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LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

FALL 2016

RXCELLENCE

CHANGE LEADERS

Reconfiguring Pharmacy and those Leading the Charge FORWARD TOGETHER Defining the next five years at the Faculty ADVOCATING FOR EXCELLENCE How the OPA is shaping the future of pharmacy


PROFESSOR AUSTIN IS INSPIRING STUDENTS WITH THE LOVE OF LEARNING. TODAY. AND FOR DECADES TO COME.

Zubin Austin arrived at U of T in 1984 to do a BScPhm. He never left. The popular professor treasures those early years at the Faculty, where his passion for learning took hold. Now an acclaimed researcher with numerous teaching awards, he wants future pharmacy students to benefit from the world-class education that shaped his life. That’s why Professor Awesome, as he’s known, included the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy in his will. Plan your bequest now so you too can inspire, enlighten and empower—for generations to come. Find out more: dmwhite@utoronto.ca • 416-978-6749 michelle.osborne@utoronto.ca • 416-978-3846


From the Dean

THE NEXT GENERATION OF PHARMACY LEADERS

Pharmacists across all practice areas play a critical role in health care - from medication therapy management, to point of care testing. Through patient centered care, graduates of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy are improving the lives of people across Canada and around the world. Throughout this issue of Rxcellence, you will read about some of the Faculty’s alumni, supporters and students who are at the forefront of addressing the need for pharmacists to assume an enhanced role in preventative and primary care – and we look toward the future and the role we will play in creating the next generation of leaders and change makers. Nowhere is this leadership better demonstrated than by John Papastergiou (BScPhm 0T2), Carmine Stumpo (BScPhm 9T4), Rebecca Yu (BScPhm 9T0) and Jeff Yurek (BScPhm 9T5), alumni who are individually leading the profession forward and continuously advocating for improved patient care in their various fields. I am thrilled that their leadership stories are being featured in this year’s issue of Rxcellence. I hope you will be as inspired by them as we are. Our leadership continues to be recognized on the international stage and for the fourth time in five years, the Faculty’s Pharmacy program has been named the best in Canada by the QS World Rankings. The program was ranked 24th overall. We are proud to once again be recognized and this is a direct reflection of the robust academic programs we offer, as well as the dedication of our outstanding faculty and students who continue to produce world class research. I am thrilled to share some of the awards and accomplishments of our faculty, students and alumni on page 6. As a Faculty we are looking towards the future and the role we will play as the profession continues to evolve. Forward Together, is the Faculty’s new Academic Plan, which leverages the Faculty’s

many diverse areas of strength and will guide our vision of advancing pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical science through worldleading education and research over the next five years. You can read more about it in our main feature: Change Leaders starting on page 17. The Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy is primed for a major transformation that will take us to the next chapter of our evolution as an institution that consistently earns its reputation for excellence, and I’m delighted to share this exciting new phase with you. Please enjoy some of our accomplishments and milestones from the past year throughout these pages, and I look forward to your continued support.

HEATHER BOON DEAN, LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY ALUMNI MAGAZINE

17

21

Reconfiguring pharmacy and the individuals leading the charge

Carmine Stumpo is helping to lead the way for transformative health care

CHANGE LEADERS

THE HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATOR

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

26 FORWARD TOGETHER

Our five core strategic focus areas for the next five years


Departments

34

6 FACULTY NEWS 8 ALUMNI RELATIONS

A message from David White 10 PAST EVENTS 12 Q+A

with Bianca Brooks 30 ANNUAL FUND 34 DONOR PROFILE 38 CLASS NOTES

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22 Published by the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Office of Advancement and Alumni Affairs Fall 2016

in

Editor

Erika Rueter Contributors

Jef Ekins Erika Rueter David White Copy Editor

Robert Good Art Direction & Design

Katina Constantinou, Sugar Design

Photography & Illustration

Raina+Wilson Jason Gordon Horst Herget Doug Chayka Charitable Registration

BN1081 62330 RR0001 Editorial Office

Tel 416 946 5554 Fax 416 946 0430

Visit us online at pharmacy.utoronto.ca Rxcellence magazine is published annually sent to 8,000 alumni, parents, friends and associates of the Faculty. All material is copyright Š 2016, and may not be reprinted without the express written permission of the author.

All correspondence and undeliverable copies: Rxcellence magazine, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, 144 College Street, Toronto, Ontario Canada M5S 3M2

ISSN 2369-5595 Printed in Canada

Do we have your correct address and contact details? Please let us know of any corrections: 416 946 5554 or email erika.rueter@utoronto.ca

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Faculty News

THE FACULTY IS PLEASED THE FACULTY IS TO WELCOME OUR NEWEST PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE FACULTY MEMBERS THE FOLLOWING NEW APPOINTMENTS

PROFESSOR LISA DOLOVICH (BScPhm 8T8; PharmD 9T5) has been appointed as a tenured Full Professor and the Ontario College of Pharmacists Professor in Pharmacy Practice at the Faculty. She will be joining the Faculty’s Centre for Practice Excellence effective January 1, 2017. Professor Dolovich currently serves as the Co-Lead of the Ontario Pharmacy Research Collaboration (OPEN) and as the Research Director and Associate Professor of the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. Professor Dolovich is the Principal Investigator (or Co-Principal Investigator) on over $10 million in research grants. Her research program explores approaches that better weave pharmacists and others within the community based health care system to create a better care experience, improve health for individuals living at home, and develop community pharmacy’s delivery of person-focused care and connection to the rest of the health care system. DR. KEITH PARDEE (PhD 1T0) has been appointed Assistant Professor at the Faculty. In this role, Dr. Pardee will teach and conduct research in the Faculty’s bimolecular pharmaceutical sciences area. He holds an Honours Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Alberta, a Master of Science degree in Natural Products Chemistry from the University of British Columbia, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Molecular Genetics from the University of Toronto. Following the completion of his doctoral studies, Dr. Pardee completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University. Dr. Pardee’s research program combines biochemistry, molecular engineering, and electronics to create a new class of sterile and abiotic tools for applications both inside and outside the laboratory.

DR. JILLIAN KOHLER has been promoted to the rank of Full Professor. Dr. Kohler’s research is focused on fair access to essential medicines with a particular focus on good governance and intellectual property rights. She pioneered the methodology on good governance in the pharmaceutical system for the World Bank, which was subsequently adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO) and has been applied in over 35 countries globally. Dr. Kohler is a technical adviser for the Access to Medicines Index and WHO Good Governance for Medicines Program, as well as the Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Transparency and Accountability in the Pharmaceutical Sector, which is based at the Faculty.

The Faculty’s outstanding investigators continue to advance groundbreaking research in Biomolecular Pharmaceutical Sciences and Clinical, Social and Administrative Pharmaceutical Sciences. Highlights for the past year include: ASSISTANT PROFESSOR KEITH PARDEE (PhD 1T0) is helping to leverage synthetic biology to develop a low-cost, easy-to-use test capable of diagnosing the Zika virus in patient samples within a few hours. Dr. Pardee’s technology is so revolutionary that it does not require refrigeration or expensive equipment, nor trained technicians to deliver highly specific results in a fraction of the time of traditional tests, which is critically important when dealing with viruses like Zika that are hard to contain and spread quickly.

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

PROFESSOR SHANA KELLEY, along with Professor Ted Sargent from U of T’s Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, were the corecipients of the Brockhouse Canada Prize for Interdisciplinary Research in Science and Engineering. The Prize recognizes outstanding Canadian teams of researchers from different disciplines who have combined their expertise to produce achievements of outstanding international significance. Professor Kelley was honoured for her work on the development of new nanomaterials for biological sensing, carried out in collaboration with Professor Sargent. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR JOHN PAPASTERGIOU (BScPhm 0T2), along with his research team, won first prize in the Community Pharmacy Practice Research Section poster competition at the International Pharmaceutical Federation World Congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. The team is exploring the feasibility and effectiveness of implementing personalized medication services in community pharmacy practice, and identifying the type of drug therapy problems identified as a result of screening. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SARA GUILCHER (MScPT 0T3; PhD 1T2) was the recipient of a four-year Canadian Institutes of Health Research Embedded Clinician Researcher Salary Award for her work on improving transitions in patient care. PROFESSOR DAVID R. HAMPSON received a fouryear Project Grant to develop a gene therapy treatment for Fragile X Syndrome from the Canadian Institute for Health Research. PROFESSOR RAYMOND REILLY (BScPhm 7T9; MAScPhm 8T3; PhD 9T9) was the recipient of a three-year Innovation to Impact grant from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute to develop radiopharmaceutical agents for the imaging and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Overall, our faculty amassed an incredible 420 publications in the past 12 months and successfully secured $6.9 million in research funding through 113 grant applications.


