Fall 2018

Page 1

Fall 2019

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION



ABGA ADDRESS CHANGE Effective November 18, 2019, the address will be: American Boer Goat Association 4258 S Jackson St San Angelo, Texas 76903

Membership Renewals Membership Renewals will be going out this month! Be sure your membership is renewed before December 31. If it is not, you will not be able to vote in 2020 ABGA elections.

Letter from the Editor Usually my letter is filled with motivation and passion as I love living in a free country where I can raise my goats, sheep, cattle and dogs the way I like to raise them. Finding the words this edition has been exceptionally difficult, though, I can tell you that no matter what challenges us from one day to the next can be overcome with a love for each other and for the animals which we take care of. There is something about a newborn goat that helps mend the soul. This edition is dedicated to me brother, William Hoefelmeyer, who passed away unexpectedly during the development of this issue. May your fall and upcoming holiday season be filled with peace and love.

Karla Blackstock

March 3 – 22, 2020

rodeohouston.com

OPEN AND YOUTH BOER GOAT SHOWS Open: Sunday, March 8 – 8 a.m. Youth: Monday, March 9 – 8 a.m. NRG Center, Main Arena

Entry Deadline: Jan. 5, 2020 Late Entry Deadline: Jan. 15, 2020 For more information visit rodeohouston.com

Contact the Livestock Competitions & Exhibits Department at livestock@rodeohouston.com or 832.667.1125 The Boer Goat - 1


2018-2019 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Board of Directors REGION 9: DERIC WETHERELL (EC) PRESIDENT: dpwether@yahoo.com REGION 13: KATHY DAVES-CARR (EC) VICE-PRESIDENT: dxdarlin1@yahoo.com REGION 14: DENISE CRABTREE TREASURER: adcrabtree@horizonview.net REGION 16: SARA DAVIS (EC) SECRETARY: csdavis@oakhollowlivestock.com REGION 1: MADDIE FENTON • maddie.fenton7@gmail.com REGION 2: KEN BATY • kbaty@crc-co.net REGION 3: CLARK HUINKER • chuinker@fmtvets.com REGION 4: KEVIN RICHMOND krichmond6896@gmail.com REGION 5: KENNY ELWOOD (EC) • kennyelwood@hotmail.com REGION 6: RANDY DUSEK • lazystranch@yahoo.com REGION 7: LINDA WEST • ll-west@sbcglobal.net REGION 8: JOHN BLACKSTOCK • blackstock.jd8@gmail.com REGION 10: JOSH STEPHANS (EC) • jcstephans@yahoo.com REGION 11: JESSE CORNELIUS (EC) • jcornelius@nettleton.k12.ms.us REGION 12: KIM MORGAN • km4881@gmail.com REGION 15: SUSAN BURNER • wvburners@comcast.net *EC DENOTES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBER

2019 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Staff LARY DUNCAN, Chief Executive Officer • lary@abga.org MARY ELLEN VILLARREAL, Executive Director • mary@abga.org4 KIM KIGER, Member Services • kim@abga.org MONICA BRIDGES, Youth Coordinator • monica@abga.org ASIA FOSTER, Support Staff • asia@abga.org NANCY TENORIA, Member Services• nancy@abga.org MAURGAN BULLARD, Member Services • maurgan@abga.org SONIA CERVANTEZ, Accounts Receivable • sonia@abga.org CIERRA MARTINEZ, Member Services • cierra@abga.org ABGA OFFICE HOURS: Monday-Friday • 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (CST)

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Letter from the President Hello fellow ABGA members, I am truly humbled again to be selected by my fellow board members to lead this great organization again. We are very excited about moving into the new building and have been working feverishly to make sure all the systems are in place. The final move will be by the end of November and it will be here before we know it. Please bear with us during times of conversion from the old to the new office space. Our crazy weather this year continues to haunt folks around the country. I have heard stories all year from people I talk to around the country that seem to be having goat health issues that have never come up before. In each case the only logical explanation is it seems the weather pattern is different this year than it has been in years past with some experiencing hotter, drier temperatures while others continue to get dumped on by extreme amounts of rainfall. God be with everyone as you work to care for the animals. We all know raising goats is not for the faint of heart. Our regional show program is once again in full swing. While two regionals have been previously completed, there are two more remaining this fall that we are looking forward to in the next month. There have been some new faces in attendance this fall amongst those that are no strangers to the program. We encourage all junior members whether you have goats to show or not to come out to the regionals and participate in the contests. If you are not members, we have regional discounts where we can help get you signed up to be a part of this great program. We, as a board, are very optimistic about the future and looking forward to new endeavors of the organization. We continue to seek ideas from our members as we look for additional avenues to benefit more members. Please contact your director and bring information forward so we can continue to grow the organization. We value all of our members and look forward to positive suggestions to move forward in our industry. I am looking forward to another exciting year of serving the ABGA and helping our members!!

President ABGA Board of Directors


ABOUT THE COVER

Fall 2019

In This Issue

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

4 Affiliates 5 CEO's Message 6 USDA studying goats 8 Johne's Disease in Goats 10 Hay Supplementation 16 Standouts 19 JABGA 20 Q-Fever 23 Treating Foot Rot 27 Gestation/Breeding Chart 28 Trailer Safety 30 Calendar of Events 31 Photos from around the ABGA 32 Classifieds

GMBR Ms. Foxy knows she is meant to be something. This young doeling's photo was submitted by Michelle Leonard. Thank you for sharing with The Boer Goat.

