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Portfolio Lauren Roberts

e. leroberts88@gmail.com c. 409-720-8631

2011


THANK YOU to everyone who played the role as a teacher in my life and invested their time into molding me into who I am today. Without the love and care of teachers, I probably would not be doing what I love and that gives my life so much purpose.


table of content

Menil Book Store Residence: commercial/residence

02-05

Weather Center: municipal

06-11

High School for the Performing Arts: institutional add-on

12-17

Urban Housing Plan for Rio de Janeiro: urban planning

18-23

MANYfold Dance Theater: performance complex

24-29

ARCH 1359: CONCRETE UTOPIAS Symposium Synopsis

30-35

ARCH 4398: Hilton Hotel Project

36-57

Student Council: Recycling Proposal

58-61

01


Menil Book Store and Residence Spring 2009 Objective: To design a bookstore with a residence attached and is located across from the Menil Art Museum.

Program: The design had to include a conference room, 450 linear ft of book shelves, an additional 40 ft of shelves for rare books, storage/ receiving space, an office, mechanical and electrical equipment room, and a residential space. As an additional request from the client, I was asked to incorporate and display their collection of Jesus Moroles sculptures into the design.

65 yrs old or older

Employment Status

02

West Elevation

Population by Education Level


Dining

Kitchen

Utility Space Library Bathroom

Living Space

Residence Entry

Mechanical

Study/ Guest Room

Private Garden

Book Storage and Receiving

Book Store Mechanical/ Electrical Room

Restroom

Restroom

Conference Room

Rare Books

Reception Area

Private Garden Space

Public Lawn

First Floor Plan Book Store View

03


Master Bathroom Office Space

Master Bedroom

Sidewalk View

Second Floor Plan

04

West Section Cut


Driveway View

05


Weather Center Fall 2009 Objective: To design a weather center that monitors the weather, functions as a distribution center for disaster relief goods, and educates the public on Galveston’s historical natural disasters. Program: The weather center includes a warehouse, gallery, theater, research room, and offices. By educating the public before disaster occurs the weather center aids in teaching the users about weather and how to receive goods in times of need. To achieve this, in my design I focused on visual ques and tangible spaces that allowed the public to very clearly see the inter-workings of the spaces to better understand and utilize of the weather center.

1

3

the open floor plan allows for a visual tie to each program

2

06

4

knowledge is the common thread into the service and goods programs

the roof skin is placed over and then pulled down into the space to unite all three programs of distribution (goods, knowledge, and service)


07


roof truss system and skin

steel members

08

tilt wall

steel members

core structure


09


sky-light metal tube N

1’ metal panels

concrete

corrugated steel

detail of roof skin

10


11


High School for the Performing Arts Spring 2010 light wells that enhance students

Objective: To modify an existing High

skin that has a

School for Performing Visual Arts (HSPVA).

Program: To meet the needs of the growing

views to see

student body by adding additional classrooms to each program and other performing spaces. Some of the problems of the existing HSPVA was the lack of space needed to function in each program, the little exposure to natural light, and the non-existing green space in and throughout the campus.

My design solution for the new HSPVA was to enhance the learning environment by adding natural light wells; re-skinning the building’s roof and exterior walls to allow additional light and allow the community to get a glimpse of the performance spaces inside; and integrate performance space nooks throughout the high school to help create an “openness” atmosphere between each of the performing visual arts.

PERFORMANCE students that put on

environmental strategies

existing HSPVA

fill-in new program; add skin around space; separate theatre space

1

2

stretch skin around HSPVA campus; push pull theatre

Push pull performance spaces (light wells)

3

4

Lastly, I pushed the performing space out from the center core of the campus to the community to aid in the interaction between the community and the users of the building. The design solutions I added are meant to allow HSPVA to truely showcase, enhance, and embrace all forms of performance.

12

Design Process


site plan

SKIN

13


The pixilated metal skin for the building’s interior and exterior gives a visual image of the performance going on inside the current spaces as well as allowing light in. One attribute of the pixilated metal skin is the image formed on the metal panels is clear and can be read from a distance. However, when the observer gets close to the metal skin, it appears to be different size punched out holes in the metal. In turn, the observer can see the performance going on inside the spaces and no longer the image on the metal skin.