Awards

Selected Faculty Awards American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists AAPS LEADERSHIP AWARD

Dr. Reina Bendayan American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering FELLOW

Dr. Gang Zheng Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada 2016 AFPC – PFIZER CAREER RESEARCH AWARD

Dr. Shirley X.Y. Wu Canadian Academy of Health Sciences FELLOW

Dr. Shana Kelley Canadian Fund for Innovation JOHN EVANS LEADERSHIP FUND

Dr. Raymond Reilly, BScPhm 7T9; MAScPhm 8T3; PhD 9T9

Pharmaceutical Sciences Symposium FELLOW

Dr. Micheline Piquette-Miller

Selected Graduate Student Awards American Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD IN PHARMACOKINETICS, PHARMACODYNAMICS, AND DRUG METABOLISM AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY AND TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH

Canadian Pharmacists Association CPHA PATIENT CARE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR INNOVATION

Dr. Suzanne Singh, BScPhm 0T0; PharmD 0T3 DEAN GEORGE A. BURBIDGE AWARD

Dr. Matthew Daniel Ng Chow, BScPhm 1T5; PharmD 1T5 Government of Ontario JOHN CHARLES POLANYI PRIZE

Dr. Adam J. Shuhendler, HBSc 0T3; MScPhm 0T6; PhD 1T1 Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy

Lilia Magomedova

PRECEPTOR OF THE YEAR AWARDS

Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences Symposium

Annie Lee, BScPhm 8T5 Linda Plong, BScPhm 1T0 Walter Yeh, BSc 0T7; BScPhm 0T9 Muhammad Zuberi, BScPhm 9T6

2016 GATTEFOSSÉ CANADA/CSPS AWARD IN LIPID-BASED DRUG DELIVERY

Rui Xue Zhang Canadian Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences ANTOINE A. NOUJAIM AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Ontario Pharmacists Association LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Barry S. Phillips, BScPhm 6T2 MENTORSHIP AWARD

Jag Maghera, BScPhm 0T3 OUTSTANDING NEW

Canadian Society of Pharmacology and Therapeutics 2015

Jasmine Williams-Dautovich

PUBLICATION AWARD

Selected Undergraduate Award Winners

PATIENT IMPACT AWARD

Canadian Pharmacists Association

VOICE OF PHARMACY AWARD

CPHA CENTENNIAL LEADERSHIP AWARD

John Papastergiou, BScPhm 0T2

Dr. Anna Taddio, BScPhm 8T9; MAScPhm 9T4; PhD 9T7 Connaught Fund CONNAUGHT INNOVATION AWARD

Dr. Shana Kelley NEW RESEARCHER AWARDS

Dr. Sara Guilcher, MScPT 0T3; PhD 1T2 Dr. Elise Paradis Dr. Keith Pardee, PhD 1T0 Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR

Dr. Carolyn Cummins Dr. Norman Dewhurst, BSc 0T1; BScPhm 0T5; PharmD 1T2 Dr. Jamie Kellar Ontario Pharmacists Association PHARMACIST OF THE YEAR AWARD

Dr. Carlo De Angelis, BScPhm 8T1

PRACTITIONER AWARD

Kayla Castoguay, BScPhm 1T1

Tiana Tilli

Danny Lui, BScPhm 8T2

University of Toronto

University of Toronto

ARBOR AWARD

GORDON CRESSY STUDENT LEADERSHIP AWARDS

Ian Stewart, BScPhm 8T8

Mohamed El-Salfiti Caitlin McIntyre Andrew Sage Joseph Samuel Jessica Sawyer

Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists ISABEL E. STAUFFER MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARD

Carolee Awde, BScPhm 7T9 NEW HOSPITAL PHARMACY

Selected Alumni Awards Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy 2016 PILLAR OF PHARMACY AWARD

Carole McKiee, BScPhm 6T3

PRACTITIONER AWARD

Olivia Gayan Ng, BScPhm 1T2 WCH EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION AWARDS NEW TEACHER/ EDUCATOR AWARD

Marko Tomas, BScPhm 1T2

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Alumni Relations

Photography by

Raina+Wilson

Alumni Relations A message from David White, Assistant Dean, Advancement and Alumni Relations It has been yet another busy year for myself and Erika Rueter, our Senior Development Officer, Leadership and Alumni Giving at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy. One of the highlights of the year took place during the last week of May when we held the Faculty’s most successful Spring Reunion to date, with more than 200 alumni attending various events at the Faculty and across the University. These events included the Golden T Dinner, honouring the 60th anniversary for the Class of 5T6 and the 50th anniversary for the Class of 6T6, the Class of 9T1’s 25th anniversary reunion, an Open House BBQ for all alumni, and a Young Alumni Reunion. Thank you to everyone who joined us over the course of the weekend, it truly was a wonderful time. Plans are already underway for Spring Reunion 2017. Please see the schedule of events on Page 16 and be sure to check your email for invitations to various events in the coming months. We also continued a number of longstanding alumni events during the year including our Annual Undergraduate Student Awards Reception, Convocation Reception and Graduating Awards Ceremony, as well as numerous class reunions, including the Class

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

of 5T4 Reunion, which took place for the 62nd consecutive year in September of 2016. We continue to have a strong presence at the annual professional conferences, where we always enjoy reconnecting with our graduates from across the province and the country. In addition to our traditional alumni relations activities, this year we embarked on some new initiatives. In the Fall, we hosted the first annual Dean’s Circle Recognition Reception, to honour all annual donors to the Faculty in excess of $1,000, and we formed our inaugural Young Alumni Committee with a goal of keeping new alumni engaged and involved with the Faculty. These two initiatives were highly successful and we anticipate they will become vital and ongoing components of our Alumni Relations programming. It was a wonderful year for our team and we will continue to build on the outstanding alumni programming offered by the Faculty. On behalf of Erika, I would like to sincerely thank you for your continued support – you truly are the lifeblood of our Faculty and we look forward to seeing you in 2017.


From L: Erika Rueter & David White RXCELLENCE FALL 2015

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Past Events

Convocation Brunch and Graduating Student Awards Reception On June 3rd, the Faculty hosted the Convocation Brunch and Graduating Student Awards Reception at the Royal Conservatory of Music. The Reception honoured the Faculty’s second class of graduates with the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. The event featured a wonderful alumni address by John Papastergiou, as well as the presentation of the graduating class gift, a donation to EVOLVE. Professor of the Year, Preceptor of the Year and a number of merit-based awards were also presented at the reception.

Induction to the Professional Community of Pharmacy In early January of 2016, the Class of 1T9 were inducted into the professional community of pharmacy in a ceremony held at the Faculty. Featuring guest speakers representing the pharmacy community (the Faculty, the Canadian Pharmacists’ Association, the Ontario Pharmacists Association, the Ontario College of Pharmacists and the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists) students learned about the Ontario College of Pharmacists’ Code of Ethics and participated in the Faculty’s Pledge of Professionalism before donning their white coats for the first time.

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

Graduate Student Convocation and Awards Reception Held in November of 2015 in the Alumni Hall at Victoria University, the Faculty recognized 38 graduate students in the MSc and PhD programs. A total of 16 internal and 10 external awards were presented during the event, which also provided an opportunity for the Faculty to celebrate the 4 PhD and 12 MSc students who graduated from their respective programs the previous day.


Undergraduate Student Awards Reception In October of 2015, the Faculty celebrated undergraduate student success and achievement at the 2015 Undergraduate Student Awards Reception. Held at the Faculty Club, 73 admission scholarships and awards for accomplishments in years 1, 2, and 3 where presented to 89 outstanding PharmD students.

Class Reunions In the Fall of 2015 two class reunions were held at the Faculty: the 40th reunion of the Class of 7T5 and the 25th reunion of the class of 9T0. Each event included a cocktail reception at the Faculty and an opportunity for class members to tour the Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building with current students.

Spring Reunion 2016

OPA Cup On March 13, 2016 the University of Toronto’s Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy hockey team faced off against their provincial rivals from the University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy in the annual OPA Cup. Cheered on by students, faculty, staff and alumni, U of T put up a good fight but ultimately lost to the University of Waterloo. Before heading to Waterloo for the game, students, faculty and staff enjoyed a tailgate party at the Faculty.

Throughout the last week of May, the Faculty held its most successful Spring Reunion ever with more than 200 alumni attending various events throughout the weekend. These events included the Class of 5T6 and 6T6 Golden T Dinner, the 25th reunion of the Class of 9T1, an Open House BBQ for all alumni and a Young Alumni Reunion. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive from all alumni who attended and the Class of 9T1 has decided to establish a student award, pledging to donate $25,000 as a class.

