Page 1

Legacy h

!W DOG TRE NE IRIE HEA

A TT R P PE P u P

SPRING 2014

  T H E   J O U R N A L   O F   T H E   R E N O   C O U N T Y   H I S T O R I C A L   S O C I E T Y

once upon a time there was a gelatin recipe for every occasion…page 4

I 12 road map addresses critical issues at museums

N

S

I

D

E 16 cookbooks from the past provide peek into culture


HISTORICAL SOCIETY STAFF (full-time)

Legacy h

THE JOURNAL OF THE RENO COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Linda Schmitt, executive director, rchs linda@underkansas.org

Ashley Maready, chief curator, rchs ashley@underkansas.org

Gayle Ferrell, director of operations, strataca gayle@underkansas.org

Tonya Gehring, docent supervisor, strataca tonya@underkansas.org

Dave Unruh, maintenance supervisor, strataca dave@underkansas.org

Lynn Ledeboer, curatorial assistant, rcm lynn@renocomuseum.org

4 revisiting the wonders of gelatin

10 grab the kids, then grab a puppet

Kourtney Krehbiel, visitor services, strataca kourtney@underkansas.org

Myron Marcotte, mine specialist, strataca myron@underkansas.org

...oodleplex theatre going to the dogs

11 youth compete on history

...preserving interest in our heritage

12 rchs directors create a road map

Paula Dover, administrative assistant, rcm paula@underkansas.org

...recipes from the heyday revived

...addressing numerous issues at museums

14 thanks to our loyal supporters

...making many projects possible

16 vintage cookbooks abound

...reflecting attitudes on fitness, nutrition

21 meet our afternoon volunteers

...providing help at rcm

22 from murder to military

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Richard Shank, president • Nan Hawver, president-elect Billy Klug, treasurer • Laura Snyder, secretary • Michael Armour • Tim Davies • Elaine Fallon • Mary Wilson • Bill Pfenninger • Carol Carr • Cris Corey • Katherine Goodenberger Arlyn Miller • Frank Alexander • Lee Spence, ex-officio Mike Carey, ex-officio • Harold Mayo, ex-officio

...special events abound in museums

Volume 26, No. 2 Legacy is published quarterly by The Reno County Historical Society, Inc. 100 S. Walnut St., P.O. Box 664, Hutchinson, Kansas 67504-0664 For advertising or membership information, call 620-662-1184. © 2014 The Reno County Historical Society, Inc. ISSN 1045-3423 All rights reserved. The RCHS disclaims responsibility for statements of fact or opinion made by contributors.


By Ashley Maready, Chief Curator, RCHS

For a history of the quivering stuff, see GELATIN on page 6.

I

have always been a fan of gelatin dishes‌for dessert. Whether it was red Jell-O in the school cafeteria, gelatinized chocolate pies, or even complicated multi-layer fruit gelatin molds that I created for parties and Thanksgiving dinners, I was completely on board for the wiggly stuff. The thought of tucking into gelatin-based main

...or revisiting the gelatinized horrors of the past courses or side dishes, however, has never particularly appealed to me, and I quaked in fear at the thought of burying helpless meat or vegetables inside a clear wiggly tomb. But I am a historian, an avid home cook, and have a particular interest in the social history of America in the 20th century. And a part of that social history is gelatin – gelatin salads, gelatin main

4

courses, gelatin desserts, colored gelatin, clear gelatin, flavored gelatin, most notably in the ubiquitous Jell-O.

THE ADVENTURE BEGINS

After exploring the history of gelatin (see GELATIN, page 6), I decided to try out a few of these slightly terrifying recipes. I turned to the collection of the Reno County


f Museum where, among many other cookbooks and booklets, I found a 1953 magazine-style publication, “Today’s Woman Book of Salads: Over 200 Tested Salads.” From this collection of salads of all sorts, I selected recipes for a threecourse meal, all of gelatin dishes. The salad course was the gelatin classic known as Perfection Salad with cabbage, celery, carrot and onion suspended in boxed orange gelatin. The main course was Molded Chicken Loaf with a mélange of chicken, celery and pineapple in chicken aspic. And the dessert was a nifty little dish called Golden Peach Gels made of canned peach halves stuffed with cottage cheese and entombed in a peach-lemon gelatin.