14


Art Band Theater Classroom Faculty

Art Band Theater Multi-purpose Classroom Faculty Light wells

15


Cross Ventilation

16


Theater

Flat Floor

Proscenium

Trust

Sandwich

Studio Theatre flexible theatre set ups

back of house

chamber

front of house typical design

above house

chamber below house HSPVA design

17


connect the city life tothese spaces city and the traveler, in-between the public the residential life. I’ve designed

infrastructure to help in- between spaces disperse the density that pass through a Iresidential choosearea to designof travelers going Urban Housing Project forrail Rio de Janeiro from the and/or these spaces metro instead of going to the bus stop. around it in order to Fall 2010 in-between the public connect the city life to Objective: To add program the area infrastructure toforhelp the residential life. between the Maracana Stadium and Mangue-

disperse the density of travelers going these spaces Program: developed a large scale from Students the and/or in-between the rail public development plan to serve the large public infrastructure to help and neighborhood. metro to the bus stop. disperse the density

activity

on the outside of the private programs NEW PATH through space

activity

and/or

commercial

Heavy rail transportation can operate in trains of up to 12 cars, at 45 – 65 km/h, carrying 1000 - 2200 people per train, and a maximum of 48,000 people per hour per direction. I added activities to The existing paths are dictate the movement on the outside of the through the space private programs and/or

This increases interaction between the UERJ residents and the traveler

UERJ

PUBLI

PRIMA

PRIVAT

residential

SECON

EXISITI

and/or

NEW P

commercial activity

I added activities to

Field b the pr and p

commercial

The existing paths are on the outside of the private programs

18

NEW PATH through space

Commercial (public) programs dictates the the movement through the spaces

I added activities to The existing paths are dictate the movement on the outside of the through the space private programs and/or NEW PATH NEW PATH through space through space

ways can operrs, at 30 – 40 people per 40,000 people

and priva

activity commercial Field bands connect the programs (public The existing paths are and private)

ria fevela, along the line of existing rail in Rio deIJanerio. choose to design

In order to increase interaction with the city of travelers going and the traveler, I’ve designed spaces infrom the between that rail pass and/or through a residential area instead of going around it in order to connect metro to the bus stop. the city life to the residential life. I choose to design these spaces the public in-between infrastructure to help infrastructure to help disperse the density of travelers going from the rail and/or metro to the bus stop.

programs frame the public space

This increases interaction


ate)

bands connect rograms (public private) EXISITING PATH OF TRAVERLER NEW PATH OF TRAVERLER

EXISITING PATH OF TRAVERLER NEW PATH OF TRAVERLER

PUBLIC ACTIVITY PRIMARY PATH PRIVATE ACTVITY SECONDARY PATH EXISITING PATH OF TRAVERLER NEW PATH OF TRAVERLER

IC ACTIVITY

ARY PATH

ATE ACTVITY

NDARY PATH

ING PATH OF TRAVERLER

PATH OF TRAVERLER

19


existing transportation

“in-between” community center

NEW PATH in-between existing spaces

existing destinations

and/or

UERJ 26


“in-between” commercial center

“in-between” sports center

27


c o n c e p t

“i n - b e t w e e n�

In order to increase interaction with the city and the traveler, I’ve designed in- between spaces that pass through a residential area instead of going around it in order to connect the city life to the residential life. I choose to design these spaces in-between the public infrastructure to help disperse the density of travelers going from the rail and/or metro to the bus stop.

residential park

activity

residential

commercial

NEW PATH through space

28

The existing paths are on the outside of the private programs

and/or


PRIMARY FLOW PUBLIC PATH PRIVATE PATH

FLOW BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

f i e l d s

CONNECTION BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PUBLIC PATH PRIVATE PATH

Residential (private) programs frame the public space

INFRASTRUCTURE

SECONDARY FLOW

theater

planter boxes (garden) pond/park

CONNECTION BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

Commercial (public) programs dictates the the movement through the spaces bus stop