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Young Alumni Spotlight

Bianca Brooks UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY


Photography by

Raina+Wilson

Bianca Brooks graduated from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy in June 2011. After graduation she worked as a Staff Pharmacist at a Shoppers Drug Mart in Toronto, before becoming Director of Specialty Programs at Pharmacy.ca. This past spring, Bianca made the leap into the marketing world, and is now an Account Supervisor at McCann Health. Q: WHAT IS MCCANN HEALTH AND WHAT DO YOU DO THERE? A: McCann Health is a healthcare communications agency. We work in consumer health care, pharmaceuticals, public health, nutrition, and wellness. We sit at the McCann Canada headquarters, alongside a few hundred odd bright and talented colleagues who work with brands like Mastercard, GM, RBC, and L’Oréal Paris. Our new space at John and Wellington was recently featured in the Style section of Toronto Life. The beer taps are certainly a nice change of pace from community pharmacy. As an Account Supervisor, there is no such thing as a ‘typical’ day. I could be doing anything from brainstorming with a client, to briefing a creative team on a new project, to negotiating with P.A.A.B. or supporting a new business pitch. A

huge part of the role is communication and relationship management – I am a liaison between clients, vendors, and the broader agency team.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB? A: I see an opportunity to have a real impact. As pharmacists, we have unique insight into the experiences and information needs of patients managing a broad range of health issues. Increasingly, as our scope of practice is re-written across the country, we are also an important stakeholder group and audience for health care communications. I enjoy bringing a different vantage point to the table. At the same time, it’s energizing to work with smart, passionate people – art directors, copywriters, strategists, marketers – who bring a different skill set and perspective to bear on our work.

Q: WHAT IS THE MOST CHALLENGING THING ABOUT YOUR JOB? A: The steepest learning curve so far has been getting up to speed on the regulatory framework for health care product communication. Any communication piece for a prescription medication that makes a claim - and the claim can be as simple as Tylenol 3 helps with severe pain has to be substantiated with high-quality evidence and cleared by P.A.A.B. (Pharmaceutical Advertising Advisory Board). Once our team has a project to the point where we know exactly what we want to say, we submit to P.A.A.B., where it goes through a team of reviewers, who are mostly pharmacists. They review your copy and layout, and they’ll come back with changes you are required to make, usually around balancing any claims of benefit with information about safety. The challenge is finding a way to meet what’s required from a regulatory perspective, but that still lends to a communication piece that has meaningful content and is not just replicating what it said in the product monograph. Q: WHAT ARE THREE OF THE SKILLS YOU REQUIRE TO DO YOUR JOB AT MCCANN WELL? A: As a pharmacy student we are taught the importance of research, and this job definitely calls on that skill set. You need

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Young Alumni Spotlight

UNDERSTANDING WHAT IT’S LIKE TO WORK IN COMMUNITY – UNDERSTANDING THE REALITY OF PRACTICE RIGHT NOW, AND WHERE THERE ARE NEEDS AND GAPS IN TERMS OF WHAT COULD BE OFFERED – ALLOWS ME TO OFFER STRATEGIC INSIGHT INTO HOW THE INDUSTRY CAN BETTER ENGAGE AND LEVERAGE PHARMACISTS.

to be able to review the literature and quickly get up to speed on a product or therapeutic area. You also have to be able to understand the broader landscape – not just a particular product – but the context of how a particular medical condition is treated. In community practice it was often really busy, so you do more quick research. In this role, it’s more of a deep dive into specific therapeutic areas or conditions. As pharmacists, relationship building and relationship management are what make us excellent health care providers. Being an Account Supervisor has that same client-facing component. It is also not just working with clients externally, but about the internal relationships as well. In my current role, I act as a liaison with various other teams at McCann – accounts, creative, strategy, production, the list goes on. I am the go-between for the client and our team internally, ensuring that we’re all clear on our goals, next steps and the end game. This position also requires a lot of strategic thinking. In pharmacy you can often get stuck just trying to keep on a level playing field and keeping pace with what the competitor is doing. Being able to think strategically about new and different ways to communicate about a health care product

or a disease state and encouraging clients to think outside of the box, is really the key to being successful at an agency.

Q: HOW DID THE EDUCATION YOU RECEIVED

AT THE LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY HELP GET YOU WHERE YOU ARE TODAY?

A: I think the educational experience at the University of Toronto – whether I’m looking at my undergrad or my time at the Faculty of Pharmacy – was very independent. Not because there wasn’t structure, or because there wasn’t a community; it was just the type of learning environment where you really had to take ownership, accountability, and realize you get out of it what you put in. There’s no hand holding and it’s highly competitive. There are resources to help you, but you also have to figure it out to a degree. Autonomy and ownership is something I took away from my time at the University of Toronto. That being said, I don’t think anything could have prepared me for this job there is not one set path to getting a job at an agency. Everyone here has a different background and took a different road to get here. What I heard a lot of when I was interviewing was that agencies were looking for agency experience - they really want you to have lived in this world and understand what that’s like. I was successful in getting into this line of work

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

because I really sold my skill set and experience as a health care professional.

Q: WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO MAKE THE MOVE FROM WORKING AS A PHARMACIST TO WORKING FOR AN AD AGENCY? A: I was looking for a change. I learned a lot at Pharmacy.ca – we were doing some pretty progressive and exciting things. But I knew that I wanted a change and thought it was the right time in my life to dive into something new. There are things that I love about community practice and I do keep up my Part A license. The agency opportunity was a great intersection of using my training as a pharmacist, with the ability to be more creative, and remaining in a role that is client-facing. Q: WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED? A: When I was looking to make a career change, I spoke with my friend and former boss at Loblaw. I told him I was thinking of making a move, and he was really supportive. He pointed out that careers aren’t always linear, that you have peaks and valleys on your path to get to wherever you’re going. The idea that our career paths are not just always an upward climb and that it’s okay to take a risk and try something different was advice that really stuck with me.


Q: HOW IS THE WORK YOU ARE DOING

groundwork is extremely important because it gives you confidence going into any other role. When you have that core experience you can also speak to the day-to-day reality of an important group of professionals as a whole, and that’s only going to be to your benefit. After that, keep your mind open to different organizations, companies or roles that you could work in that are completely outside of the box. Talk to people - every time I’ve wanted to make a shift, I spent a couple of months going through my LinkedIn profile, thinking of people in my network that could offer useful insights or who could introduce me to someone smarter or more experienced than me. It is so crucial to identify people in your life who, whether on a casual or recurring basis, you can go to for advice and perspective.

HELPING TO CHANGE THE PHARMACY LANDSCAPE IN CANADA?

A: One thing that I realized from at-

tending industry events is that pharmacists are something of a lost health care professional. The public, and in a large part the pharmaceutical industry, thinks about the doctors because they conventionally have had prescribing authority, and they think about nurses because they are close with doctors. Pharmacists are just kind of off to the side and haven’t really been thought of as key stakeholders in the health care system. I think the value that pharmacists can add is really underestimated. Being the pharmacist at the table in this type of role, I’m hoping to be able to push the thinking around what pharmacists can add, the services they can provide, and the information and counselling that they are able to deliver to patients. Understanding what it’s like to work in community – understanding the reality of practice right now, and where there are needs and gaps in terms of what could be offered – allows me to offer strategic insight into how the industry can better engage and leverage pharmacists. I want to be able to bring that perspective to the table and be able to change the conversation.

Q: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE NEW GRADUATES?

A: Spend a few years really developing your foundational skills, whether it’s in a hospital or community setting. Focus on your communication skills, your ability to build and manage relationships with patients and clients, and how to work in a fast-paced environment. Laying that

During her third year of the Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy program, Bianca Brooks was the recipient of the Drug Trading Company Limited Award. Since graduation, she has spent time as a Teaching Assistant in the International Pharmacy Graduate Program. Bianca is a founding member and a representative of the Class of 1T1 on the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy’s Young Alumni Committee.

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Join us for

SPRING REUNION 2017 THURSDAY, JUNE 1

SATURDAY, JUNE 3

6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

11:00 am – 2:00 pm

GOLDEN T DINNER AT THE FACULTY CLUB 41 WILLCOCKS STREET, TORONTO, FOR THE HONOURED CLASSES OF 5T7 AND 6T7

LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY WELCOMES ALL GRADUATES BACK FOR AN OPEN HOUSE BBQ LUNCH. 144 COLLEGE STREET, TORONTO

FRIDAY, JUNE 2

5:30 pm – 8:00 pm

5:30 pm – 8:00 pm CLASS OF 9T2 REUNION AT THE FACULTY CLUB 41 WILLCOCKS STREET, TORONTO

YOUNG ALUMNI REUNION FOR THE CLASSES OF 0T7, 0T8, 0T9, 1T0, 1T1, 1T2, 1T3, 1T4, 1T5 AND 1T6.

Please contact Erika Rueter, Senior Development Officer, Leadership and Alumni Giving, at 416 946 5554 with Spring Reunion inquiries.

Visit springreunion.utoronto.ca for a complete list of all Spring Reunion activities at the University of Toronto.


LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

CHANGE LEADERS Over the last fifteen years, pharmacy, the pharmaceutical sciences, and the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy have undergone a significant transformation. The changing scope of what pharmacists can do, the increased focus on quality of care and relationships with patients, and the opportunity for pharmacists to assume an enhanced role in preventative and primary care, are emerging as key areas that pharmacists can play a leadership role in to ultimately improve the health care system in Ontario, and beyond. Our alumni and the Faculty continue to pave the way for our students – the future generation of pharmacists – to become agents of change, and to continue to redefine the role of the pharmacist, and create new and innovative health care solutions.

