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YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles 625 South New Hampshire Avenue Los Angeles, California 90005-1342 213.380.6448 | fax 213.251.9720 www.ymcala.org

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My YMCA The YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles 125 years and counting


Our Mission The YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles puts Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.


executive letter

Through its imagination, generosity and compelling optimism,

the ymca improves all our lives.

—Larry Rosen

In truth, what has made the Los Angeles YMCA such an amazing venture is the contributions of millions of people involved.

2006 was a milestone year for the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles as it was for another American institution, the U.S. Supreme Court. We turned a robust 125 and Sandra Day O’Connor, the first female justice appointed to Court, retired from the bench after twenty-five years. Justice O’Connor’s thoughtful, informed opinions confirmed that “common sense makes good laws”—just as it makes good policy. “We pay a price,” she often said, “when we deprive children of the exposure to the values, principles and education they need to make them good citizens.” Here’s someone who knows a thing or two about taking the long view, shaping the generations and the constant passion of purpose. Her words are inspiring and instructive as we set the course for the YMCA at 125. How will we go about that? Every six years, each of the twenty-five Los Angeles YMCAs drafts a strategic plan built on the accomplishments of its previous efforts. The plans are then submitted to the Metropolitan

WELCOME TO THE YMCA OF METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES

Board of Directors who identify common objectives to create a unified direction for the entire Association. Learning, fine-tuning and growing from plan to plan, the YMCA has been building strong children, strong

whose twenty-five branches have been home to six generations of Angelinos who feel as tribal about the YMCA today as they did when it was founded 125 years ago.

families and strong communities in L.A. since 1882. We know achieving our goals won’t be easy. Nothing worthwhile ever is. But we have a powerful resource to draw from: A history of making the YMCA relevant to all, and giving every member a seat at the table, no matter who they are. A history of meeting challenges head-on—using ingenuity and civic courage to transform difficult situations into good, working common sense solutions. Today’s newcomers will find the YMCA just as supportive and committed to connecting them into the community—whether it’s through a language class, child care program, counseling session or fitness class. These activities fill serious needs. They initiate new friendships, expose people to their common humanity, give individuals and families a window to a new set of possibilities. Where do we go from here? The YMCA has increased its attention to a disease we’ve infected ourselves with—one that totals more than $103 billion in lost productivity and unnecessary healthcare costs every year: the epidemic of lifestyle-related disease and disability, including the compounding tragedy of childhood obesity.

02

Ask a member, any member to tell you about “My YMCA.” You’ll be amazed by their stories and moved by stories like the ones that follow.


executive letter

Through its imagination, generosity and compelling optimism,

the ymca improves all our lives.

—Larry Rosen

In truth, what has made the Los Angeles YMCA such an amazing venture is the contributions of millions of people involved.

2006 was a milestone year for the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles as it was for another American institution, the U.S. Supreme Court. We turned a robust 125 and Sandra Day O’Connor, the first female justice appointed to Court, retired from the bench after twenty-five years. Justice O’Connor’s thoughtful, informed opinions confirmed that “common sense makes good laws”—just as it makes good policy. “We pay a price,” she often said, “when we deprive children of the exposure to the values, principles and education they need to make them good citizens.” Here’s someone who knows a thing or two about taking the long view, shaping the generations and the constant passion of purpose. Her words are inspiring and instructive as we set the course for the YMCA at 125. How will we go about that? Every six years, each of the twenty-five Los Angeles YMCAs drafts a strategic plan built on the accomplishments of its previous efforts. The plans are then submitted to the Metropolitan

WELCOME TO THE YMCA OF METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES

Board of Directors who identify common objectives to create a unified direction for the entire Association. Learning, fine-tuning and growing from plan to plan, the YMCA has been building strong children, strong

whose twenty-five branches have been home to six generations of Angelinos who feel as tribal about the YMCA today as they did when it was founded 125 years ago.

families and strong communities in L.A. since 1882. We know achieving our goals won’t be easy. Nothing worthwhile ever is. But we have a powerful resource to draw from: A history of making the YMCA relevant to all, and giving every member a seat at the table, no matter who they are. A history of meeting challenges head-on—using ingenuity and civic courage to transform difficult situations into good, working common sense solutions. Today’s newcomers will find the YMCA just as supportive and committed to connecting them into the community—whether it’s through a language class, child care program, counseling session or fitness class. These activities fill serious needs. They initiate new friendships, expose people to their common humanity, give individuals and families a window to a new set of possibilities. Where do we go from here? The YMCA has increased its attention to a disease we’ve infected ourselves with—one that totals more than $103 billion in lost productivity and unnecessary healthcare costs every year: the epidemic of lifestyle-related disease and disability, including the compounding tragedy of childhood obesity.

