in an out-of-fuel situation while there is still

plenty of fuel in the reserve tank. Suggestion: Get a long-range tank of common construction that any competent welder could repair if need be during your trip. If a fuel transfer pump is used, purchase a spare one and make sure you know how to connect it. Have the tank fitted to your vehicle some time before leaving on your trip to ensure through normal daily use that there are no leaks or problems with the installation. Water tanks Advantages: Water tanks make it possible to get rid of the scores of bottles and little containers you would otherwise have carried for extended expeditions. Usually they also make it possible to carry more water for longer distances between replenishment stops. Like long-range fuel tanks, chassis-mounted water tanks are better for the vehicle’s centre of gravity than containers on the roofrack or inside the vehicle. Disadvantages: Once fitted, water tanks contribute to the permanent weight of your vehicle. They increase the vulnerable area underneath your vehicle and, depending on shape, might also decrease its ground clearance. It may also be difficult to clean a fitted tank which means that you have to use purification tablets which affects the taste of the water (and your coffee). Suggestion: Get a simple water tank that could be easily repaired if it starts leaking during a trip. You could also just buy water in 5 ℓ containers

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in major towns and this way keep your drinking water separate. Customised suspension Advantages: Stiffer springs and/ or shock absorbers may make your vehicle more stable when carrying a heavy load. Longer and/or softer springs may provide your vehicle with more articulation and traction on uneven terrain. Disadvantages: Stiffer springs or shock absorbers can limit articulation and therefore traction on uneven terrain. Longer and/or softer springs may make your vehicle more unstable, especially at speed or on uneven terrain. Longer springs will also require you to fit longer shock absorbers. Myth number one: “A suspension upgrade increases your vehicle’s ground clearance”. Of course a suspension upgrade can increase a vehicle’s ground clearance slightly, but it is not simply a matter of changing springs and shock absorbers, which is not recommended for overland travel. Myth number two: “A suspension upgrade increases your vehicle’s load-carrying capacity”. No matter what, that value on your vehicle’s specification plate is fixed (unless you somehow manage to re-license your vehicle). Suggestion: From the advantages and disadvantages above you can see how these factors can work against one another. That is the one problem. The other one is that there does not seem to be many – if any – actual technical experts in the aftermarket suspension industry; ex68

perts who are trained and skilled enough to calculate what a potential suspension change would do to your vehicle. Most dealers will just sell you a standard ῾lift kit’. If you load and use your vehicle within the manufacturer’s recommendations, your vehicle’s suspension will normally be fine. Differential locks Advantages: Differential locks can help traction on uneven terrain, thereby making it possible to get out of a tight spot on your own. Disadvantages: Differential locks add to the so-called unsprung weight of the modified axle. This can cause a form of instability – known as trammelling – on corrugated surfaces which can be very dangerous. They also add to the complexity and potential points of failure in your vehicle’s drivetrain. Unless de-activated when turning, differential locks increase the vehicle’s turning circle and can accelerate tyre and transmission wear as well as damage to the road surface. Under certain circumstances they can suddenly transfer all engine power to a single wheel. Unless the vehicle is driven with the limitations of differential locks in mind, this can cause a catastrophe in a situation where otherwise only wheel spin would have resulted. Suggestion: Many modern fourwheel-drive vehicles are factory-fitted with some form of traction control. If you own such a vehicle, you may not need the additional cost and


complexities of a differential lock, especially if you don’t foresee driving really gruelling terrain very regularly. Snorkels Advantages: By raising your vehicle’s air intake, snorkels help keep it clearer of water and dust. This makes the air filter last longer and also makes water crossings safer for the engine. Disadvantages: Snorkels are fitted to the outside of the vehicle, usually to the side or along the front edge of the windscreen, and are therefore exposed to potential damage from low-hanging branches. Despite being fitted with intake grids, snorkels still collect leaves and twigs which find their way to the vehicle’s air cleaner which needs to be inspected and cleaned regularly. Suggestion: To help reduce the amount of leaves and twigs collected, you can turn the snorkel’s intake towards the back, although some people believe this reduces the snorkel’s intake efficiency, especially at speed. Sand/mud tracks Advantages: These provide extra traction or better footing for recovering the vehicle from ditches, sand or mud. Two types are available: a rigid type usually called sand tracks, and a roll-up type usually made from linked rubber segments and called mud tracks. Which one is the better, depends on how you think and work. For instance, both can be used

to cross sharp ditches – sand tracks could be laid across a ditch, while rolled-up mud tracks would be used to fill the ditch. Disadvantages: Both can get very dirty from work, especially in mud, and they need to be stored in your vehicle or trailer. Suggestion: Before stowing your muddy sand or mud tracks in your vehicle, cover them in empty firewood bags. If you don’t have any, use black plastic bags (which you should always have with you in wilderness areas). Carefully consider which terrain you will drive before adding this extra weight to your vehicle. If you are shipping your vehicle from abroad, you can have it kitted out locally. There are a number of 4x4 Fitment Centres in Namibia (Windhoek, Swakopmund and Walvis Bay). Don’t go to the first shop and start buying, shop around because prices, quality and service vary a lot.

Packing your Vehicle

Pack only the things you absolutely need. NEED, not want or desire or that might come in handy. If you still run out of space, you need to rethink either your planning or packing, otherwise you’re looking at getting a bigger vehicle or a (bigger) trailer. Pack the heaviest items in the bottom and between the vehicle’s axles. This optimises your vehicle’s stability and handling with its load. Keep as little as possible on the roof; it is best

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Off-road trailers provide extra packing space and in this case also a rooftop tent. (Johann Groenewald)

not to have anything on the roof. If you have to pack on top, rather keep heavy items inside your vehicle and light stuff on the roof. You may have to compromise to be able to fit recovery equipment. These are typically heavy, but you don’t want to bury it right at the bottom if there is a good likelihood of needing it. Try being creative – perhaps you can pack it at the bottom in such a way that you can slide it in and out as needed.

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Camping checklist

Self-drive travellers have different overnight options. They can choose to stay in full board or self-catering accommodation, or to camp. Campers have the option of travelling with and staying in a mobile home or campervan, or to camp the oldfashioned way. Well, not really the old-fashioned way, because nowadays there are many gadgets and a big variety of equipment available in the outdoor shops. You can decide which of these things you want to take along to add some convenience to your camping, but there are some basic things that you will need for shelter and preparing your food.


Here are some must-haves: For camping • Tent with built-in ground sheet and mosquito net (if you’re not using a roof top tent) • Gazebo with ground sheet is con venient if you use a rooftop tent • Hammer and spade • Stretcher or inflatable/foam mat tress • Sleeping bag • Sheets • Pillow • Folding table • Camp chairs • 12 V DC LED lights (preferably LED that draws low current from your vehicle battery) • Clothes-line and pegs • Wash-basin and toiletries • Bag for carrying your towels, toiletries and clothes to the ablution block • Cooler box or small refrigerator • Water bottles filled with water from home (at least enough for the first day’s drinking) • Swiss army knife or Leatherman • Picnic blanket • Dustpan and brush • Toilet paper • Universal size plug • Torch (head lamp works best)

• Cast iron pot, frying pan, pot and kettle • Plates and salad bowl • Mugs and glasses • Cutlery and can opener • Chopping board, sharp knife and bread knife • Egg lifter and grater • Paper towel, tinfoil, jiffy bags (for leftovers) and refuse bags • Washing-up bowl, dishcloths, scourers and detergents Technical hardware • 220 V AC extension lead • Extender plug • 220 V AC battery chargers (for deep cycle batteries while at a place with electricity) • Inverter • Notebook with MapSource, T4A maps and photo programs installed to download tracks and photos • External storage device to backup tracks and photos.

For cooking • Braai equipment like grid, triangle, tongs, gloves, matches and fire lighters • Gas cylinder and cooker head with spare rubber seals, key and nozzles Off-road trailers are extremely comfortable for camping.(Johann Groenewald)

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Communication When you travel, you would want to stay in contact with the outside world and/or your travel companions if you travel in a group. Nowadays there are mainly three ways of staying in touch; by cellular phone, satellite phone or two-way radio. Few travellers make use of the public phones that are still found all over Namibia.

Two-way radio

If you want to stay in contact with other vehicles in your group, two-way radios are the most effective way. Just remember that radio types and/or frequencies often require licences. Make sure if you need a licence and where to apply for one. The best range will be found with VHF and UHF mobile (fixed) radios, with external antennas. These, however, require commercial radio licences. Bear in mind that licences issued by the Independent Communications Authority of SA (ICASA) are only valid for the Republic of South Africa, and have no standing in neighbouring countries. 29 MHz radios, which are also good for staying in contact with a group, have a shorter range but can overcome obstacles like hills much better than VHF. They are very popular among 4WD travellers but you need a visitors’ licence to use it. To apply for one, rather work through a communications company in Namibia.

(Johann Groenewald)

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If you are a radio ham (amateur radio), licensing is a lot easier. However, you will only be able to communicate with fellow radio hams, as you may only operate in your own frequency bands which do not overlap with commercial bands. Radio hams may not use their equipment to transmit on commercial bands, and require separate type approved radios and separate licences for these frequencies. Licenced hand-held radios can be used for the above frequencies as well, but unless they are connected to an external antenna, range will be severely limited. They have limited battery life, and an external power source should be considered. They are good enough for general convoy communication if the convoy is short. There is not much of a price difference between these hand-held radios and the mobile (fixed) radios, but they have advantages like enabling you to stay in contact with the campsite when on walks in the surrounding area. Licence-free hand-held radios can also be used, and are much more affordable than the radios mentioned above. Licence-free radios cannot operate on the licenced frequencies and vice versa. Their range is a lot shorter and they are unsuitable for convoy work, unless the vehicles are close to one another, e.g. on slow trails. The radios’ ranges can be extended by connecting them to external antennas. There are many models available; not all have anten-

na connectors for external antennas which might be a consideration when purchasing a radio. These radios are ideal for around-camp and hiking, if that is all you need. Many 4x4 and radio clubs will be happy to assist with detailed questions.

Cell phone

The mobile networks in Namibia are well developed and you will have cell phone coverage in and near most towns and main routes. In Namibia MTC has the most extensive coverage. International mobile phones can be used in Namibia without any problems. Remember the international dialling code (+264) if you want to phone local (Namibian) numbers from your cell phone. It is, however, very expensive to make and receive calls on your cell phone once you crossed the border. As data roaming is even more expensive it is best to switch off the data connection of your smartphone before you cross the border. If you organise with your own service provider to have your phone on SMS roaming, you can send and receive SMS messages but not calls. This will enable you to use your own cell phone number at a much lower cost than if you made and received calls. You will also have all your contacts and should you need data connection for an emergency (like doing internet banking) you can, once you

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have turned the data connection back on. The cheapest way to use your cell phone is to buy a SIM card with payas-you-go airtime as soon as you arrive in the country. You can buy it over the counter at almost any shop without any hassles. Let your friends and family know what your temporary number is as soon as you have swapped SIM cards. If you want to download data, you can use wireless internet at establishments that offer it, otherwise you would be wise to buy a local 3G card with a bundle package. If you don’t do that, you might end up with a hefty cell phone account when you get home. Airtime (for phone calls) can usually be bought at any little shop but data bundles are not that readily available at the corner cafes - you may want to stock up on data bundles while you are in town. On most smartphones replacing your SIM card with a local one has a negative side effect of changing all your settings. Although it is possible to download and change your settings back manually, you might want to consider putting the SIM card into an old phone. People find that their reception is generally better and the batteries last longer than the smartphones’. You can still keep all your data at hand on your smartphone.

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Satellite phone

A satellite phone is a must when you travel alone into remote areas. As they provide wider coverage than cellular phones, that might be the only way to call for help in case of an accident or breakdown. Waiting for a car to pass by might take several days. Under normal circumstances satellite phones work well, but there is no guarantee that they will work everywhere. Reception can be adversely affected by cloud and tree cover if your satellite phone is not of good quality. It is, therefore, worth your while to invest in a good quality satellite phone. Airtime for satellite phones is more expensive than airtime for cellular phones, but you will only use it in case of emergency. If you do not have a satellite phone, consider renting one. Many vehicle rental companies also rent out satellite phones. See our section on vehicle rental companies on page 100. Inmarsat in Johannesburg, South Africa, specialises in renting satellite phones. You can contact them at: Tel: +27 11 794 9050 Email: info@ast-sa.co.za Web: www.satcomms.com


Border post red tape Namibia has a very mature immigration and customs system and passing through road borders is normally quite easy, if you have all the correct documents. Some people have had unfortunate experiences with having to pay bribes at border posts in Africa. Namibian officials are, however, friendly and efficient and not open to bribery. You should ensure that you have all the necessary official documents to pass through immigration and customs. If you take off your hat and your sunglasses and put on a smile, chances are good that you will get a much warmer reception. Remember that border officials often differ in how strictly they apply regulations. This means that you may get by with them bending a rule nine out of ten times, but the tenth time you may get an official who does apply rules strictly. Be prepared for the strict official.

You can travel Namibia for a maximum of 90 days per year, whereafter you will have to apply at the Ministry of Home Affairs for an extended stay.

The Mata Mata border post at the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. (Willie Solomon)

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border post crossings between Namibia and neighouring countries Epupa Ruacana Falls 08:00 – 19:00 H ! Ruacana Otjinhungwa Ruacana H ! Okangwati

V! # V H#

Area

Serra Cafema

H !

H ! V #

# V

Ondangwa H! ! H

Opuwo

ZAMBEZI (CAPRIVI)

Divundu H ! Khaudum Game Reserve H Mohembo ! 06:00 – 18:00 Mohembo Tsumkwe

V #

Sesfontein

Mururani

H !

Tsumeb

H !

H !

Henties Bay

Hochfeld

H !

H !

Usakos Karibib

Okahandja

H H! !

H !

H !

H ! H Langstrand ! !Walvis H Bay

" /

H !

07:00 – 24:00 Mamuno

H !

H !

Kalkrand

H !

Aranos

H !

Namib-Naukluft Sesriem H Namibrand National Park ! H Private Maltahöhe ! NReserve

H !

Mariental

H !

H !

H !

H Trans Kalahari (Buitepos) ! V #

H !

Rehoboth

Gamsberg

Buitepos

H !

Dordabis

Solitaire

250 Km

Witvlei Gobabis

WINDHOEK

Swakopmund

Atlantic Ocean

Dobe 07:30 – 16:30 Dobe

HOtjiwarongo ! H !

Omaruru

H !

V #

H !

Outjo

H !

Uis

H Grootfontein ! H ! H !

Otavi

Kamanjab Terrace H ! Palmwag Bay H H Torra ! ! Bay Khorixas H ! Twyfelfontein ! H

125

Rundu

H !

Etosha National Park

Puros

0

A AN NG GO O LL A A

Katwitwi 07:00 – 18:00 Katwitwi

Oshakati

H !

H !

Santa Clara 07:00 – 18:00 Oshikango

B BO O TT S SW WA AN NA A

H !

Calueque 07:00 – 18:00 Omahenene

Gochas

H !

Betta

H !

Koes

H !

ZAMBEZI (CAPRIVI)

Wenela 06:00 – 17:00 Sesheke

ZZ A AM MB B II A A Katima Mulilo

A AN NG GO O LL A A Kongola

H !

Mudumu Game H Reserve !

V #

Mamili National H Park !

B BO O TT S SW WA AN NA A Ngoma Bridge 07:00 – 18:00 Ngoma Bridge

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V # H !

Luderitz

H !

Impalila Island 07:30 – 17:00 Kasane

H !

H !

Impalila Island

H V! V # #

Bethanie

Aus

Oranjemund 06:00 – 22:00 Alexander Bay

Rosh Pinah

Oranjemund

H ! V #

Keetmanshoop

Seeheim

H !

Aroab

H !

H !

H# ! V

Mata-Mata

H !

Ai-Ais

H !

Aussenkehr

H# ! V

Sendelingsdrift 08:00 – 16:30 Sendelingsdrift

H !

Noordoewer

H ! V #

V #

Grünau H Karasburg !

H !

V #

Warmbad

H !

Noordoewer Open 24 hours Vioolsdrif

V #

Mata Mata 08:00 – 16:30 Mata Mata Klein Menasse 08:00 – 16:30 Rietfontein

Ariamsvlei Open 24 hours Nakop

Velloorsdrift 08:00 – 16:30 Onseepkans

S SO OU U TT H H A A FF R R II C CA A

Helmeringshausen


Documents required When you travel by car, make sure that you have the following documents at hand: • A valid passport. • Original vehicle registration papers (a certified copy is acceptable). People whose vehicles are still being financed by the bank, will not have the original vehicle registration papers. They would therefore use the vehicle licence papers (where the renewal disk is cut out annually) or a copy of the vehicle registration papers. Have them signed by a Commis sioner of Oaths. • If you are not the registered owner of the vehicle that you are driving (e.g. it is still being financed by the bank or you are driving a friend’s vehicle), you must have a letter from the financial institution or friend giving you authorization to take the vehicle across the border. This letter must stipulate dates that you are allowed to take the vehicle out of the country and be signed by a Commissioner of Oaths. • If you are not the registered owner of the vehicle, you must have an affi- davit from the police, giving you authorization from the owner/ finan cial institution to take the vehicle abroad. • A Carnet de Passage en Douane (CPD) is the international customs document which covers the temporary admission of a motor vehicle and is compulsory only for vehicles coming from a country

outside the Southern African Common Customs Area (Botswana, Lesotho, South Africa, Swaziland and Namibia). A Police Clearance Certificate is not required if you are on holiday with your own vehicle, but if you enter with a work permit, you must have one. Keep all your official documents together in a plastic envelope. Print your vehicle details (like VIN, engine and licence number as well as make) in large letter type and put that together with your registration paper, back to front in the envelope so that it is readable through the envelope. If you have a trailer, put its detail to be visible if you turn the envelope around. Whenever you are asked for your vehicle or trailer details, you just hold your handy envelope against the window for the official to read.

The basic procedure for crossing a Namibian border by land is as follows: 1. When you arrive at the border, write down your odometer read ing as it is required by the Namibia Roads Agency. 2. The driver and all passengers must present themselves to immigration first to get their passports stamped. Always check that your passport has been stamped accor ding to the correct dates of your stay and have it amended immedi- ately if necessary. 3. Each child and adult in your group will be required to fill in an Arrival/ Departure form, so take a pen with you. 77


4. Once immigration is cleared, the driver must proceed to the Namibia Roads Agency counter. Have all the required vehicle documents ready, as well as the odometer reading. To enter Namibia with a foreign registered vehicle you are required to pay a cross border charge of R220 per vehicle and R150 per trailer (2013 charges). 5. Declare all valuables at customs. Have a list of all your cameras and electronic equipment with serial numbers and values ready; it will be much easier to complete the forms. 6. You can now proceed to the border gate. Have your gate pass (signed by both the customs and immigra tion departments) together with your passports ready for inspection. If your gate pass is not stamped, you will be sent back to the border post for the additional stamp!

without having to pay customs duty. There are, however, restrictions on the duty free quantities of the following consumables:

Customs It is illegal to have any of the following prohibited goods in your possesion:

When you return to South Africa, you are not allowed to take fuel in containers through the border without paying import duty. Empty the fuel containers into your vehicle before crossing the border.

• Narcotic, habit-forming drugs and related substances in any form. • Military firearms, ammunition and explosives. • Indecent and obscene material such as pornographic books, magazines, films, videos, DVDs and software. Namibia is a tourist friendly country and allows visitors to take personal items like binoculars, cameras, clothing, jewellery, etc. into the country

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Cigarettes – 400 Cigars – 50 Tobacco – 250 g Wine – 2 ℓ Spirits or other alcoholic beverages – 1 ℓ Perfume – 50 ml Eau de Toilet – 250 ml Other than your personal items, travellers can take new or used goods to the value of not more than the equivalent of 3 000 South African rand duty free into Namibia. Please note that you are not allowed to take maize or firewood into Namibia.

A special note on meat, fruit and vegetables The regulations on importing meat, meat products, fruit and vegetables change frequently because they are based on disease outbreaks in the region. Unfortunately there is not yet an official website that can give you the latest update on these regulations; it is therefore best to speak to people


who recently visited the country. We suggest that you ask on a trustworthy travel forum (see www.4x4community.co.za, www.overland.co.za or www.tracks4africa.co.za/community) for an update, rather than relying on the personal experience of just one person. Because foot-and-mouth disease was detected in South Africa during 2011 and 2012, the import of all cloven hoof animals (including game) from all provinces of South Africa, was banned. That means that you are currently not allowed to take any RAW meat or animal products like unpasteurised milk or cheese from South Africa into Namibia. Veterinary staff at the border will ensure that such products are confiscated and destroyed. Namibia has good quality meat at good prices, so you might as well buy your meat there. Any Spar, Pick n Pay or Choppies have a good selection of fresh meat, as do many of the local butcheries. When there is an outbreak of footand-mouth disease, you are still allowed to take in fish and usually also chicken. See more information about footand-mouth disease on page 84. Because of the outbreak of avian flu (bird flu) among ostriches in South Africa in 2011 and 2013, some veteri-

nary inspectors may currently confiscate chicken meat. Visas Nationals from the countries listed below are NOT required to obtain a visa when travelling to Namibia: Angola, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macau SAR, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritius, Moldova, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States of America, Uzbekistan, Zambia and Zimbabwe. (Source: www.namibia.org.za) Border posts Keep enough South African rand at hand because it will be accepted at all border posts. Namibia is a very popular destination for South Africans and during their June/July school holidays you may experience increased traffic and subsequent delays at the major border posts. Plan to stay close to the border post if you travel at the beginning or end of the holiday. In severe cases delays of a couple of hours have been reported. Rather stay close to the border post and cross early the next morning when everybody is still fresh and friendly.

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Veterinary fences and foot-and-mouth disease In Southern Africa the control of foot-and-mouth disease is aided by restricting the movement of animals through veterinary fences, as well as through banning the import of raw meat and animal products like unpasteurised milk and cheese of cloven hoofed animals. Import restrictions and veterinary fences are actually two forms of the same thing – animal disease control. The only difference is that import restrictions apply to international border posts between countries and veterinary fences apply to disease control within a particular affected country. Basically the same rules apply for both measures. The aim of state veterinarians when putting up veterinary fences in the 1960s was to protect cattle against foot-and-mouth disease infections from buffalo. However, in the past 50 years, the number of diseases which potentially affect cattle and which now have to be considered as veterinary control problems has increased. The current veterinary fences are thus about more than just controlling foot-and-mouth disease. Foot-and-mouth disease affects cloven-hoofed animals. (Karin Theron)

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What is foot-and-mouth disease?