Illustration by

Doug Chayka Photography by

Raina+Wilson Jason Gordon


I believe I am showing other pharmacists that we can play an important role in the political process. Jeff Yurek, MPP, Health Critic, Progressive Conservative Party


JEFF YUREK

CHANGE LEADERS

THE PHARMACY ADVOCATE Jeff Yurek (BScPhm 9T5) believes in advocating for his patients and the profession, which he does every day as an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) for Elgin-Middlesex-London. As the Health Critic for the Progressive Conservative Party, he is pointing out the gaps in the health care system and holding the Liberal government accountable for their mandated responsibilities.

B

orn into a family of pharmacists, it was only natural that Jeff would enter the family business. Following in the footsteps of his father Ed, his sister Diane and brother Peter, Jeff graduated from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy in 1995, and returned to St. Thomas, Ontario to practice at Yurek Pharmacy Limited, the family-owned, community pharmacy that his father established. Jeff always had an interest in politics and had planned on getting more involved in the political process once he retired from pharmacy. However in 2011, the decline in the health care system, the challenges facing pharmacy, and the slumping economic conditions in Ontario inspired him to put his name forward. After a historic win (the Elgin-Middlesex-London riding had not elected a Conservative in 25 years), Jeff has spent the last five years working for a better Ontario on behalf of his community and health care professionals across the Province. Sustainable health care that serves the public and creates value for taxpayers is at the core of what Jeff fights for. One of his early accomplishments was the introduction of the private member bill, Ryan’s Law, which was passed unanimously in 2012. The bill made it illegal for schools to keep inhalers away from children

suffering from asthma and was named after Ryan Gibbons, a London, Ontario boy who died after suffering an asthma attack during recess. More recently, Jeff has been a strong supporter of MPP Lisa MacLeod’s Rowan’s Law, which deals with concussions, and Michael Harris’ motion regarding the treatment of rare diseases in Ontario. Additionally, Jeff serves as an advocate for the pharmacy profession in the legislature. “I believe my presence in the Legislature has highlighted the profession. I have seen a change in debates where pharmacists are now mentioned as well as doctors and nurses in discussions,” he said. “I take any opportunity to promote pharmacy and I believe the government now acknowledges the importance of the profession.” Although pharmacists have been traditionally quiet in terms of advocating for the profession, Jeff believes that the pharmacist’s knowledge of the health care system, combined with their daily interaction with patients, makes them ideal advocates for improving health care in Ontario. “Pharmacists have always advocated for their patients but have been reticent about advocating for their profession. It is vital that pharmacists become advocates. Health care is undergoing a massive transformation, and pharmacists must ensure their voice

is heard to guarantee that they are an essential part of the system.” Jeff feels that advocating for an increase in the scope of practice is more important than ever. “Every other health profession is lobbying the government to ensure their scope is expanded in the health care system. Now is the time for pharmacists to show the government the value and expertise they bring to the table,” he adds. Jeff notes that getting involved as an advocate for the profession is easy. In addition to sending letters and emails to the Minister of Health, Jeff suggests developing a relationship with their local MPP. It can be as easy as visiting them at their constituency offices and educating them on the importance of pharmacists in our health care system. He also strongly urges pharmacists to participate in the Ontario Pharmacists Association’s lobby days at the Ontario Legislature, to take advantage of the opportunity to share the value of pharmacists with elected officials. “Pharmacists will continue to become integrated into the system with increased scope. However, the process will be quicker if pharmacists can show value for money. Whether it is five or 10 years, change can happen provided the profession stays united and is vocal with the government about the importance of pharmacy.”

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CARMINE STUMPO

CHANGE LEADERS

THE HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATOR Carmine Stumpo (BScPhm 9T4), Vice President, Programs at the Michael Garron Hospital, is helping to lead the way for transformative health care. Whether it is in his role at the hospital, or at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy where he is helping to educate and mentor the next generation, or as an advocate for the profession, Carmine is paving the way to a better health care system in Ontario.

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fter graduating from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy in 1994, Carmine completed a hospital residency at St. Michael’s Hospital before attending Wayne State University to complete his PharmD. He returned to Toronto in 1997 and took a position as a Clinical Manager at Toronto East General Hospital (now Michael Garron Hospital). Over the nineteen years he has been with the hospital, Carmine has held a number of leadership roles within and outside pharmacy practice with increasing administrative responsibility, ultimately leading to his current role. As Vice President, Programs at the Michael Garron Hospital, Carmine is dedicated to achieving the highest standard of patient care and finding innovative ways to meet and improve the health care needs of the East Toronto community. He spends his time working on a wide range of initiatives like the Project O.R. Smile initiative that the hospital launched in 2015, which is focused on helping more than 60 children from low income families get complex dental surgery, to the development of collaborations with partner hospitals to enhance cancer diagnosis and access to surgery. He is also heavily involved in the planning and design of the hospital’s new patient care centre, with over 300,000

square feet of ambulatory clinics and 210 inpatient beds, as well as projects that look at system change, such as Primary Care Reform and complex patient care management through Health Links. Trying to tackle one of the worst strains on health care – complex patients who are high users of the system – is at the heart of Health Links. “There is a subset of patients that keep coming back to hospital and there needs to be a better way to help them cope with chronic illness, to be more in control of their health and self-manage more effectively,” Carmine points out. “The skills I learned in my pharmacy training are being applied in different ways. I think in many ways we were ahead of our time in terms of patient-centered care, good care planning and basic fundamental skills around how you interact with people. Those lessons are what we now need to build on as we find ways to make the health care system work better for patients.” One of the major obstacles complex patients face is their primary care plan and a lack of understanding around their medications. Carmine sees this as an opportunity for hospitals and physicians to better engage with community pharmacists. “If a community pharmacist could engage with the team and be the person that oversees the drug therapy that would be huge. I know my family doctors

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

would love that, they would love to have that involvement” notes Carmine. “So how do we connect the right people, in the right setting, using the right technology and the right system to be able to make some of the most complex patients cope, manage and be healthier?” Technology and improved abilities to communicate are going to be key to improving patient care. Carmine notes that the Michael Garron Hospital now has the ability to communicate in real time with family doctors, sharing discharge summaries and test results with no lag time. The next step is to determine how to bring community pharmacy into the loop. “How cool would it be to send a discharge prescription direct to the pharmacy in real time, with the relevant information that will help the pharmacist be a better pharmacist, instead of trying to guess what the physician wrote, what they wanted and what the follow up should be.” The ultimate goal for Carmine is to have a seamless connection between hospitals, family physicians and pharmacists. He would like to see patients be able to transition into hospital and transition home while still always being connected and their health care team continuously informed and working on a singular health care plan. “I’m thrilled that in my career I’ve seen how medication management has become such a major quality issue. It’s got people’s attention, so it’s a great opportunity for us to see what we can do to innovate medication management across the entire system.”


The vast majority of every meeting I go to, of everything I do, is looking at performance and change. We have a great health care system – I’m a firm believer in it – but we can’t sit still. Carmine Stumpo, Vice President, Programs at the Michael Garron Hospital

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We have great science here in Toronto. The question is, how do we take that to the next level to commercialize it and get it to patients? At the end of the day, it’s about getting health care solutions to patients around the world.� Rebecca Yu, Head of JLabs @ Toronto

From L: Caitlin McIntyre & Larissa Boychuk


REBECCA YU

CHANGE LEADERS

THE INNOVATOR As Head of JLABS @ Toronto, Rebecca Yu (BScPhm 9T0) is putting the global spotlight on Toronto’s growing research and development in the field of life sciences. A 40,000 square foot life science incubator, JLABS @ Toronto is providing lab space, resources and expertise to help early -stage companies advance pharmaceutical, medical device, consumer and digital health programs.