02

Ask a member, any member to tell you about “My YMCA.” You’ll be amazed by their stories and moved by stories like the ones that follow.


executive letter

Not only are increasing numbers of adults falling victim to poor lifestyle health habits, the children are being swept along by the same malicious tide. Doctors today see children with heart disease, high cholesterol and Type 2 Diabetes—the first generation whose life expectancy is projected to be less than the generation before it. The YMCA realizes the problem lies not only with the children, but also squarely with the adults who feed them and act as role models for unhealthy behavior. All of our aspirations to help children develop as leaders and persons of good character are compromised severely by these on-going threats to their physical wellbeing. Good health is the foundation on which all other expectations and hope in life are built. Once again, the YMCA is dedicated to getting it right from the beginning. Understanding full well that building is better than mending, the YMCA is focused on improving the awareness of parents of the power of their personal example regarding healthy living and healthy nutrition to break the cycle of poor choices passed on to children. Health studies have led the YMCA to a second initiative: coming to the support of a segment of society that tries, but struggles to sustain healthy habits on its own. This group, which makes up 30% of Americans, spends $35 billion a year on their aims to adopt healthy habits, but consistently falls back into unhealthy ways. These “health seekers” want, need and deserve the skilled support of the YMCA for their goals and we are determined to provide the information, tools and, most importantly, on-going personal coaching and encouragement they will need to succeed. Of course, none of our goals or accomplishments would be possible without the boundless time, energy,

It’s the home in your neighborhood built for the common good. It’s the home

and generosity of our volunteers, donors, staff and members. Nor would our deeper purposes of building

for generations of families, individuals and dreams—of stories and histories, of

character, developing leadership, shaping generations and strengthening communities.

“what ifs” and “why nots?” Of good memories, good causes, good classes, good habits and endless opportunities to learn from each other. Of fresh starts and fresh possibilities, of meet and greet and gather and grow.

“Life,” Jackie Robinson reminds us, “is not a spectator sport.” You have to be in the middle of it to get things done. We’re especially gratified that the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles has tackled big, important issues and that for 125 years we’ve worked long and hard to make a difference. Our reach will always exceed our grasp.

robert j. lowe

larry m. rosen

Chairman of the Board

President and Chief Executive Officer

05


executive letter

Not only are increasing numbers of adults falling victim to poor lifestyle health habits, the children are being swept along by the same malicious tide. Doctors today see children with heart disease, high cholesterol and Type 2 Diabetes—the first generation whose life expectancy is projected to be less than the generation before it. The YMCA realizes the problem lies not only with the children, but also squarely with the adults who feed them and act as role models for unhealthy behavior. All of our aspirations to help children develop as leaders and persons of good character are compromised severely by these on-going threats to their physical wellbeing. Good health is the foundation on which all other expectations and hope in life are built. Once again, the YMCA is dedicated to getting it right from the beginning. Understanding full well that building is better than mending, the YMCA is focused on improving the awareness of parents of the power of their personal example regarding healthy living and healthy nutrition to break the cycle of poor choices passed on to children. Health studies have led the YMCA to a second initiative: coming to the support of a segment of society that tries, but struggles to sustain healthy habits on its own. This group, which makes up 30% of Americans, spends $35 billion a year on their aims to adopt healthy habits, but consistently falls back into unhealthy ways. These “health seekers” want, need and deserve the skilled support of the YMCA for their goals and we are determined to provide the information, tools and, most importantly, on-going personal coaching and encouragement they will need to succeed. Of course, none of our goals or accomplishments would be possible without the boundless time, energy,

It’s the home in your neighborhood built for the common good. It’s the home

and generosity of our volunteers, donors, staff and members. Nor would our deeper purposes of building

for generations of families, individuals and dreams—of stories and histories, of

character, developing leadership, shaping generations and strengthening communities.

“what ifs” and “why nots?” Of good memories, good causes, good classes, good habits and endless opportunities to learn from each other. Of fresh starts and fresh possibilities, of meet and greet and gather and grow.

“Life,” Jackie Robinson reminds us, “is not a spectator sport.” You have to be in the middle of it to get things done. We’re especially gratified that the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles has tackled big, important issues and that for 125 years we’ve worked long and hard to make a difference. Our reach will always exceed our grasp.

robert j. lowe

larry m. rosen

Chairman of the Board

President and Chief Executive Officer

05


navie smith

When doctors couldn’t find the source of her grandson’s ailment, Navie Smith found something at her YMCA she needed just as much:

compassion.