The Boer Goat CONTACT 4258 S Jackson St San Angelo, Texas 76903 TEL: 325.486.2242 FAX: 325.486.2637

PUBLISHER

AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION KARLA BLACKSTOCK, MANAGING EDITOR & CREATIVE DIRECTOR

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING?

Make sure to showcase your ranch or company by advertising in the business card section or by purchasing ad space.

WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO IN THE MAGAZINE?

If you would like to see your photo in the The Boer Goat, please submit your picture to editor@abga. org. Please send photos in the largest size you have available and include your name for print.

The Boer Goat hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or all inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Boer Goat and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer or its payment for the said advertisement, the running of a corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any errors must be made within 30 days of distribution of the magazine. The opinions or views expressed in all editorials are those of the writer or persons interviewed and not The Boer Goat. The Boer Goat does, however, reserve the right to edit or refuse all material, which might be objectable in content. No material or part thereof, may be reproduced or used out of context without prior, specific approval of a proper credit to The Boer Goat.

The Boer Goat - 3


AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Affiliates Program

Boer Goat Association of North Carolina

Northern California Meat Goat Association

Contact: Kelly Clark

Contact: Carl McCosker

Serving States: North Carolina

Email: ncmga@yahoo.com

PO Box 36479; Greensboro, NC 27416 Email: KellyClark@triad.rr.com

Keystone Goat Producers Association 125 Ivy Drive, Middletown, PA 17057

PO Box 553

Gridley, CA 95948 530-205-7922

Tall Corn Meat Goat Wether Assoc, Inc

Email: camstoys@comcast.net

Contact: James Shepard

Illinois Meat Goat Producers

Website: www.meatgoatwether.com

Serving States: Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey, New York 779 CR 800 E; Tolono, IL 61880 Email: dpwether@yahoo.com

4458 32nd St; Grinnell IA 50112 Email: dcc3200@gmail.com Serving States: Iowa

website: www.ilmeatgoat.org

Serving States: Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin, Indiana Indiana Boer Goat Classic 7974 East 100 South Elwood, IN 46978

Email: treasurer@indianaboergoat.org Website: www.indianaboergoat.org

The objectives of the ABGA Affiliate program include: •

To provide resources at the local clubs level

To assist with educational opportunities

• • •

To provide networking opportunities for the local clubs To attract and retain goat producers

To cultivate grassroots input from local clubs

Local clubs benefit from joining the group of recognized affiliates by receiving:

..Listing on the Affiliate page of The Boer Goat including a short description

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• • • • • • • •

Listing on the Affiliate section of ABGA website with description of club’s mission

Listing of club events (shows and educational events) on the ABGA Event Calendar

Monthly listing of new ABGA members in the Affiliate’s area

Eligibility to receive ABGA promotional and educational material for club events

Eligibility for educational funds

Eligibility for cost share programs

Membership matching funds at the end of each year Opportunities for future programs


Message from the CEO 2019 has been a year of changes for myself and the ABGA. As a rule, changes can be challenging and this year's changes did not disappoint. Dealing with the new office here in San Angelo has been one of the biggest changes. Moving a business is a little different than moving from house to house. With that said we will be relocating in mid-November. We could be detached from the Internet, which includes phone and emails, for 48 to 72 hours during this transition. It is probable members will subjected to some loss of services during the move. This summer’s busy season proved to be the most challenging of my tenure with the ABGA. I suspect it was a combination of compounding issues that made this one more difficult. The constant demand for input on a building, loss of key personnel at the beginning of peak registration season, and changes to the prior year’s rules. The large number of rules that govern us combined with a specialized database makes replacing personnel on the run a difficult task. This year’s roll out of the donor dam DNA requirement caught many members in its web. Why is it that some work takes an extended period of time for the ABGA to complete? It is not that simple unfortunately. The “catch 22” of incoming and outgoing work is complicated because every case is not always member friendly. How can not getting work out fast not be member friendly? Let me explain. For the office to simply open a work order and process it as we receive it means if you have any errors in your work or missing data like a service memo, flush report, lack of DNA, fields on application not filled out etc. that portion of your work is closed and you receive only what you submitted properly prepared and a request for additional information for that was not properly submitted to be worked back in the mail. If you are on electronic notification and respond immediately, you may be lucky enough to get it reopened before it leaves the office. If you do not respond quickly or if you are not on electronic notification, it is a bit more painful. Your work is closed out. The issue date on an original registration certificate is established by when the work is received at the ABGA office as long as it can be worked. If it is closed out and later resubmitted, the issue date will then correlate with the date the resubmission is received. If a show like the ABGA Nationals requires registration by a

certain date this can become major issue. Let me recap how ugly this can be in the busy season. Just for example say, if it took the mail four working days from your house to office, then it takes 10 working days for the office to get to your work in the order it was received in, and it takes the mailman another four working days to get it back to you the total days spent to get a null result depending on number of weekend days that have to be added in could now be at 24 days lost to get nothing done. The bad part at this point is you are going to have to spend another 24 days to try again once you make the corrections or provide the information required that was not received in your original application. Now let’s take another case where the office trying to be member friendly can work against you. Let’s call this case, “One Bad Apple Can Spoil the Whole Barrel”. Given the ABRI database utilized by a number registry services around the world only allows you to have one open work order at a time. Until it is closed, completed work builds within the order and is not mailed out. So follow this, you submit work to the office via the mail that is received date stamped, scanned in, assigned a work order number and placed in line to be worked in the order it was received in. The next day you decide to do some registrations with Online live and receive your temporary paper but the actual paper is placed within your existing open work order. Allow in the submitted open work is a registration application lacking a service memo and a staff member reaches out to you and or you notify the office you will provide it. The order stays open and all your completed work is on a shelf until we receive the needed information. Thus holding up everything that is ready to go until the last piece can be completed. If you are keeping up and recall we started with an Online live registration that you thought would be mailed out the following day. The reality here is say the office was at eight working days out when your Online registration order was completed you have racked up 9-11 days of hold time depending on how the weekends fell, plus the time it takes for you to provide the missing information and you still have the USPS mail time to get back to you to add to this equation. All of a sudden an Online live paper because of an overlapping piece of work takes two to four weeks with mail time before it gets to you.