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ebecca graduated from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy in 1990, and began her pharmacy career at the Wellesley Hospital where she worked as a clinical pharmacist. She then moved to the private sector and spent fifteen years in Health Policy, Medical Affairs, and Government Affairs with Solvay Pharma, Procter & Gamble, Servier and Pfizer. “The skills I learned at the Faculty really helped me in the private sector – the scientific background you receive, learning to work hard, be detail-oriented and to think innovatively, it’s very valuable knowledge.” Rebecca joined Janssen Canada in 2012 as the Director, Strategic Health Technology Assessment. “What made Janssen such a great company to work for is they allowed me to do different projects outside of my core work.” One of those projects was exploring ways of bringing more Research and Development into Canada. Naturally, this brought Rebecca back to her roots at the University of Toronto, including connecting with Dr. Ruth Ross, Chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at U of T. At a meeting with the Global Head of Neuroscience at Johnson & Johnson, Rebecca was able to expose him to the key neuroscience researchers in Toronto, including Dr. Ross’ Centre for Collaborative Drug Research (CCDR). He liked what

he saw and they ended up forming a very successful public-private collaboration called Neuroscience Catalyst. That project really helped grab the attention of Johnson & Johnson on a global level about the innovative research conducted in Toronto and at the university. “People were noticing – we had the Head of JLABS and the Chief Scientific Officer visit Toronto and they were very impressed,” notes Rebecca. She was able to leverage her government affairs experience to introduce them to the Premier and two Ministers, who really wanted JLABS to come to Ontario. It took two years, but JLABS @ Toronto held their grand opening this past Spring. JLABS @ Toronto is Johnson & Johnson’s sixth site, and the first outside of the United States. What started out as a pilot project between stakeholders and the ecosystem to see how Johnson & Johnson could help local entrepreneurs take their innovations to the next level, became such a success that the company made it a permanent venture. JLABS now has approximately 140 companies across its six sites. They have a no-strings-attached business model that provides entrepreneurs with shared lab and office space, equipment, and access to scientific, industry and capital funding experts as they work to build successful early-stage companies. “We make sure

that the space is taken care of. You just have to come into the bench and work,” notes Rebecca. Typically companies graduate from JLABS in two years and, at which point Johnson & Johnson does not own any intellectual property, nor do they have first rights. However, about 30 percent of those that have graduated have signed a collaboration of some sort with Johnson & Johnson. “Our goal is to elevate the ecosystem in Toronto and bring attention to the region on a global level. If this ecosystem is successful, and we can showcase the science that is here, we know others will follow and everyone benefits, including Johnson & Johnson. Ultimately, it will lead to more partnerships and collaborations.” JLABS @ Toronto is already forming significant partnerships with the Faculty. Nanovista Inc., co-founded by Faculty Professor Dr. Christine Allen has signed on to JLABS @ Toronto. Nanovista specializes in visualization agents designed to enhance the performance of imageguided interventions such as surgery, radiotherapy, and drug delivery. Their goal is to save lives by enhancing state-of-the-art medical interventions. Their first product is an injectable imaging agent that will help surgeons clearly identify where tumors are located using computed tomography (CT) and optical imaging. “We are excited to be part of JLABS @ Toronto, and look forward to the opportunity to grow Nanovista and bring this exciting new product to the health care system” notes Dr. Allen. “At the end of the day, that’s ultimately what JLABS is all about,” adds Rebecca. “Getting new technology into the health care system to benefit patients around the world.” JLABS @ Toronto is located at MaRS Discovery District and is a collaboration between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, the University of Toronto, MaRS Discovery District, Janssen Inc., MaRS Innovation and the Government of Ontario, and includes the following hospital partners: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, the Hospital for Sick Children, Sinai Health System, St. Michael’s Hospital, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University Health Network.

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JOHN PAPASTERGIOU

CHANGE LEADERS

THE COMMUNITY PHARMACIST When it comes to community pharmacy practice, John Papastergiou (BScPhm 0T2) has always been interested in pushing the envelope and creating a business model based on patient-focused care. His two Shoppers Drug Mart locations in Toronto are not just places to get a prescription filled - they are known as community health care destinations. They are places patients can get pharmacogenomic screening, cardiovascular risk assessment, AFib testing, comprehensive diabetes management – services that are not readily available at a typical pharmacy in Canada. “Patients recognize that we provide unique offerings” notes Papastergiou, “they value the added services and seek us out because of it.”

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fter graduating from the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy in 2002, John Papastergiou worked as a hospital pharmacist at Sunnybrook Hospital. In 2005, he acquired his first Shoppers Drug Mart (at Pape and Danforth), and started to mimic some of the work he had previously done in his hospital practice. When he acquired the store, the company was starting to undergo a transformation from the traditional pharmacy to a larger store format. John’s early research involved evaluating various pilot programs to see if they were worth keeping and implementing. He looked at what was improving patient outcomes, monitored if patients liked the services they were offering and how many patients used the programs. From the beginning there was a lot of interest in these projects and that led him to expand his work. John was one of the first pharmacists to offer A1C testing in his pharmacies, on which he published a large study that lead to pharmacies across Canada offering A1C clinics.

Indeed, being affiliated with a large chain like Shoppers Drug Mart has its advantages. “Our work in my two Toronto stores can easily end up in the fourteen hundred stores in the pharmacy’s network, and that’s not easy to do if you’re working as an independent pharmacist,” he said. His latest research, pharmacogenomics screening in community pharmacy, is garnering both national and international attention. John is exploring the feasibility and effectiveness of implementing personalized medication services in community practice, and quantifying the type of drug therapy problems identified as a result of the screening. “As the price of this kind of testing goes down and insurers start coming on board,” notes John, “they are going to be looking for people to start doing these type of consultations. I think the area of personalized medicine is going to be a really big business opportunity, and hopefully pharmacists can be the ones to champion it. Given our extensive education in pharmacokinetics and our knowledge of

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

the basic principles used to individualize drug and dosage regimens for patients based on their genetic, physiological and environmental factors, it seems only natural that we would take the lead in this area.” Pharmacogenomics is just one of the frontiers that John is championing to help broaden the community pharmacy practice of the future. “I think we’re going to slowly evolve to a primary health care setting. If I look five to ten years down the road, the traditional dispensing role is going to change and we are going to see more centralization of services.” John hopes to see central fill become a reality in Ontario, which will dramatically lower the cost to fill or refill a prescription. If the price point can be lowered significantly with the use of central fill, it will put money back into the business which can be reinvested into clinical services. John, who is already piloting paperless workflow at both his Shoppers Drug Mart locations, also believes that technology will play a huge role in helping community pharmacies become the primary health care destinations of the future. “To keep the model sustainable we’re not going to be able to do what we do now in our practices,” says John. He truly believes that the community pharmacy of the future is going to be a place where patients will come to get point-of-care testing, vaccinations, clinical opinions on different minor ailments, and ideally, where pharmacists will also be able to do advanced prescribing. John credits the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy for helping instill in him the idea that a pharmacy should be about patient-centered care. The focus on pharmaceutical care in the program prepared him to really start engaging with patients and taking responsibility for patient care. “When you’re in the pharmacy, your priority is the patient. All the work I’ve done since graduating from the Faculty has been built around that philosophy.”


We’re still holding on to that traditional dispensing role and I’m not really sure why. It’s always going to be a part of what we do, but I think we have to look beyond that. John Papastergiou, Associate at Shoppers Drug Mart

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FORWARD TOGETHER Over the last fifteen years, governments across Canada have implemented expanded scopes of practice for pharmacists, acknowledged their expertise as medication therapy experts and leveraged their accessibility as frontline health care providers in the community. In response to these changing roles, the Faculty has revamped our undergraduate curriculum and transitioned to a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program as its entry-to-practice degree. The new curriculum included a new admissions process, expanded experiential education requirements and new assessment and evaluation practices. As we look toward the future, we recognize we cannot stagnate. As a Faculty we need to continue to be visionary. The health care system needs leaders that can advance pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical science to maximize the contributions of pharmacists and generate new solutions to meet the increasingly complex demands of patients and health systems. As Canada’s largest Faculty of Pharmacy, we have a unique opportunity to leverage our outstanding faculty, staff, students and alumni to set a bold agenda that aligns our programs, asserts our leadership, and advances meaningful research and knowledge development, that improves health care in our local community, across Canada, and around the world.

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

Forward Together, the Faculty’s new Academic Plan, has defined our core strategic focus areas for the next five years. Our diverse stakeholders identified priorities and goals designed to advance pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical science research to prepare leaders who create innovative health care solutions. Our Academic Plan will enhance our reputation for impactful research and innovative education and practice. Our graduates and faculty will act as change agents, continuously improving patient care, generating knowledge, enhancing the role of the pharmacist and creating innovative health care solutions. Our flexible, student-focused learning experiences will foster graduates who are versatile, lifelong learners, with the ability to explore multiple career pathways. We will continue to be an incubator and catalyst for new ideas and will further engage in meaningfully collaborative research and innovative partnerships across disciplines, across the University of Toronto and around the globe.


Our five core strategic focus areas for the next five years include: Advancing Education Programs that Develop Leaders for Diverse and Emerging Careers

Lead Innovations in Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science Education and Learner Engagement

We will advance our core programs and create multiple individualized academic pathways that leverage the expertise of our faculty members and prepare our graduates for increasingly diverse career options and practice innovation.

We will develop and integrate innovative education strategies to optimize the learning experience while empowering our faculty and staff to bring their best to teaching and learning.

Grow Our Scientific Impact We will be global leaders in pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical science research, from drug discovery to drug therapy to drug policy. Through our partnerships with researchers, educators, students, health care providers and decision-makers, we will identify and create knowledge that advances science and drives practice, policy and investment on the most important medication related matters.

Improve Health Through Knowledge Translation and Influence on Policy We will leverage our expertise to influence public conversations about pharmaceutical care, pharmaceutical science, and the role of the pharmacist in order to improve health and enhance the optimal use of medications in the health care system. Build a Distinct Brand Identity We will leverage our research and pedagogical expertise and our impact will be recognized internationally, allowing us to attract the best and brightest students, staff and faculty from across Canada and around the world.