Ask Navie Smith about her seven year-old grandson Tyttis, and she’ll tell you, “he weighs fifty pounds—and about forty pounds of that is heart.”

“He loves to read,” she says. So much so, he’s earned

Then Erica came in with a walker. That was the start

a scholarship to a school outside the Central L.A. neighbor-

to our way back.”

hood where he lives.

“He loves summer camp—always has,” Navie says.

But on Easter Weekend, 2006, things were different.

“It’s especially important to keep kids busy in summer—

Tyttis was playing in the park, fell and couldn’t get up.

idle time is when bad things can start happening. Camp

At first, the other kids thought he was just embarrassed,

gives kids something they can feel good about. It helps

fooling around. The hospital she rushed him to told her

build self-esteem. Besides, the YMCA is where you meet

the same thing. “Your grandson is playacting, Mrs. Smith,

people from all different places. That helps you see things

there’s absolutely nothing wrong with him.”

different, and realize that maybe things can be different.”

Navie knew better. It wasn’t like Tyttis. Finally, she

Navie remembers one day when she brought Tyttis

took him to the hospital determined not to leave until

to the YMCA for the afternoon. As she was getting ready to

someone found out what was wrong. Tyttis has since

leave, she noticed Erica hadn’t brought Tyttis his walker.

been diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, a painful,

“Oh, he won’t be needing that today, Mrs. Smith,” she said.

chronic inflammation of the joints that can severely

“Are you sure?” Navie asked. “We’re both sure

restrict movement particularly in the legs.

Tyttis is getting along just fine.”

Looking for a way to take Tyttis’s mind off his

It’s the home of a healthy outlook, the physically fit, the mentally stimulated and lifelong learning. Of extraordinary child care, well-adapted kids, citizen teenagers, working moms, active dads and all manner of motivated men and women.

“Taking my grandson to the YMCA was the best

condition, Navie took him to her local YMCA.

thing that ever could have happened. I’d just about come

“I went there crying, hoping they would help me with

to the end of my rope. We needed help and there they

him,” she said. “And Michelle looks at me and says,

were. They didn’t do it because they had to. They did it

‘Of course we will.’

because they wanted to. And I’ll never forget it.”

Navie Smith with her grandson Tyttis (L) and son Zion.

06


navie smith

When doctors couldn’t find the source of her grandson’s ailment, Navie Smith found something at her YMCA she needed just as much:

compassion.

Ask Navie Smith about her seven year-old grandson Tyttis, and she’ll tell you, “he weighs fifty pounds—and about forty pounds of that is heart.”

“He loves to read,” she says. So much so, he’s earned

Then Erica came in with a walker. That was the start

a scholarship to a school outside the Central L.A. neighbor-

to our way back.”

hood where he lives.

“He loves summer camp—always has,” Navie says.

But on Easter Weekend, 2006, things were different.

“It’s especially important to keep kids busy in summer—

Tyttis was playing in the park, fell and couldn’t get up.

idle time is when bad things can start happening. Camp

At first, the other kids thought he was just embarrassed,

gives kids something they can feel good about. It helps

fooling around. The hospital she rushed him to told her

build self-esteem. Besides, the YMCA is where you meet

the same thing. “Your grandson is playacting, Mrs. Smith,

people from all different places. That helps you see things

there’s absolutely nothing wrong with him.”

different, and realize that maybe things can be different.”

Navie knew better. It wasn’t like Tyttis. Finally, she

Navie remembers one day when she brought Tyttis

took him to the hospital determined not to leave until

to the YMCA for the afternoon. As she was getting ready to

someone found out what was wrong. Tyttis has since

leave, she noticed Erica hadn’t brought Tyttis his walker.

been diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, a painful,

“Oh, he won’t be needing that today, Mrs. Smith,” she said.

chronic inflammation of the joints that can severely

“Are you sure?” Navie asked. “We’re both sure

restrict movement particularly in the legs.

Tyttis is getting along just fine.”

Looking for a way to take Tyttis’s mind off his

It’s the home of a healthy outlook, the physically fit, the mentally stimulated and lifelong learning. Of extraordinary child care, well-adapted kids, citizen teenagers, working moms, active dads and all manner of motivated men and women.