The Boer Goat - 5


But let’s go back to the rotten and add a twist, which is where I see the more extreme delays. It can be much slower given that original service memo you failed to provide is coming from the buck’s owner “NOT YOU” and he does not have your sense of urgency. Yes, he told you on the phone he would send it that evening but the reality is he takes two weeks. More than likely you don’t have him send it directly to you so every couple of days you’re calling the ABGA office to see if we have received it. Given members outnumber staff at a rate of a 1,000 to one, these sort of calls alone slow things further. How can you help yourself? Make sure your work has all supporting document in place and is filled out properly. Know your Online line work will be tied up with submitted work if you send in both at same time and allow for it or plan around it if you have pieces of work on short time lines. Fax or email work in to reduce mail time. It is not uncommon for the mail to take four or five days to arrive here. Utilize the electronic notification system to immediately correct simple issues before they are returned to you via the mail. Plan for rush season as it is seasonal and with as much as a 400% variance in work load there are simply times where the office will run five to ten days longer than in the slow season. How do we make things better, faster and more efficient at the ABGA office? The short answer: make adjustments to Online live allowing you to do more things without having to go through the office. Improvement targets could include resolving frozen embryo issues, the grandfathered semen DNA issue, and transfers. Identify and set to policy to deal with incorrect or incomplete work in the most time-efficient and consistent manner to avoid delays with finished work. Utilize what we identified from this past year’s issues to eliminate as many as possible to make us better next year. Bottom line: sometimes we have to take one step backward to go two steps forward. I plan to use what I’ve come to better understand this past year to do just that if possible.

USDA studying goat operations From July 1 through December 2019, the USDA’s National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS), in collaboration with the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), will conduct its second national study of the U.S. goat industry. The NAHMS Goat 2019 study will take an in-depth look at the priority issues facing U.S. goat operations and provide new and valuable information regarding animal health and management practices in this growing industry. The NAHMS Goat 2019 study is designed to provide individual participants and stakeholders with valuable information on the U.S. goat industry. NAHMS collects and reports accurate and useful information on animal health and management in the United States. Since 1990, NAHMS has developed national estimates on disease prevalence and other factors related to the health of U.S. beef cattle, sheep, goats, dairy cattle, swine, equine, poultry, and catfish populations. The science-based results produced by NAHMS have proven to be of considerable value to the

6 - The Boer Goat

U.S. livestock, poultry, and aquaculture industries as well as to other animal health stakeholders. Producers that choose to complete both phase I and phase II of the study will be offered free biologic testing.

T


National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services Veterinary Services

2019 GOAT STUDY Did You KNOW?

Selected participants can receive FREE biological testing.

Every 10 years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services’ National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) conducts a National Goat Survey. This is NAHMS’ second National Study of the U.S. goat industry. The first NAHMS goat study occurred in 2009, and another study will not occur for at least 10 years.

Why PARTICIPATE?

Your participation in the NAHMS 2019 Goat Study will provide the goat industry—and fellow producers—with new and valuable information regarding goat health and management. Information from the study will be used to help develop new treatments, control, and prevention mechanisms for common goat diseases, and

How it WORKS?

Selected participants receive a 2019 Goat Study packet in the mail from the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). A few weeks later, a NASS representative contacts you to set up a time to complete the questionnaire. Questionnaires are usually To learn more, visit www.aphis.usda.gov/nahms

Includes preand postdeworming testing and scrapie genetic testing. If you have been selected to participate and would like more information, please contact your local representative at: 866-907-8190

help guide future research and education efforts. completed during an in-person interview and take approximately one to two hours to complete.

Oops—Did You Lose Your PACKET? If you accidently lost your 2019 Goat Study packet, or if you have not heard from your NASS representative, call 866-907-8190. NAHMS Doc #451.0818


Johne’s Disease in Goats Q:

3

do goats with clinical signs (CLA) of Johne’s disease Lymphadenitis and Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus Johne’s (“YO-knees”) disease is a Why fatal gastrointestinal lose weight and become weak? (CAEV)—laboratory tests are needed to confirm a diagnosis. disease of goats and other ruminants (including cattle, When an animal with signs of Johne’s disease is discovsheep, elk, deer, and bison) that is caused by the bacterium When an animal is infected with the bacteria reside in ered, itMAP, is very likely that other infected animals—even those Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). the last part of the small intestine—the ileum—and the intestinal lymph that still appear healthy— are in the herd. Control of the Also known as paratuberculosis, this infection is contagious, nodes. At some point, the infection progresses as bacteria multiply and infection that yousystem and your veterinarian address it in which means it can spread intake yourover herd.more and more of the tissue. Therequires goat’s immune the whole herd and not just on an individual The MAP organism is most commonly passed in the maresponds to the bacteria with inflammation that thickens the intestinal animal basis. nure of infected animals. Thewall infection usually spreads and prevents it from from absorbing nutrients. As a result, a goat in the ill stage of Johne’s disease in effect toinfected death. At thisMAP, the bacteria reside When anstarves animal is with adult goats to kids and occursclinically when a young animal swallows stage the organism may also spread beyond the gastrointestinal tract, in the last part of the small intestine—the ileum—and the the organism via water, milk or feed that has been contamtravelling in the blood to muscles or other major organs such as the liver intestinal lymph nodes. At some point, the infection proinated by manure from infected animals. Most owners are or lungs. gresses as bacteria multiply and take over more and more of taken by surprise when the infection is diagnosed, and learn the tissue. The goat’s too late that the infection has immune system retaken hold in multiple animals sponds to the bacteria in a herd. with inflammation that Due to lack of testing and thickens the intestinal reporting, it is not known how wall and prevents it widespread Johne’s disease is from absorbing nutriin goats in the United States. ents. As a result, a goat The infection has been conin the clinically ill stage firmed, however, in many goat of Johne’s disease herds throughout the counin effect starves to try—in milk, meat, heritage death. At this stage and other breeds—and it the organism may also is a problem in most other spread beyond the goat-rearing countries as well. gastrointestinal tract, The costs of this infection Top: Thickened intestinal mucosa caused by Johne’s disease. travelling in the blood range from economic losses— Bottom: Thin, pliable, normal intestine to muscles or other due to reduced production and major organs such as increased culling for meat and the liver or lungs. milk animals—to emotional losses—for those whose goats Since there is no cure for Johne’s disease, control of the are more pets than agricultural investments. infection is critical. Control of Johne’s disease takes time and There is no cure for Johne’s disease, and there is not a strong commitment to management practices focused on anapproved vaccine for goats in the United States to help protect them rom infection. Therefore, prevention is the key keeping young animals away from contaminated manure, milk, feed and water. A typical herd clean-up program may to control. take a number of years. The basics of control are simple: new A goat that appears perfectly healthy can be infected infections must be prevented, and animals with the infection with MAP. Although goats become infected in the first must be identified and removed from the herd. few months of life, many remain free of clinical illness until Your State Designated Johne’s Coordinator can help you months or years later. When goats finally do become ill, the undertake an on-farm risk assessment that evaluates your symptoms are vague and similar to other ailments: rapid operation, your resources and your goals. weight loss and, in some cases, diarrhea. Despite continuing The University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medto eat well, infected goat soon become emaciated and weak. icine’s Johne’s disease website—www.johnes.org—adSince the signs of Johne’s disease are similar to those for dresses all aspects of Johne’s disease for multiple species, several other diseases— parasitism, dental disease, Caseous

A:

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including goats. The site has an “Ask An Expert” feature that allows you to submit your own questions and receive a personalized response from an expert. The University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine also offers a free online course for goat producers. Simply go to www.vetmedce.org, click on “Courses” in the lower left hand corner of the homepage. Once on a new page, click on “Johne’s Disease.” At the next new page, click on “Johne’s Disease Courses for Producers” followed by clicking on “0017—Johne’s Disease for Goat Producers.” To learn more about Johne’s disease in goats, please contact your State animal health regulatory agency or your State Designated Johne’s Coordinator. Contact information for your State’s Johne’s diseas program is available online at www.johnesdisease.org when you click on “State Contacts.” Additional information and resources available at http://www.johnes.org/. Information reprinted with permission by Michael T. Collins, DVM, PhD, DACVM, Johne’s Testing and Information Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How Do You Control Johne's Disease in a Goat Heard? The best methods for MAP infection control in your goat herd depend on the resources available, the goals of your enterprise, and the methods you use to take care of your goats. All control methods however rely on two core strategies that must be employed at the same time: Kids must be protected from infection by being born and raised in a clean environment and fed milk and water free of MAP contamination. The primary sources of MAP contamination are manure and/or milk from infected adult animals. Adult animals infected with MAP must be identified and culled managed to ensure no kids are exposed to their milk or manure. Because twins are common for goats, the annual risk of a new case born to an infected doe is believed to be twice the risk seen in species that produce just one offspring a year. No vaccines are available in the United States for Johne’s disease in goats, however, in Spain, Australia and several other countries vaccines are used.

What are the symptoms of Johne's Disease and what causes them? There really are only two clinical signs of Johne’s disease: rapid weight loss and diarrhea. In goats, diarrhea is less common than in cattle. The MAP infection occurs in kids in the first months of life, but signs of disease usually do not appear until the animals are adults. Despite continuing to eat well, adult goats become emaciated and weak. Since the signs of Johne’s disease are similar to those for several other diseases, laboratory tests are needed to confirm a diagnosis. If a case of Johne’s disease occurs, it is very likely that other MAP-infected goats, that may still appear healthy but are incubating the infection, are in the herd. No one yet understands what causes a clinically normal goat that has been infected by MAP for months or years to suddenly become sick from the infection.We do know that at some point the MAP that have been lying quietly within cells of the last section of the small intestine (called the ileum) start to replicate and take over more and more of the tissue. The animal’s immune system responds to all these organisms with what is called granulomatous inflammation. This inflammation thickens the intestinal wall, preventing it from functioning normally. This, among other factors, means the animal cannot absorb the nutrition it needs and thus begins to lose body condition, milk production drops off, and diarrhea may occur. In effect, an animal with Johne’s disease is starving in spite of having a good appetite and eating well.