HELP ARRIVES

Assisting me in this culinary mission was my patient fiancé, Mike, who manned the grater and squeezed the lemons for my dessert dish. And, of course, along the way he felt compelled to provide colorful commentary: “Why are you doing this again?” I replied, “For HISTORY!” We started things off with Perfection Salad. This dish has a long and storied history, beginning with a third-place cooking award in 1904 that resulted in publication of

PERFECTION SALAD WON A THIRD-PLACE COOKING AWARD IN 1904. WHO WANTS THE RECIPE?

the recipe in a gelatin advertisement the following year. This development led to skyrocketing popularity nationwide until the dish fell out of fashion in the 1960s. My experiment with this one started out fairly

mixture into my refrigerator for 45 minutes until the gelatin reached the consistency of unbeaten egg whites. After just a few minutes, my refrigerator reeked of orange gelatin and vinegar. In the meantime, I prepared the salad ingredients with Mike’s help. He shredded carrots and I chopped cabbage, onion and celery.

SMALLER PORTIONS

“WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS?” HE ASKED. “FOR HISTORY,” I REPLIED. normal. I chose to use orange-flavored gelatin (the recipe suggested orange or lemon). But that was the beginning of the end of my enthusiasm for this dish. I like orange gelatin, raw carrots and even raw cabbage, but I do not like the smell or taste of white distilled vinegar. I added a teaspoon of salt and with severe misgivings put the finished

5

One thing that struck me while I was preparing my innocent vegetables for their gelatin asphyxiation were the small amounts called for in the recipe. This dish was to serve six to eight diners, yet it only specified two cups plus one tablespoon of vegetables? When a serving of vegetables is now regarded to be half a cup, the amount called for here seemed skimpy. Nevertheless, once the orange gelatin reached egg-white consistency, I mixed in the vegetables and spooned the mixture into a muffin pan. I do not own any gelatin molds, and I thought the muffin pan would make nice little individual portions of Perfection Salad (should anyone be so daring as to eat a whole serving). I ended up with seven, so right on target. I slid everything back into my refrigerator. Next up was Molded Chicken Loaf that called

(See APPETIZING, page 7)

THIS MERRY HOUSEWIFE WAS FEATURED IN A 1931 KRAFTPHENIX CHEESE BOOKLET THAT FEATURED THE MANY WAYS TO USE CHEESE. THIS AND OTHER COOKBOOKS OF THE PAST ARE FEATURED IN OUR “FOCUS ON COLLECTIONS” STARTING ON PAGE 16.


GELATIN

...it goes way back

Gelatin, a component of foods since at least the 15th century, derives its name from the Latin gelatus, meaning “stiff” or “frozen.” It is a highly processed dried form of collagen from animal by-products such as skin, bones and connective tissues. Its commercial success, however, began in the late 19th century. And the key was refrigeration. The precursor to the modern refrigerator was the icebox. These were wooden boxes lined with metal and insulated with wood, sawdust or sometimes seaweed. They held blocks of natural ice and food could be kept cold inside. A drip pan caught the melting ice, so new ice had to be added frequently to keep the icebox cold. This ice was purchased from icemen who sold and delivered blocks of ice to people’s homes. The ice harvesting industry peaked from the mid-19th century to the 1930s. The fate of the icebox was sealed, howev-

er, when widespread electrification and safer refrigerants brought refrigerators home to the public. Early refrigerators were very expensive. One 1922 model cost $714, while a 1922 Ford Model-T went for $450! The rise of the home refrigerator meant that dishes needing to be kept cold, such as those made with gelatin, were now within reach of many more home cooks. Serving these dishes in the early days sent the message that you had the financial means to afford a refrigerator. With the availability and marketing of powdered gelatin, most notably Jell-O, the popularity of these dishes grew during the postwar baby boom. Women’s magazines touted colorful recipes for gelatin concoctions that now seem nothing short of bizarre. These dishes have faded from favor but today many foods contain gelatin, such as candies, yogurt, ice cream and many more.