“Taking my grandson to the YMCA was the best

condition, Navie took him to her local YMCA.

thing that ever could have happened. I’d just about come

“I went there crying, hoping they would help me with

to the end of my rope. We needed help and there they

him,” she said. “And Michelle looks at me and says,

were. They didn’t do it because they had to. They did it

‘Of course we will.’

because they wanted to. And I’ll never forget it.”

Navie Smith with her grandson Tyttis (L) and son Zion.

06


doug smith

I’ve learned over the years that

it’s not what parents buy you that’s important. It’s what they give. Mine gave me the YMCA.

—Doug Smith

For three generations—whether camping, counseling or civics—here’s where Doug Smith connected with his father—and his sons with him.

The only thing Doug recalls that’s been in the Smith family

joined his local YMCA for Salsa lessons with wife

longer than the apartment business his father started and

Ellen and to have fun with his two boys. Generation Next started with Doug’s older son,

he now helps run, is their affection for the YMCA.

Steven, who was attracted to the organization’s Youth and

While his career is as satisfying as carrying on the family business, neither stirs memories quite like the

Government program. And the bonds he forged in Y&G

YMCA experience.

had a wonderful by-product—they launched a band. “We were both drummers and Steven started out on

“My greatest times with my father were from 1960

It’s home to an abiding principle that says, “All are welcome here— we draw strength from our diversity.” It’s home to leadership by choice, leadership by example and involved members determined to raise strong communities.

when I was six, till 1964. We couldn’t wait to load the

my old Ludwigs. He has a new set now, and plays gigs

wagon and pack off to some remote campground or beach

with three of the kids he met at the YMCA. I’ve put my

with other fathers and sons. Dad and I had great fun just

Ludwigs in storage—I’m saving them for when my

hanging out, being young together.”

grandson comes along.”

For the next two years, Doug took part in Gray-Y,

Recently, his younger son Dillon, thirteen, became

mixed in with summers full of camp adventures and finally

part of the Model United Nations program and then Youth

ending with him becoming a camp counselor at Little Green

and Government. “Not only do kids learn the principles

Valley at age sixteen.

of government, they actually go to Sacramento, sit in the General Assembly and run mock legislative sessions—

After high school, Doug drifted away. Three decades passed. But then in 2000, he got a phone call from an old

writing bills, working on committees, even meeting

friend. “Hey Doug, a bunch of us old Trailblazers are put-

Governor Schwarzenegger. What a thrill. It’s literally

ting together a father/son camping group—you game?”

changed Dillon’s life.” “You know, they say, ‘Kids will be kids.’ But I often

Doug couldn’t say yes fast enough. Then he asked himself,

wonder what kind of kid I would’ve been if it hadn’t been

“Now why didn’t I think of that?”

for my YMCA?”

After getting together three to four times a year, Doug

09


doug smith

I’ve learned over the years that

it’s not what parents buy you that’s important. It’s what they give. Mine gave me the YMCA.

—Doug Smith

For three generations—whether camping, counseling or civics—here’s where Doug Smith connected with his father—and his sons with him.

The only thing Doug recalls that’s been in the Smith family

joined his local YMCA for Salsa lessons with wife

longer than the apartment business his father started and

Ellen and to have fun with his two boys. Generation Next started with Doug’s older son,

he now helps run, is their affection for the YMCA.

Steven, who was attracted to the organization’s Youth and

While his career is as satisfying as carrying on the family business, neither stirs memories quite like the

Government program. And the bonds he forged in Y&G

YMCA experience.

had a wonderful by-product—they launched a band. “We were both drummers and Steven started out on

“My greatest times with my father were from 1960

It’s home to an abiding principle that says, “All are welcome here— we draw strength from our diversity.” It’s home to leadership by choice, leadership by example and involved members determined to raise strong communities.

when I was six, till 1964. We couldn’t wait to load the

my old Ludwigs. He has a new set now, and plays gigs

wagon and pack off to some remote campground or beach

with three of the kids he met at the YMCA. I’ve put my

with other fathers and sons. Dad and I had great fun just

Ludwigs in storage—I’m saving them for when my

hanging out, being young together.”

grandson comes along.”