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BOUNDLESS LEADERSHIP As Canada’s top pharmacy school, the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy is committed to providing the leadership necessary to excel in a dramatically changing health care landscape. To do so, we require the support and generosity of our worldwide community of alumni and friends. Together, we can prepare the pharmacists of tomorrow with the scientific knowledge and practical skills necessary to deliver the new standard of health care. By expanding opportunities for students and researchers, we will accelerate the ability of our Faculty to make meaningful contributions within the health care system, drive innovation in science and business, and advance pharmacy research. Your support will help us attract the most productive and imaginative students and empower the entire community of scholars to reach their full potential. There are a number of ways to give back to the Faculty including: monthly donations, payroll deductions, gifts of securities or one-time annual gifts. Whatever method and amount you choose, you can be assured that your donation today, and for years to come, will do more than simply support a student award or update a laboratory. Your gift will support a dedicated group of individuals, providing them with the skills, knowledge and experience to meet the current and future needs of today’s complex health care system, ensuring the health and prosperity of our communities. Every gift truly makes a difference. Without the support of our donors, we would not be able to provide pharmacy students with the opportunity to excel and become the future leaders of our profession.

boundless.utoronto.ca/pharmacy

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY


Designed for the Canadian health care system, the

PharmD for Pharmacists program allows you to customize your course selections based on your interests, and gives you the flexibility to complete the program requirements at your own pace.

Expand & shape your practice with a PharmD degree that’s flexible & customizable

pharmacy.utoronto.ca/pharmdforpharmacists


Annual Fund

Support from alumni, whether in the form of scholarships, mentorship or internships sends a strong message that you believe in me and my classmates and that we are worth investing in. Thanks to your support I was able to spend two unbelievable months at a hospital in northern Uganda. This lifechanging experience showed me the incredible impact that pharmacists can have in low-resource settings and ignited a passion for global health. That you care about building the future of the pharmacy profession is inspiring and I am motivated by your generosity to become a truly caring pharmacist and give back to the next generation.”

THANK YOU!

Our reputation as the leader in pharmacy education in Canada has been built by our outstanding faculty, students, alumni and, of course, the steadfast generosity of our donors. Together we will continue to realize the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy’s vast potential and strengthen both the pharmacy profession and health care in Canada. Every gift, no matter the size, truly is important and makes a difference. Thank you to the many people – alumni, friends, faculty, staff, students and parents – without whom we could not succeed.

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

ERIN CICINELLI, PHARMD STUDENT

I have been extremely fortunate to receive a number of scholarships to support my studies as well as funding to attend and present at international scientific conferences, broadening my networks and enhancing my development. KAREN LAM, PHD STUDENT


$18,666 tuition for a pharmacy student in 2015-2016

$465,676 awarded in student financial assistance in 2015-2016

$872

average student financial assistance received

$196,693 raised

25

different student clubs and organizations that received funding from the Annual Fund during the year

75

students received funding to attend various industry conferences throughout the year

30 534

faculty and student events funded through the Annual Fund in 2015-2016

students received financial assistance in the form of scholarships and bursaries in 2015-2016

14

21

students received funding through the Annual Fund for internships in countries like Australia, China, Galapagos Islands, Ghana, Switzerland, and Uganda.

412

students in our PhD, Masters and PharmD programs who are conducting research in the areas of pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical sciences received funding to attend and present at conferences and symposia around the world.

donors

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Honour Roll

DEAN’S CIRCLE DONORS

ANNUAL FUND

The Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy is grateful to the following members of the Dean’s Circle for their generous and ongoing support. Their annual gifts of $1,000 or more (or of $250 and above for current students and young alumni of the last decade) are critical in advancing the Faculty’s top priorities each year. Donors listed below have made leadership gifts or pledges to the Faculty between May 1, 2015 and April 30, 2016.

Gifts from alumni, faculty, staff and friends are at the heart of philanthropy at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy. These gifts assist to shape student life and learning and advance groundbreaking research at the Faculty. Donors listed below have made a gift to the Faculty between May 1, 2015 and April 30, 2016.

Chris Aljawhiri Zubin Austin Selasi Badasu John F. Bajc Erwin S. Bonivart Heather S. Boon Bianca Brooks Barrie Cade Andrea J. Cameron Salina Y. Chan Christine Charlebois Vernon K. Chiles Virginia Cirocco The Dan Family and Leslie and Anna Dan Irma W. Davies Carlo De Angelis Dina Dichek Linda D. Dresser Drug Trading Company Limited Lindsay Dryden Mahlon M. and Barbara Dyer Hussien H. El Ghamry Federation of Chinese Canadian Professionals (Ontario) Education Foundation Ramon Goomber Sherif Guorgui Jack Gwartz Paul J. Heffer Muriel A. Heska Wayne and Lois Hindmarsh Lori A. Howard Sidney M. and Elaine Kadish Doris C. Kalamut William Kassel Shana O. Kelley Evelyn and Ubby Krakauer Lesley Lavack Geor-Ming Lee London and District Pharmacist Association Stephanie Lovering

Shama Acharya Christina Adams Neil C. Adamson Anita Alexiou Frank E. Allevato Mais Al-Sheikhly Suzanne B. Auld Peter Babishuk Antonetta R. Bailie Martha J. Bailkowski Ravinder Kaur Banait Henry Barkin Bill and Ginny Bartle Loredana D. Berescu Eveline Berger Marvin G. Bernstein Rudy Bies Lorena Ann Blain Mark A. Bocchinfuso Scott H. Booth Barry M. Bowen Anne M. Broeders Elizabeth M. Brown Donald R. Brunton Linda Bubenko Charles W. J. Bull Margaret A. Bull Christine Burchat Michael J. Burnett Kalyna Z. Butler Roger C. Campbell Ronald E. Campigotto The Canadian Institute Bernard R. Ceifets John D. Chapski Sally L. Charlton Julie B. Chen Wing Billy Cheung Elizabeth Chiu Caroline S. Chu John Cobby Nancy E. Coffey

William N. MacEachern Jean V. Macie Rita McDowall Carole G. McKiee Merck Canada Limited Medical Pharmacies Group Inc. Ernest J. Miatello Giovanna A. and Jack Nagao Pauline Ng Nong’s Company Limited Ontario College of Pharmacists Ontario Pharmacists Association Steve and Gail Pearson Pharmasave Ontario David E. Pellow Pfizer Canada Inc. Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Lalitha Raman-Wilms Raymond and Anita Reilly Rexall Pharma Plus Marie A. Rocchi Mark Rosenhek Gary William Ross Erika M. Rueter Monica Seger Richard Sevazlian Shoppers Drug Mart/ Pharmaprix Life Foundation John C. Somerville Michael Spino Ian Stewart Mahmoud Suleiman Teva Canada Limited Peter Tolios Marko Tomas Undergraduate Pharmacy Society Helen M. Walton Walmart Canada Corp. David White Heather A. Wiegand Cathy and David Windross Peter Wonder

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

Kelly A. Cowan Ian Crandall Elizabeth F. Crichton David R. Crockett Marcia J. Crockett Della Croteau Robert Croxall Karen Currie Michael S. Cybulsky Roger G. Daher Samuel D’Alfonso Edward G. Davies Mary M. Davies Roger Demers Asmara D. Devree-Wilson Mary Lou T. Doran Joan D. Doubt Robert Dunn-Dufault Robert C. Eberhardt Suzanne K. Eckert Andreas Eden Martin J. Edge Bruce E. Elliott Martin M. Engel Mary F. Ewert P. E. Fedirchuk Rochelle Feldberg Robert T. Ferrier Alexandra Fievoli Phyllis and Ab Flatt Family Endowment Fund Maija Fleck Samuel Fleming Kathryn A. Fletcher Patricia M. Fontana Antonietta Forrester Dale A. Foulkes Marcia J. Frank Stanley Freedman Mary E. Gallaugher


Robert H. Gallaugher Monica Gan J. Peter Gardner S. David Garshowitz Jane M. Gauvreau Ben J. Golinsky Doreen R. Gryfe Randy Gunning Eric P. Gunter Heather L. Hadden Janet E. Heffer Inga Hellings John E. Henderson Nikolaus Herberholz Paul Herbert Jack B. Hoffman Honest Ed’s Pharmacy Limited Heather A. Howell Kevin Huang Jonathan Eric Hunchuck Dolores C. Iaboni Cheryl and Phillip Jalowiec Valentina I. Jelincic Mike Johnson Benjamin B. Kachuck Anne Kalvik Debbie F. Katchky Luba Kelebay Mary J. Kerr Yoonhwa Kim Robert Kipp Adeline Loo Yee Koh Susan J. Kriger Becky A. Kuehl Robert S. Laing William J. Laing Daniel S-K Lam Wendy Y. M. Lam Claire Larocque Larry Hallok Pharmacist Prof. Corp. Janet Lavack Eileen S. Lee Laura J. Lefave Maureen G. Lepinskie Robert S. Lesco Nelson S. T. Leung Daisy W. Li Katherine Loh Anne H. J. Longo Faith S. Louis