PUBLIC ACTIVITY

farmer’s market

farmer’s market

soccer field

COMMUNITY ACTIVITY AGRICULTURE

planter boxes (garden)

Field bands connect the programs (public and private) spray park

planter boxes (garden)

planter boxes (garden)

l parks residential green space

farmer’s market

PRIVATE ACTIVITY

EXISITING PATH OF TRAVERLER farmer’s market

residential parks planter boxes (garden)

PARK

*residents maintain the agriculture fields and boxes

NEW PATH OF TRAVERLER

FLOW BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE CONNECTION BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PUBLIC PATH PRIVATE PATH INFRASTRUCTURE

29


blic mmercial

MANYfold Dance Theater Spring 2011 adj. 1. Many and varied; of many kinds; multiple: manifold dance types. 2. Having many features or forms: manifold performance spaces. 3. Being such for a variety of reasons: a manifold theater. 4. Consisting of or operating several devices of one kind at the same time.

Objective: To work in collaboration with

another student to design a house for performance and dance for the 2011 ACSA/AISC Steel Competition.

Program: Our belief for the ACSA/AISC Steel Competition was to create a performance space that will support the surrounding districts so that the facilities can be utilized by multiple groups of people. Our dance/ Theater District performance facility celebrates the all types of Historic District dance performance and highlight some of the Tunnel System history in Houston. This intern creates a richer Metro Light Rail and more collaborative neighborhood that could be used by the community along with the owner of the building to support both the Theater and Historic District. Therefore, our concept for the house for dance and performance is to transform the way an audience views different methods of dance so that the spectators can see and learn about dance. To do this we created transitioning and transforming dance programs, spaces, views and skins to meet the needs of the dancers and Public/Private Private their audience. Transition

R

N

C

R

P

P

C

P

Main Performance

C

P 10

50

100 ft

Houston Current Circulation Map

Theater District Historic District Tunnel System Metro Light Rail

Houston District Map

Restaurants Nightlife Commercial Office Residential Parking Parks/ Open Spaces Current Pedestrian Circulation Proposed Pedestrian Circulation Current Tunnel Circulation Proposed Tunnel Circulation

Restaurants Nightlife Commercial Office Residential Parking

24

Parks/ Open Spaces Current Pedestrian Circulation Public

Public/Private

Private


Restaurants

Nightlife

Commercial Office

Residential

Parking

Parks/ Open Spaces

Current Pedestrian Circulation

Proposed Pedestrian Circulation

Current Tunnel Circulation

Proposed Tunnel Circulation Primary Shell Secondary Shell

Secondary Shell

Primary Shell

Theater District Historic District Tunnel System Metro Light Rail Restaurants Nightlife Commercial Office

Public Commercial

Residential Parking

Public/Private Transition Public Private Commercial

Public/Private Transition

Main Performance

Parks/ Open Spaces

Current Pedestrian Circulat Private Main Performance

Proposed Pedestrian Circu Current Tunnel Circulation

25

Proposed Tunnel Circulatio 10

50

100 ft


Congress Street

Preston Street

Prairie Street

Gallery Party Rooms

Offices

Main Theatre Upper Deck

Mechanical

10

26

50

Site Plan

100 ft

Gallery Party Rooms

First Floor

Patio Theatre


Ex. Main Theatre Seating

Ex. Main Theatre Stage

Secondary Shell

Primary Shell

Gallery Party Rooms

Offices

Main Theatre Upper Deck

Mechanical

Mechanical

Stage Mechanics Second Floor

First Floor

Patio Theatre

Tunnel Connection First Floor

Second Floor

27


Second Floor

Cafe Perform

Ex. Main Theatre Seating

Ex. Main Theatre Stage

Corten Metal Panels

Perforated Metal Accoustic Panel

Light From Theatre

Copper Mesh Glass

Mechanical 0

5

10

Dominant Light From Exterior

First Floor

Transverse Section

20 ft.