How do Goats Get Infected? Johne’s disease typically enters a herd when a MAP-infected, but healthy-looking, goat is purchased. This infected goat then sheds MAP in its feces onto the premises – perhaps onto pasture or into water shared by its new herdmates. Young animals are far more susceptible to infection than are adults: these kids swallow the organism along with grass or water. Perhaps they are bottle-fed with MAP-contaminated milk collected from the infected but healthy-appearing new arrival. Milk may become contaminated from the environment (manure-stained teats) or, in the advanced stages of the infection, the bacterium is shed directly into the milk. Animals may even have been infected before they are born, called in utero transmission, if the doe is in advanced stages of the MAP infection. Thus the infection spreads insidiously,

The Boer Goat - 9


Forages and Hay Supplementation by Karla Blackstock

Choosing forages and hay for the winter can be a difficult task for some producers. There are a number of choices in any region of the country, which can be confusing. Let’s first cover the basics. There are cool-season and warm-season forages, many of which can be grazed, foraged or browsed. There are also many others that are often harvested for hay or silage, including some perineals and annuals. For a partial list of forages, turn to pg 19. The forage species utilized will have a large impact on the nutritional value of the hay and/or crop. When choosing a plant species, consider the nutrient value as well as the nutrient requirements of the goats. “Cool-season annuals, such as rye grass, oats, wheat and barley, are typically higher in nutrient value,” said Associate

10 16 -- The The Boer Boer Goat Goat

Professor & Extension Forage Specialist Vanessa Corriher-Olson, Ph.D. “Annuals will be higher in quality than perineals.” When choosing a forage species for a pasture situation, the first considerations need to be geographic location, soil type and annual rainfall. Past that, Corriher-Olson said nutrient value and requirements should be considered. “Animals that are actively growing or supporting kids will require forage and/or hay that is higher in nutrients,” Corriher-Olson said. “The stage of production and management style should dictate forage decisions much like any other feeding decision.” Corriher-Olson went on to say that producers should look at their overall production goats and determine when animals will require more nutrition.


“The southern states will have a warm-season base and will need to incorporate other types of forages into their production system,” said Corriher-Olson. And, the opposite is true of the northern states where a cool-season base is more likely.” Ultimately, she said, it comes down to location and production management. “There are a lot of forages that we have access to across the United States,” Corriher-Olson said. Whichever route a producer takes, Corriher-Olson said that managing feed options is critical to make it through drought or winter situations. Because small ruminants have a much higher metabolic rate than larger ruminants, they require more hay per pound. Hay fed to goats should also contain more protein and be more digestible than hay produced for the dry, bred cow. Estimating hay requirements for winter can be based on a few calculations. According to Dr. Susan Kerr, dry matter intake of goats is 2% to 6 % of a goat’s body weight. In order to calculate feeding requirements for a specific period of time, estimate body weights, number of head to feed and days to be fed.

Crude protein (CP) and total digestible nutrients (TDN) levels required in diets of different kinds and classes of grazing livestock. Meat Goat

% CP

Doe (lactating)

12

Growing buck

12-13

% TDN 62 62-66

Weight of Herd X Days X (2-6%) For example, if you have 50 goats that average 125 pounds per goats. Take 6,250 lbs and multiply by the number of days and days to be fed. If you are feeding for 3 months, multiply the overall weight of the hay by the recommended daily intake of 2% to 6%. Using the minimum (2%), the hay requirement would be 22,500 lbs. Additionally, forage analyses can be obtained to more adequately identify the herd’s requirements. “If you locate the forage specialist at your nearest Land Grand University or your County Extension Agent, you can get a list of labs that will analyze local forages,” Corriher-Olson said. “Hay is an important aspect of livestock management because there is always risk involved in pasture grazing. Forages of all types provide the balanced nutrition that livestock need.” Some risk is inherent because of rainfall (or lack of) and because some grasses can pose threats, such as prussic acid and nitrate poisoning. Both prussic acid and an abundance of nitrates in forages can be toxic to livestock, including goats. “However,” said Corriher-Olson, “this should not keep producers from utilizing forages.” When forages become stressed because of drought or freezing conditions, their growth can be limited. Corriher-Olson said that toxic conditions occur during the stress recovery stage. “Immediately following a drought or freezing situation, livestock can be pulled until the plant is grown. Following a freeze or heavy rain, the

Green, leafy alfalfa grown in New Mexico is trucked to other states to supplement livestock in winter months.

Coastal hay is a warm-season grass that can be stored and used for winter supplementation. The Goat TheBoer Boer Goat- 11 - 17


cattle grazing dormant pastures or consuming poor quality hay, protein is usually the most limiting nutrient. When acid you have to buy suppleprussic can be dangerous.” Table 3. Approximate hay yield, crude protein content, and total digestible nutrimental feed, protein is often ent (TDN) content of various hay crops under good soil fertility and managePrussic acid will return to safe levels during ment. the most expensive the curing process ofcomponent. hay; therefore hay does Forage dra-she said. Approximate usual not posenutritive a prussicvalue acidhas threat, nutrient level matic effects on livestock proAnnual (A) Usual Nitrate levels, however, do not level off after ductivity Type of or hay yield Crude TDN cutting and(weight storinggain, hay reproforages. hay crop perennial (P) (tons/A) protein (%) (%) duction, etc.), so it is critical Corriher-Olson said, “If forage contains too to match the nutritive value of convert it all Cool-season much nitrate, the animals cannot the hay to the nutrient requireAlfalfa (early bloom) P 3-6 17-22 57-62 into protein quickly enough and nitrite levels ments of the target animal. Arrowleaf clover A 2-3 14-17 56-61 build up.” provide digestible protein.