6

h


ashley drew her inspiration from this cookbook, “today’s woman book of salads: over 200 tested salads,” that features a colorful shrimp and tomato salad on the cover. (1992.113.52)

u

“Appetizing,” he replied (Continued from page 5) for unflavored gelatin. As the refrigerator for the chicken and pineapple are designated chilling period. great partners in Asian In addition to grilled dishes, I thought, why not chicken, this dish called in gelatin salads? for crushed canned I have to say, however, pineapple and celery. I that the gelatin base couldn’t find crushed for this dish, which pineapple in syrup consisted of (the syrup was aspic powdered unrequired for the is perhaps flavored gelatin, gelatin base), so not a chicken stock, I made do with favorite. salt, lemon juice pineapple chunks and syrup from the that I cut into canned pineapple, did smaller pieces. I mixed not exactly fill me with deeverything, added it to light. This base is known the aspic base once it was unappealingly as aspic, egg-white consistency, because it contains meat and spooned everything stock. But it came togethinto a loaf pan. er just fine, and went into I then asked Mike for

his opinion of our work thus far. He replied with a rueful smile, “Appetizing.” The third course of my gelatin meal was dessert. It was difficult to pick recipes for the first two courses, mainly because nearly everything sounded so unappetizing. I had the opposite problem choosing a dessert recipe. Most of them sounded tasty, and I found a lot of interesting recipes.

GOLDEN DESSERT

Finally, I settled on Golden Peach Gels, which sounded delicious and unobjectionable as far as ingredients were concerned, and had the added bonus of being visually appealing. This dish started with a peach-lemon gelatin base, consisting of unflavored gelatin dissolved in syrup from canned peaches, water, sugar, lemon juice, and grated lemon peel. My faithful assistant grated and juiced lemons for me. PERFECTION SALAD

7

(See THE ASSEMBLED, page 8)


THE MOLDED CHICKEN LOAF FEATURED A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING.

“On the appointed day, I brought my gelatin dishes to the Reno County Museum for a taste test. Guinea pigs included eager Assistant Curator Lynn Ledeboer, and our administrative assistant, Paula Dover, a vegetarian who was excused from the Chicken Loaf.”

“The assembled gelatin...was striking to behold.” (Continued from page 7)

THE GOLDEN PEACH GELS, RIGHT, WERE A SOLID WINNER WITH THE TASTE TESTERS, ONE OF WHOM SAID, “THIS TASTES LIKE SOMETHING THAT COULD SPAN THE AGES.”

The assembled gelatin half in the center of each. base was studded with We took our meal coursfloating bits of lemon zest es in order. Opinion was and was very striking to divided about the edibility behold. I poured the mixof the Perfection Salad. ture into a square Pyrex I couldn’t manage even glass dish and left one bite. Lynn and it to chill. After Paula, however, 45 minutes, I almost liked it, REVIEWS completed the saying it was FROM dish by putreminiscent of TASTE-TESTERS ting a spoonful coleslaw. of small-curd Molded WERE MIXED. cottage cheese Chicken Loaf into the middle of was not as repelnine canned peach lent to me. Gelatihalves and placing them nized chicken stock is a in the gelatin in neat rows weird experience, but the of three. Everything went combination of pineapple back into the refrigerator and chicken is a solid to solidify. one. We garnished the loaf On the appointed day, I with peanuts for that exbrought my gelatin dishes to the Reno County Museum for a taste test. Guinea pigs included eager Assistant Curator Lynn Ledeboer, and our administrative assistant, Paula Dover, a vegetarian who was duly excused from Molded Chicken Loaf. I had unmolded the individual Perfection Salads from their muffin tin and the gelatinized chicken loaf the night before with varying degrees of success. The Golden Peach Gels were cut into individual pieces with a peach

8

tra special something. To Lynn, however, it tasted like chicken just on the other side of spoiled. The Golden Peach Gels, however, were a solid winner and definitely the favorite with all three of us. Per Lynn, “This tastes like something that could span the ages.” In spite of the misfires, Lynn thanked me for allowing the staff to share in experiencing history through culinary weirdness. There was a time in the recent past when gelatin dishes were commonplace in the dining rooms and kitchens of America.


GELATIN DISHES WERE SO POPULAR THAT A NOVELTY SONG WORKED ITS WAY INTO THE PUBLIC CONSCIOUSNESS.

“Dinner wasn’t dinner at my house without a Jell-O salad,” said Linda Schmitt, RCHS Executive Director and Hutchinson native, about growing up eating the gelatin dishes served by her mother. Dishes like these entered the public consciousness to the point that composer and pianist William Bolcom wrote a novelty song: It's my lime Jell-O marshmallow cottage cheese surprise! With slices of pimento (You won't believe your eyes) All topped with a pineapple ring And a dash of mayonnaise, My vanilla wafers 'round the edge Will win your highest praise. The Hutchinson News weighed in on the mid-century gelatin phenomenon as well. In 1952 writer Mary Lou Dungey recommended the use of gelatin for dieters, and extolled its virtues overall, saying that “gelatin can be the busiest food in the kitchen…it gets into everything from soup to nuts and even candies.” In 1954 food columnist Dorothy Budde offered helpful tips on molding and unmolding gelatin, adding that gelatin is “called upon to beauty other foods, make palat-

able leftovers and to prevent excessive crystallization and coarse texture.”