mance

Lobby Performance

Corten Metal Panels

Mediamesh Screen Glass

1/4” Glass Panel Changing Facade Lock 1/2” AirTrack Gap Moveable Stage

1/4” Glass Panel 1/20” Coper Mesh 1/4” Glass Panel

29


Lauren Roberts ARCH 1359 Second Assignment March 21, 2011

CONCRETE UTOPIAS Symposium Synopsis

"Not TV or illegal drugs but the automobile has been the chief destroyer of American communities." — Jane Jacobs : Dark Age Ahead On Thursday, February 17, 2011 at 7:00 PM, I attended the welcome and opening remarks portion of the Concrete Utopias Symposium by Michelangelo Sabatino (UH), and then at 7:10 PM the keynote address by Jean-Louis Cohen (NYU). They introduced the symposium by talking about the various current events of the 1960s and how those events inspired diverse forms of utopian thinking. Professor Sabatino specifically explained how the cultural idea of collective living, the automobile and anti-urbanism, dramatically influenced architecture and design. Habitat 1967 in Montreal, Canada is an example of a utopian style of design, given by Professor Sabatino, which was the theme behind the flyer for the symposium. The architect for this modern style design was Moshe Safdie. Habitat 1967 was a multifamily housing building type of stacked modular units designed for cold temperatures set in an urban waterfront context. In the book Twentieth Century Architecture: a Visual History, Dennis Sharp states that Safdie's housing complex concept allowed “privacy, fresh air, sunlight and suburban amenities in an urban location. It was designed as a permanent settlement and


consists of 158 dwellings, although originally it was intended to provide 1,000 units. The resulting ziggurat was made up of independent prefabricated boxes with fifteen different plan types.� The keynote speaker, Jean- Louis Cohen, introduced the audience to a number of different current trends in the 1960s and examples of modern architecture of that time which influenced different utopian ideas of living and designing. Political events like women, race and gay rights were given as illustrations of how changes in culture can lead to changes in thought processes. He also brought up different buildings like Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers design for the Centre Pompidou in Paris, France. The design came about from the industrial revolution, and was an expression of how a building is a working machine by exposing all the mechanical systems that help the building function positioned on the exterior of the building. The problem with the design of exposing these systems was the high cost of constantly maintaining these machine systems because of the exposure to the elements causing them to break down and need more maintenance than the typical way of designing a building with their mechanical systems sheltered from the exterior elements. My personal perspective on the issues discussed that night were shifts in cultural can and will influence design because it changes the way people live. Cases like the Centre Pompidou will forever remain a great icon for their era, like the industrial revolution; however, these building’s concepts can often be perceived failure, like the Pompidou’s costly up keep. Nevertheless, these modern examples of architecture and design can be used as tools to learn from despite any flaws that may arise in the final product of the design. One will always learn from both the success and failures in life.


The second part of the symposium consisted of different speakers giving approximately twenty minute presentations on the details of urbanism and utopian ideas from around the world. I attended the session on Friday, February 18, 2011 at 3:00 PM on Europe and Asia. The lecture speakers and topics consisted of Peter Lang (TAMU) Super Studio in Italy, Zhongjie Lin (UNCC) Metabolism: Urban Utopias of Modern Japan, Yasufumi Nakamori (MFAH) Isozaki Arata's city: "Invisible City" and "Electric Labyrinth", Simon Sadler (UC DAVIS) Toby Paterson: Cast Adrift, and then at 5:00 PM Dietmar Froehlich (UH) had a lecture on Cinematic Interlude. One city planner that was mentioned in the lectures was Jane Jacobs. Her primary interest was communities and urban planning decay. Ms. Jacobs has spent her life studying cities and has three publications explaining her views. These books are The Death and Life of Great American Cities, The Economy of Cities, and Cities and the Wealth of Nations. Along with her publication Jane Jacobs is known for her grassroots efforts to block urban-renewal projects that potentially would have destroyed local neighborhoods. Zhongjie Lin gave a lecture on Metabolism the Japanese Architect Kenzo Tange. Kenzo Tange, influenced by the Swiss modernist and architect Le Corbusier, joined efforts with a group of architects known as Team X in the late 1950s to begin a movement known as Metabolism. The Webster definition for metabolism is The act or process, by which living tissues or cells take up and convert into their own proper substance the nutritive material brought to them by the blood, or by which they transform their cell protoplasm into simpler substances, which are fitted either for excretion or for some special purpose, as in the manufacture of the