Joan Ruth Lounds Murray H. Love Sylvia Lynch Janice M. Mack Linda D. MacKeigan Hugh G. MacKinnon John J. MacReady Andrew C. C. Mah Harveer Mahil Raymond Mak J M. Manley Kathleen Mansfield Inda D. M. Marcucci William P. Markow Jane A. Martin Dustin Mathieu Walter H. Mausser Richard E. Mawdsley B. C. Mayhew Bruce G. McAlpine Christine McBean Maribeth McCluskey Donald R. McDermott Mary E. McLean Rita McMahon McMaster University Allan R. McPhee Switlana Medwidsky Josephine P. Meeker Janice Meisner Anne Milochik Boris Mirsky Ruth M. Mitchell Alei Eldeen Mohamed P. Bruce L. Mooney Elizabeth J. Moran-Murray Katrina Mulherin John K. Murdoch Victoria B. Murray Marianne J. Nagata Michael Nawar Michael J. Naylor Robert H. and Virginia R. Newman Darcy L. Nicksy Lesia Pahuta Frank Palko Martha J. Palys Diane L. Pawlowsky Jane S. Penney Leo U. Penttila Laurie Phillips

Robert S. Phillips Neil Proctor Pole Dawn E. Polley Monica Powell Thomas Albert Pugsley Vince Purificati Ronald Radwick Kimberly A. Rae Ross E. Ransom Anna Reffo Brigitte P. Reiner Anne Resnick Vicky M. Reynolds Linda E. Robertson Murray Rubin Henry Ruschin Happy Saladeen Stanley S. Salapatek Teresa I. Salerno Mohammad J. Sarwar Margaret J. Sayers D. Lyn Schlotzhauer Eva Y. Scott Gundi R. Seifried The Semchism Family Lisa Margaret Sever Sharbot Lake Pharmacy Ltd. Diane Louise Sherk-Jones John W. Silke Manuel Silva Jagdeep Singh Judith M. Skene-Rogelj William D. Skorenky Marilyn L. Sloan Deborah A. Smeltzer Thomas A. Smiley Linda Mae Snyder Richard M. Stein Margaret Stewart Jack L. Stone Fanar Swaida Elena Sze Angela L. Teasdale John D. Toohey Linh T. Tran Nancy J. Trimble Yu Chung and Annie Tsang Stephanie C. Tsao Jack P. Uetrecht Valerie Lynn Unger Michael Vachon Fatima Vieira-Cabral

Robert Vukovic James C. Walton Robert A. Watson Jim and Margo Watt Katri L. West Lyle H. Whitham Gary J. Willard R. Scott Wilton Peter J. Wojcik Joanne Wong Murray A. Wood May H. Woolfe J. A. Wordsworth Tamara L. Wright Tracy L. Wylie Misaki Yamamoto Karen T. Yates Deanna S. Yee-Chu Tama R. Zalan Nicholas Zamora Mary Zerebecki Vyacheslav Zlydennyy Rosemary Kathleen Zvonar

We would also like to thank all the individuals who support the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy anonymously.

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Donor Profile

Advocating for Excellence Photography by

Raina+Wilson

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

The Ontario Pharmacists Association’s generosity is helping to shape the future of pharmacy in Ontario


Photography by

Raina+Wilson

FROM L: SEAN SIMPSON (BSCPHM 0T6; OPA CHAIR), ERIN CICINELLI, DENNIS DARBY (OPA CEO), TIANA TILLI, SHANE NIRULA, MIKE CAVANAGH (BSCPHM 0T6; OPA VICE CHAIR), RACHEL LIU, GERICK ABACA

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Donor Profile

In 2014, the Ontario Pharmacists Association (OPA) established the Ontario Pharmacists Association Awards, recognizing five students entering Year Four of the undergraduate pharmacy program for academic excellence and outstanding service to the community. As the largest pharmacist advocacy organization in Canada, OPA is dedicated to working on behalf of all patients, pharmacists, pharmacy students and pharmacy technicians across Ontario in an effort to evolve the practice of pharmacy and advocate for the highest standards of professional excellence and fair compensation. “We wanted to have a continued presence at the Faculty and remind students that the professional association is here and (we) can’t succeed without them,” said OPA CEO Dennis Darby. “We advocate for excellence in practice and care. We wanted our values to be

represented and the recipients to be students that stand for what our organization is trying to do.” This year, the recipients of the Ontario Pharmacists Association Awards are five students who have all served in various leadership and volunteer roles, both at the Faculty and in their communities: Gerick Abaca, Erin Cicinelli, Rachel Liu, Shane Nirula and Tiana Tilli. Not only do these students represent some of the Faculty’s best students in terms of academic performance, but they are also students who have achieved their outstanding grades while giving back to their respective communities. Tiana and Shane have both been incredibly active in student government, serving in a multitude of different roles, ultimately becoming President and Vice-President of the Undergraduate Pharmacy Society for the 2015-2016 year. Rachel has been a volunteer with a number of hospitals including St. Michael’s, The Hospital for Sick Children, and Credit Valley Hospital, while Gerick has played numerous volunteer roles in events, social activities and mentorship with a number of religious organizations. Erin recognized the need for helping the disadvantaged members of the community early in her pharmacy education and founded the Pharmacy Student Service Team (PhaSST), a group dedicated to facilitating community involvement among pharmacy students, by

We wanted to have a continued presence at the Faculty and remind students that the professional association is here and (we) can’t succeed without them. We advocate for excellence in practice and care. We wanted our values to be represented and the recipients to be students that stand for what our organization is trying to do. OPA CEO DENNIS DARBY


organizing volunteer opportunities in partnership with local community service programs. “I have had some amazing opportunities while studying at the Faculty,” said Tiana. “Without the support of donors like the OPA, I would not have been able to take advantage of all the extra-curricular activities and internships that will make me a well rounded practitioner. I am proud to be a part of a profession and organization that supports its newest members.” “Being a pharmacist is about more than just providing health care,” added Erin. “It’s about using our education, skills, and knowledge to build and actively serve our communities,” she said. “Receiving an award that recognizes my work has given me the encouragement and resources to continue these efforts. I have great respect for the OPA and for the advocacy work they do on behalf of the pharmacy community in Ontario, and it is a huge honour to have been selected as one of the award recipients this year.” Darby acknowledges that the practice of pharmacy continues to ask more and more from its pharmacists as the profession evolves. “The people who volunteer, work hard in school – they’re the people who continue to give back once they’re in practice,” he notes. “We’re thrilled to be able to encourage and reward those students.” The Doctor of Pharmacy program at the

Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, which includes practice based experience in all four years, is teaching students not only therapeutic knowledge but also the judgement required with expanding the scope of practice and the ability to have successful patient interactions. “We’ve been at the Faculty for Lunch and Learns and these students are ready and excited to move the profession forward,” continued Darby. “They want to practice differently. We at the OPA are very hopeful that we are seeing the generation that will change the profession.” In the next few years OPA will continue to focus on the expanding scope of practice. They are driven to remove barriers to practice so that pharmacists in Ontario can do all the things that pharmacists in the leading jurisdictions around the world are able to do. “We’d really like to have pharmacists able to be a key part of the circle of care, taking on the appropriate role as the medication experts. Pharmacists are a fantastic resource,” notes Darby. “Let’s get the government and the private sector to recognize the value pharmacists bring.” Award winner Rachel concurs. “It’s extremely encouraging for students to have an organization that applauds our success and works on our behalf,” she said. “We are all proud to be associated with the OPA and the work they do for the health care community in Ontario.”

I have had some amazing opportunities while studying at the Faculty. Without the support of donors like the OPA, I would not have been able to take advantage of all the extra-curricular activities and internships that will make me a more rounded practitioner. TIANA TILLI

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Class Notes

Tell us where you are, what you’re doing, who you care about, and how you’re staying in touch with your Pharmacy friends. Celebrate your achievements, activities and interests. Let us know about the latest matches and hatches—these are your pages.

6T4

GARY BANKS

I don’t know where the time went, but, after 50-odd years or so of working I am happily retired. During those years I have been in the RCAF as a reservist (before U of T), taught at Clarkson Secondary School (that was amazing), and was partners, or owned outright, 3 successful dispensaries. Along the way my wife Christiane and I found time to raise 3 sons and also have 3 grandchildren with another on the way. My wife has recently published a novel called “Amelia’s Prayer”, and now we are busy promoting it. It’s like having another career. We are lucky!

6T4

LYNN CORLEY (SMART)

This year has been one of travel: San Miguel de Allende, Santa Fe, Victoria, Cambridge, Cuba, Chelsea, Quebec and the Cognashene Community on Georgian Bay. This year is also the year of my separation and divorce. My three children, Greg, Rebecca and Amy are doing fine. I recently attended a conference on the TRC Plans of Action in Winnipeg. I took part on a St. Michael’s University committee for a conference. I am

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

sponsoring a refugee family with a group at my apartment complex. All is well.