For the next two years, Doug took part in Gray-Y,

Recently, his younger son Dillon, thirteen, became

mixed in with summers full of camp adventures and finally

part of the Model United Nations program and then Youth

ending with him becoming a camp counselor at Little Green

and Government. “Not only do kids learn the principles

Valley at age sixteen.

of government, they actually go to Sacramento, sit in the General Assembly and run mock legislative sessions—

After high school, Doug drifted away. Three decades passed. But then in 2000, he got a phone call from an old

writing bills, working on committees, even meeting

friend. “Hey Doug, a bunch of us old Trailblazers are put-

Governor Schwarzenegger. What a thrill. It’s literally

ting together a father/son camping group—you game?”

changed Dillon’s life.” “You know, they say, ‘Kids will be kids.’ But I often

Doug couldn’t say yes fast enough. Then he asked himself,

wonder what kind of kid I would’ve been if it hadn’t been

“Now why didn’t I think of that?”

for my YMCA?”

After getting together three to four times a year, Doug

09


henry tseng

Thoreau said,

“friends cherish one another’s hopes.” And Henry Tseng and Wally Fischmann were dramatic proof.

They became friends at the YMCA. One developed Parkinson’s, the other developed a program for living with Parkinson’s.

Henry Tseng is 100 years fit—in spirit, mind and body. And

for twenty years to make the community healthier and

though he’s now officially a centenarian, Henry says he

stronger. He’s been a key part of the Annual Community

“will continue to come to the YMCA until I can’t move

Support Campaign as a donor and campaigner because he

any more.”

knows the importance of making the YMCA’s programs and

That’s good news for the people he inspires at his

services available to everyone regardless of circumstances.

YMCA, and it was especially good news for his longtime

He also generously supports the Kids to Camp Campaign

friend, Wally Fischmann, who was about to quit due to the

that raises money for underprivileged youth

onset of Parkinson’s disease. Though they hadn’t disagreed

to go to Camp Whittle at Big Bear Mountain. Henry is as persuasive as he is pragmatic. He lobbied

much in their long friendship, they disagreed on this.

successfully to get his YMCA to extend its hours on Sundays.

So Henry did the only logical thing. He co-founded P.L.L.U.S., an exercise program to keep Wally and other

He had a rail put in the middle of the stairway leading up to

Parkinson’s sufferers as healthy as possible through

the gym so it would be easier for members to negotiate all

It’s home to a proud, progressive history that stands on the shoulders of our founders

exercise and by surrounding them with other people.

those steps.

to shape tomorrow’s leaders today. It’s the home of individual strivers and boisterous

Henry doesn’t take any medications. And according to

Wally relented, Henry smiled, and the program has

his daughter, Linda Hsia, “Not only does he get a good

since expanded to seven other YMCAs. Henry acknowledges that as innovative as the program

workout six days a week at his favorite class, Totally Fit, he

is, it isn’t completely original. It’s an idea that took him

enjoys the camaraderie of people he’s come to know who

back 27 years to why he joined the YMCA in the first

really care about one another.” “We’re convinced this combination of physical

place: its cardiac therapy program to help overcome some

and social activity has contributed to my father’s

heart issues he was experiencing.

well-being and longevity. And I know he believes he

Helping to establish P.L.L.U.S. for his friend who has since passed on is just the most personal of Henry Tseng’s

is a better person for having given so much of himself

contributions. He’s also served on the Board of Managers

to help others at the YMCA.”

10

town halls. It’s the home of architectural jewels, architectural gyms and friends.


henry tseng

Thoreau said,

“friends cherish one another’s hopes.” And Henry Tseng and Wally Fischmann were dramatic proof.

They became friends at the YMCA. One developed Parkinson’s, the other developed a program for living with Parkinson’s.

Henry Tseng is 100 years fit—in spirit, mind and body. And

for twenty years to make the community healthier and

though he’s now officially a centenarian, Henry says he

stronger. He’s been a key part of the Annual Community

“will continue to come to the YMCA until I can’t move

Support Campaign as a donor and campaigner because he

any more.”

knows the importance of making the YMCA’s programs and

That’s good news for the people he inspires at his

services available to everyone regardless of circumstances.

YMCA, and it was especially good news for his longtime

He also generously supports the Kids to Camp Campaign

friend, Wally Fischmann, who was about to quit due to the

that raises money for underprivileged youth

onset of Parkinson’s disease. Though they hadn’t disagreed

to go to Camp Whittle at Big Bear Mountain. Henry is as persuasive as he is pragmatic. He lobbied

much in their long friendship, they disagreed on this.

successfully to get his YMCA to extend its hours on Sundays.