ONLY A CURIOSITY

Even though I liked only one of the three dishes I prepared, I feel as if I learned a lot from this project. To me, gelatin is more of a culinary curiosity than a staple. I now can see the advantages of gelatin that can turn a small amount of meat or vegetables into a fairly generous meal. The dishes I prepared

9

were easy and required little time to prepare. They required few different ingredients, and were comparatively far easier than many of the meals I assemble in my own kitchen every week. I don’t think that I’ll be preparing any of these recipes anytime soon – or ever – but I have learned to look at gelatin in a new way. So the next time you’re at the grocery store, spare a kindly thought for that humble little box.

h


Grab a puppet...curtain rising! puppets on their stand await their acting debut.

o dy t rea

go!

T

a-dah! Our brand new Prairie Dog Puppet Theatre is now open for play! If you haven’t seen it or played in it yet, stop by and take a peek. The puppet theatre, located in the Oodleplex, takes the place of the beloved bank that was beginning to look the worse for wear. The designs for both the bank and puppet theatre were created by Tina Moore, past assistant administrator. After completing Tina’s construction design for the theatre, Hutchinson Correctional Facility Inmate Steve Somerville began painting the backdrop mural for the theatre in mid-February. His creative talents were unleashed, and as of March 14 the project was complete. So grab the kids and come put on a puppet show in the new Prairie Dog Puppet Theatre!

10

h


the puppet theatre mural, above, is reminiscent of the official kansas seal, and represents symbols of reno county – a farm, silo, windmill, water tower, fire house and, most importantly, the prairie dog (detail upper right). this striking mural began with steve somerville’s pencil-drawn design. at right, he adds the colorful paint to complete the mural.

All in the name of ...

H

HISTORY

ave you heard about National History Day? If not, this academic program centers around a competition for middle and high school students who submit research papers, websites, documentary films, presentations or exhibits, either individually or in small groups. On February 28, I served as a volunteer judge at Friends University for Kansas region 6. I was asked to judge in the senior high individual exhibits division.

Previously I judged in 2007 and 2008 for the Pennsylvania regional competition. In my division, our winners’ exhibits focused on several topics: the origin of the mandatory reading of Miranda rights to lawbreakers; the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church of Birmingham; and the eugenics movement in America and abroad. Entrants competed in the state competition in Topeka on April 19.

11

Results later! Judging was a great experience and a great way to network with fellow Kansas historians and museum professionals. It’s wonderful to see today’s youth actively involved in exploring the wide world of history. The National History Day competitions are the perfect platforms on which they can continue to pursue their interest in history. – Ashley Maready RCHS Chief Curator

for more information on the national history day contest, please see www.nhd.org/contest. htm.


cracked and uneven, the steps and porch leading to the doors of the kline side of the museum have deteriorated and need urgent repair.

Do we have a

PROBLEM?

I Linda Schmitt Executive Director, Reno County Historical Society

t’s always nice to know where you are going and how you will know when you get there! With this in mind, the RCHS Board of Directors participated in a planning retreat in February. Facilitated by Jon Daveline, former CEO of the Hutchinson Chamber of Commerce, the retreat resulted in a roadmap for Strataca and the Reno County Museum that will take us up to 2017. The process began by taking a look back at the 2009 strategic planning process and 2012’s retreat and plan update. We were very pleased to be able to review the progress made at both museums since 2009, including:

12

Reno County Museum: • Permanent storage solution with purchase of the RCM annex • New outdoor signage • Window restoration (complete this summer) • Updated irrigation system and fountain repair Strataca: • Salt Mine Express Train • Underground restroom

complex and Event Center • Salt Safari Adventure Hike • Miner’s Life exhibit After celebrating many successes, we got down to business with a look at the mission statements of both museums, and found that both needed a little updating. After much deliberation, we changed to the following:

permanent walls a priority for strataca event center


the porch must be repaired on the rosemont (avenue a) porch seen here and at right.