Foot-and-mouth disease or hoofand-mouth disease (Aphtae epizooticae) is an infectious and sometimes fatal viral disease that affects clovenhoofed animals like African buffalo, antelope, impala, springbok, sheep, goats and domestic cattle. The virus is highly variable, which limits the effectiveness of vaccination. The virus causes a high fever for two or three days, followed by blisters inside the mouth and on the feet that may rupture and cause lameness. Adult animals may suffer weight loss from which they do not recover for several months, as well as swelling in the testicles of mature males, and in cows milk production can decline significantly. Though most animals eventually recover from foot-andmouth disease, the disease can lead to myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) and death, especially in newborn animals. Some infected animals remain asymptomatic, but they nonetheless carry foot-andmouth disease and can transmit it to others.

Foot-and-mouth disease is a severe plague in animal farming, since it is highly infectious and can be spread by close contact with infected animals as well as over a long distance. Furthermore, it can be spread through contact with contaminated meat and animal products, farming equipment, vehicles, clothing and skin of animal handlers, animal feed, and by domestic and wild predators. Its containment demands considerable efforts in vaccination, strict monitoring, export bans for meat and other animal products, quarantine, and occasionally the elimination of millions of animals. Hedgehogs and elephants may develop mild symptoms of foot-and-mouth disease, but are resistant to the disease and do not pass it on to other animals of the same species. Just as humans may spread the disease by carrying the virus on their clothes and bodies, animals that are not susceptible to the disease may also aid in spreading it. Humans can be infected with footand-mouth disease through contact with infected animals, but this

Foot-and-mouth disease can have an adverse affect on local goat farmers. (Karin Theron)

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Veterinary gate near Tsumkwe. (David Smith)

is extremely rare. The disease is not to be confused with Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) which is usually caused by a Coxsackie virus and often seen in toddlers. Because footand-mouth disease rarely infects humans but spreads rapidly among animals, it is a much greater threat to the agriculture industry than to human health. Foot-and-mouth disease is not unique to Africa, but has been reported in countries like the United States, United Kingdom, Taiwan, China, Japan, Korea and Bulgaria. (Source: Wikipedia)

Import restrictions

The conditions for importing meat into Namibia vary according to where the meat comes from. Imports of products for own consumption are the result of bilateral agreements and are subject to change depending on the prevailing animal health situation. Travellers are urged to check with the local Directorates of Veterinary Services what the current regulations are.

You can contact Dr. Cleopas Bamhare, Deputy Chief Veterinary Officer at Tel: +264 61 2087505 or e-mail: bamharec@mawf.gov.na. Some people do not take this prohibition seriously and try to hide their meat. However, you should be polite to your host country as something like foot-and-mouth disease can bring the whole meat industry of a region to its knees. The minute foot-and-mouth disease is detected, all exports are suspended, and that includes exports to the EU which is a massive market for Namibia. Be a responsible visitor and respect your host country’s regulations.

Veterinary fences

Veterinary cordon fences are physical fences demarcating control zones in accordance with the guidelines of the International Animal Health Authority. These fences are referred to as vet fences and they are indicated with red lines on T4A’s GPS maps. The movement of raw meat and animal products, including unpasteurised milk, are allowed into but not out of an area classified as an infected zone. 85


Often visitors feel that their vacuum packed or deep frozen meat poses a minimal disease risk, but unfortunately the logistics of having every possible permutation of the rules in a form that can be understood by the vet fence guards, is quite impossible. Therefore you should rather not try to take raw meat in any form past a vet fence checkpoint. In Namibia vet fence restrictions basically allow you to move meat from south to north and from east to west. However, you cannot move meat from north to south and from west to east past the vet lines as the northern regions are classified as foot-andmouth infected zones. The vast majority of veterinary fences and the gates allowing access are static, therefore some checkpoints have been in operation at the same places for years. However, temporary veterinary gates are erected when it is possible to contain a footand-mouth disease outbreak within a smaller area, thus preventing it from spreading through the entire sector. The temporary gates operate similar to police road blocks; sometimes they are in operation, but more often not. It all depends on the veterinary health in the area at a specific point in time. At some of these fences you may be asked to drive your vehicle through a dip filled with a disinfecting solution and you and your passengers will also have to exit the vehicle and walk

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on a mat impregnated with the solution to disinfect your shoes (the ones you are wearing plus extras) as it is said that the disease is also carried by the urine and faeces of infected animals. It is best to have shoes and cool boxes/fridges readily accessible as a nothing-to-hide attitude makes life so much easier. Keep all shoes in a box so that you won’t need to unpack your luggage to find them at a control point. It also prevents the disinfectant from covering other gear.

Because of vet fences you are not allowed to: • Take meat from Katima Mulilo to Rundu. • Take meat from Rundu to Groot fontein. • Take meat from Palmwag south into Damaraland. • Take meat west past the vet fence Rundu/Grootfontein road. • Take meat from Etosha south. You can however take meat into Etosha coming from the south.

If you need to travel in the ‘right’ direction past vet fences with meat, you should declare the meat and show your till slip indicating where you bought the meat. The official is then supposed to issue you with a permit. However, because of the human factor this system doesn’t always work out well. If you are polite and courteous to the officials at these vet check points you will very seldom encounter any problems.


Health Travelling anywhere into Africa poses some health risks. You should consult a medical practitioner at your local travel clinic about all the possible risks, inoculations and vaccinations needed. Having said this, driving is probably still the biggest risk to health when travelling southern Africa! With the courtesy of Travelsafe Clinics, we offer you some information on health issues for your overland trip to Namibia. You can contact Dr. Izak Joubert of the clinic at doctor@travelsafeclinic.co.za or 0860 100072 (South Africa), or tel. +27 21 851 7643. For some health risks you can take precaution and for others not. Malaria is the most obvious health issue when you travel to Namibia. However, hepatitis A, cholera, typhoid and diarrhoea can occur where water is not 100% safe. You should also be aware of the risk of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Hepatitis B is transmitted like the AIDS virus which means that if you have to undergo dental or medical procedures while in Namibia you are at the same risk as anywhere in Africa. The bush traveller may be exposed to tick-bite fever, rabies, bilharzia and other infections or parasitic diseases. Then there also are the risks of snake bites and scorpion stings which could be lethal.

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Burns

Second-degree burns are quite common when camping because you often make and cook over a fire. These burns are painful and usually accompanied by swelling and blisters. First degree and second degree burns that are fewer than 7 cm in diameter or totalling less than 5% of the body surface area are generally considered minor burns. These types of burns usually heal quickly with minimal care. The only exceptions to this are burns in critical areas of the face, or burns that go around the whole circumference of a limb or finger, which need specialist care. Prevention: The most important thing is to prevent burns – whether it is an open fire or gas flame. Keep children and flammables away from open flames, especially cooking oil. Do not start fires with petrol or diesel. Treatment: The most important immediate treatment is to rapidly cool the area because heat below the surface can continue to cause tissue damage after the burn has occurred. Pouring on cold water or holding it under a running tap is recommended. Every camper should have a few packets of sterile trauma hydrogel burn dressings in their First Aid Kit. These are designed to cool and pro-

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tect burns. The hydrogel has a longer term cooling and soothing effect and the dressing instantly shields and protects the wound against further contamination and infection. Fluid loss is kept to a minimum, and so the potential for shock is reduced. Dressings should cover the whole of the burn area. The non-adhesive moist gel impedes bonding of the dressing to the wound and thereby facilitates easy removal of the dressing. You should take the dressing off within a day and apply antiseptic ointment to prevent infection. If you have to clean the burn area/ blisters, do so with a sterile saline solution. To make a sterile saline solution, mix 10 ml salt in 1â„“ of water, boil the solution for a minute and let it cool down. Do not use an antiseptic liquid like Savlon or Dettol as it can cause chemical burns if not used in the correct dilution. Take a pain reliever if needed.

Malaria

Malaria is found north of Etosha, therefore northern Namibia is a high risk malaria area and you must take prophylaxis if you plan to go there. Even in winter when it is cooler and the risk less, there is still a lot of water around which acts as breeding ground for mosquitoes. Most doctors will advise you not to take toddlers under the age of five into a malaria risk area. You can take


some kind of precaution like spraying the children with mosquito repellents and keeping them inside mosquito nets in the afternoon and at night, but it still is a gamble and the risks are high. Remember, adults have about 10 times more blood in their bodies which means that if they do get infected, they have so much more time than a toddler before their condition gets serious. Malanil and Malarone have paediatric versions for children of 11 kg and more, and the dosage is determined by their weight. Ask your travel clinic for more information. Malarone is extremely effective in preventing malaria and have few side effects, but can be expensive. You still need to take anti-biting precautions even if taking preventive drugs, as the drugs do not fully eliminate the risk. Prevention: There are measures you can take to limit mosquito bites. Mosquitoes feed mainly between dusk and dawn. Female mosquitoes will take a blood meal just before laying their eggs, which happen at night. It is therefore important that repellents are used between dusk and dawn. Use a repellent that contains DEET or a natural repellent such as lemon and eucalyptus. While clothing alone will not protect you against mosquito bites, it can help limit bites when used together with other preventative measures. Clothing that covers the body,

like long sleeves and long trousers tucked into socks, will lower the risk of being bitten. While mosquitoes are able to bite through many materials, canvas mosquito boots and thick denim jeans will make it more difficult for the mosquitoes. Clothing that has been impregnated with permethrin will also help repel mosquitoes. Such clothing, along with impregnated wrist and ankle bands, lower the risk of mosquito bites. If you are reluctant to impregnate everyday clothing, impregnated netting worn over your clothing will prevent contact between the chemicals and skin. Most travel clinics stock sprays for clothing and nets. Research suggests that mosquitoes are attracted by sweat and dark colours; keeping clothes (especially socks) clean and wearing light colours or white clothing, might also help prevent being bitten. While air conditioning helps to keep mosquitoes away due to the lower temperature, it is important that it is left on all day and that the windows are closed. Using a mosquito net in an area where there is malaria, is a good idea. Ideally, the net should be impregnated with permethrin at least every six months or when it is washed. If bed nets do not reach the floor, they should be tucked under mattresses.

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Note that no precautionary measures are 100% effective. Symptoms: Anyone experiencing flu-like symptoms shortly after returning from a malaria area must immediately consult a doctor and mention the visit to the malaria area. Make sure that the clinic you attend can do a reliable malaria test, either a blood slide with a microscope or one of the newer RDT (rapid diagnostic tests) dipstick tests on a drop of blood. The RDTs are often better than the microscope tests because they do not rely on how experienced the microscopist is. Other symptoms of malaria include body pain, diarrhoea and vomiting. The usual incubation period for malaria is 14 days, but it can take as little as a week to manifest itself, or as long as two months in some cases.

Hepatitis A

This is a viral infection of the liver which is generally transmitted by food and water. Outbreaks have been linked to contaminated water. Prevention: Although the water quality in Namibia is high, it is safest to treat any drinking water or to drink bottled water. Ensure that the bottles are sealed when you buy it. Don’t drink anything with ice, since you cannot be sure of the source from which the ice was made.

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Symptoms: Patients usually become jaundiced, nauseous, vomit and experience joint pain that may last up to 12 weeks. It can be effectively prevented by two injections, six months apart, to give permanent immunity. (Another option is a combination vaccine against hepatitis A and hepatitis B – a series of three injections).

Hepatitis B

This is a viral infection of the liver which is contracted in the same way as the AIDS virus. You don’t know beforehand if you might need to undergo dental or medical procedures while you travel. Prevention: Three doses of vaccine constitute the complete series of immunisation. The first two doses are usually given one month apart with the third dose about six months later. A further booster every five years is recommended. Symptoms: Most people remain healthy without any symptoms while they fight off the virus. Some will not even know they have been infected. However, until the virus has been cleared, they can remain infectious. If there are any symptoms, they will develop on average 60 to 90 days after exposure to the virus. Symptoms of hepatitis B include flu-like symptoms such as tiredness, general


aches and pains, headaches and a high temperature. Further symptoms are loss of appetite and weight loss, feeling sick, being sick, diarrhoea, pain in your upper right-hand side as well as yellowing of the skin and eyes. Symptoms will usually pass within one to three months. However, hepatitis B is said to be chronic when you have been infected for longer than six months. The symptoms are usually much milder and tend to come and go. In many cases, people with chronic hepatitis B infection will not experience any noticeable symptoms. Symptoms of chronic hepatitis B may include feeling tired all the time, loss of appetite, feeling sick, abdominal pain, muscle and joint pains and itchy skin. This disease may eventually lead to liver cancer.

Traveller’s diarrhoea The reasoning “What is good for the local people, cannot be bad”, is only partially correct. The local population may have developed resistance or tolerance to a number of harmful components in their food, such as parasites or other infectious agents. Infections are the most important food related hazards. They relate mainly to the contamination of food by parasites, but also bacteria or viruses of human origin present in human excreta. These can contaminate food through dirty hands or the water used in food preparation which

has been soiled by sewage or leakages from latrines. Human excreta used as fertiliser can carry dangerous parasites or germs. Improper hygiene of food and water leads to traveller’s diarrhoea. Many of these infectious agents can be destroyed by heating, but some are found on the surface of foodstuffs such as fruit and vegetables which we do not want to cook. Meat and fish may contain parasites which undergo a biologic cycle ending in the animal. However, the intensive heat of frying, baking or stewing largely destroys these parasites. Bacteria are responsible for 50% to 80% of cases of traveller’s diarrhoea. E. coli will be the most likely cause. Prevention: If you prepare your own food while you travel, you limit the risk of diarrhoea substantially. Also, rather buy your food from a trusted supermarket than a street vendor or open-air market. The saying “Cook it, peel it or leave it!” carries considerable wisdom when you buy from the street markets. A solution of 10 drops of unscented bleach per 1 ℓ water can be used to rinse all veggies and/or fruit that will be consumed raw. Treat nonbottled water with chlorine, iodine or silver based purifiers, or boil it. Symptoms: Diarrhoea causes profuse watery stools which can lead to dehydration.

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Jackal can carry Rabies. Be suspicious if they look tame. (Karin Theron)

Rabies No animal bite should be ignored! Since the disease is invariably fatal once symptoms appear, post-exposure treatment is based on the principle of inducing immunity before the virus gains access to the nervous system. Victims must get treatment without delay. Prevention: Overland travellers should consider preexposure immunisation (three injections within one month) as there are many domestic dogs roaming around Namibia. Wild animals like bats, jackals, foxes, skunks, mongooses, meerkats and monkeys can also carry rabies. Be very suspicious if these animals behave as if they are tame. 92

Symptoms: Rabies is a fatal disease contracted by virus-laden saliva after a bite from a rabid animal. The disease progresses to paresis or paralysis. Spasms of muscles on attempts to swallow will lead to a fear of water (hydrophobia). Delirium and convulsions follow. After two to ten days, death results (often due to respiratory paralysis).

Cholera The mode of transmission is primarily through ingestion of water contaminated with faeces or vomit of infected people or, to a lesser extent, faeces of carriers. It is often associated with flooding, poor water supplies and/or poor sanitation.


Prevention: Cholera can be prevented by an oral vaccine dissolved in water. Its effectiveness is from six months to two years. You can avoid cholera by only drinking bottled water, especially in areas where you are not 100% sure of the water source. Symptoms: Cholera is caused by bacteria and will usually cause profuse watery stools and vomiting. Rapid dehydration may follow which may lead to the patient’s death within a few hours.

Typhoid

This is a systemic bacterial disease, contracted when food or water contaminated with faeces or urine of an infected person or carrier is ingested. Prevention: Inoculation with a typhoid injection is advised if you are travelling to remote areas where you are not 100% sure of the water source and are not able to take enough bottled water. The inoculation provides immunity for three years. Symptoms: It may cause fever, headache and constipation (more common than diarrhoea). Intestinal haemorrhage or perforation may occur in untreated cases, which can lead to the death of the infected person.

Yellow fever

You do not need a yellow fever cer-

tificate for Namibia. However, if you cross over to Zambia or Angola, you will need one. Yellow fever is endemic in the tropics of Africa and America and is a much bigger problem in Africa than in America. It is a virus transmitted by a mosquito which flourishes in human habitations, especially under slum conditions. It is prevalent in the large urban informal settlements in tropical Africa. Prevention: A single inoculation provides excellent immunity in over 95% of recipients, providing long-lasting immunity that will probably last a lifetime. International travel regulations, however, demand that boosters be administered every 10 years. The risk of infection can be minimised by taking general measures to prevent or reduce mosquito bites, as one would do for malaria. Keep your inoculation certificate in your passport.

Symptoms: The time between being infected with yellow fever and the start of symptoms is usually three to six days. This is known as the incubation period. The symptoms of yellow fever usually appear in two stages. The initial symptoms (the acute first stage) can include a high temperature, headache, shivers, nausea and vomiting, aching muscles, backache and loss

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of appetite. Symptoms usually improve after three or four days. After the initial symptoms of yellow fever, about 15% of people go on to develop more severe symptoms. The symptoms of the toxic second phase can include a recurrent high temperature, abdominal pain, vomiting, a yellow tinge to the skin and whites of the eyes that is caused by liver damage, kidney failure, bleeding from the mouth, nose, eyes or stomach; you can also have blood in your vomit or stools. Half of the people who have the second toxic phase of symptoms, die within 10 to 14 days. The other half recover with no major organ damage and are immune from the disease for life. Overall, this means that around seven or eight people out of every 100 who develop yellow fever, will die from it.

Tick-bite fever

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clothing for ticks at the end of each day, especially if you are camping in or walking through bush. Prompt removal of ticks can prevent some infections. Symptoms: Tick-bite fever is characterised by a primary sore (often having a blackish centre), swollen lymph nodes and, in most cases, intermittent fever lasting 10 to 14 days. The incubation period for this disease is about seven days. There is a sudden onset with significant malaise, deep muscle pain, severe headache and conjunctivitis. A rash, appearing on the hands and feet on about the third day, soon includes the palms and soles and spreads rapidly to most of the body. Bleeding underneath the skin is common. Blood tests may frequently be negative in the early stages – the diagnosis may therefore be missed if tests are not repeated! The rash on the palms and soles is also a hot clue.

Tick-bite fever is transmitted by a hard tick. It has been shown that at all stages of development, the common dog tick (larva, nymph and adult) is infective, and there is hereditary transmission of the disease to succeeding generations through the tick eggs. (This is believed to continue indefinitely).

Bilharzia

Prevention: No vaccine is presently licenced for public use. This disease requires specific antibiotics for treatment. You should inspect yourself and your

Prevention: The only prevention is to avoid swimming in contaminated lakes and rivers. If you are not 100% sure that a lake or river is bilharzia free, rather

This is a blood fluke infection with adult male and female worms living over a life-span of many years in certain veins of the infected person. The infection is acquired from contact with water containing free-swimming larval forms which have developed inside snails.


abstain from swimming. (You should in any case be very cautious of crocodiles and hippos!) Symptoms: Severe liver complications and bladder cancer may result with chronic infections. If you suspect that you might have been in contact with contaminated water, go for a Bilharzia test at a pathologist when you return home.

Scorpions

The majority of scorpions are harmless to humans, although their sting is extremely painful and will require painkilling treatment. However, Parabuthus Villosus, one of the deadliest scorpions in the world, can be found in the entire western region of Namibia. You should be very careful in the Namib Desert, Fish River Canyon, Epupa Falls, Brandberg, Spitzkoppe, Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. Some have even been found in the Windhoek area. Scorpions prefer rocky areas and mostly come out at night, apparently more so when the wind blows. Prevention: Campers are advised to always wear closed shoes after dusk. Outdoor lights attract insects and thus the scorpions that feed on insects. Yellow outdoor lighting is less attractive to insects and is recommended in areas where scorpions are prevalent.

It is always a good idea to check for scorpion holes during daytime so that you know before nightfall if there might be any around. A scorpion hole is easy to recognise. The burrow entrances are usually situated in open ground and look like oval shaped smallish holes. A compound in the exoskeleton of scorpions refracts ultraviolet light in the visible spectrum and causes them to fluoresce or glow. The fluorescence is thought to serve as an ultraviolet sensitivity mechanism, perhaps allowing the scorpion to avoid damaging light levels. Because the exoskeleton glows in UV light, it is very easy to find scorpions at night using a torch with UV LEDs. If you use a UV torch and walk around your campsite at night, you have an excellent chance of finding scorpions. Depending on the UV output of the torch you will be able to find scorpions from a distance of one to ten meters. The scorpions will have a greenish glow and will be easy to spot against the dark background of the ground. The scorpions do not seem to suffer any ill effect of the UV light and do not react to the UV light at all. (Reference: www.wildlifephotography.nl)

Symptoms: Moderate to more serious poisoning through scorpion sting causes malaise, sweating, heart palpitations, rise in blood pressure, salivation, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Hyper acute (typically allergic) reactions include blurring of consciousness, unconsciousness, convulsions, fall in blood pressure, shock and even death. 95


Treatment: Pain at the site of a scorpion sting can sometimes be limited with an ice cube, but strong painkillers might be needed. In the case of more marked symptoms, treatment must be given as for snake bites, and the patient must receive medical treatment as quickly as possible.

Above: Puff Adder. (iStockphoto) Below: Mozambique Spitting Cobra (iStockphoto)

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Above: Boomslang. (iStockphoto) Middle: Cape Cobra (iStockphoto) Below: Black Mamba. (iStockphoto)


Snakes

Fatalities from snake bites are quite rare and the vast majority of snakes are actually not venomous. Less than 10% of bites ever need anti-venom. Venomous snakes will often avoid humans, and if they bite they rarely inject their full venom load. In Namibia the most deadly snakes are black mambas, puff adders, boomslang and Cape cobra. The Mozambique spitting cobra is found in the north of Namibia. Prevention: Be very careful and on the lookout for snakes whenever you are in the bush. It is best to wear boots when you are out in the field and shake them out in the morning before putting them on. Symptoms: Depending on the species of snake, there are five types of venom that have been identified. Each venom acts differently inside the body of the victim: Cobras and mambas have neurotoxic venom that attacks the central nervous system. It starts affecting movement, breathing, swallowing, speech and sight. Boomslang has haematoxic venom that affects the blood by using up the clotting factors so that it no longer coagulates. This leads to extensive blood loss into the tissues. Puff adders have cytotoxic venom

that attacks the body cells or tissues. The bite is extremely painful with much swelling and the victim experiences marked symptoms of shock. The Mozambique spitting cobra has mixed neurotoxic and cytotoxic venom. It is considered one of the most dangerous snakes in Africa and it can spit its venom. Its bite can cause severe local tissue destruction (similar to that of the puff adder) while venom in the victim’s eyes can cause impaired vision or blindness. (Reference: http://goafrica.about.com)

Treatment: Anybody bitten by a poisonous snake must get professional medical treatment as quickly as possible. Wash the bite with plain water and tightly bandage the limb. Note that a bandage is not the same as a tourniquet, which should never be used. Keep the victim as still as possible to help prevent the venom from entering the system. If a snake spits on you, rinse the affected area as soon as possible with clean water or milk. Only if there is NO risk of the photographer getting bitten in the process, photos can be taken of the snake for identification purposes. This will aid the doctor/hospital in treating the bite.