digestive enzymes. Hence, metabolism may be either constructive (anabolism), or destructive (catabolism). The way this scientific term translated into architecture occurred during the post war reconstruction of Japan after World War II in regards to housing. These architects envisioned cities that in the future were inhabited by mass societies of large scale, flexible and expandable structures that suggested the processes of organic growth. Metabolistic designs depended greatly on advanced technology, and they often involved the idea of adjustable plug-in mega-structures. Two examples given in the lecture were the City in the Air, by Arata Isozaki and Kurokawa's Nakagin Capsule Tower. Architects and designers are not the only people that take part in expressing modern and utopian ways of living. A modern artist mentioned by speaker Simon Sadler was Toby Patterson. This artist’s interest is in painting, sculptures and photography. Toby Patterson’s work is driven by his knowledge of post war architecture and is often stimulated by his own skateboarding journeys and the structures used by skateboarders. Patterson plays with the ideas of the incorporation of art and architecture, combining the art (paintings/ sculptures), the structural, the material, the minimal and the brutal. His work often is compared to the work of Piet Mondrian’s, and it has been stated that it is as if Patterson has taken a piece of Mondrian’s paintings and blown it into fragmented pieces then placed them thoughtfully into a composition. Critics feel as if he is disrupting the modernist aesthetics by floating his structures in the air, but it is difficult to judge whether he is celebrating or rebuking modernism. However, Simon Sadler stated that Patterson was


putting the modernism back into the city with this works of art so that the people could view it in relationship to the other movements occurring around them. Lastly, in collaboration from all the lectures, I have listed a few utopian ideas, their concepts, and how they affected cultures. One utopian idea is living off the grid. This utopian idea is a lifestyle that is low cost, self-sustaining, without taxes where people live unplugged from conventional society. Drop City, Colorado 1965 is an example of this utopia. The idea was that people could take part in designing their own environments, not just an architect, because the occupants of these houses knew best how to design according to their own functional needs. This lifestyle also encourages using renewable resources. Other utopic ideas consist of anti-capitalism Utopia (Constant Nieuwenhuys), Arch gram Utopia (Plug into city, Peter Cook, and expanding because of need), Desegregation Utopia (All space is either public or private) and escaping reality Utopia (Yona Friedman, Space City, 1959-63). In summary of the symposium, I have gathered that there are multiple forms of utopian ideals. Most utopian ideals have negative consequences, which in my opinion is the reason why humanity will never truly reach utopia. Utopia is defined as a perfect place, but the problem with utopian ideas is everyone has their own opinions of what utopia should be. However, I believe through investigating the successes and failures of various utopian designs, one learns about cultures, modern trends in society and ultimately about themselves which will lead to a superior way of coexisting on planet Earth as we grow beyond a global population of seven billion.


Utopia is an imaginary island that one enjoys the greatest perfection in politics, laws, and the like, but this idea can never become a tangible reality. We live in a world made of people who all have different views and ideas of what utopia could be. Different current events like the industrial revolution or the invention of a material like concrete have changed the world and thus caused many new utopian ideas to spiral from them. The theme of this symposium was the Concrete Utopia of the 1960s which was stimulated by the invention of the automobile that encouraged a constant flow of circulation. As I stated before all ideas have pros and cons, but one will never know the complete outcome of those ideas because of the human factor that will, most of the time, completely alter the results. Jane Jacobs states in her book The Death and Life of Great American Cities that “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody. Also, the more successfully a city mingles everyday diversity of uses and users in its everyday streets, the more successfully, casually (and economically) its people thereby enliven and support well-located parks that can thus give back grace and delight to their neighborhoods instead of vacuity. " After attending this symposium, reading Jane Jacobs’ theories and thoughts, and learning about other urban city planners’ ideas, I believe society can never completely reach utopia. However, life and its current events will forever be changing; therefore, one should always design and plan for diversity and flexibility, always keeping in mind the environmental impact and probable effects on humanity.