The Reno County Museum collects, preserves, interprets and shares the history of Reno County, Kansas to inspire awareness and appreciation of the past for present and future generations. Strataca is an awe-inspiring destination in an active salt mine that provides the ultimate underground adventure to its visitors. Next we tackled our priorities for the next several years. They are ambitious, yet doable. Here are some of the highlights: Reno County Museum: • Digitize and enhance research • Repair and restore porch and stairs of both Kline and Rosemont buildings • Establish an annual fundraiser • Increase membership • Broaden appeal to “millennials” and increase marketing • Develop an intern program • Add a Director of Education • More programs and events

the highly successful strataca salt cellar gift shop will expand topside this summer. Strataca: • New corner sign (this year) • Finish Event Center (to be called the StrataCenter) • Develop a topside gift shop (this summer) • Establish an annual fundraiser • Develop a geology exhibit (We have the plan, now we need the funding.) • Increase staffing • Develop a “Boom Room” (coming this year) These are just a few of the many goals that we hope to accomplish in the next three years. Clearly we have our work cut out for us! We are fortunate to have a board and staff who are always looking ahead and actively helping to bring about continuous progress. Let’s go!!

13

h


Thanks to supporters! C A BIG WELCOME TO OUR NEW MEMBERS! WE’RE GLAD TO HAVE YOU ON BOARD.

itizens and StoryKeepers make up the backbone of the Reno County Historical Society by supporting Strataca and Reno County Museum. We thank all of you for your generous support. The following joined or renewed between January and March of this year.

Reno County Museum StoryKeepers Caretakers Steve Conard John and Jane Eriksen Barbara Frizell First National Bank of Hutchinson

E. Francis Habiger Jim and Sandra Haskell Heart of Kansas Quilt Guild *Arlyn and Loretta Miller Aavon Powers Laura Snyder John and Peg Stephens Jack and Donna Wortman Cleyon and Laura Yowell Protectors Allen and Ila Stone Restorers Dennis and Jennalee Boggs Tremenda and Butch Dillon Donor Advised Fund of the Hutchinson Community Foundation Downtown Hutchinson

Patty and Dan Foss Ken and Barbara Keefer F.E. Schoepf (Shep) Bill and Virginia Rexroad In-kind and General Donors Mary Janet and Bill Collins Melissa and Billy Klug R. Wayne Lowe Donor Advised Fund of the Hutchinson Community Foundation Bill’s Appliances CK’s Lock & Key *New member

Strataca Citizens Pickers John and Jane Eriksen First National Bank of Hutchinson Barbara Frizell *Katherine Goodenberger E. Francis Habiger *Arlyn and Loretta Miller Laura Snyder *Jason Steele Jack and Donna Wortman Diggers Charles and Bonnie Benscheidt Dennis and Jennalee Boggs Maurice and Melva Cummings Tremenda and Butch Dillon Donor Advised Fund of the Hutchinson Community Foundation Jack and Ginger Koelling Bill and Virginia Rexroad John and Peg Stephens Drillers Patty and Dan Foss

14

*New member

h


2 1

Reno County Museum                                                        

Where Your Stories Live! W

Become a StoryKeeper!

It’s 20,000   years   ago.   Imagine   a   woolly   mammoth   grazing  along  the  river   on  a  beautiful  summer  day  in   what   is   now   South   Hutchinson.   A   tooth   found   in   South   Hutchinson   and   now   on   display   at   the   Reno   County   Museum   inspires   this   story   of   an   ancient   Reno  County  inhabitant.       Our  museum   is   not  a   warehouse   for   “old   stuff”-­‐   it’s  a   place   that   ensures   that   our   stories   of   immigration,   hardship,   celebration,   innovation,   and   industry   will   live   on   and   continue   to   be   told.   In   2014,   RCM   will   explore   with   you   all   of   the   ways   we   preserve,   interpret,   and   cherish   the   stories   of   our  families   and   communities.  

One way  that  we  will  do  this  is  through  a  series  of  workshops   that   will  inspire  and  inform  you  of  how  to  preserve  your  own   personal   stories.   Do   you   have   a   treasured   piece   of   family   history  packed  away?  We  will  show  you  how  to  bring  its  story   to   life   and   preserve   it   for   your   children,   grandchildren,   and   future  generations.      

Help us keep your stories safe by supporting the Reno County Museum in 2014!