Sleeping sickness

African trypanosomiasis (generally known as sleeping sickness) is a

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Stock-up your first aid kit before you leave. (Karin Theron)

parasitic disease transmitted by tsetse fly. Apparently no new cases were reported in Namibia for decades, so it is currently not seen as a threat to visitors. There is no vaccine available for sleeping sickness.

Heat exhaustion or heat stroke

An adult should normally drink four to six litres of water or other fluids (including what is in foods) per day. High temperatures can easily double this requirement. Loss of water and salt from the body causes heat exhaustion and ultimately heat stroke. Prevention: Make sure that you always have enough water with you and take special precaution when you travel into remote areas. Make sure that your water intake is enough, especially when it is hot.

98

Symptoms: Heat stroke occurs when the body can no longer sweat to cool itself while the body temperature is rising. Heat stroke presents with a temperature of greater than 40,6 째C in combination with vomiting, confusion and a fast pulse. Treatment: People suffering from heat stroke must be cooled in the shade with water poured on them, after which they must slowly start drinking water.

Medical insurance

You have to ensure that your own medical insurance have you well covered during your overland trip, otherwise take out extra travel insurance. Make sure that your insurance includes medical evacuation. Namibia has good private hospitals but because of distances, air evacuation may be required.


Note that evacuation does not include search and rescue and you should check that your insurance covers that as well. SOS International is opera-

tional in Namibia and the nearest 24 hour assistance call centre is in South Africa (+27 11 541 1300).

First Aid Kit

1 x Eyebath 1 x Eye patch 2 x Big sterile trauma hydrogel burn dressing 1 x Small sterile trauma hydrogel burn dressing 1 x Roll clear Elastoplast 6 x Plasters Respirator mouthpiece Gloves, scissors, tweezers and safety-pins 6 x Rehydrate packets Antiseptic ointment (e.g. Bactroban) Antiseptic solution Antacid for heartburn and stomach acid Antihistamines Laxatives Imodium for mild diarrhoea A broad spectrum antibiotic Painkillers with aspirin or paracetamol and anti-inflammatories Skin-disinfecting agent or antiseptic wipes Water purification tablets Having your own syringes, sterile needles and possibly scalpels will help if you have to undergo treatment at a place where you doubt the hygiene.

When you travel you should always have a well-kitted first aid kit. Apart from special needs like chronic medication for adults and paediatric medicine and a thermometer if you travel with children, there are a few basic things that should be in every first aid kit. If you already have a first aid kit for travelling, don’t forget that medicine have a limited lifetime. Check ‘use by’ dates, and ask your pharmacist for advice to ensure the contents of your kit remain effective and safe to use. If you are travelling into remote areas, you are strongly advised to do a course in first aid before you leave.

Your first aid kit should contain at least the following, but you can add medicine according to your travel party’s personal needs: 1 x Quicklot trauma pack 2 x Plastic SP Joints Stabilisers 2 x Dressings 3 x Bandages 2 x Gauze swabs 1 x Triangular bandages 2 x Conforming bandages Cotton wool 2 x Gauze 1 x Sterile dressing 1 x Sterile dressing pad 2 x Eye pads 1 x Sterile eye pad

INDEMNITY: This information is NOT

intended as a complete list of all the risks encountered in Namibia. Consultation with a qualified doctor at a travel clinic is recommended. Travelsafe Clinic and Tracks4Africa are not responsible for any infection/illness resulting from the use of this information.

99


Pitfalls to renting a 4x4 with camping equipment It is possible to fly to Namibia and rent a 4WD vehicle, fully equipped for camping. There are many trustworthy companies with lots of experience offering this service and for some people this is a really good option. You can rest assured that the rental companies in Namibia compare to the best in the world. You can rent a 4WD vehicle, fully equipped for camping, in Namibia. (Johann Groenewald)

100


It is advisable to make accommodation reservations prior to committing to hire a 4WD. Once your itinerary is fixed, look for recommendations on rental companies on the internet. You will often find personal recommendations on some Africa forums like www.namibia-forum.ch (German), www.4x4community.co.za, www. overland.co.za or www.tracks4africa.co.za/community, or you can start a new thread on one of these forums and ask for advice. You should also search the internet for reviews on specific companies that you are interested in getting a quote from. Remember, not finding any reviews is not necessarily a negative sign. Most people tend to only comment about bad rentals or experiences. When comparing rates, check for the terms and conditions on insurance, applicable taxes and extra charges. Going with what appears to be the cheapest quote often is not what it appears to be. Unlimited mileage seems to be the standard practice.

Insurance

Normally vehicle insurance does not cover the loss of personal items. Check the insurance in your rental contract, and be aware of the following fine print: 1. You can choose to pay zero excess, reduced excess or full excess in the event of loss of or damage to the vehicle. This influences your daily rental rate.

2. You might still be held responsible for damage to tyres, windscreen, glass, head lamps and paintwork. 3. Most rental companies have conditions on negligence and driving after dark. 4. Underbody and clutch damage might not be covered in your insurance. 5. Make sure your insurance covers tow in. Ask about backup vehicles in case of breakdown or recovery. You would not want to be stuck for several days waiting for a replacement vehicle or recovery.

Extra charges

You might be charged extra for the following: 1. Transfer to and from the airport. 2. Cleaning the vehicle on return. 3. Refuelling on return. 4. Additional driver. 5. Cross-border fees. 6. Some companies charge a once off contract or administration fee. When renting a 4WD through an international rental company, make sure you specify that you want a 4x4 vehicle. Some rental companies will advertise a 4x4 or similar vehicle and you might end up with something like a SUV which may not be suitable for off-road driving. If you rent a vehicle with camping equipment, ask for the equipment list in advance. Not all vehicles are kitted out the same way. If you are travel101


BOESMANLAND

With the exception of lion, almost all wildlife species are found in the Mangetti National Park. (Frank Hรถppener)

Boesmanland

(also called Bushman land) is a historic region in north-eastern Namibia. It has the largest remaining group of Bushmen or San people who still live on their ancestral land, the Nyae Nyae Conservancy. The Bushmen occupied the southern African sub-continent long before black and white settlers invaded their territories. They lived in the Kalahari for some 20 000 years as hunter-gatherers and survived by hunting and gathering edible plants. The Bushmen at the Nyae Nyae Conservancy are still very traditional as they only had contact with western civilisation since 1950. At Tsumkwe, the main town of the

106


ANGOLA

C45/M110

Bwabwata National Park

Rundu

!

B8

D3600

Divundu

!

Khaudum Game Reserve

Mururani

! Tsumeb

Nyae Nyae Communal Conservancy

C44 /M7 4

C

B1

42

Grootfontein

Tsumkwe

!

Craft Market

03

!

!

Nyae Nyae Pans

M11

3/C

44

2 C4

6 D38 0

11 4

11 5

M

C22 /M

BOTSWANA

B1

M7

5/D

Mangetti National Park

D33

36 00

B8

!

C31/M90

!

9 /M C2

70

M8

5

M11 4

107

BOESMANLAND

conservancy, you will find a craft market ed in 2008 before which it was a camp selling Bushmen arts and crafts. used solely for the breeding of rare and endangered species. As a relaBoesmanland is a vast and sparsely pop- tively young park it has no facilities ulated area. Although not as lush as the and entry is still free. The park has 4x4 more northern parts, there is an abun- tracks with deep sand; therefore you dance of game, flora and bird species. must have a 4WD if you want to exThe terrain ranges from pans and stony plore this park. plains, to dune fields and open woodland. Wildlife in the park includes eland, blue The Mangetti Park was establish- wildebeest, impala, gemsbok, kudu, NAMIBIA:National MANGETTI/BOESMANLAND giraffe, Burchell’s zebra and predators such as leopard and hyena as well as the endangered African wild dog. Unfortunately the park has no lion.


Tsumkwe

D Photo: David Smith

Tsumkwe

used to be a South African army base, hence the sign on the map showing an airport, but there is very little but a few houses, shops and businesses. It is a small and dusty town, however, it is the administrative capital and main town of Bushmanland that was once home to the indigenous Bushmen (San).

Traveller Description: The main tourist attraction of Tsumkwe is the fact that the area is still inhabited by Bushmen people. Visits to some Bushmen villages are offered by several safari companies and usually leave from Tsumkwe to the Khaudum Game Reserve. The Bushmen hunter-gatherer lifestyle of living off the land and its animals and plants is almost lost now and only a few traditional communities are left in the Nyae Nyae Conservancy. Travel INFO: Arts and crafts of the local people can be bought at the G!hunku Craft Centre which is next to the Nyae Nyae Conservancy offices in Tsumkwe. There is a clinic in town, number +264(0)67 244Â 014. Polka 24hr tow-in who are based in Okahandja services this area, number +264(0)81 129 7490. 108


Town Info:

Police: +264(0)67 244 088

Djokhoe Campsite Makuri Campsite Tsumkwe Country Lodge

!

Tsumkwe

C44/M74

Nyae Nyae Communal Conservancy

Nyae-Nyae Concession Area

Gura pan

Nyae Nyae Pans

Vogel Pan

Gamsa Pan

Pannetjies veld

Legend

Gautscha Pan

0

2

4

km

Main Road Minor Gravel Road Off-Road/Jeep Track Runway Pan Conservancy

Travel TIP: The C44 road between Tsumkwe and Grootfontein can be travelled with a sedan vehicle, but as all other roads in the area have deep sand and mud in the rainy season, it should only be attempted with a 4x4 vehicle and a driver with reasonable off-road experience. The seasonal pans come alive after rains (January to March). There is a vet fence between Tsumkwe and the main Grootfontein/Rundu road. Therefore you cannot bring raw meat and unpasteurised milk back west but you can take it through going east.

B O TBSOW EA SN MA AN ยง LAN OKD A Vโ€ขATs NG um Ok / mo w e r em i

Tsumkwe Country Lodge

D3303

109


TSUMKWE 1 Djokhoe Campsite

2 Makuri Campsite

Community Camp NAD 60.00 pp (2012)

Community Camp NAD 60.00 pp (2012)

w137764

w139372

23km or 26min SE of Tsumkwe (4WD)

35km or 35min ESE of Tsumkwe (4WD)

Tel: +264(0)67 244 011 nndfn@africaonline.com.na

Tel: +264(0)67 244 011 nndfn@africaonline.com.na

Djokhoe Campsite is a community run campsite in the Nyae Nyae Conservancy. The campsite is located near Die Holboom. Campers need to be totally self-sufficient.

Makuri Campsite is a community camp in the Nyae Nyae Conservancy. Sites have their own braai pits and there are clean ablutions. Campers need to bring their own drinking water. No need to book; camping fees can be paid at the campsite.

Facilities:

Facilities: Activities:

3 Tsumkwe Country Lodge

4 Tsumkwe Country Lodge

Lodge w137910 NAD 435.00 to 621.00 pp (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 95.00 pp (2013)

2km or 4min SW of Tsumkwe

2km or 4min SW of Tsumkwe

Tel: +264(0)61 374 750, Fax: +264(0)61 256 598 reservations@ncl.com.na www.namibialodges.com

Tel: +264(0)61 374 750, Fax: +264(0)61 256 598 reservations@ncl.com.na

Tsumkwe Lodge offers en-suite accommodation. It is the ideal base from where you can explore the Nyae Nyae Conservancy and Khaudum National Park. They have Bushmen guides and offer half or full day visits to Bushmen villages. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Tsumkwe Lodge offers five campsites with individual braai facilities and communal ablution. They have Bushmen guides and offer half or full day visits to Bushmen villages. Enjoy 4x4 excursions to Die Holboom and the Nyae Nyae Pans. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Facilities: Activities:

110

A VIS

@

w239952

A VIS

Facilities: A VIS

Activities:

@

A VIS


B O E S M A N LAN D • Ts u m k w e

Photo: David Smith

111


CENTRAL NAMIBIA

The landscape near Windhoek is undulating and beautiful. (Karin Theron)

The Central region is home to Namibia’s capital, Windhoek. This large modern city boasts a mix of modern and old colonial architecture. The Christuskirche, Tintenpalast, Reiterdenkmal and Alte Feste near the town centre are reminiscent of the German presence established in Namibia in the 1900’s. Windhoek is a lush, hilly and clean city, and the people are warm and friendly. You can easily spend two to three days in Windhoek, as there are lots to see and do. Windhoek caters well for visitors and you will find everything that you need, even long term storage facilities for your vehicle. Many overseas visitors who regularly visit Namibia, store their vehicles on one of the surrounding farms. These ‘vehicle hotels’ offer good security, are spotlessly clean and have workshops. They will even run your vehicle regularly. 112


NAMIBIA: CENTRAL NAMIBIA

!

1 /M C3

59

!

Usakos B1

Daan Viljoen Game Reserve

M

9 /M4 C26

8

M

46

11 4 M

C23/M41

Bitterwasser Pan

36

Solitaire M4 7

/M4 5

M

42

Aranos

!

0 C2

M4

B1

Hardap Dam

C21

9

Kalkrand !

M3

^

!

M

1

Naukluft

8 /M3

^

36

C21

C18 /M

Gochas

C18

/M3

2

M29

Betta

C

C1 7 /M

30

!

/ 27

D41

D 7 40

Namib-Naukluft National Park

32

!

C1 4 /M

Namibrand Nature Reserve

C19/M34

31

!

33

M

Maltahöhe

Mariental

!

M

9/ C1

Zebra Park

39

5/ C1

! Sesriem Mountain

CENTRAL NAMIBIA

Arnhem Cave

91

25 /

M

47

!

/ 22

M

!

C

C

C2 4/

B6

40

6

Gobabis

2 /M C2

/M4

/M4

48

4 /M C1

Gamsberg Nature Reserve

Buitepos

Witvlei

3 /M C2

!

Gocheganas Nature Reserve

C25

C23

15

Rehoboth

49

^

1

Dordabis

!

C

6 /M C2

31

German War Graves M5

33

Von Francois Fort C14/M36

^ M

C28

M1

!

3/ C2

^! ^^ Windhoek

Liebig Haus

53

C22

B1

Okahandja

B2

5

BOTSWANA

!

M8

!

4

D5 54

Helmeringhausen

M9 8

M24

!

Koës

Mata Mata

!

SOUTH AFRICA

B2

80

Karibib

6 /M C3

C33

!

C20 /M39

Omaruru

4

11 5

57

/M6

M

C36

C3 0/

C33

C2 2 /M

Alte Feste (Old Fort) Christuskirche Curt von Francois Statue Gibeon Meteorites Display Haven Zoological Park Heroes' Acre ! Independence Memorial Museum National Botanical Gardens National Museum Parliament Gardens Reiter Denkmal (Rider Memorial) Springer Chocolate Factory State House Tintenpalast (Parliament Buildings) Zoo Park

Because of its high altitude, Windhoek can get extremely cold at night, especially in winter. The landscape around Windhoek mainly consists of dense Acacia growth and swaying grass which appears white in the late afternoon sun. Attractions worth visiting near Windhoek are the German War Graves, Liebig Haus, Von Francois Fort and Hero’s Acre. Close to Windhoek you can experience scenic hiking trails at the Daan Viljoen Game Reserve. The Bitterwasser Pan south-east of Windhoek, is about 3 km wide and used as a glider port during the summer months. It is said that the Arnhem Cave, east of Windhoek, is inhabited by six different species of bats. In the 1930’s farmers extracted tons of bat guano from the cave to utilise as an alternative fertilizer.

113


Aranos

D

@

ATM

Photo: Francois Malan

Albeit small,

Aranos reached town status in 2010. The town is surrounded with the red sands of the Kalahari, and is near the border between Namibia and Botswana.

Traveller Description: Aranos offers all basic facilities for the passing through tourist seeking some refreshments, fuel, food or medical help.

114


C20

Aranos C20

Aranos Hotel

10 D10

SPAR

D1010

Legend River Minor Road City Street Main Street

C2 0

Highway Town

Nossop River

0

Town Info:

Hospital: +264(0)63 276 900 Doctor: +264(0)63 272 085

Police: Tow-in:

230

460 Meters

+264(0)63 272 002 +264(0)81 200 7513 115

CENTRAL NAMIBIA • Aranos

Aranos Hospital


ARANOS 1 Aranos Hotel Hotel w138425 NAD 300.00 pu (2013) 125 Nossob st, Aranos Tel: +264(0)63 272 031, Fax: +264(0)63 272 300 strauss@iway.na

Aranos Hotel can host 22 people. Eight en-suite rooms are air-conditioned, have television and coffee/tea making facilities. Three more rooms share a communal ablution facility. Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities:

Photo: Francois Malan 116


CENTRAL NAMIBIA • Aranos

117


DAMARALAND

NAMIBIA: DAMARALAND

The mountains in the Twyfelfontein area are extraordinary. (Johann Groenewald)

Damaraland

is a harsh, semi-desert area east of the Skeleton Coast and south of Koakoland. It offers travellers beautiful rock formations and geological and cultural sites, as well as some of the most famous Namibian landmarks: Brandberg and Twyfelfontein. Sunset on the western face of Mount Brandberg is an unforgettable experience. Brandberg is also well-known for the ‘White Lady’ Bushmen painting, discovered in 1918, and wonderful wilderness hiking opportunities.

174


DAMARALAND

!

5/ C3 M8

C4 0/

8 C3

C40

Palmwag

!

M

0

76

D3236/M66

C43

! C39 /M6 9

C39

Petrified Forest

Khorixas

^

!

^

Desolation Valley

Twyfelfontein

126

Twyfelfontein World Heritage Site

^

76 76

M

D2344

D3 71 2

C36

/M6 4

C36

0 93 D1

^

White Lady

! Uis

/M6

4

Omaruru

6 D23 0

Mount Brandberg Nature Reserve

31

2

^

D2 34 2

D19

0 23 3 30 D2

C3 5/

C3 5 /M

^

Rhino Camp

Burnt Mountain Organ Pipes

Doros Crater

D2 30 3

!

!

D

D1918

Usakos

Karibib

!

!

B2

77

Omaruru Game Park

4 C3

Henties Bay

18

B2

D19

Ocean

C32 /M

16 D37

Atlantic

19 27

M

76

D19

30

C33

Messum Crater

C3 5/

4 /D C3

Gai-Ais Fountain

Vingerklip (Fallen)

C3 5 /M

^^ ^

76

!

^ Skeleton Coast National Park

C39 /M

175


With at least 2 500 individual open-air rock engravings, Twyfelfontein is one of the largest and most important concentrations of rock art in Africa. No wonder Twyfelfontein was proclaimed as Namibia’s first World Heritage Site in 2007. Close to Twyfelfontein you can visit the Organ Pipes, Burnt Mountain (not the same as Brandberg), the Petrified Forest and Vingerklip (also known as Mukurob or Finger of God) which collapsed in 1988. The mountains in the Twyfelfontein area are extraordinary. The Mowani Mountains are also called the Red Mountains because of their beautiful colour. Himba and Herero women in traditional wear sell stones and crafts on the road between Twyfelfontein and Uis.

176

Other attractions Damaraland has to offer, are the Messum Crater where one of the oldest plant species (Welwitschia mirabilis) flourishes, and the Doros Crater. If you camp close to the Huab or Aba-Huab Rivers, chances are good that you will encounter desert elephant or black rhino. The desert elephants are not as used to humans as the elephants in Etosha and they don’t like being disturbed. They have a comfort zone of at least 500 m. As the dry riverbeds belong to them, you are advised to rather stay out of there. An elephant encounter requires patience more than skill, because these lords of the desert may take a long time to make way – and sometimes they don’t! Be very cautious, because elephants have killed people in the riverbeds of Namibia.


Be careful when driving in Damaraland in the rainy season. Because of seasonal flooding, the roads can be very confusing. Many vehicles had to be rescued from rivers like the Aba-Huab, so always inquire about road conditions during the rainy season.

spent at community camps stays in the communities.

Damaraland is mainly communal land that is divided into Conservancies. The Conservancies are managed by the local communities who own the land rights and are responsible for the wild game. Money

If you want to enjoy the 4WD opportunities that this vast and remote region has to offer, do one of the popular ecotrails like the Upper-Huab Trail or the Ruspoort Trail.

Brandberg is a remarkable landmark in Damaraland. (Johann Groenewald)

177

DAMARALAND

Please stay on existing tracks or roads when driving on the pebble desert plains in Damaraland. New roads are the worst example of ‘vehicle track pollution’, as a new track will be visible for the next 600 years! That is the time required for the desert winds to wipe out these tracks.

Unfortunately some visitors see the area as a 4x4 playground where anything goes. As this attitude can cause resentment, we urge you to respect the people and, what is in effect, their backyard. When you drive past a village, keep your speed down so as not to cover them in your dust and give them a polite wave. Remember to dispose of your own litter in a proper way and respect the local people and their cultures.