Oats

A

1-4

8-10

55-60

Orchardgrass

P

2-5

12-15

55-60

Red clover

P

2-4

14-16

57-62

Rye

A

1-4

8-10

50-55

Ryegrass

A

1-4

10-16

56-62

Soybean

A

2-3

15-18

54-58

Tall fescue

P

2-4

10-15

55-60

Annual lespedeza

A

1-2

14-17

52-58

Bahiagrass

P

3-5

9-11

50-56

Coastal bermudagrass (4 weeks)

P

5-8

10-14

52-58

Common bermudagrass

P

2-6

9-11

50-56

Dallisgrass

P

2-4

9-12

50-56

Johnsongrass

P

2-5

10-14

50-56

Pearl millet

A

2-6

8-12

50-58

Sericea lespedeza

P

1-3

14-17

50-55

Sudangrass

A

2-6

9-12

55-60

Warm-season

Source: D.M. Ball, C.S. Hoveland, and G.D. Lacefield. Southern Forages, 4th edition.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, “Hay Forages in Texas.” Vanessa Corriher, Tony Provin, and Larry Redmon*

The nitrite is then adsorbed directly into the Beef cattlethe rumen wall where it rebloodstream through acts hemoglobin to form For with beef cattle operations, the methhemoglobin. Hemoglobin carries oxygen most common source of stored in the blood, but methhemoglobin does not and can cause an feed is hay. If hay is harvested animal to die from at the proper stageasphyxiation. of plant Corriher-Olson that planting forages and growth and storedsaid properly, it supplementing with hay is a critical part to any can, with the possible exception ruminant livestock of grazing, provideoperation. nutrients Finding the perfect forage that will be suited at the lowest possible cost.toAyour geographic location may require the assistance of local cow’s nutrient requirement is extension agents or nutritionists, she said, noting the greatest 60 to 80 days after that thereStockering are simplyyoung, a large number of options calving. for producers each unique growing cattleinrequires an situation. The accompanying chart average daily gain of at least and listing of forages1.5 should befor used a basicand guideline since soil pounds theas season, make-up and annual will dictate overall high-quality forage israinfall essential nutrient value. to meeting this goal. A growing “The best thing for any producer to do if they beef steer or heifer requires want to know what they are feeding, is find a forage with about 12 percent lab,” Corriher-Olson said.TDN. CP and 65 to 68 percent

4

American Boer Goat Association Breed Standards

Revisions --Effective Date: 9/2/2019 Flood waters in New Orleans left people and animals stranded in high waters. These photos were submitted as Revision to two sentences under the heading “HEAD” an example of how fellow agriculture producers bonded together to help save animals from the flooded areas. The front of the upper dental pad must touch all incisors until the goat is 24 months of age. Disqualifications: Wry or twisted face; cleft palate; blue eyes; ear folded lengthwise; ear crimped or narrowed at the base; shortened lower jaw (parrot mouth); the front of the upper dental pad does not touch all incisors before 24 months of age; incisor teeth protruding more than ¼ inch of an inch beyond the upper dental pad after 24 months; teeth not erupting in proper sequential order or position; more than 8 incisors when additional teeth are not the result of the normal shedding process of deciduous teeth. Fullbloods that are disbudded or polled (hornless). Under the heading “DOES” sub heading ACCEPTABLE the following sentence was restructured. ACCEPTABLE teat structures have no more than two functional teats per side and may include: • One or more non-functional teats with no more than one additional non-functional teat or protrusion attached to the main teat, as long as it does not interfere with or prevent nursing • A split teat with two distinctly separate teats and orifices, when at least 50% of the body of the teat is separated counts as two functional teats per side allowed • Only one of the two functional teats per side can contain two milk channels with a smooth or rounded end and with no sign of a dimple or division between the orifices

18 -- The The Boer BoerGoat Goat 12


Warm-Season Perennial Grasses Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) tolerates a wide range of soil types and soil pH values, making it adapted to most of the southern U.S. There are numerous varieties of bermudagrass, both seeded (common, Cheyenne, Wrangler) and hybrid (Tifton 85, Coastal, Jiggs, etc.). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) is established from seed. The grass is very tolerant of low-fertility, acid soils, but does respond to nitrogen and potassium. It is best used for grazing rather than hay production. Once bahiagrass grows 10 to 12 inches tall, it produces little new growth and loses nutritive value the longer it stands. It is necessary, therefore, to harvest every 30 to 35 days to maintain forage nutritive value. Dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum) is palatable and has a higher level of nutritive value than bahiagrass and some bermudagrass varieties, and it can retain its nutritive value later into the summer. Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) is better suited for hay production than for grazing because it can accumulate prussic acid in its leaves and poison livestock. Young, tender, fast-growing plants are more likely to be toxic than mature plants. Johnsongrass should be harvested at heading. Old World bluestems (Bothriochloa ischaemum, B. bladhii, and Dichanthium spp.) are well adapted to North, Northcentral, and Central Texas because they are cold and drought tolerant.

Warm-Season Annual Grasses Crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis and D. ischaemum) has high nutritive value and is well adapted to sandy soils. Though often considered a weedy species, it is palatable and can be used for hay production. Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) can be used for pasture, silage or hay, though making hay is usually somewhat more difficult because of the large stems. Sorghum-sudan hybrid (Sorghum bicolor x drummondii) is a warm-season annual that grows rapidly and produces high yields and high nutritive value hay. Like pearl millet, though, sorghum-sudan hybrids also have large stems, which require conditioning and extra drying time. Similar to johnsongrass, sorghum-sudangrass also has a strong potential for nitrate accumulation when subjected to stress and/ or high nitrogen fertilization and can produce prussic acid under stress conditions such as drought or frost. Again, proper sampling and testing are required to ensure the hay is safe to feed.