• • • •

Become a  StoryKeeper  with  your  donation   Contribute  to  the  Collection  Care  Fund   Adopt  a  window  in  our  Adopt  a  Window  Project   Visit  often  and  attend  our  events  

With your support in 2014, we can keep your stories alive for the future!


kraft-phenix cheese products are the focus of the front and back covers of this unique 1931 booklet, “cheese and ways to serve it,” above. (1992.113.58) below left is the 1911 white house cookbook boasting that it is the new and enlarged edition. (1986.43.01) a crazy-quilt pattern, which may or may not have been made by donor mildred hamilton, adorns this 1891 white house cookbook, below center and right, the cookbook is threaded across the front and back covers to hold it together. (1992.51.40)

COOKBOOKS

W

...through the years

hat happy homemaker was – or is – without a cookbook? Or two or three? The Reno County Museum has a plentiful supply of cherished cookbooks from various eras. There is the classic, “The White House Cookbook,” published in 1891. A later edition of this cookbook is covered in a custom, hand-quilted patchwork cover. And then there’s the more unusual, “Cheese and Ways to Serve It,” which came out in 1931 and features Kraft cheese products.

The variety of our historical cookbooks and recipe booklets is truly scrumptious. The “Navy Chow” cookbook features recipes compiled by the Officers' Wives Club of the U.S. Naval Air Station in Hutchinson. Published in 1954, it has many cute, humorous, hand-drawn illustrations that highlight the recipes. The 1935 “Bride’s Cookbook,” published and distributed by the Women’s Civic Center Club of Hutchinson, features more polished advertising images of local products

and businesses. Each era of cooking has its own flavor and focus. The covers of the 1942 cooking booklet, “Food for Fitness for 2 or 4 or 6,” feature color photographs of ice cream with chocolate syrup and an olive loaf sandwich with ketchup on top. Today we would probably not include these food items in a cookbook published with a focus on “fitness.” With all the recipes mulling around in these great cookbooks in our archives, we’re sure you’ll soon get cookin’!


this photo of a woman frosting a cake, above, appears in “the white house cook book” from 1911. (from 1986.43.01)

the 1891 “white house cook book, above, included a photo of frances cleveland, then-current first lady, and illustrations of all previous first ladies. (from 1992.51.40)

an elegant woman with marcel waves, above, serves up a recipe featuring mazola-mayonnaise in “the modern method of preparing delightful foods.” (from 1986.121) this iga ad, above right, appeared in the 1930 “bride’s cook book,” published by hutchinson’s women’s civic center club. (from 1993.58.155)

MORE COOKBOOKS AND THEIR CONTENTS ON PAGES 18-20.

17

800-760-5315

620-662-5315


FOR THE HOMEMAKER OF 1943. (1990.116.01)

THE WAY TO A MAN’S HEART (1995.04.41)

SAVING WWII RATION POINTS (1990.116.02)

FRONT AND BACK COVERS OF TWO RECIPE BOOKLETS PUBLISHED IN 1941. (LEFT: 1992.113.44; RIGHT: 1992.113.45A)

18

FOOD FOR FITNESS IS A PICKLE LOAF SANDWICH, LEFT, TOPPED WITH KETCHUP? APPARENTLY IT IS IN 1942. (1992.113.56) ABOVE, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ISSUED THESE BOOKLETS IN 1945 AND 1949. (1992.113.26 AND 1992.113.27)


THE NAVAL OFFICERS’ WIVES PRODUCED THIS 1954 COOKBOOK (1994.50.01) THAT FEATURED a TONGUE-IN-CHEEK RECIPE FROM CONTRIBUTOR “A. BACHELOR.” (1994.50.01)

BACK COVER OF THE 1953 “BOOK OF SALADS.” (1992.113.52)

PHOTO FROM COOKBOOK FEATURING SOUFFLE RECIPES. (1990.116.02)

CAKE RECIPE IN “BRIDE’S COOK BOOK” TERMED “NEW SUPER-CAKE OF THE CENTURY.” (1993.58.155)

19

THIS WHIMSICAL AD WAS FEATURED IN THE “BRIDE’S COOK BOOK.” (1993.58.155)

CUTE LINE DRAWINGS IN THE GAS SERVICE COOKBOOK. (1995.04.41)

“BOOK OF SALADS” FEATURES THIS ENTICING MOLDED AVOCADO AND TUNA LOAF. (1992.113.52)