Khorixas

Photo: Karin Theron

D

@

ATM

@

Khorixas

used to be the capital of Damaraland prior to Namibia’s independence. The town is in close proximity of tourist attractions like the Petrified Forest, Organ Pipes and the Burnt Mountain. Twyfelfontein is a world heritage site with its large gallery of open-air rock engravings. Traveller Description: Khorixas is not a touristy town, but you will be able to stock-up and find basic facilities. There are several good lodges, game farms and camping facilities around Khorixas. Travel INFO: Phone the hospital if you need to see a doctor. Private doctors only come in from Otjiwarongo on Mondays and Thursdays. Travel TIP: If you like hiking, you must experience the Brandberg hiking trail and visit the famous ‘White Lady’ Bushmen painting. 178


! C40 m Ka

an

ja

b

r ve Ri

Kamanjab

D3248 D2671

Bambatsi Guest Farm

Legend

Bambatsi Guest Farm Damara Mopane Lodge

D3246

C40/M76

r Huab Rive

Huab Lodge

D2694

!

iGowati Lodge iGowati Lodge Khorixas Rest Camp D2666

Ugab Terrace Lodge Ugab Terrace Lodge Vingerklip Lodge D3236/M66

D2670

Huab Communal Conservancy

C35/M66

!

u So

iv tR

Fransfontein

Audi Communal Conservancy D2744

er

C39/M69

D2625

Khorixas ! D2351

Unib

r Rive

C39/M126

Doro!nawas Area2 Communal Conservancy

Town Info:

a Ug

D2743 C35/M76

Hospital: +264(0)67 335 100 Doctor: +264(0)67 335 100

Khoro Goreb Communal Conservancy 0

Police:

5

10

r ive bR

km

+264(0)67 331 003

179

DAMARALAND • Khorixas

Main Road D2667 Minor Road Minor Gravel Road Off-Road/Jeep Track C35/M80 Hiking/Walking Trail Minor River Mountain Conservancy


KHORIXAS 1 Bambatsi Guest Farm

2 Bambatsi Guest Farm

Guest Farm NAD 880.00 pp (2013)

Farm Camp NAD 100.00 to 120.00 pp (2012)

w138134

w232622

62km or 41min ENE of Khorixas

62km or 40min ENE of Khorixas

Tel: +264(0)67 313 897, Cell: +264(0)81 245 8803, Fax: +264(0)88 615 627 bambatsi@iway.na, www.bambatsi.com

Tel: +264(0)67 313 897, Cell: +264(0)81 245 8803, Fax: +264(0)88 615 627 bambatsi@iway.na, www.bambatsi.com

Accommodation is provided in comfortable bungalows with en-suite bathrooms. View the wildlife from the main veranda or enjoy a drink at the bar.

Camping facilities are provided in two different camps on the guest farm. Biro Camp can accommodate only one group and Camp Gik can accommodate two groups.

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Facilities:

A VIS

FC

A VIS

Facilities:

FC

Activities:

Activities:

3 Damara Mopane Lodge

4 Huab Lodge

Lodge w255824 NAD 920.00 to 1150.00 pp (2014)

Lodge w139462 NAD 1574.00 to 2173.00 pp (2014)

26km or 18min ENE of Khorixas

86km or 01h34min NNW of Khorixas

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Fax: +264(0)67 687186 info@gondwana-collection.com www.gondwana-collection.com

Tel: +264(0)67 312 070, Cell: +264(0)81 627 6768, Fax: +264(0)88 628 432 info@huab.com, www.huab.com

The three star lodge offers accommodation in double rooms with air conditioning. Excellent meals are prepared from their own vegetable garden.

Situated on a private nature reserve, this lodge and spa offers luxury accommodation. Guests can enjoy the beautiful landscape, antelope, zebra, warthog, baboons and elephant as well as over 200 bird species. Activities include sun downer drives.

Facilities:

Facilities:

Activities:

Activities:

5 iGowati Lodge

6 iGowati Lodge

Lodge w137501 NAD 440.00 to 1000.00 pp (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 80.00 to 100.00 pp (2013)

King Justus Garoeb Ave, Khorixas

King Justus Garoeb Avenue, Khorixas

Tel: +264(0)67 331 592, Cell: +264(0)81 450 8790, Fax: +264(0)67 331 594 igowati@mweb.com.na, www.igowatilodge.com

Tel: +264(0)67 331 592, Fax: +264(0)67 331 594 igowati@mweb.com.na www.igowatilodge.com

iGowati Lodge offers 30 comfortable en-suite rooms each with fans, television and coffee/tea making facilities. The restaurant serves a la carte and buffet style menus. Guests can enjoy traditional dances and learn about the Damara culture.

The lodge offers camping facilities. Campsites, with shared ablutions and a wash-up area, are set out on green grass under trees. One private site with its own facilities is available. Campers may use the lodge facilities.

A VIS

Facilities:

180 Activities: 180

@

A VIS

FC @

@

Languages: English, Afrikaans A VIS

Facilities: Activities:

@

w255833


Khorixas Rest Camp Lodge Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2013/2014)

7 w138532

3km or 5min NW of Khorixas Tel: +264(0)61 285 7200, Fax: +264(0)61 224 900 reservations@nwr.com.na www.nwr.com.na

Khorixas Rest Camp has campsites and caravan sites as well as accommodation in bungalows available. There is also a restaurant and curio shop.

A VIS

Facilities: Activities:

Photo: Namibia Wildlife Resorts

Ugab Terrace Lodge 8

Ugab Terrace Lodge 9

Lodge w207675 NAD 835.00 to 1400.00 pp/pu (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 50.00 to 150.00 pp (2012)

66km or 48min E of Khorixas

70km or 1h12min E of Khorixas

Tel: +264(0)64 461 677, Cell: +264(0)81 140 0179, Fax: +264(0)88 63 6170 info@ugabterracelodge.com, www.ugabterracelodge.com

Tel: +264(0)64 461 677, Cell: +264(0)81 140 0179, Fax: +264(0)88 63 6170 info@ugabterracelodge.com, www.ugabterracelodge.com

The lodge is situated on a plateau which allows panoramic views. There are 16 en-suite bungalows with a private veranda each. Facilities include a bar.

The lodge has five campsites where you can park your RV or construct your own camp. The campsites are situated against the incline at the foot of the hill overlooking the Ugab Terrace and Valley.

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

w255846

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans A VIS

Facilities:

@

Activities:

Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

@

Vingerklip Lodge 10 Lodge w138041 NAD 1095.00 to 1800.00 pp/pu (2014) 72km or 54min E of Khorixas Tel: +264(0)61 255 344, Fax: +264(0)88 623 642 vingerkl@mweb.com.na, www.vingerklip.com.na

Accommodation is provided in double and family rooms as well as a suite. Eagle’s Nest Restaurant is situated on top of the plateau. There are two swimming pools and a Jacuzzi. Activities include sun downer drives and cultural trips. Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

@

Photo: Karin Theron 181

DAMARALAND • Khorixas

Languages: English


Erongo

Spitzkoppe is one of Namibia’s most recognisable landmarks. (Karin Theron)

The Erongo region lends its name from the Erongo Mountains where beautiful gemstones are found. These gemstones are sold informally along the roads. Spitzkoppe (meaning sharp hill) is one of Namibia’s most recognisable landmarks and indeed its most famous mountain and an outstanding camping spot. Although it is not the highest mountain in Namibia, it is popular for rock climbing. Even though it has a sharp peak from afar, Spitzkoppe in fact consists of a series of rounded granite mountains. Although Twyfelfontein in Damaraland is a world heritage site because of its rock art, you will also find paintings and engravings in the Erongo region throughout the Erongo Mountains and Spitzkoppe. 194


NAMIBIA: ERONGO

! ! C22 D2612

M

76

C3 5/

C3 3

M7

6

C3 5/

Mt Brandberg Nature Reserve

Uis C36/M6 4

Kristallkeller Winery Erongo Singing Rocks

^ D1 93 7

Karibib ! Usakos

D1918

^

B2

Okahandja

!

!

Mount Erongo

B2

C32/M77

Omaruru Game Park

B1

^

ERONGO

C3 3

80

^

Spitzkoppe Nature Reserve

D24 14

6 /M C3

D23 1 6

6 /M7

Philipp's Cave

C35

Erindi Private Game Reserve

^

Omaruru ! D2315

B1

!

Dorob National Park

Tsaobis Leopard and Nature Park C28

!

Langstrand

8 C2

C28

! C14/M36

Namib-Naukluft National Park

Attractions in the vicinity are Philipp’s Cave (known for its rock art and archaeological findings) and the Erongo Singing Rocks. Erongo is a farming area with lots of game farms offering accommodation. The B2 highway between Windhoek and Swakopmund traverses this region and offers easy access to its attractions. Omaruru is a beautiful and tourist friend-

C26

B2

/M4

9

!

2

C2 6

!

/M5

ly town where you can visit one of Namibia’s few wineries, Kristallkeller Winery. Though small in size, the town is well worth a visit for people interested in arts and culture. The Erindi Private Game Reserve is also in this region and here you will find from the smallest insects to the largest land mammals and a multitude of rare and endangered species. 195


Karibib

D

@

ATM

Photo: Karin Theron

Karibib

is situated halfway between Windhoek and Swakopmund on the B2 (Trans-Kalahari Highway). Karibib is known for its marble quarries and a gold mine. Originally Karibib was a waterhole known to the Herero under the name Otjandjomboimwe. When business opportunities aroused from the railway construction work between Swakopmund and Windhoek, a merchant bought the waterhole and surrounding land from the Herero headman in 1895. 1 June 1900 marks the day of the official foundation of Karibib at the occasion of the first train arriving from Swakopmund. Today Karibib is still connected to the TransNamib railway network. Traveller Description: The beautiful Erongo Mountains dominate the skyline of Karibib. There are a number of tourist attractions in the vicinity, like Spitzkoppe, Philipp’s Cave (known for its rock art and archaeological findings) and the Erongo Singing Rocks. The town itself is not really a touristy town, but rather a stop for replenishing stocks and refuelling. Travel INFO: The contact number for the town clinic is 264(0)64 550 073. There is an Agra Retail and OK Bazaars. 196


r Police: +264(0)64 550 008 ive ha n R K Doctor: +264(0)64 550 050 Tow-in: +264(0)81 129 7490 Tourist Info: +264(0)64 550 700

Off-Road/Jeep Track Minor Gravel Road

C33

Minor Road Main Road

C36/M80

Town Info:

Legend

Highway River

95 D1

Mountain

1

Nature Reserve

D1987

B2

Karibib

!

C32/M 7

bu

an jo s

i ver eR

D1 95 2

2 99 D1

95 D1 3

ve r

D1954

Om

use ma

Ri

Mt Otjipatera

Albrechtshohe Guest Farm Etusis Lodge Guestfarm Okondura-Nord Kaliombo Safari Lodge Kaliombo Safari Lodge

D19 6

7

Kansimba Game Lodge

Swa

Tsaobis Leopard and Nature Park 0

k op Rive

r

Khan River Lodge Klippenberg Guesthouse Okomitundu Guest Farm Tsaobis Nature Park Rest Camp

5

10 Km

7 D19

6

Tsaobis Nature Park Rest Camp

Travel TIP: The Henckert Tourist Centre in the main street is worth a visit. They weave beautiful karakul rugs and wall hangings and sell an excellent selection of curios and Namibian made jewellery. There is a Police control point just outside Karibib on the C33 to Omaruru. 197

ERONGO • Karibib

Um

7

!


KARIBIB 1 Albrechtshohe Guest Farm

2 Etusis Lodge

Guest Farm NAD 650.00 pp (2013/2014)

Lodge w142653 NAD 664.00 to 1134.00 pp/pu (2014)

w138441

27km or 20min E of Karibib

35km or 40min SSW of Karibib

Tel: +264(0)62 503 363, Cell: +264(0)81 128 3363, Fax: +264(0)62 503 363 meyer@iafrica.com.na, www.safariwest.de

Tel: +264(0)64 550 826, Fax: +264(0)88 643 131 etusis@resdest.com, www.etusis.de

This guest farm offers modern accommodation, delicious game meals and warm hospitality. Languages: English, German

Etusis Lodge is an oasis nestled in savannah and mountainous bush veld. Guests can choose between comfortable bungalows and luxury tents or they can rough it at the campsites. A 4WD is recommended during the rainy season. Languages: English, German

Facilities:

FC

A VIS

Facilities:

FC

@

Activities:

Activities:

3 Guestfarm Okondura-Nord

4 Kaliombo Safari Lodge

Guest Farm EURO 65.00 to 650.00 pp (2014)

Lodge w142660 NAD 375.00 to 630.00 pp (2013)

w142648

70km or 57min ESE of Karibib

51km or 42min E of Karibib

Tel: +264(0)62 503 983, Cell: +264(0)81 128 5039, Fax: +264(0)88 625 636 okondura@mweb.com.na, www.okonduraguestfarm.com

Tel: +264(0)64 404 561, Cell: +264(0)81 129 4561, Fax: +264(0)64 404 923 sunrisetours@iafrica.com.na, www.sunrisetours.com.na

Okondura-Nord is situated on a farm with beautiful mountains and hills as well as open savannah. They have six double rooms with en-suite bathrooms and verandas available. There are lots of wildlife and farm animals to see.

The lodge offers accommodation in safari tents, each with en-suite bathroom and a private patio with spectacular views over the surrounding plains and animals. Choose between self-catering, bed and breakfast or full board accommodation.

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans Facilities:

A VIS

@

Activities:

Facilities:

@

@

Activities:

5 Kaliombo Safari Lodge

6 Kansimba Game Lodge

Lodge Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2013)

Game/Safari Lodge NAD 750.00 to 1500.00 pp (2012)

w142661

w224556

51km or 42min E of Karibib

54km or 48min ESE of Karibib

Tel: +264(0)64 404 561, Cell: +264(0)81 129 4561, Fax: +264(0)64 404 923 sunrisetours@iafrica.com.na, www.sunrisetours.com.na

Tel: +264(0)62 503 966, Cell: +27(0)81 687 5782, Fax: +264(0)62 503 967 kansimba@iafrica.com.na, www.kansimba.com

The camp is situated on a dry riverbed and has one campsite available for maximum 10 people. There is a shower and one toilet as well as a place to wash dishes.

Kansimba Game Lodge offers breath taking scenery and an abundance of wildlife. Each guest room has a balcony leading onto the garden and the luxury suites have balconies overlooking the river and waterhole. Pre-booking is required.

Facilities:

Facilities:

Activities: 198

@

Activities:

A VIS

@

FC @

@


7 Khan River Lodge

8 Klippenberg Guesthouse

Lodge w138464 NAD 770.00 to 880.00 pp (2013)

Guest House NAD 480.00 to 680.00 pp (2013)

70km or 01h01min ENE of Karibib

1km or 2min SSE of Karibib

Tel: +264(0)62 503 883, Cell: +264(0)81 386 7077, Fax: +264(0)62 682 333 info@khanriverlodge.com, www.khanriverlodge.com

Tel: +264(0)64 550 693, Cell: +264(0)81 129 0064, Fax: +264(0)64 550 693 kcc@iway.na

Khan River Lodge offers accommodation in comfortable rustic chalets with en-suite bathrooms. The campsites have clean ablution facilities with hot showers. Activities include bird watching, hunting safaris and campfires at night. Languages: English, Afrikaans

The lodge is situated close to Klippenberg Mountain, hence the name. It has tennis courts and a small golf course.

A VIS

Facilities:

w206849

Facilities:

9 Okomitundu Guest Farm

10 Tsaobis Nature Park Rest Camp

Guest Farm NAD 580.00 to 1120.00 pp (2014)

Self-catering w138679 NAD 200.00 to 350.00 pu (2013)

w138460

85km or 01h01min ESE of Karibib

64km or 01h13min SSW of Karibib

Tel: +264(0)62 503 901, Cell: +264(0)81 128 1964, Fax: +264(0)62 503 902 cdkemp@iway.na, www.okomitundu.com

Tel: +264(0)64 684 060, Cell: +264(0)81 444 9911 tsaobis@live.de www.tsaobisnaturepark.com

The Guest Farm with magnificent old farm house offers accommodation in eight bungalows with double rooms, balconies and bathrooms. There are many activities to enjoy which include sun downer drives, bird watching, stargazing and archery.

Tsaobis Nature Park Rest Camp is the ideal setting for geological trips and one-day-excursions. They provide accommodation in eight bungalows. Activities include sun downer drives and 4x4 trails.

Facilities:

A VIS

FC @

Facilities:

@

Activities:

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Activities:

A VIS

@

ERONGO • Karibib

@

Activities:

11 Tsaobis Nature Park Rest Camp Camping w141116 NAD 80.00 to 100.00 pp/pu (2013) 64km or 01h13min SSW of Karibib Tel: +264(0)64 684 060, Cell: +264(0)81 444 9911, Fax: +264(0)64550954 tsaobis@live.de, www.tsaobisnaturepark.com

The camp is situated within the Tsaobis Nature Park which is home to the Tsaobis Baboon Research Project. The spacious campsite has lovely shady trees and an open air shower. Languages: English, German, Afrikaans A VIS

Facilities: Activities:

@

Photo: Karin Theron 199


EtOSHA

There is an abundance of wildlife at the Okaukuejo waterhole. (Johann Groenewald)

Etosha is one of Namibia’s finest national parks and offers spectacular game viewing. The park has a few watering holes – some natural and some fed by boreholes – which is where most of the game is concentrated. Visitors can expect to see elephant, lion, giraffe, rhino and a variety of antelope. Thousands of years ago the Kunene River would have fed the Etosha Pan as a lake, but today the pan will only hold water after heavy rains. Then, for a short while, it will play host to flamingos, pelicans and wading birds. The rainy season generally offers better birding opportunities with some 340 bird species, about a third of which are migratory. The park is serviced by a good gravel road with camping facilities and lodges in 212


NAMIBIA: ETOSHA

ANGOLA Oshikango

!

C4 6

M123

C45/M110

Oshakati

!

C35 /M76

C41 1 1 /M C4

C46

B1

Ruacana

!

Ondangwa

!

22

Lake Oponono

Lake Oponono Wetlands

Onguma Private Game Reserve

B1

ETOSHA

Etosha Pans

Etosha Restricted Area

Lake Otjikoto B1

C38

Etosha National Park

^ ^

Kamanjab

B1

42

!^

Lake Guinas

Kamanjab Rock Engravings

Grootfontein !

Otavi

!

B8

5 /M C3

C4 0/

M

80

76

Outjo

B1

! C39/M69

!

M6 3

Khorixas

Tsumeb

!

C

Ongawa Private Game Reserve C40

D3600

Okaholo Pan

C3 8

! 3 C3

B1 C22

B1

and around the park. When it was proclaimed in 1907, the park was one of the largest reserves in the world, but it has since shrunk in size to an area that now consists mainly of the Etosha Pan which is 130 km long and 50 km wide. There are numerous luxury accommodation places just outside Etosha which offer their own game drives and beautiful scenery. Some of these are in the Onguma Private Game Reserve east of

2 C4

Otjiwarongo

C39/M126

! Twyfelfontein

Waterberg Plateau National Park

C2 2/

M1 15

Etosha near Namutoni Gate and some in the Ongawa Private Game Reserve south of Etosha near Andersson Gate. Other highlights of this region are two natural sinkhole lakes, Lake Otjikoto and Lake Guinas, near Tsumeb. Both are popular among experienced divers. Those in search of Bushmen rock engravings can visit the site near Kamanjab.

213


Etosha National Park AREA

D

Photo: Johann Groenewald

The Etosha National Park

is without a doubt Namibia’s most famous and popular national park, partly because it is malaria free. The park has an abundance of game and about 340 bird species have been counted. Game viewing is easy in the park as most animals come to drink at one of the few watering holes. It is only after heavy rains that the Etosha Pan fills up and becomes a water source to wading birds and other animals. This is also the time when the bulbs flower.

Travel TIP: Because of veterinary fence restrictions you are allowed to take raw meat of cloven hooved animals and unpasteurised milk into Etosha if you travel from the south. However, you are not allowed to take meat from Etosha past the vet fence control point if you travel south. 214


Traveller Description: The western part of Etosha and Galton Gate is only open to operators with special permits. Self-drive visitors either use Namutoni Gate in the east or Andersson Gate in the south. The park is serviced by a good gravel road which you can drive in a normal sedan vehicle. However, you are advised to use a 4WD or pick-up vehicle during the rainy season. The main camps (Okaukuejo, Namutoni and Halali) offer a good variety of accommodation while Onkoshi and Dolomite are exclusive camps.

Photo: Johann Groenewald

215

etosha • etosha NP area

Travel INFO: All three main camps (Okaukuejo, Namutoni and Halali) have fuel stations, restaurants and shops with basic food supplies. Okaukuejo has laundry facilities and a basic clinic. Namutoni Camp has the best shade but most people regard the waterhole at Okaukuejo as sensational, especially at night when not only elephant, herds of rhino and prides of lion come down to drink but also smaller nocturnal animals which are not usually seen.


ETOSHA National Park Area Okasnanakana Pan

le er Ri v

!

N

Legend !

ipe

Olyapeke Pan

E

Waterhole/ Fountain Etosha Gates Highway kum Main Road Minor Road er Minor Gravel Road Off-Road/Jeep Track River Deep River Valley Pan Conservancy Private Game Reserve National Park a Ri v

Natukanaoka Pan

Etosha Pan

Etosha National Park

!

Adamax=dry

8 C3

! Okondeka

!

Salvadora

Charitsaub !

Homob

!

! !

Sueda

!

Rietfontein

Halali Airstrip Moringa

!

!

Ondonkab

!

Kapupuhedi

Okaukuejo Pan ! Airstrip

!

!

!

Okaukuejo

Nebrownii

!

! Aus

! Gemsbokvlakte !

Ongava Airstrip

Olifantsbad

0

12.5

Ombika !

! Anderson Gate

Ongawa Private Game Reserve

D269 5

216

79 D27

D2 77

9

25 Km

Nuamses Goas 2 Goas 1 !! !

Noniams

Halali


Andoni Pan

B1

Beisebvlakte Pan

!

Andoni

Oshivelo Airstrip

Ubareb Pan

( !

Oshivelo

Stinkwater !

etosha • etosha NP area

Onguma Private Game Reserve D3001

21 Etosha Aoba (Private)

!

4

Aroe

D30 0

Tsumcor !

!

Namutoni

Groot Okevi Airstrip Fisher's Pan !

!

Klein Okevi

!

C38

!

Chudop !

Ngobib

! !

!

Namutoni Gate !

!

Klein Namutoni Okerfontein !

!

Mokuti Lodge Airstrip

Mushara Lodge Airstrip

!

Kalkheuwel

Springbokfontein

! !

Baitia

D3 00

! !

3

!