So Henry did the only logical thing. He co-founded P.L.L.U.S., an exercise program to keep Wally and other

He had a rail put in the middle of the stairway leading up to

Parkinson’s sufferers as healthy as possible through

the gym so it would be easier for members to negotiate all

It’s home to a proud, progressive history that stands on the shoulders of our founders

exercise and by surrounding them with other people.

those steps.

to shape tomorrow’s leaders today. It’s the home of individual strivers and boisterous

Henry doesn’t take any medications. And according to

Wally relented, Henry smiled, and the program has

his daughter, Linda Hsia, “Not only does he get a good

since expanded to seven other YMCAs. Henry acknowledges that as innovative as the program

workout six days a week at his favorite class, Totally Fit, he

is, it isn’t completely original. It’s an idea that took him

enjoys the camaraderie of people he’s come to know who

back 27 years to why he joined the YMCA in the first

really care about one another.” “We’re convinced this combination of physical

place: its cardiac therapy program to help overcome some

and social activity has contributed to my father’s

heart issues he was experiencing.

well-being and longevity. And I know he believes he

Helping to establish P.L.L.U.S. for his friend who has since passed on is just the most personal of Henry Tseng’s

is a better person for having given so much of himself

contributions. He’s also served on the Board of Managers

to help others at the YMCA.”

10

town halls. It’s the home of architectural jewels, architectural gyms and friends.


looking forward

remembering the future. ensuring the ymca. your role in both. A grandmother from South Los Angeles turns to her local YMCA for care when her grandson is diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and finds compassion. A San Fernando Valley family remains closely knit over three generations through camping, music and Youth and Government activities. A 100year-old YMCA member establishes an exercise program to strengthen his longtime friend and others in their struggle against Parkinson’s. These are just three recent stories that help form the bricks and mortar of our 25 Branches. Thanks to the generous contributions of past and future donors, the place people call “My YMCA” will have the means to contribute to and enrich the lives of all our members.

THE CHALLENGES WE FACE. THE OPPORTUNITIES WE’RE CREATING.

It’s the home of hard fought games, buzzer beaters and “To Be Continued.” Of rock solid foundations, purpose, encouragement, confidence and discovering things you didn’t know you were looking for. Of spirit, mind and body for every member every day.

As life becomes more complex, it becomes harder and harder for young people, individuals, families and seniors to develop the personal skills, discipline and wherewithal to manage and solve the ever-changing challenges they face. Once again, the YMCA is stepping up to meet their needs. By 2010, the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angles intends to offer every person in the communities we serve the opportunity to become physically, socially and spiritually healthy. How? By providing programs and facilities that encourage positive life choices and a supportive community committed to individual success. We will offer children environments rich in developmental assets. We will strengthen communities by instilling the values of volunteerism and philanthropy in every member through a lifetime of progressive YMCA membership experiences.

FOUR CRUCIAL ISSUES, AND HOW WE’RE TACKLING THEM. #1: Unhealthy Lifestyles Unhealthy lifestyles create $103 billion in healthcare costs and lost productivity every year. Yet the human casualties behind the financial burden are even more devastating. Children Since the 1970’s, the rate of obesity among pre-schoolers has doubled. Among children 6 to 11, it has tripled. Doctors today see children with heart damage, high cholesterol and Type 2 diabetes—the first generation whose life expectancy is projected to be less than the generation before it.

13


looking forward

remembering the future. ensuring the ymca. your role in both. A grandmother from South Los Angeles turns to her local YMCA for care when her grandson is diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis and finds compassion. A San Fernando Valley family remains closely knit over three generations through camping, music and Youth and Government activities. A 100year-old YMCA member establishes an exercise program to strengthen his longtime friend and others in their struggle against Parkinson’s. These are just three recent stories that help form the bricks and mortar of our 25 Branches. Thanks to the generous contributions of past and future donors, the place people call “My YMCA” will have the means to contribute to and enrich the lives of all our members.

THE CHALLENGES WE FACE. THE OPPORTUNITIES WE’RE CREATING.

It’s the home of hard fought games, buzzer beaters and “To Be Continued.” Of rock solid foundations, purpose, encouragement, confidence and discovering things you didn’t know you were looking for. Of spirit, mind and body for every member every day.

As life becomes more complex, it becomes harder and harder for young people, individuals, families and seniors to develop the personal skills, discipline and wherewithal to manage and solve the ever-changing challenges they face. Once again, the YMCA is stepping up to meet their needs. By 2010, the YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angles intends to offer every person in the communities we serve the opportunity to become physically, socially and spiritually healthy. How? By providing programs and facilities that encourage positive life choices and a supportive community committed to individual success. We will offer children environments rich in developmental assets. We will strengthen communities by instilling the values of volunteerism and philanthropy in every member through a lifetime of progressive YMCA membership experiences.