Material Workshop with Peter Zweig (Hilton Hotel Project) Spring 2011

Characteristics of a screen

36


37


Definition of origami from ori meaning "folding", and kami meaning "paper";

Pop-up Kinetic

38

Asian Folds

Kirigami Cuts

Tessellation Patterns


mountain fold

rotate

valley fold

turn over and invisible line

pleat fold

repeat action

inside reverse fold

outside reverse fold

inside crimp fold

outside crimp fold

pull

open

39


Pop-up (screens) 40


Asian (furniture) 41


Kirigami (textiles) 42


Tessellation (storage) 43


The origami inspired screen and moveable walls I designed for the Hilton Hotel room, located on the campus of University of Houston, has characteristics that will divide the space, conceal people or objects, have multiple functions and be interactive with the user.

44


Divides

Conceals

Multifunction

Interactive

45


The current hotel room is designed as a static space; therefore, I decided to explore the idea of creating a space for a hotel room at the Hilton Hotel with the concept of origami. This idea allows for a more diverse space that will fold and unfold from moveable screens and walls to create the desired space for the current activity being used. Also the concept allows the floor plan to have maxium square footage use for each activity.

46


MINI BAR STORAGE

SLEEPING

ENTERTAINMENT DINING/ WORK

HILTON HOTEL FLOOR PLAN 47


ENTERTAINMENT

OMNIGAMI FLOOR PLAN 68

STORAGE


MINI BAR

SLEEPING

49


Entertainment Wall

Divides,Conceals, Multifunction and Interactive Functions that are housed in the wall are concealed storage for the electronic devices and gaming systems, additional storage for extra blanket and pillows, a light source for the entertainment side of the room, and a television screen that rotates to be viewed from either side of the wall. The entertainment wall moves on tracks to divide the sleeping space from the entertainment space when the users would like to use both spaces simultaneously.

moves on track system

50


task lighting

rotating tv screen electronic control panel

Side A

storage space Side B

ENTERTAINMENT

51


Storage/ Mini Bar

Divides, Conceals, Multifunction and Interactive This space is made up of three different pieces; the mini bar countertop, a moveable storage container, and four removable screen panels that turn into the furniture for the room. By moving the panels and storage unit on the track system this creates the two different spaces for dining and changing.

1

52

2

3

4


moves on track system

STORAGE

moves on track system

MINI BAR

53


Panels

Divides, Conceals, Multifunction and Interactive In order to free the space of furniture that isn’t needed at all times, the screens used to divide and conceal the space for changing can be taken off their tracks and turn into a bench, a desk, or a table.

2’

3’

BENCH

54

8’

4’

4’

3’

DESK

TABLE


55


Sleep Space

Conceals, Multifunction and Interactive Functions in the wall system for the sleeping space are single or double bed arrangements accompanied by a nightstand that consists of a lamp and draw housed in the bed connection. There are 256 different bed arrangements to accommodate every situation the hotel may come across to meet the needs of their customers sleeping needs.

56


SLEEPING

57


Student Council Mission Statement: The Gerald D Hines College of Architecture Student Council is comprised of student representatives committed to the achievement, promotion, and facilitation of a collaborative design community.