Namutoni Rest Camp Okaukuejo Rest Camp Okaukuejo Rest Camp Ongava Lodge Ongava Tented Camp Onguma Bush Camp Onguma Bush Camp Onguma Etosha Aoba Lodge Onguma Tented Camp Onguma The Fort Onkoshi Rest Camp Sachsenheim Guest Farm Taleni Etosha Village

4 D30

3

D3 03 1

6 86 D2

Andersson's Camp Eldorado B&B Eldorado B&B Emanya@Etosha Game Lodge Etosha Safari Camp Etosha Safari Camp Etosha Safari Lodge Mushara Bush Camp Halali Rest Camp Halali Rest Camp Mokuti Lodge Aikab Pan Mushara Lodge Mushara Outpost Namutoni Camp

217


ETOSHA National Park Area Andersson’s Camp

1

Lodge w208956 NAD 1790.00 to 4687.00 pp (2014) 6km or 09min WWS of Anderson Gate (Etosha) Tel: +264(0)61 274 500, Fax: +264(0)61 239 455 enquiry@wilderness.co.za www.wilderness-safaris.com

Andersson’s Camp is situated in the Ongava Private GR which is adjacent to the Etosha NP. They offer accommodation in tented units on raised decks with en-suite bathrooms. The camp has an eco-sensitive design and a waterhole to view wildlife. Facilities:

A VIS

Activities:

FC

@

Photo: Wilderness Safaris

Eldorado B&B

2

Bed and Breakfast NAD 400.00 to 500.00 pp (2014)

w227570

10km or 10min S of Anderson Gate (Etosha) Cell: +264(0)81 302 2290 hanel@iway.na www.etosha-camping.com

Located on the doorstep of the world renowned Etosha National Park, this owner-run accommodation offers true hospitality. They offer full board accommodation. Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities:

A VIS

FC @

Activities:

Photo: Eldorado B&B

Eldorado B&B

3

Lodge Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2014)

w227907

10km or 10min S of Anderson Gate (Etosha) Cell: +264(0)81 302 2290 hanel@iway.na www.etosha-camping.com

The camping area at Eldorado B&B is grassed. They do sell meat. This is the ideal location for day trips into Etosha. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Facilities: Activities: 218

A VIS

FC Photo: Eldorado B&B


Emanya@Etosha Game Lodge

4

Lodge w239883 NAD 1165.00 to 2236.00 pp (2013) 22km or 20min E of Namutoni Gate (Etosha) Tel: +264(0)61 222 954, Fax: +264(0)61 260 458 bookings@emanya.com www.emanya.com

Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities:

A VIS

@

Activities:

Photo: David Rogers

5 Etosha Safari Camp

Etosha Safari Camp 6

Self-catering w254370 NAD 775.00 to 970.00 pu (2013)

Tour Operator Camp NAD 150.00 pu (2013/2014)

9km or 7min SSW of Anderson Gate (Etosha)

9km or 7min SSW of Anderson Gate (Etosha)

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Cell: +264(0)81 129 2424, Fax: +264(0)67 333 455 info@gondwana-collection.com, www.gondwana-collection. com

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Cell: +264(0)81 129 2424, Fax: +264(0)67 333 455 info@gondwana-collection.com, www.gondwana-collection. com

Accommodation is available in 50 twin-bedded chalets which are fully equipped. They also offer good camping facilities. Birding is great at Etosha Safari Camp.

Etosha Safari Camp has fully equipped campsites available. Popular activities include bird watching and hiking. A 4WD is recommended during the rainy season.

Languages: English

Languages: English

A VIS

Facilities:

@

@

Activities:

A VIS

Facilities:

w138856

@

@

Activities:

Etosha Safari Lodge 7

8 Mushara Bush Camp

Lodge w219518 NAD 985.00 to 1325.00 pu (2014)

Tented Camp NAD 1300.00 to 2200.00 pu (2014)

12km or 14min SSW of Anderson Gate (Etosha)

10km or 09min SEE of Namutoni Gate (Etosha)

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Cell: +264(0)81 129 2424, Fax: +264(0)61 251 863 info@gondwana-collection.com, www.gondwana-collection.com

Tel: +264(0)67 229 121, Fax: +264(0)61 304 290 enquiry@MusharaBushCamp.com www.musharabushcamp.com

Etosha Safari Lodge offers accommodation in comfortable bungalows, each with own veranda. They are all fully serviced and equipped. Facilities include a bar where guests can quench their thirst.

Mushara Bush Camp offers accommodation for 32 guests and eight children in custom made tent structures. The bush camp offers a down-to-earth bush experience. The main house is thatched and meals are served on the veranda. Languages: English

Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

Facilities:

@

etosha • etosha NP area

Emanya@Etosha offers 20 luxury air-conditioned en-suite rooms, laundry services on request, a stylish bar, African cuisine with grill and buffet and a rejuvenating foot spa. A variety of wildlife can be viewed at the waterhole.

w209635

A VIS

Activities: 219


GOBABIS

You enter the Gobabis district between Dordabis and Witvlei. (Karin Theron)

South of Boesmanland, Gobabis is cattle farming area with quite a lot of hunting safari opportunities. The area around Gobabis is beautiful with long, soft grass and big Acacia trees. Here and there the red sand dunes of the Kalahari Desert are visible. You will find a lot of game along the roads, especially between Gobabis and Hochfeld. Be on the lookout for jackal, warthog, kudu, oryx, rooihartebees, steenbok, springbok and erdvark, and never drive after dark. Gobabis is the closest town to the Buitepos border post and a convenient stopover on the Trans-Kalahari Highway linking Namibia and Botswana. It offers a lot in terms 248


Okamatapati Communal Conservancy C42 Ozonahi Communal Conservancy

African Wild Dog Communal Conservancy

Eiseb Communal Conservancy

M1 12

C2 2 /M

C3 1/

Hochfeld

M8

!

/M6

5

M11 4

C31 /M9 0

Omuramba Ua Mbinda Communal Conservancy

Harnas Wildlife Foundation

0 C3 0 /M

57

53

Otjombinde Communal Conservancy

^ M

M

C22

59

11 5

13 1

M

C31

Ondjou Communal Conservancy

Museum Statue of Brahman Bull

/M7

0

53

C29

M

!

B6

! Gobabis C

1

22 /

M

Dordabis C2 3 /M

48

SOUTH AFRICA NAMIBIA: GOBABIS

15

2 /M C2

C

C20/M3 9

!

91

40

5/ C1 M3

C

C23 /M4 1

3

/ 25

GOBABIS

M5

Buitepos

!

Witvlei

M

/M4 42

B1

C20

C22

M

M3 9

33

1

5

M4

5 /M C1

/M4

0

46

C21

! Kalkrand

! Aranos

of accommodation and stock-replenishment; however, you may prefer to rather continue to Windhoek if you come from Botswana. Gobabis is home to the Herero people. Although it is a modern town, many Herero women still wear their traditional clothing. Always ask before you take a photo of the women with their colourful dresses and beautiful head gear.

D10 1 0

Gobabis is the Little Texas of Namibia and the statue of a large Brahman bull in the middle of town shows that this is indeed serious cattle farming country. The Harnas Wildlife Foundation, an animal sanctuary north of Gobabis, is worth a visit.

249


Buitepos

D

@

ATM

Buitepos

(meaning outer post) is not much more than a border post between Namibia and Botswana, but proves to be a good stop-over. Traveller Description: If you are on your way from Windhoek to Johannesburg (South Africa) this route is the shortest and most interesting way to go. Buitepos is only one day’s drive from Johannesburg. Buitepos is also used by people travelling between Ghanzi (Botswana) and Windhoek. Travel INFO: The tow-in service number is for Polka 24 hour service - they can help anywhere in Namibia but is based in Okahandja.

250


Town Info:

Police: +264(0)62 560 400 Tow-in: +264(0)81 129 7490 Tourist Info: +264(0)62 560 405

9 D177

9 M11

BOTSWANA

!

Buitepos

V V# #

GOBABIS • Buitepos

Buitpos Border Control

Mamuno Border Control

B6

NAMIBIA

0

3

6 Km

3 9 /M D17

55

Legend

V #

Border Post

East Gate Rest Camp

Off-Road/Jeep Track

East Gate Rest Camp

Minor Gravel Road

Kalahari Bush Breaks Camp

Minor Road

Kalahari Bush Breaks Lodge

Highway

Zelda Game Guest Farm

National Border

Travel TIP: East Gate Rest Camp is known for its comfortable lodging and camping in beautiful surroundings.

251


buitepos 1 East Gate Rest Camp

2 East Gate Rest Camp

Self-catering w254369 NAD 150.00 to 1000.00 pu (2013/2014)

Lodge Camp NAD 60.00 pu (2013/2014)

At Buitepos border post

At Buitepos border post

Tel: +264(0)62 560 405, Cell: +264(0)81 129 0686, Fax: +264(0)62 560 406 eastgate@namibnet.com, www.eastgate-namibia.com

Tel: +264(0)62 560 405, Cell: +264(0)81 129 0686, Fax: +264(0)62 560 406 eastgate@iway.na, www.eastgate-namibia.com

The rest camp offers accommodation in bungalows, sleeping up to four adults, each with a fully equipped kitchen and private bath facilities. There is also a cabin for two available. There is a fuel stop at the rest camp.

The rest camp is mainly used for stopovers. A camping area with separate ablution facilities is available. There is a fuel stop at the rest camp.

w137323

Languages: English, Afrikaans

Languages: English, Afrikaans A VIS

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FC

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A VIS

3 Kalahari Bush Breaks Camp

4 Kalahari Bush Breaks Lodge

Lodge Camp NAD 80.00 to 100.00 pp (2014)

Lodge w139608 NAD 690.00 to 1020.00 pp (2013)

w137977

25km or 17min W of Buitepos

28km or 21min W of Buitepos

Tel: +264(0)62 568 936, Cell: +264(0)81 244 4844, Fax: +264(0)64 464 155 enquiries@kalaharibushbreaks.com, www.kalaharibushbreaks.com

Tel: +264(0)62 568 936, Cell: +264(0)81 244 4844, Fax: +264(0)64 464 155, enquiries@kalaharibushbreaks.com, www.kalaharibushbreaks.com

Kalahari Bush Breaks has luxury campsites with electricity points as well as eco campsites available. The ablution facilities at the eco campsites are open air and the water is heated with a donkey. Meals can be pre-booked at the lodge. A FC VIS Facilities: Activities:

@

Guest Farm NAD 440.00 to 550.00 pp (2013/2014)

w138424

20km or 15min W of Buitepos Tel: +264(0)62 560 427, Fax: +264(0)62 560 431 zelda.guestfarm@iafrica.com.na www.zeldaguestfarm.com

The guest farm offers accommodation in en-suite twin or family rooms. Guests can choose between the ordinary B&B option and a more inclusive option. Facilities include a bar and a volley ball court. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Activities: 252

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities:

5 Zelda Game Guest Farm

Facilities:

Kalahari Bush Breaks offers en-suite bedrooms as well as chalets with en-suite facilities. A thatched lapa with a bar overlooks a shaded garden and a lit waterhole. Pre-historic bushman engravings on the farm is a must see.

A VIS

@

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GOBABIS • Buitepos Photo: Karin Theron 253


kaokoland

Epupa Falls is quite spectacular after good rains. (Johann Groenewald)

Kaokoland lies in the extreme north-western corner of Namibia. It is bordered in the north by the Kunene River and in the west by the Atlantic Ocean and the Skeleton Coast National Park. Kaokoland is a beautiful, remote and wild area with landscapes that range between sweeping plains, rugged mountains and dry riverbeds seamed with lush riparian bush. It deserves your respect, so be an eco-traveller and do not cause track pollution; stay on the beaten tracks or roads and do not disturb any plants, especially the Welwitschia. 262


Epupa Falls D3 70 0

Otjinhungwa

Ruacana Falls Marienfluss

Okangwati

!

/ 43 D 0 37

7 16 D3

D3 61 6

C4 3/

D3 70

4

C35 /M76

Van Zyl’s Pass

Opuwo

!

Orupembe !

1 /M C4

1 22

C41 /M1 00

09 D37

D3710

C43 /D

D37 08

Puros

!

NAMIBIA: KAOKOLAND Ongongo Hot Springs

D3707

Sesfontein !

^ Hobatere Concession C43/D3706

Fort Sesfontein

D2 69 5

Ocean

C40

Palmwag

!

C43

! D2 30 2

!

Kamanjab

!

D2650

D2646

Palmwag Area

2 30 D2

Terrace Bay

Etosha Restricted Area

76

Atlantic

C35 /M

D37 07

37 0 4

D37 0 7

D3 7 07

D3 70 5

D3 7 07

C46

0

! Ruacana

C35/M80

^ ^ ^

^ 1 70 D3

C

D3703

D3703

Skeleton Coast National Park

ANGOLA

!

!

Rooidrom

k ao k o l an d

Epupa Falls

D26

70

263 !


Life is simple, almost uncomfortable; therefore the traveller has to prepare properly for a harsh but nevertheless beautiful and rewarding experience. You definitely need a 4WD to tour Kaokoland and you would be wise not to take a trailer. A satellite phone is a must when you travel Kaokoland on your own. The roads are dusty sand or gravel roads, often no more than simple tracks, which can easily become flooded depending on the season or a nearby rainstorm. Otjitheka Trail is a popular eco-trail and 4x4 enthusiasts and a few brave motorcyclists find Van Zyl’s Pass a challenge they cannot resist. Van Zyl’s Pass can only be travelled from east to west (downhill) although the brave and crazy do it the other way as well. The road is very bad and you can only traverse it with a 4WD or an off-road type motorbike which is not bigger than 650cc. You need outstanding riding skills The Himbas stay in simple round huts. (Johann Groenewald)

264

on rock and sand to be able to ride Van Zyl’s Pass. A trip down Van Zyl’s Pass usually starts off early morning from Ruacana, Opuwo, Epupa Falls or lodging somewhere along the Kunene River. Plan to stay over at the Van Zyl’s Pass Community camp. The road from Etengwa to Otjitanda is as bad as the road down van Zyl’s Pass. So, when you reach Otjitanda and you are still comfortable with your driving or riding skills, you can continue to Van Zyl’s Pass. If not, take the road south from Otjitanda leading to Orupembe.

Like in Damaraland, you have to be aware of desert elephant, especially in the dry riverbeds. Chances are good that you might also encounter rhino, lion and leopard. Kaokoland is mainly communal land that is divided into Conservancies. The Conservancies are managed by the local communities, who own the land rights


There is a community campsite in Van Zyl’s Pass. (Johann Groenewald)

The area is sparsely inhabited and here you will find the semi-nomadic Himba who are cattle herders and live in simple round huts. Respect them and their culture. They have a number of holy places spread throughout Kaokoland and you need to ensure that you do not camp on or near them. These holy places are indicated on Tracks4Africa’s GPS maps. Beware of cattle stampedes if you camp near Himba villages. The cattle have adapted to feeding as far as 35 km away from water and only return to drink every second or third day. The return to water normally happens at nightfall or later. Over the last 5 km they can smell the water which make them very excited and can cause a stampede.

Koakoland has a lot to offer in terms of natural beauty. The life-giving Kunene River has many waterfalls and rapids of which the most spectacular are the Ruacana Falls and Epupa Falls. The Marienfluss is a wide and long valley covered in soft waving grass for most of the year, set between high, stark mountain ranges. There are some beautiful fairy circles in the Marienfluss. You can enter the Marienfluss in the south via the nerve-wracking Van Zyl’s Pass, or the track passing Rooidrom. Rooidrom is a red, 45 gallon Caltex drum that was put there many years ago by farmer Ben van Zyl as a way of storing petrol for when he would pass there again and need it. Its purpose, however, changed to that of being a road marker (it is at a split in the road) and this is how it got its name. Rooidrom became a well-known landmark in Kaokoland and fellow travellers regularly paint it. It later also became a memorial for Jan Joubert who was a pioneer in marking the 4x4 trails of Namibia and was killed on one of his excursions into Kaokoland. 265

k ao k o l an d

and are responsible for the wild game. Money spent at community camps stays in the communities. Remember to take your own litter with you when you leave, as they live in a very natural way and do not have techniques for disposing of your rubbish.


Epupa Falls

Photo: Johann Groenewald

The Epupa Falls is in Angola known as the Monte Negro Falls. The

falls are created by the Kunene River which forms the border between Angola and Namibia. The Kunene River is 0.5 km wide and creates a series of waterfalls ranging from 1.5 m to 37 m in drop. The name ‘Epupa’ is a Herero word meaning foam, named after the foam that is created by the falling water. Traveller Description: It is recommended that you travel from Opuwo to the falls with a 4WD vehicle. Even though the falls are difficult to reach it is still a major tourist attraction in Namibia. What makes it so special is the unspoilt environment, covered with Fig trees, Baobabs and Makalani palms. The falls are framed with walls made of coloured rock. Travel INFO: Polka 24hr tow-in is based in Okahandja and services this area. Cell: +264(0)81 129 7490.

266


Epupa Camp Epupa Camp Epupa Falls Lodge Epupa Falls Lodge & Campsite

kaokoland • Epupa Falls

Kapika Waterfall Lodge Omarunga Lodge Omarunga Lodge

Kunene River Epupa Shop

C43/D3700

Legend

! (

Epupa Falls

River Hiking/Walking Trail Off-Road/Jeep Track City Street Main Road

0

150

300 Meters

Major River D3700

Town

Travel TIP: There are two possible routes from Epupa Falls to Ruacana Falls. The inland route via Okangwati is about 160km along good dirt roads and takes a morning. The 4x4 route next to the river is very scenic but takes one to two days, depending on the height of the river. Don’t tow a trailer or do this trip in a lone vehicle. During the rainy season (December to March) the route can be a technical challenge. 267


EPUPA FALLS 1 Epupa Camp

2 Epupa Camp

Tented Camp NAD 1260.00 pp (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 120.00 pp (2013/2014)

w141499

w255826

1km or 3min ENE of Epupa Falls

1km or 3min ENE of Epupa Falls

Tel: +264(0)61 232 740, Cell: +264(0)81 366 4003, Fax: +264(0)61 249 876 reservations@epupa.com.na, www.epupa.com.na

Tel: +264(0)61 232 740, Cell: +264(0)81 366 4003, Fax: +264(0)61 249 876 reservations@epupa.com.na, www.epupa.com.na

Epupa Camp offers accommodation in nine en-suite safari tents with private balconies. The lodge has a dining room and a lounge that overlook the Kunene River. Activities available include river rafting and boat trips.

Epupa Camp works with and supports the local community. The camp has an ecological policy, recycling and removing all solid waste from the area. Activities include river rafting, boat trips and visits to a Himba village.

Languages: English, Afrikaans

Languages: English, Afrikaans

A VIS

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@

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Epupa Falls Lodge

A VIS

@

@

3

Lodge w255827 NAD 1100.00 pp (2013) Directly at Epupa falls Tel: +264(0)65 695 108, Cell: +264(0)81 149 2840, Fax: +27(0)88 617 368 info@epupafalls.com, www.epupafalls.com

Epupa Falls Lodge not only has a beautiful deck overlooking the falls, but also offers accommodation in five chalets. Involved with the Himba community, they offer a unique cultural experience. Languages: English, German, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities:

@

Photo:Koos Verwey

Epupa Falls Lodge & Campsite Lodge Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2013)

4 w142431

Directly at Epupa falls Tel: +264(0)65 695 108, Cell: +264(0)81 149 2840, Fax: +27(0)88 617 368 koos.cunene@iway.na, www.epupafalls.com

Epupa Falls Lodge & Campsite is the oldest campsite in the area with seven shaded campsites. Their deck includes a fully operational kitchen and bar. Electricity is available for small appliances. Enjoy rafting and hiking to Himba villages. Facilities: Activities: 268

@

Photo: Richard Randall


6 Omarunga Lodge

Lodge w216437 NAD 1170.00 to 1760.00 pu (2013)

Lodge w227910 NAD 1108.00 to 1958.00 pp (2013)

1km or 2min E of Epupa Falls

In Epupa Falls town

Tel: +264(0)65 685 111, Cell: +264(0)81 470 9312, Fax: +264(0)65 685 110 pam.morgan111@gmail.com, www.kapikafalls.com

Tel: +264(0)64 403 096, Cell: +264(0)81 252 9426, Fax: +264(0)64 402 097 camtrav@iafrica.com.na, www.omarungalodge.com

Kapika Waterfall Lodge offers accommodation in ten chalets with solar electricity and mosquito nets. The chalets are set on a terrace overlooking the Kunene River. Facilities include a lapa and a bar. Pre-booking is required.

Omarunga Lodge offers accommodation in 13 en-suite thatched chalets. Guests can relax at the bar and stroll over to view Epupa Falls.

kaokoland • Epupa Falls

5 Kapika Waterfall Lodge

Languages: English

Languages: English, German Facilities:

A VIS

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@

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7 Omarunga Lodge Lodge Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2013)

w137649

In Epupa Falls town Tel: +264(0)64 403 096, Cell: +264(0)81 252 9426, Fax: +264(0)64 402 097 camtrav@iafrica.com.na, www.omarungalodge.com

Omarunga Lodge has campsites available and campers are welcome to eat at the restaurant and drink at the bar. Nine campsites are available, each with its own braai pit and water tap. Ablutions are comfortable and clean. Languages: English A VIS

Facilities: Activities:

FC

@

Photo: Johann Groenewald 269


Kavango

Popa Falls are rapids rather than falls. (Lindy Lourens)

The Okavango River

forms the northern border of Namibia and the Kavango region. Most of the attractions of this region are situated along the river, like Popa Falls near Divundu. After good rains these falls, which are in fact rapids rather than falls, are quite spectacular. The B8 highway that runs from Grootfontein to Rundu (the capital of this region), is the main artery that links the heart of Namibia with the Zambezi (Caprivi) region that stretches out like an arm over Botswana. The B8 also runs through the Bwabwata National Park which straddles both regions. With over 600 bird species, the park is a real paradise for bird watchers. There is also plenty of game to see and unguided walking is permitted.

298


NAMIBIA: KAVANGO

ANGOLA Bwabwata National Park

C45/M110

Popa Falls

Rundu

! D3600

Mahango Game Reserve

42

Tsumkwe

03 D33

C

Grootfontein

!

2 C4

Waterberg Plateau National Park

C22 11 5

6 D38 0

The Mahango Game Reserve with its magnificent Baobab trees borders the Bwabwata National Park. These ancient trees look like they were planted upside down, especially when they shed their leaves in the dry season. The Khaudum Game Reserve is a true wilderness area that is only accessible with a 4WD vehicle. It is not for the fainthearted – this area is wild and rough in

M1 14

4 3/C4 M11

B1

Naye Naye Pans

BOTSWANA

B8

60 0 5/D 3 M7

B1

Nyae Nyae Communal Conservancy

C44 /M7 4

!

C22 /M

^

!