FOUR CRUCIAL ISSUES, AND HOW WE’RE TACKLING THEM. #1: Unhealthy Lifestyles Unhealthy lifestyles create $103 billion in healthcare costs and lost productivity every year. Yet the human casualties behind the financial burden are even more devastating. Children Since the 1970’s, the rate of obesity among pre-schoolers has doubled. Among children 6 to 11, it has tripled. Doctors today see children with heart damage, high cholesterol and Type 2 diabetes—the first generation whose life expectancy is projected to be less than the generation before it.

13


The YMCA realizes the root cause of poor childhood health habits, including obesity, is the adults

A big part of strengthening the family involves supporting parents’ efforts to ensure that their

who influence children, feed them and act as role models for unhealthy behavior. No parent wants to

children have sufficient developmental assets in their lives to succeed and thrive as they grow—even great

raise unhealthy children, but too few have either the information or support needed to both set a good

families have a stake in seeing a strong community engaged in their children’s growth. As part of this, the

personal example for their kids and guide their families to healthy choices in nutrition, exercise, sub-

YMCA is working to double the number of children involved in more than 100 existing school-based

stance abuse prevention, stress management and productive personal relationships. So the YMCA is com-

programs to 12,000 and establish new school-based models for program delivery.

mitted to involving parents in ways that will help to break the cycle of poor choices they unwittingly

There are currently 77 YMCA child care centers on public school campuses across L.A. County. More than 50 additional school facilities are used for YMCA youth sports and healthy lifestyle

pass on to their children. As part of this effort, the YMCA is establishing programs addressing the crisis of youth lifestyle and

programs for children.

obesity in 21 of its 25 Branches, substantially modifying all of the existing program models to reach an addi-

#3: Leadership Development

tional 15,000 children and their parents each year.

Healthy communities depend on citizen leadership, yet few are prepared for even effective membership in

Adults

decision-making groups, let alone the roles of leadership.

Health studies identify a segment of society that makes continuous attempts to live healthy lives, but finds it

Both youth and adults learn the skills of leadership in the YMCA—this has been central to the

difficult to sustain healthy habits without abundant external support. The plain truth is that less than 20% of

YMCA experience for generations over the YMCA’s entire existence and it remains a key feature of its

us are able to adhere continuously to good habits in diet and exercise; the rest of us will need the on-going

work. To build on this strength, the L.A. YMCA aims to double the percentage of its members who take

encouragement of supportive environments like YMCAs throughout our lives to succeed in these goals.

part in the active leadership of their YMCAs from 10% to 20% annually. The YMCA teaches

In addition to the nearly 75,000 of these good people who are already involved in YMCA healthy living

specific leadership and community development skills to 30,000 young adults and adults each year.

programs, the YMCA of Metropolitan L.A is reaching out to another 17,000 of these health seekers with programs to overcome the barriers to healthy living. The L.A. YMCA’s response to these challenges is comprehensive, ranging from capital projects to add

At the same time, the YMCA will continue the practice of embedding character education curriculum in the fabric of every YMCA youth program, reaching 200,000 children every year. #4: Building Community

another 300,000 square feet of facility and program space in communities with unmet needs to designing

Social interaction is crucial to the health of individuals and communities. People need places where they can

new programmatic approaches to healthy eating, supporting exercise adherence, member involvement and

find acceptance, support and opportunities to contribute to a larger cause. Nowhere are these needs more

stress management.

acute or more important than they are in Los Angeles, one of the most diverse communities in the history of

# 2: Families Under Stress

human civilization.

21st Century life puts astounding pressures on every member of every family as they are constantly and

YMCAs are important gathering places of L.A.’s epic diversity. The YMCA is a voluntary association

increasingly pressed for time, resources and answers. Job demands, income demands, school demands and

whose staff and membership mirror the demographics of each community in this vast cultural mosaic. It is

commuting demands, make it harder than ever to give children enough attention and guidance to promote

as members of YMCAs that people from all backgrounds often begin to get the sense that the world works

their healthy development.

better when all are welcome in the house.

The YMCA is dedicated to finding ways to strengthen families. One direction is to move from separate

The Los Angeles YMCAs will never forget that the secret to their 125 years of success is

youth and adult programming in healthy lifestyle facilities to programs for the whole family. The aim here is

human connection. Community is what people have always needed most and is what the YMCA

to provide more tools for families by offering programming that allows parents and their children to be

has provided. The YMCA’s foremost goal is to continue to create environments that bring together

involved in together—or in separate activities they can take part in at the same time. Plans call for increasing

more people of all ages and abilities to encourage and support each other in building healthy spirit,

enrollment in YMCA parent-child programs from 4,000 to 8,000 by 2010.

mind and body for all.