7T3

Bill Dingwall and Vera Smith are planning a 45th reunion for the Class of 7T3 on the weekend of September 14-16, 2018. Since many classmates live far away, we hope this early notification will encourage you to plan to attend the reunion. By popular demand we will return to the Fern Resort (Orillia, Ontario). A limited number of rooms have been set aside at a reasonable rate that will include all meals. For further details please contact Vera Smith at 705-326-8290 (pedpharm@rogers.com) or Bill Dingwall 705-812-0614 (bdingwall@rogers.com).

7T3

TOM BETTS

After 43 years (this past September), I hung up my lab coat and retired. It saddens me that I will miss all the newly expanded scope of practice - it’s just the beginning of even more new and exciting changes in the services we provide, along with the interaction with our patients and other healthcare providers. I will miss that,


but it’s time to let the new generation of intelligent, caring and capable young pharmacists lead the charge. It has been quite a journey as I recall telling the current (much younger) staff what we did back in the “old days” (no patient records, let alone computers). No counselling - in fact, interaction with patients seemed to be discouraged (dispensaries on 2nd floors, inaccessible to patients, or elevated dispensary floors so we’d talk down to our customers). No assistants - so scraping labels off of Maalox bottles or peeling the labels off of Kenacomb cream were part of my job. No child proof vials, and an electric typewriter was the big technological advance. I have loved changing with the times, and watching the profession grow and justifiably be one of the most trusted of all professions. It has been an honour to work with some of the best people in the business, to learn and to serve my patients. However, as I said, it’s time to move on and let the new pharmacists take over. I’ll be on the sidelines, cheering them on. With my thanks Pharmacy, it’s been a good journey.

7T6

JOE SELISKE

The U of T Faculty of Pharmacy class of 7T6 got together for their 40th reunion on the weekend of May 27-29, 2016 at Hockley Valley Resort in Mono, Ontario. Thirty-six members of the class attended with a random number of spouses. There was a get-together in Jennie Hopkins’ room on Friday night where the early arrivers exchanged memories over an assortment of fermented beverages. Saturday brought a variety of activities such as golf or sightseeing to neighbouring communities (such as Creemore) or just reminiscing by the pool.  There was a dinner on Saturday where people could attend without staying

over. MC Dave Hetherington kept the group in stitches with his humour wound around old memories. Class members who have passed away were remembered by the group. Freda Leung was recognized for her 2015 Commitment to Care and Service Award for Advanced Learning.

7T7

The Class of 7T7 is planning their 40th reunion for Saturday, May 27, 2017! There will be a cocktail reception and building tour of the Faculty (144 College Street), followed by dinner at the Intercontinental Toronto Yorkville. Look for your invitation from the Faculty and be sure to update your address with the University so you get your invitation! Join our Facebook page: U of T Pharmacy Class of ’77. For more information contact Elizabeth Johnston (Johnstonc60@gmail.com) or Erika Rueter at the Faculty (erika.rueter@utoronto.ca).

0T8

JESSIE SINGH

My husband, Colin D’Mello, and I would like to announce the birth of our daughter Mia Kaur D’Mello, born April 9th 2016.

1T0

VINCENT HO & JESSICA LAM

Jessica and I met during our time in school and we are thrilled to share that we got married this past Summer! Since graduation, Jessica is now a pharmacist with the Taddlecreek Family Health Team and is currently pursuing her Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD). I recently graduated with my PharmD and I am working as a pharmacist in the intensive care unit at Hamilton Health Sciences Centre.

1T2

OLIVIA NG

8T3

MYRTLE LESCO (NEE D’CRUZ) AND ROBERT LESCO

I met the love of my life in first year of Pharmacy school at U of T in 1979. We graduated in 1983. We have been married 30 years (October 1985) and have 3 children that we are very proud of. It turns out that none of them want to follow in our footsteps as pharmacists.

8T5

JOHN T. WIERNIKOWSKI

I was inducted as one of the inaugural 4 Fellows of the Canadian Association of Pharmacy in Oncology (FCAPhO). I was also this year’s recipient of the Larry Broadfield Distinguished Service Award from CAPhO.

I am now an Adjunct Lecturer with the Faculty of Pharmacy and was honoured to receive the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists (CSHP) New Hospital Pharmacy Practitioner Award and the Wightman-Berris Academy Teaching Excellence Award this year.

1T4

ZHENMING WEI

My fiancée Katrina Grubb (1T5) and I are happy to announce we are engaged - we just added another pharmacist couple to the world. We went on a trip to my homeland of China in May and I proposed on the Great Wall. We are happily settled down and bought a house in Walkerton, Ontario and are in fact co-workers at a community independent pharmacy. Kind of surprised we haven’t killed each other yet.

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Class Notes

In Memoriam This year, we learned of the passing of the following alumni:

6T7

DAVID BLOOM

David Bloom, one of the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy’s most prominent alumni, passed away on September 25th at the age of 76. David graduated from the Faculty in 1967 and began his career as a pharmacist with Shoppers Drug Mart at their Yorkdale Shopping Centre store. In 1971 he joined Shoppers Drug Mart’s management team as Director of Operations and went on to hold positions of increasing responsibility until being named President and Chief Executive Officer in 1983. David added the Chairman’s title in 1986 upon the retirement of Shoppers Drug Mart founder (and fellow Pharmacy alumnus) Murray Koffler and served as Chairman and CEO until his own retirement in 2001. During his highly successful tenure as Chief Executive Officer, he doubled the chain’s store count, quadrupled its sales, and generated a tenfold increase in earnings. He also launched the Shoppers Optimum Program, which has become one of Canada’s most popular customer loyalty programs with more than 10 million members.

of the Leslie L. Dan Pharmacy Building, which resulted in the Herbert R. Binder/ Shoppers Drug Mart Professional Practice Laboratory, the Shoppers Drug Mart/David Bloom Student Lounge, and the Shoppers Drug Mart/Herbert R. Binder Bursaries.

David was a staunch supporter of the Faculty and served as the Honorary Chairman of the fundraising campaign for the F. Norman Hughes Research Chair in Pharmacoeconomics. He was also the driving force behind Shoppers Drug Mart’s $3.2 million commitment to the construction

In addition to his commitment to the Faculty, David supported a number of organizations across Canada including the Ontario Science Centre, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Hospital for Sick Children, Mount Sinai Hospital and the Canadian Foundation for AIDS Research. Most

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY

recently, David focused his efforts on raising funds for the David and Molly Bloom Chair in Multiple Myeloma Research at Princess Margaret Hospital. “David Bloom was an incredible man who transformed the retail pharmacy landscape in Canada,” said Dean Heather Boon. “His dedication to the profession, to the Faculty, and to the community has been tremendous. We are proud to call David an alumnus and a friend of the Faculty, and send our sincerest condolences to his family during this difficult time.”


Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy Lives Remembered Harry M. Sauer, 3T9

Louis R. Norton, 4T8

G. D. Buckingham, 6T2

John C. Schuyler, 3T9

Morris Weldman, 5T2

David C. McIntyre, 6T3

Margaret E. Hall, 4T0

Marv William, 5T4

Helen M. Ventin, 6T3

Robert Scott, 4T1

Bernice C. Willis, 5T5

Helena Decyk, 6T5

Muriel B. Ronson, 4T2

Marvin K. Jones, 5T6

George A. Hutton, 4T3

Leo Weksler, 5T6

James W. C. McConnachie, 6T5

Catherine E. Haffey, 4T6

Joe R. Greco, 5T7

Hugh V. J. Sullivan, 4T7

Jean R. Kupiec, 5T7

Joyce A. Wordsworth, 4T7

Larry Rosen, 5T7

Robert W. Bevers, 4T8

Donald M. Sproule, 5T8

Lieutenant Commander Harold Jamieson, 4T8

George V. Kiproff, 5T9

Carole-Ann M. Ray, 6T8 Paul H. Dennison, 6T9 Catherine R. Kelley, 7T4 Michael P. MacCrone, 7T4

Murray Caplan, 6T1

We always welcome submissions to Class Notes. Please email your news to us at any time at erika.rueter@utoronto.ca RXCELLENCE FALL 2016

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Behind the Scenes A lot of work goes into each issue of Rxcellence, but we also have a lot of fun! Here are a few outtakes from this issue.


LESLIE DAN FACULTY OF PHARMACY CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ENHANCE YOUR SKILLS. ADVANCE YOUR PRACTICE.

The Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto offers Continuous Professional Development (CPD) courses to help pharmacy professionals stay at the forefront of pharmacy practice in Canada. As one of the leading pharmacy educators and research institutions in the world, we are uniquely positioned to provide you with cutting-edge practice instruction delivered by today’s top educators and practitioners.

Visit cpd.pharmacy.utoronto.ca Your life-long learning partner RXCELLENCE FALL 2016

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RXCELLENCE ALUMNI MAGAZINE FALL 2016

Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy University of Toronto 144 College Street Toronto, Ontario Canada M5S 3M2 TEL 416 978 2889 FAX 416 978 8511

pharmacy.utoronto.ca

Rxcellence 2016  

The University of Toronto Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy's Alumni Magazine The University of Toronto Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy's Annual...

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