! Tsumeb Otavi

Khaudum Game Reserve

Mangetti National Park

Mururani

!

K AVANGO

B8

Divundu !

every way. The reserve is unfenced to allow the natural migration of animals between Khaudum and Botswana. It is home to herds of elephant, a variety of antelope, giraffe, hyena, leopard, lions and the African wild dog. For a real African experience there are two basic rest camps, also unfenced.

299


Divundu

D Photo: Peter Levey

Divundu

is a small village on the south-eastern bank of the Okavango River, 200 km east of Rundu. Divundu is the home of the localized Mbukushu kings. There are many attractions in the area like game drives in the Bwabwata National Park and Mahango Game Reserve, as well as Popa Rapids. Traveller Description: There are a few upmarket lodges in the area that also offer camping facilities. There are two general dealers in Divundu. You can stock-up on all the basics like tinned food, milk, fresh bread, basic vegetables (potato and onion), airtime and frozen meat. Mahango Game Reserve is well worth a visit. The river loop can be accessed in a normal 2WD car and lots of animals can be seen in the late afternoon. The birdlife is prolific. Allow one to two hours for the drive. The western loop requires a 4WD and will take at least two hours to complete. Travel INFO: The tow-in service number is for Polka 24 hour service - they can help anywhere in Namibia but is based in Okahandja. A police station is being built. Until it is finished, the nearest police station is at Mukwe, which is 20 km away. Their number is +264(0)81 729 1328. The nearest hospital is at Andara, which is 15 km away. 300


Legend

National Border

Town Info: Tow-in:

Off-Road/Jeep Track

+264(0)81 129 7490

Minor Gravel Road Minor Road Secondary Tar Road

ANGOLA

Main Road National Road Mbapuka !

402 D3

!

!

Highway

D3402

River

! Kayanga

B8

Shinyungwe

!

Bwabwata National Park

D3431

D3402

Divundu

Shamungwa Communal Conservancy

Muduva Nyangana Communal Conservancy

Dikundh u

Ri ver

Ruk ang e

!

NAMIBIA George Mukoya Communal Conservancy

0

BOTSWANA

10

Divava Okavango Lodge & Spa

Xau du m O mu r amb a Khaudum Game Reserve

Mahangu Safari Lodge Mahangu Safari Lodge Mobola Lodge Mobola Lodge Ndhovu Lodge Ndhovu Safari Lodge Ngepi Camp

B8

Bagani Airstrip

R iver Mahango Game Reserve Thinde rev u R ive

r

Ngepi Camp

20 Km

Divundu Guest House

!

Ngoabaca Community Camp Nunda Safaris & Lodge Nunda Safaris & Lodge Popa Falls Rest Camp Rainbow River Lodge

K AVA N G O • D i v u n d u

Shamangorwa !

Mohem

RiverDance Lodge RiverDance Lodge Shametu River Lodge Shametu River Lodge Shamvura Camp

Tshukumutshu

Travel TIP: There have been times in the past when fuel was in short supply, but it is no longer the case. The Shell filling station is no longer operational but fuel is available from the Engen fuel stop. No 50ppm Diesel is available. Basarwa The Njova entire road from Rundu to Katima Mulilo has cell phone reception. 301

Tsod Hills

Tso


DIVUNDU 1 Divava Okavango Lodge & Spa

2 Divundu Guest House

Lodge w138183 NAD 1520.00 to 2050.00 pp (2014)

Guest House ZAR 350.00 pp (2012)

7km or 6min ESE of Divundu

B8 Highway at bridge over Kavango River, in Divundu

Tel: +264(0)66 259 005, Cell: +264(0)81 819 1779, Fax: +264(0)66 259 026 reservation@resdest.com, www.divava.com

Tel: +264(0)66 259 031, Cell: +264(0)81 127 8565, Fax: +264(0)88 613 754 divundu@mweb.com.na

Divava is a luxury lodge that nestles among majestic trees on the bank of the Okavango River. The lodge offers 20 luxurious chalets and has a viewing deck overlooking the river. Activities include boat cruises to Popa Falls and bird watching.

The guest house has six bungalows available, sleeping two persons each. Extra mattresses are available. Activities to be enjoyed include river cruises and guided cultural tours to Mbukushu homesteads.

Facilities:

A VIS

FC

w224554

Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities:

FC @

Activities:

Activities:

3 Mahangu Safari Lodge

4 Mahangu Safari Lodge

Lodge w137844 NAD 705.00 to 1025.00 pp (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 90.00 pp (2013)

20km or 19min ESE of Divundu

20km or 19min ESE of Divundu

Tel: +264(0)66 259 037, Cell: +264(0)81 127 1347, Fax: +264(0)66 259 115 mahangulodge@iway.na, www.mahangu.com.na

Tel: +264(0)66 259 037, Cell: +264(0)81 127 1347, Fax: +264(0)66 259 115 mahangulodge@iway.na, www.mahangu.com.na

Mahangu Safari Lodge offers accommodation in ten thatched bungalows with en-suite bathrooms as well as six luxury safari tents with en-suite facilities. Activities include boat trips. Pre-booking required.

Mahangu Safari Lodge offers campsites situated close to the river. Campers may use the lodge facilities like the restaurant and bar. Activities include bird watching and boat trips. Pre-booking is essential.

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Facilities:

A VIS

FC

Facilities:

w192958

A VIS

FC

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5 Mobola Lodge

6 Mobola Lodge

Lodge w255812 NAD 460.00 pp (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 90.00 pp (2013/2014)

31km or 25min WNW of Divundu

31km or 25min WNW of Divundu

Cell: +264(0)81 230 3281 mobolalodge@gmail.com www.mobola-lodge.com

Cell: +264(0)81 230 3281 mobolalodge@gmail.com www.mobola-lodge.com

The lodge is located next to the Okavango River. They offer two double bed bungalows and one family unit. They also have a pool and a bar.

The lodge has six campsites available. There is a fully equipped kitchen and lounge area for guests. A nearby island belongs to the lodge. No private boats allowed.

Languages: German

Languages: German

Facilities:

Facilities:

Activities:

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w255811


7 Ndhovu Lodge

8 Ndhovu Safari Lodge

Lodge Camp NAD 125.00 pp (2013)

Tented Camp NAD 1060.00 to 4920.00 pu (2013/2014)

w221710

w141576

20km or 19min ESE of Divundu

20km or 18min ESE of Divundu

Tel: +264(0)61 250 725, Fax: +264(0)88 642 978 ndhovu@resdest.com www.ndhovu.com

Tel: +264(0)61 224 712, Fax: +264(0)66 259 153 ndhovu@resdest.com www.ndhovu.com

Ndhovu Lodge has one exclusive campsite available. Activities that can be enjoyed include bird watching, sundowner cruises and tours to local villages. The campsite is closed from March to end of May due to annual flooding.

Ndhovu Safari Lodge is situated on the bank of the Okavango River. Tents are fully-equipped with all the modern amenities and have en-suite bathrooms. Activities include bird watching, sundowner cruises and tours to local villages.

A VIS

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9 Ngepi Camp

10 Ngepi Camp

Lodge w139367 NAD 440.00 to 540.00 pp (2014)

Lodge Camp NAD 95.00 pp (2013)

15km or 18min E of Divundu

15km or 18min E of Divundu

Tel: +264(0)66 259 903, Cell: +264(0)81 202 8200, Fax: +264(0)88 631 160 bookings@ngepicamp.com, www.ngepicamp.com

Tel: +264(0)66 259 903, Cell: +264(0)81 202 8200, Fax: +264(0)88 631 160 bookings@ngepi.com, www.ngepicamp.com

Ngepi Camp is situated on an island and offers en-suite tree houses as well as en-suite family bush huts. Relax in the shaded garden or at the bush pub, or enjoy activities like mokoro safaris, sunset boat cruises and river rafting.

Ngepi Camp is situated on an island and offers private grassed campsites. Overlander sites are separate. Their ablutions and bush pub are legendary. Activities include mokoro safaris, sunset boat cruises and river rafting.

Languages: English

Languages: English A VIS

Facilities:

FC

Activities:

Ngoabaca Community Camp Community Camp NAD 80.00 pp (2013/2014)

A VIS

Facilities:

@

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w138399

FC

@

11 w139056

5km or 6min ESE of Divundu Tel: +264(0)66 252 108, Cell: +264(0)81 292 7793, info@spitzkoppereservations.com www.spitzkoppereservations.com

Four campsites; each has their own ablution and kitchen facilities. Some have wooden decks. For camping we suggest that you just show up as the community will help you or make a booking. Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

@

Photo: Thomas Wagner 303

K AVA N G O • D i v u n d u

Languages: English


DIVUNDU 12 Nunda Safaris & Lodge

13 Nunda Safaris & Lodge

Lodge w192363 NAD 627.00 to 1212.00 pp (2014)

Lodge Camp NAD 110.00 pp (2013/2014)

9km or 10min E of Divundu

9km or 10min E of Divundu

Tel: +264(0)66 259 093, Cell: +264(0)81 310 1730, Fax: +264(0)66 259 094 bookings@nundaonline.com, www.caprivi.org

Tel: +264(0)66 259 093, Cell: +264(0)81 310 1730, Fax: +264(0)66 259 094 bookings@nundaonline.com, www.caprivi.org

Nunda is situated on the banks of the Okavango River. It is within easy reach of the Bwabwata NP and the Mahango Game Reserve. Activities include boat trips, mokoro trips, bird watching and walks to the nearby villages.

The grassy camping area is right on the riverbank. Two sites can accommodate larger groups. Each of the campsites has a braai area, seating, tap, light and electricity point and they share ablutions. Drinking water is available.

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

A VIS

Facilities:

FC @

Facilities:

@

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w222186

A VIS

FC @

@

14 Popa Falls Rest Camp

15 Rainbow River Lodge

Tour Operator Camp NAD 100.00 to 150.00 pp (2013/2014)

Lodge w139337 NAD 350.00 to 540.00 pp (2013)

w138292

5km or 4min SE of Divundu

8km or 7min ESE of Divundu

Tel: +264(0)61 285 7200, Fax: +264(0)66 259 108 reservations@nwr.com.na www.nwr.com.na

Tel: +264(0)66 259 067, Cell: +264(0)81 210 6678, Fax: +264(0)66 686 003, rainbow@mweb.com.na, www.rainbowriverlodgenamibia.com

Popa Rapids Rest Camp is a basic camp on the bank of the Okavango River with 15 campsites. The camp has a restaurant that offers simple food as well as a bar. A 4WD is recommended.

Rainbow River Lodge offers 20 semi-luxury chalets with mosquito nets. The restaurant has a bar with satellite television and there is a viewing deck over the river. There is a hide for bird watching and boat trips are available.

Languages: English

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Facilities:

A VIS

Facilities:

@

Activities:

A VIS

RiverDance Lodge

Activities:

FC @

@

16

Lodge w254372 NAD 950.00 pp (2013) 31km or 25min WNW of Divundu Tel: +264(0)66 686 086, Cell: +264(0)81 124 3255, Fax: +264(0)88 614 995 reservations@riverdance.com.na, www.riverdance.com.na

RiverDance Lodge offers luxurious accommodation with full river views. Visit the Popa Falls, Bwabwatha National Park (Mahango Core Area) or nearby village. Guests can join boat cruises or mokoro trips. Owner managed. Languages: English, German, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities: 304

A VIS

@ @

Photo: RiverDance Lodge


RiverDance Lodge

17

Lodge Camp NAD 120.00 pp (2013/2014)

w254373

31km or 26min WNW of Divundu Tel: +264(0)66 686 086, Cell: +264(0)81 124 3255, Fax: +264(0)88 614 995 reservations@riverdance.com.na, www.riverdance.com.na

The lodge offers exclusive campsites with individual bathrooms on the river. Campers are welcome to join activities offered at the lodge and order take-away pizzas from them. The lodge is not affected by seasonal flooding. A VIS

Facilities:

@

@

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Photo: River Dance Lodge

18 Shametu River Lodge

19 Shametu River Lodge

Lodge w255842 NAD 950.00 pu (2013)

Lodge Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2013)

7km or 6min ESE of Divundu

7km or 6min ESE of Divundu

Tel: +264(0)66 259 035, Cell: +264(0)81 653 1901 cheryl@barefootencounters.com shameturiverlodge.wordpress.com

Tel: +264(0)66 259 035, Cell: +264(0)81 653 1901 cheryl@barefootencounters.com

Shametu River Lodge has the most stunning view of Popa Rapids. They offer 12 chalets with en-suite bathrooms. There are ten double chalets, one wheelchair friendly and one family chalet.

Shametu River Lodge is located on the Okavango River, just below Popa Rapids. They have eight private campsites and four campsites for large groups. Each site has its own kitchenette and ablution. Fresh vegetables for sale.

Languages: English, Afrikaans

Languages: English, Afrikaans

Facilities:

FC

Facilities:

A VIS

w255822

FC

Activities:

Activities:

Shamvura Camp

20

Tented Camp NAD 430.00 to 600.00 pp (2014)

w141017

82km or 54min W of Divundu Tel: +264(0)66 686 055, Cell: +264(0)91 241 7473, Fax: +264(0)66 686 054 shamvura@iway.na, www.shamvura.com

Shamvura is a tented camp that is ideal for fishing and birding. Children under 12 require parent supervision as there is a hand-reared otter roaming around and an unfenced pool. Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

FC @

@

Photo: Shamvura Camp 305

K AVA N G O • D i v u n d u

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans


NAMIB-NAUKLUFT

NAMIBIA: NAMIB-NAUKLUFT

Petrified dunes in the Namib-Naukluft National Park. (BjĂśrn Rehder)

The Namib-Naukluft National Park covers most of the NamibNaukluft region that stretches from the Swakop River in the north to the Aus/LĂźderitz road (B4) in the south. The park is said to be the largest in Africa and the fourth largest in the world, and it includes sections of the still restricted Diamond Area. 316


M

70 M

46

M4 7

36 C19 /M D8 54

M3

8

36 7 /D C2

9 C1

6 82

Namibrand Nature Reserve

^

C20

Mariental

Neuras Winery

Maltah旦he

45

33

1/ C2

31

C21 /M

5 /M C1

!

B1

9 /M C1

^

Naukluft Mountain Zebra Park

C27 07 /D4

Koichab Depression

!

M2

C19/M34

!

Duwisib Castle

C18

9

/M3

2

Quiver Tree Forest

^

!

Helmeringhausen Tirasberg Conservancy

^ L端deritz

^!

^

Sperrgebiet

7

^

Garub Pan (Feral Horses)

^

Aus

!

Kolmanskop (Ghost Town)

9

D70

Bethanie

!

M2

Adolf L端deritz Memorial Felsenkirche (Church on the rocks) Haus Goerke (Museum) L端deritz Museum Woermann Haus (Museum)

Diaz Point Cross Lighthouse

Kalkrand

C1 4 /M

!

^

C2 5/

Solitaire

Betta

Saddle Hill (Ghost Town)

48

C14/M31

36

Namib-Naukluft National Park

M

15

4/ C1

^

!

Gamsberg Nature Reserve

Sesriem

! ^

C2 3/

Rehoboth

9 M4

Kuiseb Canyon

Sesriem Canyon

Sossusvlei

Dordabis

!

C

6/ C2

!

Ocean

C2 9 /M

B1 9 /M4

Tinkas Flats

^

Atlantic

!

C26

C14/M36

33

Langstrand

B6

!

M

!

^ ^^

^

53

Windhoek

Rock Sculpture Trail

C2 8

B2

!

Walvis Bay !

B2

M

3/ C2

Swakopmund

C32/M77

Dorob National Park

Moon Landscape

! Okahandja

Karibib

Sunset Viewpoint

4 C3

Henties Bay

!

!

Keetmanshoop

!

B4

Seeheim

B1

!

317

NA M I B -NAU K L U F T

Usakos

!


The red sand dunes at Sossusvlei are of the highest in the world. (Hannes Thirion)

Adjacent to the already huge NamibNaukluft National Park is the Naukluft Mountain Zebra Park. Other popular conservation areas in the region are Gamsberg and Namibrand Nature Reserves. Both offer excellent photographic opportunities. The word Namib means ‘open space’ and that is mainly what the traveller will find in this breathtakingly beautiful landscape. The Namib Desert, with its towering orange sand dunes, is one of the world’s oldest deserts. The burnt orange colour of the sand developed over millions of years as iron in the sand is oxidised, like rusting metal. The Namib Desert is the first natural site in Namibia to be inscribed on the World Heritage List. This honour was bestowed in 2013. According to UNESCO the Na318

mib is composed of two dune systems, an ancient semi-consolidated one overlain by a younger active one. The desert dunes are formed by the transportation of materials thousands of kilometres from the hinterland by river, ocean current and wind. It features gravel plains, coastal flats, rocky hills, inselbergs within the sand sea, a coastal lagoon and ephemeral rivers. Fog is the primary source of water, accounting for a unique environment in which endemic invertebrates, reptiles and mammals adapt to an ever-changing variety of microhabitats and ecological niches. Lüderitz, in the south, is the main town of the region and also a tourist hub. It is a beautiful and historical town from where guided 4WD desert trails and extreme hiking trails start. Close to Lüderitz is Kolmanskop, the ghost town with a


rich diamond mining history. Kolmanskop is a fascinating open air museum and popular tourist stop because it is located outside the restricted diamond area, unlike other former mining settlements like Elizabeth Bay and Pomona that also became ghost towns.

The biggest tourist attraction within the region is without a doubt Sossusvlei. Although the name is used to describe the area, it in fact only refers to the dry salt pan stretched out amongst the undulating red sand dunes. The Sossusvlei dunes are regarded as some of the highest in the world.

The nearby Deadvlei Valley is of great photographic significance with the skeletons of Acacia trees dotting a dry white pan. Another notable natural formation in the area is the Sesriem Canyon. The ghost town of Kolmanskop is a popular attraction. (Hannes Thiron)

319

NA M I B - NAU K L U F T

As you travel east from L端deritz towards Aus, you will find one of the few populations of desert-dwelling feral horses in the world. There is a special lookout point at Garub Pan where you can view these beautiful wild horses of the Namib.

The gates to Sossusvlei only open at sunrise and close at sunset. There is a 2x4 parking area just before the vlei; beyond this area a 4x4 vehicle is a necessity. Visitors can either walk from there to the pan or make use of the 4x4 shuttle service to and from the sites. It is best to visit Sossusvlei early in the morning when the red color of the sand is very strong and bright, and the light and shadows offer breathtaking views. Otherwise, visit in the late afternoon when the sun does not bake down relentlessly on the desert sands.


Aus

Photo: Johann Groenewald

D

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Aus

is a tranquil desert town situated 125 km east of L端deritz on the B4 that runs between L端deritz and Keetmanshoop. The village was formerly the site of a prisoner-of-war camp established by the South African army in 1915 to house German inmates captured during the First World War.

Traveller Description: The village is small but has all the basic necessities you might need as well as good accommodation. Here you can soak up the peace and quiet of the Namib Desert and the magnificence of the Aus Mountains. The climate is usually hot and arid but snow has been recorded in winter. The biggest attraction of the area is without a doubt the feral horses that can be sighted at the nearby Garub Pan.

320


B4

Aus Accommodation

Bahnhof Hotel Aus

Klein Aus Vista Camping

Klein-Aus Vista Lodge

Legend River Hiking/Walking Trail Minor Gravel Road

Shop

Off-Road/Jeep Track

Aus

City Street Main Street Highway Town

0

275

Town Info: Police:

550 Meters

+264(0)63 258 005

Tow-in:

+264(0)81 298 1495

321

NA M I B -N A U K L U F T • A u s

Aus Accommodation


AUS 1 Aus Accommodation

2 Aus Accommodation

Self-catering w140300 NAD 150.00 to 350.00 pp (2013)

Camping w255815 NAD 65.00 pp (2013)

St Theresia, Aus

St Theresia, Aus

Tel: +264(0)63 258 029, Cell: +264(0)81 298 1495, Fax: +264(0)88 612 614 namibaus@mweb.com.na

Tel: +264(0)63 258 029, Cell: +264(0)81 298 1495, Fax: +264(0)88 612 614 namibaus@mweb.com.na

Accommodation available in Aus, with double and single rooms on a self-catering basis. A bar and braai facilities are available. Parking is safe and secure.

Aus Accommodation has a camping area with braai facilities available. There is a bar as well. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Languages: English, Afrikaans FC

Facilities:

@

Activities:

FC

Facilities: A VIS

Activities:

@

A VIS

3 Bahnhof Hotel Aus

4 Klein Aus Vista Camping

Hotel w142179 NAD 605.00 to 710.00 pp (2012)

Camping w142204 NAD 90.00 pu (2012)

20 L端deritz St, Aus

5km or 6min WNW of Aus

Tel: +264(0)63 258 091, Cell: +264(0)81 235 6737, Fax: +264(0)63 258 092 bahnhof-hotel-aus@iway.na, www.hotel-aus.com

Tel: +264(0)63 258 116, Fax: +264(0)63 258 021 reservations@klein-aus-vista.com www.klein-aus-vista.com

This historic hotel combines traditional comfort with excellent service and a la carte cuisine. They offer accommodation in 21 double rooms as well as a 4-bed family room, all en-suite. They also have a wheelchair-friendly room.

Klein Aus Vista offers a spotless camping area with clean ablutions with flush toilets. Hiking and sunset drives can be enjoyed.

Facilities:

A VIS

FC @

Activities:

Lodge w137552 NAD 600.00 to 870.00 pp (2012) 4km or 3min NW of Aus Tel: +264(0)63 258 116, Fax: +264(0)63 258 021 reservations@klein-aus-vista.com www.klein-aus-vista.com

Klein Aus Vista has breath taking views of the Namib Desert plains. The lodge offers a choice of unique accommodation at separate locations. This is the ideal base from where to explore the south and view the Aus feral horses. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Activities: 322

Facilities: Activities:

5 Klein-Aus Vista Lodge

Facilities:

Languages: English, Afrikaans

A VIS

@

A VIS

@


NA M I B -N A U K L U F T • A u s

Photo: Johann Groenewald 323


NORTH NAMIBIA

NAMIBIA: NORTH NAMIBIA

The orange cliffs of the Waterberg Plateau glow in the afternoon sun. (Lindy Lourens)

In the area north of Windhoek, you will find a few major settlements

like Okahandja, Otjiwarongo, Otavi and Grootfontein. The landscape is covered in grey grass and specked with Acacia trees, shrubs and ant heaps that are meters high. There are many hunting and cattle farms in this area, and you have to be very aware of wild animals along the roads. Never travel at night.