Student Council Recycling Receptacle Background To Whom this May Concern, The Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture is known for its initiatives in sustainability and green design practices. The building currently accommodates 800 students. The curriculums at the College of Architecture allow the students, future designers, to express their ideas and concepts on paper; however, they do not always have the resources to make the student’s ideas reality. The problem that currently exists within the College of Architecture is there is only one designated area for recycling on each floor but numerous trash bins scattered over the entire building. The College of Architecture is also one of the few buildings on campus that is open 24/7 for their students. Therefore, many students consider the building as a home away from home and many times spend more time in the building than they do in their actual homes. Since the students spend the majority of their time in the building, many students tend to eat and have many different events in the building. This creates a large amount of trash, and much of it could be recycled. Currently, the college has made an attempt to recycle by placing trash cans on each of the four floors of the building that are labeled, “Plastic”, “Paper”, and “Aluminum”. The limited number of recycling receptacles does not make it convenient for the majority of the students to recycle their goods. Therefore, the students end up going to the closely located trash bins rather than recycling. Last year Student Council placed three labeled paper bags in each of the studios to allow the students to recycle more frequently. This was a success in that the bags were closer for all the students, but unsuccessful because when the bags were filled no one bothered or knew it was their duty to take the recycling to the side of the building with all of the recycling bins. This caused many eye sores around the building for many reasons. First, everywhere a person walked in the building they would find overflowing bags of recyclables that needed to emptied. Secondly, these paper bags were easily damaged and soaked, and therefore required frequent change-out. If they weren’t replaced quickly, they too, became trash. Eventually the bags were perceived more as being clutter, impediments and unsightly. As a result, the 2010 – 2011 Student Council decided to take a different direction in order to promote recycling in the College of Architecture. To this end, the College of Architecture 2010 – 2011 Student Council proposes to have a sponsored studio for the Industrial Design students in our college. The project for the receptacles will take place in the fall 2011 semester for either a junior or sophomore design studio taught by Adam Wells, and will last six weeks. The Student Council will play the role as


Student Council Mission Statement: The Gerald D Hines College of Architecture Student Council is comprised of student representatives committed to the achievement, promotion, and facilitation of a collaborative design community.

the clients and the Industrial Design Studio will be the designers to create the design solution for the current problem. This project will help encourage the student to learn about material properties, as well as manufacturing processes. This will benefit the Industrial Design students by allowing them to design a simple solution for an actual problem. The students will be broken into teams to research and be able to design something that will actually be produced in the school. The solution will alleviate the ongoing problem with excess aluminum cans, plastic bottles, and paper in the school. Partnering with the Student Council by provided money donations are Emily Messa and Dean Patricia Oliver at the University Of Houston College Of Architect. The money will support the price of materials and the manufacturing of the prototype receptacles. Emily Messa will provide the project with a $1500 donation for the final prototypes that will be placed throughout the College of Architecture, and Dean Oliver made a match donation of $1500 for the supplies for the design process. Sincerely,

2010-2011 College of Architecture Student Council Adam Cook Lauren Roberts Chris Pine Frank Martin Jamie Tirpak


INDS 2500 or 3500 Recycling Receptacles Duration of project 6 week studio project Project Description The project is to design a recycling receptacle that will allow students in the College of Architecture to recycle more aluminum, paper, and plastic. We are trying to enable the students by putting them closer, but trying to see if there is a design solution to reducing the amount of waste in the college by offering more places for recycling. The total system’s footprint should be minimal (approx. 3 sqft). The concept must have data/ statistics to prove that it is more efficient than the current configuration in the building. The receptacles must be able to hold a volume of recycling for a 1 week period and be understandable that it is the responsibility of the students to take the recycling to the larger receptacles when full (not the janitors). The material chosen must be durable to withstand liquids. The use of material and production process is unlimited as long as it is able to be produced quickly and efficiently for the quantity needed. Project Brief Identify problems with the current configuration throughout the building : Location, amount of receptacles, volume of receptacles Explore ways to encourage the students to recycle rather than throw items in the trash. : Interaction design, design scenarios, signage Present statistics/data collected from students in the building on efficiency final system : Surveys collected, diagrams, charts, pictures, video, etc.

Monetary Breakdown: $1500 for design process and final 4 prototypes +$1500 for 30-50 produced working units ($30-50/unit) Total

$3000


Schedule: Teams will be critiqued every 2 weeks (Exact dates and times will be announced at later date) 1st critique will be research and conceptual sketches 2nd critique will be scale models and full scale mock ups with material selection 3rd critique will be final prototype with statistics and production costs

Aluminum Paper Plastic Current placement of bins

Mixed


Architecture Portfolio 2011