Cool-Season Annual Grasses Ryegrass is used primarily for pasture, though it can be used for hay or silage. It tolerates a variety of soil types and grows better in wet soils than any other cool-season annual grass. Ryegrass is sensitive to acid soil pH values below 5.5. It is a popular choice for late winter/early spring grazing and hay production. Oat (Avena sativa), though primarily used for grain and pasture, can also be used as a hay crop. Oat is generally more cold sensitive than other small grain species and can suffer winterkill. Harvesting oat hay in the boot stage produces the highest overall forage nutritive value, but delaying harvest until the soft dough stage will produce a greater yield. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is primarily used for grain and pasture though it can also be used for hay. It should be harvested at the boot to early heading stage. Rye (Secale cereale) is generally the most winter hardy of the cool-season annual grasses. Rye is also the most productive cool-season annual grass on low fertility, well-drained sandy soils. Rye matures earlier in the spring than most wheat varieties but generally produces more forage in the fall than wheat. Triticale (Triticum secale) is a cross between wheat and rye. Grain from triticale is used as a feed by the livestock industry. It can be planted earlier, often produces more forage, and has a longer grazing period than many varieties of wheat or rye. Triticale tolerates drought and pests better than wheat.

Cool-Season Perennial Grasses Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) can be used for pasture, hay and/or erosion control. Tall fescue grows on a wide variety of soil types, but it performs best on loam or clay soils that have some water-holding capacity. Tall fescue also tolerates flooded conditions and grows well in soils that are typically too wet for many other forage grasses.

Cool-Season Legumes Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a perennial with high yield potential and nutritive value. Alfalfa hay is very digestible and can be high in crude protein, energy, vitamins, and minerals. Alfalfa harvested pre-bloom typically has higher nutritive value and is more palatable than more mature hay. Red clover (Trifolium pratense) is a short-lived perennial that can last 2 to 3 years. It is better suited for hay production than other clovers because it grows upright and late into the season. Red clover should be reserved for well drained soils, as this legume does poorly when planted on wet soils. Arrowleaf clover (Trifolium vesiculosum) can be used for grazing or for hay.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, “Hay Forages in Texas.” Vanessa Corriher, Tony Provin, and Larry Redmon*

The Boer Goat - 13 The Boer Goat - 19


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JUNIOR AMERICAN

BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Prizes / Payouts / Points / Jackpots

Wether Shows | ABGA Shows | Fitting Contests | Showmanship | Skill-A-Thons

AREA AREA

AREA AREA AREA

Each show will have a unique set of contests for juniors to earn points toward the regional series.

Anderson, CA | April 4, 2020 Spencer, IA | May 23, 2020 Stillwater, OK | Nov. 2, 2019 Osgood, IN | Sept 28, 2019 Bloomsburg, PA | May 16, 2020 Murfreesboro, TN | October 12, 2019 Abilene, TX | November 16, 2019


in the Boer Goat Industry Congratulations to the breeders and owners of the animals listed below. The following animals have received the awards of Ennoblement, Doe of Excellence and Sire of Merit.

ENNOBLEMENTS Name

Sex

Owner

Breeder

DL HILLBILLY BONE

Buck

Kent,Amy,Amanda&Sam Davidson

EGGS CHECK MY ACE C616 LFC BODACIOUS RM 1515 “CHEWIE” AFB2 ALL WOUND UP 2M BOER GOATS 2M-GOTCHA LOOKIN NEWTON FARMS UNTOUCHABLE E129 WONDER LIVESTOCK PAID MY DUES 2JW SMOKIN’ GUN’S BOOMSTICK LK7 HSFG AFTER DARK EGGS ROCKIN LES C467 HIBB I’M YOUR HUCKLEBERRY BSA CAN’T STOP THE PARTY MCR WHITE LIGHTNIN MKHD THE FRONT RUNNER TDGB BOOT CAMP KHBG1 GANGSTERS PARADISE JAD SRB LUCKY’S SMOKIN COPPER KODYS WOODFORD’S GOLDEN DIMENSION ROCKING C BOER GOATS CROWNED KING JAD SRB RUGER’S EVOLUTION RM 1601 COWBOY TST1 WINDY ACRES TRUMP TRAIN DHTBG YADI EVENLY FOLD MY CAPE OF SECRETS LK7 DEVILS SMOKIN SPOTS GRI REGEL HONEY HOLLOW GERONIMO URBG SMOKE’S ET TU BRUTE JCKN FIRESTORM

Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck

Madison Fenton Linda Faye Cullers Danny or Bobbie Stovall Lucio & Astra Feliciano Paul & Kim Morgan Justin, Jared, Jason Dyjak Casey Adamick & Jordan Buehne Dylan Hitner Bob Seelke William & Melissa Orsak Kevin Moore Micheal & Katie Kerns Trey Chavana Madessa Hoffer-Dye Jason Berry Shawn Hailey Kenneth Baty

Kent,Amy,Amanda&Sam Davidson John or Jackie Edwards Linda Faye Cullers Roger McSwain Mark Fraser Paul & Kim Morgan David Duncan & Family Casey Adamick & Jordan Buehne Josh & Johanna Weir Chad & Nancy Steinke John or Jackie Edwards Payton Hibbs Shana Koonsman May Trey Chavana Madessa Hoffer-Dye Thomas James Dodd Katelyn Kerns Justin, Jared, Jason Dyjak

Buck

Greg, Yvonne, & Dakota Ballard

Greg, Yvonne, & Dakota Ballard

Buck

Richard & Sandy Cook, Kena Justice

Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck

Justin, Jared, Jason Dyjak Sharon & Phil Fullerton Terry & Sue Taylor Jose & Gabriella Moya Casey Jo Stevens Able Acres Ron & Chris Grier Parker Myers Ryley Johnson