The most notable attraction of this region is without a doubt the Waterberg Plateau National Park, south-east of Otjiwarongo. It is a beautiful, lush park with orange cliffs, diverse vegetation and wildlife like rhino, roan, sable, buffalo, leopard, eland, giraffe and many more. The best way to explore the park is by foot. There are various routes for hikers up the sides of the mountain and the view from the top is truly spectacular. 370


Mangetti National Park

C38

C38

! Mururani

M7

5/D

B1

36 00

Etosha Pans

Etosha National Park

!

Tsumeb

C44 /M7 4

C

B8

42

C38

Otavi

! Grootfontein

^

!

C39/M69

NORTH NAMIBIA

B1

Hoba Meteorite C40 /M

76

2 C4

Outjo

!

Waterberg Plateau National Park

Otjiwarongo

63

D2 51 2

! M

C22

M5

C3 3

0/ C3 C22

7

C36 /M

64

!

/M1 15

B1

C3 1/

M1 12

Craft Market Herero Cemetery Mbangura Wood Carvers' Market Moordkoppie (Museum)

Omaruru

M8

5

C31 /M60

Hochfeld

80

Von Bach Dam Nature Reserve

Gross Barmen Hot Springs Resort

!

M

13 1

^ 0

97 2

/M7

/D1

7 ^

57

C29

Okahandja M8

C32/M77

! ! Usakos

B2

B1

Karibib

C3 0 /M

C22

C36 /M

C33

!

B6

Witvlei

!

Gobabis

!

!

With over 200 bird species, among them Namibia’s only breeding population of Cape vulture, the Waterberg is rich in natural heritage. Further north, Grootfontein is a good stopover to stock-up on supplies for those planning to travel further north towards Kavango and the Zambezi (Caprivi). The Hoba Meteorite, which weighs around 50 ton, can be seen at Grootfontein.

This is the world’s heaviest metallic meteorite. The Von Bach Dam near Okahandja supplies most of Windhoek’s water. The surrounding Von Bach Nature Reserve and holiday resort is a popular recreational area, as is the Gross Barmen Hot Springs Resort which is close to Okahandja. 371


Grootfontein

Photo: Johann Groenewald

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Grootfontein

was known to the Herero people as Otjivanda, but in 1885 a group of families from the north-west of South Africa settled and changed the name to Grootfontein. Today it is the centre of a large cattle farming community while mining is also prevalent in the area. Grootfontein used to house an important military base in the time when the South African Defence Force was still active in Namibia. The area has a relatively good rainfall and is therefore green in summer. In spring, Jacaranda and Flamboyant trees bloom in profusion.

Travel TIP: Because of the vet fence at Mururani you are not allowed to take raw meat or unpasteurised milk from Rundu to Grootfontein, but you can take it from Grootfontein to Rundu.

372


Legend

B15

Kalkfontein Guest Farm Kamrav Guest Farm Maori Campsite Meteor Travel Inn

Mururani D30 Camp 01 Omatako Valley Rest Camp

Mangetti National Park

B8

D3600

Greenhill Chalets

Mururani

Omega Rest Camp

D3016

B1 5

D2855

Peace Garden Lodge

D2908

Omega Rest Camp

D2898

Roy's RestDCamp 3039 Roy's Rest Camp

D2862

D2856

Pondoki Rest Camp

2 C4

^

D2874

Grootfontein

!

Otjituuo Communal Conservancy

Otjituuo Pan

5 82 D2

r

D2896

C42

4 D280

Gunib Riv

D2 80 6

er

D2 86 3

6 83 D2

D2

59 D28 0 6 8

3 80 D2

Hoba Meteorite

D2844

N'a-Jaqna Communal Conservancy

D2846

D3022

D2893

C44/M74 D2845

B1

D3021

D2868

D3017

M75

The Stone House Lodge

D2 84

8

Seidarap Guest House

Ri ve

D2902

D3 80 2

O

2 51 D2

m

at a

ko

0

Omakande Pan

Town Info:

Hospital: +264(0)67 240 064 Doctor: +264(0)67 243 198 Tourist Info: +264(0)67 242 456

Okamatapati Communal Conservancy

Police: Tow-in:

15

30 Km

+264(0)67 242 111 +264(0)81 242 5430 373

NORTH NAMIBIA • Grootfontein

Highway Main Road Minor Road Minor Gravel Road Off-Road/Jeep Track Nawugui Vlei River Pan National Park Conservancy

Ghaub Guest Farm

D2908

Dornhuegel Guest Farm


OVAMBOLAND

The Ovamboland landscape is dotted with enormous ant heaps and Makalani palm trees. (Karin Theron)

Ovamboland is situated north of the Etosha Pan and is the homeland

of the Ovambo people. It is one of the most densely populated areas of Namibia and the gateway to Angola. Although it doesn’t really offer much in terms of tourist attractions, travellers passing through the larger towns of Ovamboland like Oshakati, Ondangwa and Oshikango, can get just about all the services they need for their trip further north. The landscape is dotted with Makalani palm trees and enormous ant heaps. The Ovambo people weave baskets from the leaves and use the pits to carve key holder

404


NAMIBIA: OWAMBOLAND

ANGOLA

C46

!

Outapi

!

Oshakati

!

C45/M110

B1

C41

C46

Ondangwa

!

22

Okaholo Pan

D3600

1 1 /M C4

O VA M B O L A N D

Oshikango

Ruacana

!

Lake Oponono Wetlands

C35/M76

B1

Onguma Private Game Reserve D3001

Etosha Restricted Area 36 00

C38

C38

M7

B1

5/D

Etosha Pans

Etosha National Park

!

Tsumeb C

C40

/M7

C38

Ongawa Private Game Reserve

42

Kamanjab

!

6

curios. There are many natural pans in which the locals have built structures for fishing. In some places they dry the barbers which they caught and sell it next to the road. This region has a true African feel with little African villages every few kilometres on the main road in between the big

Otavi

!

B1

! B8

towns. Each village has a shebeen and a bar, and each hut has its own kraal with goats and a patch of mealies. Be aware as dogs, donkeys, goats and cattle have right of way, even on the main roads through these villages.

405


Ondangwa

Photo: Karin Theron

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Ondangwa

means the end of the Ondonga area (Ondonga is one of the kingdoms of Ovamboland). Ondangwa is located about 80 km from the Angolan border. It shares an air strip with the nearby Oshakati and also remains an important transit point for Ovambo contract workers to and coming from the mining town of Tsumeb. During the Namibian War of Independence, Ondangwa was a major base for the deployment of troops. Today Ondangwa is a bustling town, with the Ovambos being warm and friendly. Traveller Description: In Ondangwa you will find all the services and facilities that you need. The town has a mixture of Africa-style shops and modern shopping centres. The surroundings are beautiful, with standing water and palm trees everywhere you look. Cattle and goats roaming loose lend a real African charm to the area. Travel INFO: Ondangwa has a Shoprite, Pick n Pay and Woermann Hyper. 406


Pick n Pay

Town Info:

Hospital: +264(0)65 248 115 Police: +264(0)65 242 650 Doctor: +264(0)65 241 290 Tow-in: +264(0)81 129 7490

C46

BP Express Shop

FNB First City Centre

1

2

Shoprite

km

O va m b o l a n d • O n d a n g w a

0

Nedbank

D3625 B1

Legend Railway D3606

Highway City Street Secondary Tar Road Minor Road

D3605

Fantasia Guest House Fantasia Guest House Nakambale Community Camp Protea Hotel Ondangwa Town Lodge Ondangwa

Nakambale Museum

Travel TIP: If you prefer camping, you should consider Nakambale Community Camp, less than 10 km out of town. This camp offers a cultural experience depicting the history and lifestyle of the Ovambo people. They do arrange trips to the Etosha National Park and Lake Oponono. 407


Ondangwa Fantasia Guest House Guest House NAD 335.00 to 600.00 pu (2013)

1 w222184

In Ondangwa Tel: +264(0)65 240 528, Cell: +264(0)81 315 4997, Fax: +264(0)65 241 014, duitser@iway.na

Accommodation available in two air-conditioned suites, each with a TV, fridge, toaster, microwave, cutlery and crockery. They offer fine food and drinks as well as a laundry service. Secure and shaded parking is available. Languages: English, German, Portuguese, Afrikaans, Ovambo Facilities: Photo: Fantasia Guest House

Fantasia Guest House

2

Camping w254371 NAD 80.00 pu (2014) In Ondangwa Tel: +264(0)65 240 528, Cell: +264(0)81 315 4997, Fax: +264(0)65 241 014 duitser@iway.na

Fantasia Guest House is centrally situated for business or leisure trips and they offer camping facilities. They have a kitchen and bar that offer fine food and drinks, as well as a braai service. Phone, e-mail and fax facilities are available. Facilities: Photo: Camping (Fantasia Guest House)

Nakambale Community Camp Community Camp NAD 50.00 pp (2013/2014)

3 w140772

10km or 14min SSE of Ondangwa Fax: +264(0)88 652 2162, Cell: +264(0)81 211 6291 info@spitzkoppereservations.com www.spitzkoppereservations.com

Situated next to a traditional homestead, this camp offers a cultural experience. There are ablutions with flush toilets and hot water. Kitchen and wash-up facilities. We suggest that you just show up as the community will help you or make a booking. Facilities: Activities: 408

@

Photo: Braam Ellis


5 Town Lodge Ondangwa

Hotel w177629 NAD 525.00 to 765.00 pp (2013)

Lodge w222183 NAD 400.00 to 550.00 pu (2012)

Main St, Ondangwa

Brian Simaata St, Ondangwa

Tel: +264(0)65 241 900, Fax: +264(0)65 241 919 res.ondangwa@proteahotels.com.na www.proteahotels.com

Tel: +264(0)65 241 715, Cell: +264(0)81 124 4382, Fax: +264(0)65 241717 ondangwatl@iway.na

Protea Hotel Ondangwa consists of 88 en-suite rooms which are air-conditioned and have satellite television, internet access, coffee/tea making facilities and hairdryers. The hotel has a restaurant, bar and swimming pool.

The Ondangwa Town Lodge offers comfortable accommodation in en-suite rooms with air conditioning and satellite television. The bar serves cold drinks and food. Languages: English

Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

@

Facilities:

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A VIS

Photo: Karin Theron 409

O va m b o l a n d • O n d a n g w a

4 Protea Hotel Ondangwa


SKELETON COAST

Cape Cross marks the spot where the first European set foot on the coast of south-western Africa. (Johann Groenewald)

The Skeleton Coast is an extremely wild, remote and desolate stretch of land where the Namib Desert and the Atlantic Ocean meet. The Skeleton Coast most probably derives its name from the combination of whale and seal skeletons, as well as the numerous shipwrecks along the coastline. The region consists mainly of the Skeleton Coast and Dorob National Parks, and the main towns of the region are Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. Both towns are tourist friendly and offer a lot in terms of attractions. Henties Bay is a prime holiday town, as is Langstrand which is situated about halfway between Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. This coastline is very popular amongst anglers and keen fishermen literally flock to places like Terrace Bay, Torra Bay, Mile 108, Mile 72 and Jakkalsputz. Because many people used this area as a 4x4 playground in the past and caused severe track pollution, strict regulations on off-road driving are now enforced. You need a permit to 418


37 06

Dorob National Park

76

!

3 C3

C22

C

B2

57

B1

M

!

Karibib Okahandja

! !

!

1 /M C3

59

! Langstrand ! ^ ^ !

! B1

M

Guano Platform Stone Monument

49

C28

!

Elephant Tracks (Solidified in mud) Shepmansdorp Memorial

M4

7

86 21

Namib-Naukluft National Park

!

Rehoboth

D

^ ^

Welwitschia Planes 4WD Trail Moon Landscape

C2 6/

Swakopmund

Walvis Bay

30 /

B1

!^ ^

Henties Bay

!

B1

Omaruru

Salt Pans

Usakos

9

Otjiwarongo

Uis

!

^ ^^

Sandwich Harbour

8

Dead Sea Swimhole (Soutgat)

4 C3

Walvis Bay Wetland Oyster Farm Kisha Gibus Ancient Settlement Topnaars 4WD Trail Dune 7 Nataniel Maxuli Monument Old Plum Railway Line Ruin of Old Quarantine Station Pelican Point Pelican Point Lighthouse

!C3

C39/M69

M6

Solitaire

C2 4/

Jakkalsputz

Twyfelfontein

9/ C3

Outjo

! Otavi

B1

!

!

! Sesriem

drive on most of the roads, and some areas can only be entered if you are accompanied by an accredited guide. The Cape Cross Seal Reserve just north of Henties Bay is home to a large colony of Cape fur seals. It is of historic interest as it marks the spot where the first European, the Portuguese navigator Diogo C達o, set foot on the coast of south-western Africa in 1486. Very close to the reserve is a pool which is very high in salt and minerals. Because one can float on the water, this is referred to as the Dead Sea Swimhole. There are no facilities and you are recommended to take water with you to

!

rinse the salt from you after your swim. You also need to take shoes in which you can swim because the pool is situated between very sharp rocks that can cut your feet. Although very controlled for conservation reasons, the inland of the Skeleton Coast also offers a lot of recreational opportunities. Dune 7 near Walvis Bay is a popular spot for off-road dune and quad bike driving. On some of the off-road trails, you will be able to view the magnificent Weltwitschia plants from close-by and on the Welwitschia Plains 4WD Trail near Swakopmund you will pass through an almost surreal moon landscape.

419

SKLETON COAST

302 /D2

Adventure Park African Leather Lighthouse Martin Luther Steam Locomotive Museum National Marine Aquarium Old Jetty Old State Railway Station Omeg Haus Otavi-Bahnhof (Snake Park) Town Hall Woermann Haus Alte Kaserne Crystal Gallery

76

C39/M126 ! Khorixas !

Torra Bay

C34

Super Tube Amusement Park Sunset Viewpoint

C4 0 /M

0

C39

C43

!

Terrace Bay !

!

Palmwag

/M8

Cape Cross (Diogo C達o 1485) Cape Cross Seal Reserve

Etosha National Park

Kamanjab

C40

!

Etosha Pans

Etosha Restricted Area

C35

Mile 108

11 0

Ondangwa

M47

2 30 D2

Ocean

C45 /M

!

1 /M C4 Okaholo Pan

Sesfontein

!

C43 /D

D3 70 7

!

B1

Atlantic

1 22

C35/M76

37 04 C43 /D

Puros

!

C41

C38

!

Oshakati

M6 3

Opuwo Skeleton Coast National Park

Oshikango

!

!

36

!

C3 5 /M

03 37

Ruacana

Okangwati

C35/M76

!

D

ANGOLA

! Falls

B1

Epupa

Otjinhungwa

C19 /M

NAMIBIA: SKELETON COAST


Henties Bay

D

@

ATM Photo: Karin Theron

Henties Bay was named after major Hendrik “Hentie” Stefanus van der Merwe who ‘discovered’ the place in 1929 when looking for water while on a hunting expedition. He later returned and built a wooden hut in the riverbed. The place became known as Henties Bay and developed into a holiday hideout, mainly because of the abundance of fish at this spot. Traveller Description: Henties Bay is a beautiful and popular tourist town, predominantly for anglers and 4x4 enthusiasts. Although the municipal area of Henties Bay is excluded from the recently proclaimed Dorob National Park, you should take note of restricted roads outside the town. The town is a gateway to adventures like 4x4 routes and quad biking in the adjacent Namib Desert, but you need to book these through tour operators. From Henties Bay you can visit the Cape Cross seal colony to the north or Swakopmund to the south. Travel TIP: The abandoned salt mine south-east of Henties Bay is worth a visit. It is situated on the Old Salt Mine 4 x 4 Trail within the Dorob National Park. The man-made salt pans and old implements are still clearly visible. Take care when driving around the pans as they are porous and your vehicle will get stuck. A heap of whalebones and an old boiler indicate that whales were once processed here. Interesting natural phenomena in the area are quartz crystals, triangular shaped stones and granite boulders. Henties Bay is often misty and windy, so remember to take a wind shield when you go camping. 420


C3 4

Standard Bank & ATM SPAR

SKELETON COAST • Henties Bay

FNB Bank and ATM

8 91 D1

Bank Windhoek ATM

Willaine Centre Total Convenience Store

Die Viskas

Eagle Shopping Centre

Atlantic Ocean

0

250

500 m

Buck's Camping Lodge Buck's Camping Lodge De Duine Hotel Desert Rose Holiday Flats Die Oord Holiday Accommodation Eagle Holiday Flats

Legend Main Road

Els Hoekie Accommodation

Main Street

Fishermans' Guest House

City Street

Gamsberg Accommodation

Minor Road

Haus Estnic B&B Huis Klipdrift Namib Shore Guest House

Off-Road/Jeep Track Town

Travel INFO: There is a clinic in town and the contact number is +264(0)64 500 020. There is a laundry service at the Spar centre and the Spar has a butchery and a bakery. 421


Henties bay ^

30 3

Messum Salt Pan

Mile ! 108

Tsiseb Conservancy

Orawa p

Mile 108 Airstrip

Messum crater

D2

302 /D 2 C34

Messum River

Cape Cross Lodge Cape Cross Lodge Fishermans Inn Fishermans Inn C3

Jakkalsputz Rest Camp

p

0 23

Oraw Rive a r

4/D

Mile 108 Rest Camp

1

Mile 72 Rest Camp St Nowhere Spa St Nowhere Spa

White Lady Salt Pan

Cape ! Cross

Cape Cross Seal Reserve Legend

Dorob National Park

Riverbed Track

Mile 72

Off-Road/Jeep Track

!

Minor Road

Atlantic

0 23 1

C

Ocean

/M 35

76

Om a Riv ruru er

Mountain

D 4/

River

C3

Main Road

Deep River Valley Henties Bay Airstrip

Crater

Henties Bay !

Pan

C3 4

National Park Conservancy

Town Info: Police: Tow-in: 422

+264(0)64 500 201 +264(0)81 124 1251

0

12.5

Doctor:

25 Km

+264(0)64 500 423

18 D19


13 Gamsberg Accommodation

14 Haus Estnic B&B

Self-catering w192913 NAD 150.00 to 200.00 pp (2013/2014)

Bed and Breakfast NAD 350.00 to 500.00 pp (2013)

1847 Brukaros St, Henties Bay

1417 Omatako St, Henties Bay

Tel: +264(0)61 238 800, Cell: +264(0)81 127 3800, Fax: +264(0)61 238 167 kotie@iafrica.com.na, www.gamsberg-safaris.com

Tel: +264(0)64 501 902, Cell: +264(0)81 201 2381, Fax: +264(0)64 501 902 hausestnic@iway.na

Gamsberg Accommodation features two separate units which can accommodate up to 4 people each and can be used together. Each unit is fully equipped for self-catering. Cleaning services are available. Pre-booking required.

Haus Estnic B&B offers luxurious double rooms with en-suite facilities and hearty breakfasts. The rooms are equipped with coffee/tea making facilities and DSTV premium bouquet. They only accommodate six persons.

Languages: English, German, Afrikaans

Languages: English, Afrikaans

FC

Facilities:

FC

Activities:

Activities:

15 Huis Klipdrift

16 Jakkalsputz Rest Camp

Self-catering w192939 NAD 450.00 to 1300.00 pu (2013)

Tour Operator Camp NAD 100.00 pu (2013/14)

142 Kabeljou St, Henties Bay

10km or 10min SSE of Henties Bay

Tel: +264(0)64 501 329, Cell: +264(0)81 127 3823, Fax: +264(0)88 620 856 val@iway.na

Tel: +264(0)61 400 205, Fax: +264(0)64 402 172 info@tungeniafrica.com www.tungeniserenity.com

Huis Klipdrift offers eight fully equipped self-catering units with satellite television and 1 to 4 bedrooms. Security is good and lock-up garages are available. It is within walking distance from shops and the beach. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Jakkalsputz is a very popular fishing camp. There are 230 campsites which can accommodate up to six people each. Campers need to be self-sufficient. There are ablutions, but you pay for the water. No electricity. Day and overnight visitors are welcome.

Facilities:

Facilities:

Activities:

Activities:

17 Mile 108 Rest Camp

18 Mile 72 Rest Camp

Park Camp NAD 100.00 pp (2013)

Tour Operator Camp NAD 100.00 pu (2012)

w138633

w142244

w138465

93km or 01h15min NW of Henties Bay

38km or 29min NW of Henties Bay

Tel: +264(0)61 400 205, Fax: +264(0)64 403 023

Tel: +264(0)61 400 205, Fax: +264(0)61 220 081 info@tungeniafrica.com www.tungeniserenity.com

At Mile 108 campsites are marked out on the beach. The communal ablution block has long drop toilets. Hot showers are only available for a limited time and you pay per shower. The camp is crowded during the high season.

Popular amongst anglers, Mile 72 Rest Camp has numerous sites marked out on the beach surrounding an ablution block. There is no shade. Languages: English

Languages: English Facilities:

@ Activities:

A VIS

Facilities: A VIS

Activities: 425

SKELETON COAST • Henties Bay

Facilities:

w141527


Henties bay 19 Namib Shore Guest House

20 St Nowhere Spa

Guest House NAD 325.00 to 420.00 pp (2013)

Lodge w141952 NAD 520.00 to 1200.00 pu (2013)

w142962

Dolfyn St 303, Henties Bay

104km or 01h29min NW of Henties Bay

Tel: +264(0)64 500 182, Cell: +264(0)81 127 5663, Fax: +264(0)64 500 182 namshore@iway.na, www.namshore.iway.na

Cell: +264(0)81 252 9422 stnowhere@mtcmobile.com.na

Namib Shore offers comfortable en-suite rooms with air conditioning and television. They also have fully equipped self-catering units available. They offer laundry services, safe parking and a bar. Pre-booking is essential.

St Nowhere Spa offers detox salt baths. Guests can enjoy fishing and trips into the desert and to the Messum Crater. Languages: English, Afrikaans

Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities:

426

FC @

Facilities: Activities:

FC


21 St Nowhere Spa Lodge Camp NAD 350.00 to 430.00 pp/pu (2013)

w141953

104km or 01h29min NW of Henties Bay Cell: +264(0)81 252 9422 stnowhere@mtcmobile.com.na

SKELETON COAST • Henties Bay

St Nowhere Spa offers detox salt baths. They have a campsite with ablution facilities available. Guests can enjoy fishing and trips into the desert and to the Messum Crater. Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities:

FC

Activities:

Photo: Karin Theron 427


south namibia

A low level crossing at the Fish River. (Willie Solomon)

The south of Namibia is mostly hot and dry with a stark but

beautiful landscape. In the far south it has fascinating and colourful rock formations, and extraordinary succulent plants like the Quiver tree and the Halfmens tree (meaning half human) that are uniquely adapted to the low rainfall.