14

15


The YMCA realizes the root cause of poor childhood health habits, including obesity, is the adults

A big part of strengthening the family involves supporting parents’ efforts to ensure that their

who influence children, feed them and act as role models for unhealthy behavior. No parent wants to

children have sufficient developmental assets in their lives to succeed and thrive as they grow—even great

raise unhealthy children, but too few have either the information or support needed to both set a good

families have a stake in seeing a strong community engaged in their children’s growth. As part of this, the

personal example for their kids and guide their families to healthy choices in nutrition, exercise, sub-

YMCA is working to double the number of children involved in more than 100 existing school-based

stance abuse prevention, stress management and productive personal relationships. So the YMCA is com-

programs to 12,000 and establish new school-based models for program delivery.

mitted to involving parents in ways that will help to break the cycle of poor choices they unwittingly

There are currently 77 YMCA child care centers on public school campuses across L.A. County. More than 50 additional school facilities are used for YMCA youth sports and healthy lifestyle

pass on to their children. As part of this effort, the YMCA is establishing programs addressing the crisis of youth lifestyle and

programs for children.

obesity in 21 of its 25 Branches, substantially modifying all of the existing program models to reach an addi-

#3: Leadership Development

tional 15,000 children and their parents each year.

Healthy communities depend on citizen leadership, yet few are prepared for even effective membership in

Adults

decision-making groups, let alone the roles of leadership.

Health studies identify a segment of society that makes continuous attempts to live healthy lives, but finds it

Both youth and adults learn the skills of leadership in the YMCA—this has been central to the

difficult to sustain healthy habits without abundant external support. The plain truth is that less than 20% of

YMCA experience for generations over the YMCA’s entire existence and it remains a key feature of its

us are able to adhere continuously to good habits in diet and exercise; the rest of us will need the on-going

work. To build on this strength, the L.A. YMCA aims to double the percentage of its members who take

encouragement of supportive environments like YMCAs throughout our lives to succeed in these goals.

part in the active leadership of their YMCAs from 10% to 20% annually. The YMCA teaches

In addition to the nearly 75,000 of these good people who are already involved in YMCA healthy living

specific leadership and community development skills to 30,000 young adults and adults each year.

programs, the YMCA of Metropolitan L.A is reaching out to another 17,000 of these health seekers with programs to overcome the barriers to healthy living. The L.A. YMCA’s response to these challenges is comprehensive, ranging from capital projects to add

At the same time, the YMCA will continue the practice of embedding character education curriculum in the fabric of every YMCA youth program, reaching 200,000 children every year. #4: Building Community

another 300,000 square feet of facility and program space in communities with unmet needs to designing

Social interaction is crucial to the health of individuals and communities. People need places where they can

new programmatic approaches to healthy eating, supporting exercise adherence, member involvement and

find acceptance, support and opportunities to contribute to a larger cause. Nowhere are these needs more

stress management.

acute or more important than they are in Los Angeles, one of the most diverse communities in the history of

# 2: Families Under Stress

human civilization.

21st Century life puts astounding pressures on every member of every family as they are constantly and

YMCAs are important gathering places of L.A.’s epic diversity. The YMCA is a voluntary association

increasingly pressed for time, resources and answers. Job demands, income demands, school demands and

whose staff and membership mirror the demographics of each community in this vast cultural mosaic. It is

commuting demands, make it harder than ever to give children enough attention and guidance to promote

as members of YMCAs that people from all backgrounds often begin to get the sense that the world works

their healthy development.

better when all are welcome in the house.

The YMCA is dedicated to finding ways to strengthen families. One direction is to move from separate

The Los Angeles YMCAs will never forget that the secret to their 125 years of success is

youth and adult programming in healthy lifestyle facilities to programs for the whole family. The aim here is

human connection. Community is what people have always needed most and is what the YMCA

to provide more tools for families by offering programming that allows parents and their children to be

has provided. The YMCA’s foremost goal is to continue to create environments that bring together

involved in together—or in separate activities they can take part in at the same time. Plans call for increasing

more people of all ages and abilities to encourage and support each other in building healthy spirit,

enrollment in YMCA parent-child programs from 4,000 to 8,000 by 2010.

mind and body for all.

14

15


Annual Report for Metro YMCA of Los Angeles  

Annual report on 125th year anniversary

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