MORE ON PG 20


THE MARY LEE TAYLOR RADIO SHOW, ABOVE, WAS ADVERTISED IN THE “FOOD FOR FITNESS” COOKBOOK. (FROM 1992.113.56)

THIS PHOTO OF A FAMILY EAGERLY ANTICIPATING FRESHLY BAKED MUFFINS IS FEATURED IN THE GAS SERVICE COMPANY’S COOKBOOK, “THE WAY TO A MAN’S HEART.” (FROM 1995.04.41}

THE AD FOR FAIRMONT FOODS TRIED TO MAKE COTTAGE CHEESE GLAMOROUS WITH ITS “HOLLYWOOD BOWL SALAD.”(1995.04.41)

IN THE PASTRIES SECTION OF “THE WAY TO A MAN’S HEART” COOKBOOK, RIGHT, MEN LOOK HUNGRILY AT A FRESHLY BAKED PIE. (FROM 1995.04.41)

20

THE KNOX GELATINE COMPANY DISTRIBUTED THIS RECIPE BOOKLET IN 1961.(1992.113.57)

h


Meet our volunteers: Karen & Shanna

O

n Wednesdays and Thursdays we really do have you covered – thanks to two of our terrific new volunteers, Karen Fager and Shanna Soukup, who both joined us in 2013. Karen Fager If you visit the Reno County Museum on Wednesday afternoon, most likely you will be greeted by Karen. She grew up on a farm between Haven and Burrton. After high school, she earned her Bachelor’s degree in elementary education and teaching certificate, then taught sixth graders for two years. karen fager

When she realized that teaching wasn’t for her, Karen went to work for Waggoner’s, where she sewed cushions for church pews. She had always enjoyed quilting and sewing, and the job with Waggoner’s became her career for 33 years. Karen still occasionally works there when business demands extra hands. In the meantime, Karen still found time to raise a son and daughter with her husband, Norman, who passed away in 1990. The family traveled often and “…went somewhere every summer…” Remarried to husband Ted, Karen still enjoys quilting, reading and volunteering at local organizations, among them First Call For Help two afternoons a week. Karen says the best part of volunteering is chatting with visitors. Shanna Soukup If you come back to visit the museum on Thursday afternoon, Shanna Soukup will be your friendly greeter. Shanna is a lady who loves to travel with husband Herb, even being adventurous enough to take “mystery” trips

21

where the destinations were unknown! Raised in Decatur County, Kansas, Shanna remembers attending a very small rural school for her elementary grades, then studying for two years at the College of Emporia. After she married, she moved to Hudson and finally to Hutchinson. Shanna was the Hutchinson High School activities treasurer for about 16 years, then worked in the business office of Hutchinson Community College for nine years. Both Shanna and her husband are retired, Herb from the local school district in 1996 and Shanna in 1999 from HCC. The couple has two daughters and a son. When her children were younger, Shanna enjoyed “…sewing for myself and the kids…and playing the piano and organ.” Today she appreciates her time at the museum. The museum is certainly lucky to have both these wonderful volunteers who generously devote their afternoons to covering our reception area and gift shop.

h

shanna soukup

f

YOU’LL FIND OUR NEW VOLUNTEERS, KAREN AND SHANNA, BOTH NATIVE KANSANS, READY TO HELP IN THE GIFT SHOP AND RECEPTION AREA.


Murder in the Mine

Salt Safari Mine Adventure

August 23: “A Very Brady Murder”

Select Fridays and Saturdays, 1-4 p.m.

December 12: “I Saw Mommy Killing Santa Claus”

Limit: 20 hikers Must be 13 years or older

Interactive Mystery Dinner Theatre STRATACA HOURS 9 am–6 pm Tues–Sat 1–6 pm Sunday closed Mondays last tour departs at 3 pm advance reservations strongly recommended allow about two hours for your adventure SALT BLAST PASS our best deal includes gallery tour, dark ride (both handicapped-accessible) and train ride: adults: $19 seniors (60+), AAA and active military: $17 children (4-12): $12.50 reno county residents: $14 strataca citizens: $7 children under 4 not admitted due to mine safety regulations. pricing available to add only dark ride or train ride to gallery admission. all prices include sales tax. special pricing for groups over 28 and school groups with arrangements made one week in advance. 3650 e. avenue g (at airport road) hutchinson, ks 67501

620-662-1425 toll-free 866-755-3450 underkansas.org

22

$55 per person / $400 for table of 8 Doors open at 5 p.m. Last trip underground: 6:15 p.m. Must be 18 years or older due to adult humor

Should you attend, we promise to deliver murder, mayhem and hilarious madness. Make your reservations soon as these events fill up quickly.