460


NAMIBIA: SOUTH NAMIBIA

M 29

M

C15 /M

7/ C2 30

B1 29 M

4 /M C1

C13

31

/M3

5

Keetmanshoop

^

Mesosaurus Fossil Site

^ C16 /M2 7

!

Aus

!

B4

Seeheim

8 /M11

M

!

Aroab

Quiver Tree Forest Giants Playground

! C16/M27

!

Sendelingsdrift Sperrgebiet

!

C13

!

!

1/M C1

B3

C10 /M9 7

C10/M2 71 M2 2

/D2 12

Ai-Ais Hot Springs Resort

Aussenkehr

! Oranjemund

!

^

Aussenkehr Nature Reserve

Noordoewer

!

Karasburg

!

!

^

25

GrĂźnau

B1

C37

Ai-Ais

/D3 24

^ Ai-Ais National Park

M2 6

28

Gondwana Nature Park

Fish River Canyon

Rosh Pinah

22 D6

Naute National Park

C12 /M

Canyon Nature Park (East) Canyon Nature Park (West)

M21

C13

Vogelstrausskluft Private Nature Reserve

Sandfontein Nature and Game Reserve

C

B3

10 /

M

23

Warmbad

Warmbad Hot Springs

Quiver Tree Forest

The Gariep River is a green belt in this otherwise arid landscape. This mighty river defines the border between South Africa and Namibia and cuts through the Ai-Ais National Park in Namibia and the Richtersveld National Park in South Af-

German War Graves

rica that forms the Transfrontier Park. The river that joins these two parks, provides a habitat for hundreds of bird species as well as ideal conditions for canoeing and rafting. 461

SOUTH NAMIBIA

!

Atlantic Ocean

!

! 7/ C1

Bethanie

Mata Mata

KoĂŤs

M24

61 4

^ 98

33

30

11 /D

07 D4

Helmeringhausen

!

7 /M C1

M

B4

33

Brukkaros Crater

SOUTH AFRICA

C14 /M3 1

C1 5/

C

Betta

!


Giant’s Playground near Keetmanshoop. (Karin Theron)

The Ai-Ais National Park is popular for the hot springs resort, but it is of significance because of the majestic Fish River Canyon which is well known for its five-day 80 km hiking trail. The Canyon Nature Park and Gondwana Nature Park that border the Ai-Ais National Park to the north and the east, make this quite a large conservation area.

low grass, giving access to the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park between South Africa and Botswana at Mata Mata.

To the east, the region forms part of the Kalahari with its red dunes and tall yel-

Keetmanshoop is the administrative centre of this region and is surrounded

462

The Naute Game Park surrounds Namibia’s second largest dam, the Naute Dam. Other attractions of this area are the Brukkaros Crater and Mesosaurus Fossil Site near Keetmanshoop.


SOUTH NAMIBIA

by karakul sheep and ostrich farms. In the vicinity of Keetmanshoop there are Quiver trees estimated to be between 200 to 300 years old, and an area called Giant’s Playground where it literally looks like a giant has been playing with blocks made of stone. Between Grßnau and Seeheim lies the beautiful Klein Karas Mountains with interesting rock formations. Seeheim is a very small and historic town which will

most definitely take you by surprise and is well worth a visit. Further north, the landscape softens a bit (especially after good rains) and you will see rolling grasslands with camel thorn trees and distant blue mountains as you travel towards the central region of Namibia.

463


Ai-Ais

D Photo: Hannes Thirion

Ai-Ais

is a well-known holiday resort at the end of the Fish River Canyon. The name means “burning water� and refers to the sulphurous hot springs found in the area. The resort offers accommodation and camping with a spa complex which is very rewarding to the hikers finishing their hike through the Fish River Canyon.

Traveller Description: Ai-Ais has been a very popular holiday destination for many years. At one stage facilities deteriorated quite badly but the resort has been renovated and improved again in recent years. Travel INFO: The resort has a restaurant and bar as well as a small shop that sells basic necessities.

464


60 1

Fishriver Lodge Airstrip (1.6km)

C3 7/ D

Canyon Nature Park (West)

Ai-Ais Hotsprings Chalets er

sR iv bo

Hobas

yn Ro s

! (

Canon Lodge Ho lo o g Ri ver

Canon Mountain Camp Canon Roadhouse Ai-Ais National Park

Canon Roadhouse Canon Village Hobas Rest Camp

Canon Lodge Airstrip

ve r

Ri

Fish River Lodge

bi Ka ne s

Gondwana Nature Park

D 7/ C3

4 32

Legend Off-Road/Jeep Track

Minor Gravel Road 0

4

8 Km

D298

Hiking/Walking Trail

Minor Road Main Road River Major River National/Nature Park

! (

Ai-Ais

C10/M97 /C C10

37/M

SOUTH NAMIBIA • Ai-Ais

Hobas Airstrip

t jie

Ai-Ais Hot Springs Resort

9

Travel TIP: The border post at Sendelingsdrift (approximately 20 km from Rosh Pinah) at the Orange River decrease travelling times to and from South Africa significantly. The crossing at the border post is done by way of a pontoon. 465


AI-AIS Ai-Ais Hotsprings Chalets

1

Self-catering w228675 NAD 435.00 to 700.00 pp (2013) Ai-Ais, Ai-Ais National Park Tel: +264(0)61 285 7200, Fax: +264(0)61 224 900 reservations@nwr.com.na

The resort provides accommodation in standard and luxury flats, each with a bathroom and kitchenette. The luxury flats have balconies. The resort has many facilities including a tennis court and spa. They are motorbike friendly. A VIS

Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

Photo: Namibia Wildlife Resorts

Ai-Ais Hot Springs Resort

2

Holiday Resort Camp NAD 130.00 pp (2013/2014)

w138419

Ai-Ais, Ai-Ais National Park Tel: +264(0)61 285 7200, Fax: +264(0)61 224 900 reservations@nwr.com.na

The resort has a large caravan and camping area. Facilities include a tennis court and spa. Activities include bird watching, trips to the Fish River Canyon and relaxing in the hot springs. They are motorbike friendly. Languages: English A VIS

Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

Photo: Namibia Wildlife Resorts

3 Canon Lodge

Canon 4 Mountain Camp

Lodge w138347 NAD 1200.00 to 1500.00 pp (2014)

Self-catering w139985 NAD 310.00 pp (2013/2014)

62km or 01h11min NE of Ai-Ais

68km or 1h11min NNE of Ai-Ais

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Fax: +264(0)61 251 863 info@gondwana-collection.com www.gondwana-collection.com

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Fax: +264(0)61 251 863 info@gondwana-collection.com www.gondwana-collection.com

Canon Lodge is situated on the privately owned Gondwana Canyon Park. Accommodation consists of 25 thatched, wooden bungalows with en-suite bathrooms, fans and mosquito nets. Facilities include a bar.

The camp is 20 km from the main look-out point at the Fish River Canyon and situated amongst dolerite hills. This is a self-catering alternative with a fully equipped dining and kitchen area and an outside braai and lapa.

Languages: English

Languages: English

Facilities: Activities: 466

A VIS

@

Facilities:

@

Activities:

A VIS


5 Canon Roadhouse

6 Canon Roadhouse

Guest House NAD 920.00 to 1150.00 pp (2014)

Lodge Camp NAD 150.00 pp (2013/2014)

w139107

w139106

79km or 1h22min NNE of Ai-Ais

17km or 20min NE of Hobas

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Cell: +264(0)81 129 2424, Fax: +264(0)61 251 863, info@gondwana-collection.com, www.gondwana-canyon-park.com

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Cell: +264(0)81 129 2424, Fax: +264(0)61 251 863 info@gondwana-collection.com, www.gondwana-collection. com

Languages: English

Languages: English A VIS

Facilities:

Canon Roadhouse offers private and secluded campsites under large Camel thorn trees. They have good ablution facilities.

@

Facilities:

Activities:

A VIS

A VIS

Activities:

A VIS

Canon Village 7

8 Hobas Rest Camp

Self-catering w139680 NAD 920.00 to 1150.00 pp (2014)

Park Camp NAD 120.00 pp (2013/2014)

61km or 1h03min NNE of Ai-Ais

Hobas, Ai-Ais National Park

Tel: +264(0)61 230 066, Cell: +264(0)81 129 2424, Fax: +264(0)61 251 863, info@gondwana-collection.com, www.gondwana-collection.com

Tel: +264(0)61 285 7200, Fax: +264(0)61 224 900 reservations@nwr.com.na www.nwr.com.na

The Cape Dutch style bungalows of this village are surrounded by the mountains of the Gondwana Canon Park. The bungalows are equipped with all the modern amenities and the restaurant prepares delicious food.

A four day hiking trail in the Fish River Canyon starts at Hobas and ends at the Ai-Ais Resort. Hobas offers ten comfortable campsites with ablution facilities.

w137564

Languages: English

Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

@

Facilities:

@

Fish River Lodge

Activities: 9

Lodge w139047 NAD 1347.00 to 2695.00 pu (2014) 149km or 02h44min SSW of Seeheim Tel: +264(0)61 228 104, Fax: +264(0)88 625 855 reservations@fishriverlodge.com.na www.fishriverlodge-namibia.com

This stylish lodge offers 20 chalets with breath taking views of the Fish River Canyon. Each chalet has an inside and outside shower. They offer guided hikes during winter, canyon excursions, plateau hikes and sundowner drives. Languages: English Facilities: Activities:

A VIS

Photo: Fish River Lodge 467

SOUTH NAMIBIA • Ai-Ais

The guest house has acquired a sort of cult status due to its elaborate decor. It offers 24 immaculate en-suite rooms. They have an Information Centre that explains the geology, fauna, flora and history of the area.


SPERRGEBIET

The wild Atlantic Ocean at Oranjemund. (Karin Theron)

The word Sperrgebiet literally means restricted area and

this region indeed has limited or no public access to most parts of it because of diamond mining. It was declared a restricted area in 1908. This forbidden territory has a spectacular landscape ranging from rocky outcrops to pure Namib Desert. The sand dunes are bordered to the west by the violent Atlantic Ocean. Like the Skeleton Coast further north, this wild coastline is also a graveyard to many shipwrecks. The magnificent Bogenfels Arch Rock is a 55 meter high rock arch with one foot of the arch in the Atlantic Ocean and the other in the sand of the Namib Desert. Bogenfels, Pomona and Elizabeth Bay are mining ghost towns and day trips are offered from L端deritz to Bogenfels and Pomona. Various concession holders offer guided 4x4 tours into the desert. Most of them operate from L端deritz and the adventures are undertaken in the dunes between Oranjemund and L端deritz.

516


!

Kolmanskop (Ghost Town)

Lüderitz

!

B4

^

3/ C1

M

35

! Aus

Elizabeth Bay (Ghost Town)

^

Pomona (Ghost Town)

^

C1 3/

Sperrgebiet

^

M

11 8

Bogenfels (Ghost Town) Bogenfels Arch Rock

NAMIBIA: SPERRGEBIET

Onyx Pan

!

!

C13/D21 2

Sendelingsdrift

Atlantic Ocean ! Oranjemund

Oranjemund is an active diamond mining town right on the border of Namibia and of the Sperrgebiet. For many years the town was closed to the public. It was recently proclaimed as a public town, but on going to press, an independent municipality was not yet established. After crossing the border at Oranjemund, you need to be in possession of a Namdeb (the mining corporation who runs the town) access card before you can enter Oranjemund. Although not yet geared for tourism, the town is still worth a visit if you areKarin lucky enough to obtain Photo: Theron a permit. Oranjemund is a friendly town and in the museum you can learn about the fascinating mining history of the region.

SOUTH AFRICA

The Sperrgebiet was proclaimed a National Park in recent years. It is home to a wealth of endemic succulent plant species that is unrivalled anywhere else in the world, making it one of the world’s top twenty-five Biodiversity Hotspots. Because the area has been off limits to the public for so long, the habitat has been left largely untouched, making a visit to the park a truly unique wilderness experience. Unfortunately you cannot travel the area as you like; you may only explore it with one of the concessionaires that was granted a permit by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism and operates from Lüderitz. 517

S P E R R G EBIET

Rosh Pinah


Oranjemund

Photo: Karin Theron

D

@

ATM

@

The mining

town of Oranjemund is situated on the northern bank of the Gariep River mouth. Developed to service the rich diamond fields of southern Namibia after diamonds were discovered in 1928, the town is an oasis in the Namib Desert. The Oranjemund mine contributes approximately 7% to the GDP of Namibia. Oranjemund has 4 km of unspoilt beach front and prolific birdlife. The reed channels at the river mouth form part of the RAMSAR proclaimed Gariep River Wetland. Both the sea and the river are rough and dangerous to swim in. Traveller Description: Even though Oranjemund was recently proclaimed a municipal town, you can still only enter if you have a valid permit issued under the Diamond Act. Foreigners (non-Namibians) also require a valid passport to enter. The town was developed by the mine with the sole purpose of housing their staff and today all the houses still belong to the mine. In order to create good conditions for its workers, the mine has developed an excellent infrastructure and every possible sporting facility – even a 18 hole golf course that is grazed by Oryx! 518


FNB BOB

Sperrgebiet

Omahanda Groceries FNB

Oranjemund

Eastgate

km

BOB

Supermarket

Gariep River

Sperrgebiet

# V

Oranjemund Border Control

# V

Alexander Bay Border Control

Alexander Bay

SOUTH AFRICA

NAMIBIA

SPERRGEBIET • Oranjemund

Bank Windhoek SPAR

Op My Stoep Lodge

1

Oranjemund Airstrip

0.5

R382

V # V#

# V

# V

Hospital: +264(0)63 238 000 Doctor: +264(0)63 238 002

Tom's Cabin

National Border

Border Post

Legend

# V National Road Main Road City Street Minor Road Major River Runway Restricted Area

0

# V

+264(0)63 232 228 +264(0)81 124 8963

Police: Tow-in:

Town Info:

519


Or anjemund Travel INFO: You can camp for free on the beach at the river mouth, although there are no facilities. The town has a golf course, bowling club, public swimming pool, putt-putt course or you can go river paddling or enjoy organised dune riding. Fishing is good at the river mouth and at the Jasper House Heritage Centre you can see how pioneer miners lived in years gone by.

Travel TIP: It is not easy to obtain a permit. Somebody from inside Oranjemund has to ‘invite’ you and apply for the permit as Namdep wants an address in Oranjemund where you will stay. There are many locals who are trying to get tourism going in Oranjemund and guest houses are willing to apply for your permit. Allow enough time and phone the permit office on +264(0)63 23 6100 (or mail to Permits.PermitsOffice@namdeb.com) to confirm that your permit was issued before you leave; without your permit you won’t be able to enter Oranjemund. For a day permit you can contact the Ministry of Mine & Energy at +264(0)63 233 726.

1 Op My Stoep Lodge

2 Tom’s Cabin

Lodge w186181 NAD 380.00 to 440.00 pu (2012)

Self-catering w252805 NAD 368.00 to 702.00 pp (2012)

7km or 9min E of Oranjemund

In Oranjemund

Tel: +264(0)63 23 4223, Cell: +264(0)81 127 5837, Fax: +264(0)63 232 874 opmystoep@iway.na, www.opmystoep.com

Tel: +264(0)63 234 207, Cell: +264(0)81 362 1227, Fax: +264(0)63 234 209 tep@mweb.com.na

The lodge is situated about 6 km from Oranjemund. Rooms are new and very comfortable. They also have a restaurant and bar area. You need a permit to enter Oranjemund. Lodge owner Fanie Smit will be able to assist you.

Tom’s Cabin is an upmarket establishment which offers fully equipped self-catering units. Languages: English

Languages: English, Afrikaans Facilities: Activities: 520

A VIS

FC

Facilities:

A VIS


SPERRGEBIET • Oranjemund

Photo: Karin Theron

521


ZAMBEZI (caprivi)

The Kongola area has lush vegetation and abundance of wildlife. (Peter Levey)

The name of the Caprivi Strip was changed in 2013 to Zambezi. This region stretches out like an arm between Angola, Zambia and Botswana, touching Zimbabwe at the confluence of the Chobe and Zambezi Rivers. It is a tropical region hosting an array of wildlife and bird species and is ideal for fishing. This region is characterised by an abundance of water, wetlands, large floodplains and thick Mopani woodland. Bwabwata, Mamili (Nkasa Lupala) and Muduma National Parks and the Kwando Conservancy are the major conservation areas in the Zambezi region. They are well worth a visit and, with over 600 bird species, a real paradise for bird watchers. Game is plentiful and hippos and crocodiles laze around on the riverbanks. 528


Z AMBE Z I ( C a p r i v i )

hango me erve

NAMIBIA: CAPRIVI

ZAMBIA

ANGOLA Kwando Core Area

Susuwe Triangle

Mayuni Conservancy

Kwando Conservancy

! Kongola

B8

Impalila Conservancy

D35 08 B8

! ^ Impalila

D3 50 7

^

Katima Mulilo

!

Island Kasika Conservancy

Popa Falls

Mashi Conservancy Bwabwata National Park

9 /M C4

5 12

Salambala Conservancy

Mudumu National Park

Mamili (Nkasa Lupala) National Park Wuparo Conservancy

BOTSWANA

There are countless fishing camps and lodges along the Zambezi, Kwando and Linyanti Rivers, offering a variety of activities. These rivers define Namibia’s borders with Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Angola. The Zambezi region is also a gateway to the Okavango Delta and national parks

such as Chobe and Moremi in Botswana, and the famous Victoria Falls which straddles Zambia and Zimbabwe. Katima Mulilo is the main town in this region and offers essential services to tourists. 529


Impalila Island

Photo: Ichingo Chobe Lodge

Impalila Island is an 11 000 hectare patch of land bounded by the

Chobe River, Zambezi River and the Kasai Chanel. The island has about 800 inhabitants staying in 22 villages. The island, which is a conservancy, is very secluded and has limited facilities. Although Impalila Island is on Namibian territory, Kasane is the nearest town and therefore the logistic management of the lodges on the island is run from Kasane.

Traveller Description: There are only two lodges on the island itself. Ichingo Chobe River Lodge is on the Chobe side and Impalila Island Lodge on the Zambezi side. Guests have to leave their vehicles in safe parking at the Botswana Immigration Office in Kasane and are fetched by boat. The boat trip takes about 15 minutes and guests have to clear Namibia Immigration on the island. The border post and crossing to Impalila Island is for people only, no vehicles are allowed. There are only a few vehicles on the island. Game viewing is done by boat along the Chobe River and you can fish in the Chobe and Zambezi Rivers as well as in the Kasai Chanel.

530


Legend

# V

Border Post National Boder Highway Main Road City Street Minor Road Off-Road/Jeep Track Riverboat Trail River Delta Conservancy National Park Forestry Reserve

Impalila Island Border Control

# V

Kasika Conservancy

SPAR Barclays Kasane Border Control

# V

Kasane Hospital

G

Choppies

! Kasane

FNB

Kasika !

NAMIBIA BOTSWANA Chobe Flood Plains Chobe Savanna Lodge

Kasane Forest Reserve

Ichingo Chobe River Lodge Ichobezi Safari Boats Impalila Island Lodge Zovu Elephant Lodge

0

1

2

km

Nogatsaa Tchinga

Travel TIP: Fishing and birding are excellent on the island. 531

Z AMBE Z I ( C a p r i v i ) • I m p a l i l a I s l a n d

Impalila Conservancy


Impalila Island 1 Chobe Savanna Lodge

2 Ichingo Chobe River Lodge

Lodge w198310 USD 385.00 to 580.00 pp (2014)

Tented Camp ZAR 3000.00 to 4000.00 pp (2013)

No self-drive access. Access by boat only

No self-drive access

Tel: +267 686 1559, Fax: +267 686 0037 info@desertdelta.com www.desertdelta.com

Fax: +27(0)866 185 220, Cell: +27(0)79 871 7603 ichingo@iafrica.com www.ichobezi.co.za

Thatched en-suite chalets have air conditioning, mini bars and ceiling fans. Relax at the bar or visit a remote village. The lodge closes for about three months each year for maintenance, therefore pre-booking is essential.

The secluded lodge offers luxury rooms and outstanding cuisine. Guests will be collected from the Kasane Immigration office where they leave their vehicles and are transferred by boat to Impalila Island.

Languages: English

Languages: English

Facilities: Activities:

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3 Ichobezi Safari Boats

4 Impalila Island Lodge

Houseboat w232873 ZAR 2850.00 to 4000.00 pp (2013)

Lodge w139984 USD 373.00 to 628.00 pp (2013)

No Self-drive access

No self-drive access (4WD)

Fax: +27(0)866 185 220, Cell: +27(0)79 871 7603 info@ichobezi.co.za www.ichobezi.co.za

Tel: +27(0)11 781 1661, Cell: +267 71 303 418, Fax: +264(0)86 766 9369 res2@africananthology.co.za, www.africananthology.co.za

Enjoy a floating safari on the Chobe River. The boat has four cabins, a lounge, bar, sun deck with splash pool and open air dining area. Cell reception only available if the boat is near Kasane.

The en-suite chalets have views of Mambova Rapids. All meals included. Enjoy bird watching, river cruises and game viewing. Impalila Airstrip is closed during the rainy season. Transfer to and from Kasane Airport.

Languages: English

Languages: English, Afrikaans

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Facilities:

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5 Zovu Elephant Lodge Lodge w252901 ZAR 1530.00 to 1685.00 pp (2014) No self-drive access Cell: +267 71 318 210 bookings@zovuelephantlodge.com www.zovuelephantlodge.com

The lodge offers accommodation in ten double en-suite rooms. Guests will be collected from the Kasane Immigration office where they park their vehicles and are transferred by boat to Impalila Island. Pre-booking is essential. Languages: English, German Facilities: Activities: 532

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ZAMBEZI (Caprivi) • Impalila Island

Photo: Ichobezi Safari Boats

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Tracks4Africa Namibia Self Drive Guide  

To order a copy visit www.tracks4africa.co.za.

Tracks4Africa Namibia Self Drive Guide  

To order a copy visit www.tracks4africa.co.za.

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