Advance online reservations required This challenging, rugged hike will explore raw areas of the mine, cover many miles, and last up to three hours. Hike is not handicapped-accessible. For details and reservations for all events: underkansas.org

STRATACA ATTRACTIONS The Shaft See this engineering marvel that houses the sixton double-decker hoist that transports visitors 650’ below ground. Stratadome Intriguing and palatial, experience the grandeur of this vaulted salt room. Play in the Permian Playground filled with a variety of hands-on salt. Salt secrets exposed! Mining Gallery See the Myron-mobile, a post-apocalyptic looking car driven by Mike Rowe, the host of the TV show “Dirty Jobs.” Discover modern day mining practices versus mining in the past. Find out what a day in the life of a miner is really like.

Harry’s Habitat (Dr. Vreeland’s Fluid Inclusion Exhibit) The world’s oldest living organism, nearly 250 million years old and once encapsulated inside a salt crystal, is a resident of Strataca. Learn about its discoverers, Dr. Russell Vreeland and his team.

GE Engine No. 2 One of only three such engines ever built, it is now on display outside of Strataca. Built in 1919, the train ran along a short railway line from 1928 to 1963 that provided switching services for the Carey plant and mine.

Salt Mine Express This 15-minute train ride is a narrated, guided tour through a part of the mine that was active in the 1940s and ‘50s.

The Iodine Deficiency and Disorder Story Explore the efforts of Kiwanis International and UNICEF in using salt to combat the devastating effects of iodine deficiency.

The Dark Ride Your personal guide delivers fascinating information on a 30-minute tram ride where you experience true “mining dark” and collect your souvenir piece of salt.

The Story of Underground Vaults & Storage View costumes and props from your favorite movies in this exhibit focusing on a unique underground storage business.

h


RENO COUNTY MUSEUM

EVENTS & EXHIBITS New for 2014! Reno County Treasures: Talks, Tips, & Treats These fun, informal workshops will focus on education and preservation with a bit of show-and-tell and treats! Call for details:

June 10 – Heroes, Helmets & Holsters: Military item preservation, 7-9 p.m.

RENO COUNTY MUSEUM HOURS

August 14 – No Dog Ears Allowed: Book repair and preservation, 7-9 p.m. ($)

9 am–5 pm tues-Fri 11-5 saturday closed sunday and monday

October 28 – Dragons, Gargoyles, & Cauldrons: 7-9 p.m. ($)

free admission unless otherwise noted

December 6 – Trimming the Tree: Ornaments Past & Present: 1-2:30 p.m.

100 S. Walnut 620-662-1184

Ice Cream Social

July 17, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Our annual sweet calorie give-away day at RCM is free to the public! Come out and enjoy...or until the ice creamsee is gone! these stickpins in reno county’s “jewelry box.”

EXHIBITS

RCM on the Road… Comes Home

Tough, Rough & Ready: Reno County Tools A-Z

From 2011 to 2012, RCM travelled to 14 Reno County communities to display artifacts from those towns. The exhibits stayed up for six months. Now we are bringing this exhibit back to Hutchinson for all to see. Also we are accepting photographs of current and historical items relating to any of the Reno County cities. We’ll display them along with this exhibit.

This tool-tally awesome exhibit displays an amazing variety of tools that built Reno County from the ground up.

A Peek Inside Reno County’s Jewelry Box From rhinestones to fine gold, see what adornment Reno Countians have been wearing from the mid-1880s through the 1960s.

23

Hail to the Hall: 100 Years of Convention Hall This exhibit traces the history of Hutchinson’s historic Convention Hall and officially displays the items from the Convention/Memorial Hall 1911 time capsule box.

Transportation Gallery See the Schuttler wagon, an Amish buggy, the Indian motorcycle, sidecar and much more.

h

f email us snapshots of your community and we will post them along with the “on the road” exhibit. send to: lynn@renocomuseum.org.


WHAT’S COOKING? TASTE, IF YOU DARE! PAGES 4 &16 reno county historical society p.o. box 664 hutchinson, kansas 67504-0664

return service requested

If your address changes, please call us at 620-662-1184.

Legacy Spring 2014  

The "it's all about Jell-O" issue!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you