Richard & Sandy Cook, Kena Justice Justin, Jared, Jason Dyjak Roger McSwain Terry & Sue Taylor Kathie & Katie Diemer Casey Jo Stevens Chad & Nancy Steinke Austin Pagel Parker Myers Jason Coin


CAPRIOLE’S TIC N BOMB AABG NBD AFRICAN GOOSE LK7 SMOKIN HOT SPOTS KMBG1 OUTCAST LGF3 START ME UP URBG SMOKE’S INFERNO BJERKE FARMS POWER STROKE ADVBG MOVIN ON TATER Y01 JMI SHE’S LIVIN THE DREAM TGF4 FOUR T’S PRETTY WOMAN WONDER LIVESTOCK CRAZY CHAINED CHICKEN 4-L BOER GOATS SHARP LIL GIRL S G R CADDY’S I’VE GOT LIPSTICK TOO 2M BOER GOATS CINNAMON TWIST FCFB FITZWATER’S LITTLE MORE SUMMERTIME SGG FANCY DIMENSIONS CGJG GIBBS/MACKEY C325 HRDR 401K SEVEN TGF4 FOUR T’S ELVIRA

Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Buck Doe Doe Doe

Julie Stellingwerf Bailey Bergherm Madison Lumpkin Kedrick Miller Rick and Misty Allen John Armentrout Sydney Baty Mike & Sandy Kyle Brian & Brooke Hardy Jason Miller John, Seth & Glania Trimble

Terry Brown Nathan Duncan Chad & Nancy Steinke Kedrick Miller Sharon & Phil Fullerton Parker Myers Trevor Bjerke Bailey Brumfield Madison Seawell Jason Miller Seth Trimble

Doe

Casey Adamick & Jordan Buehne

Casey Adamick & Jordan Buehne

Doe Doe Doe

Jared Lindenfelser Dylan Hitner Lane Fitzwater

Jared Lindenfelser Jeff & Sheryl Pearcy Paul & Kim Morgan

Doe

Paul & Kim Morgan

Chuck & Brenda Fitzwater

Doe Doe Doe Doe

Nicholas Pitlick Madessa Hoffer-Dye Tim Harder John, Seth & Glania Trimble

Brandon & Amanda Smith Chrystie & Jeff Gibbs Tim Harder John, Seth & Glania Trimble

ROCKING C BOER GOATS BELLA

Doe

Richard & Sandy Cook, Kena Justice

Richard & Sandy Cook, Kena Justice

BACK 2 NATURE CHEERIO FIX N TO CHILL A060 RRD TOPAZ B615 LABG1 303 ROCK ME BABY CRI COPPER CREEK JINGLE BELL ROCKS

Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe

Kelly Mahan Terry Brown Casey Adamick & Jordan Buehne Daniel & Brenda Carlson Terry Brown

RNSH HOT HANNAH

Doe

Taryn & Jason Gaustad

ROCKING C BOER GOATS MS. PRISS

Doe

Richard & Sandy Cook, Kena Justice

AFB2 OUT OF CONTROL CAPRIOLE’S BARBLIPPY SLS3 GUNZ POWDER N LEAD JSSG SINFUL LGF3 WHOLE LOTTA ROSIE LGF3 ROYAL FLUSH 2M BOER GOATS JANE DOE URBG FIREBALL’S EYE CANDY KNR STRTEGIC’S ATTITUDE MKHD GIMME ALL YOUR LOVIN’ BSA IT’S MY PARTY 8881 DBL-D D78 SIMPLY AMAZIN F25 URBG SMOKE’S KARMA TOO KM97 TEMPUS’ PAINTING THE SKYE

Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe Doe

Lauren Green Terry Brown Sarah Mastrobattisto Wyatt Stevens Sharon & Phil Fullerton Sharon & Phil Fullerton Matt Hartman John Armentrout Erica Ashby Madessa Hoffer-Dye Emma Rethans Lee & Sharon Dana John Armentrout Kenneth Baty

Kelly Mahan Dennie & Sherri Clark Rocking R Boer Goats Stacey Gravenhof Becki Crighton Richard Norman & Sandy Hemminger Richard & Sandy Cook, Kena Justice Mark Fraser Terry Brown Scott Hughes Justin Stuart Sharon & Phil Fullerton Sharon & Phil Fullerton Paul & Kim Morgan Parker Myers Erica Ashby Madessa Hoffer-Dye Shana Koonsman May Lee & Sharon Dana Parker Myers Kevin & Flora M Tempus


in the Boer Goat Industry Congratulations to the breeders and owners of the animals listed below. The following animals have received the awards of Ennoblement, Doe of Excellence and Sire of Merit.

SIRE OF MERIT Name

Owner

Breeder

AABG NBD GIGELO JOE TST1 WINDY ACRES SQUARE POWER AABG NBD SMOKIN’ YOUR ACES CAPRIOLE’S TIC N BOMB JLS21 ELK CREEK MONOPOLY MONEY AABG BAB4 FUTURE FAN OF THE MAN AFB2 ALL WOUND UP LANHA RUSKIN ROCK TST1 WINDY ACRES FLAME THROWER T F RAVE’S EXPRESS HARMONY HILL MILLER’S MAN KMTSB STORM SURGE AABG NBD EYE KANDY

Jaclynn Heckendorn Trevor Bjerke Timothy, Arlan & Becky Humble Julie Stellingwerf Jeremy Church Jason Miller Lucio & Astra Feliciano Levi Dale Brent & Danielle Dugat Thomas & Jacqueline Redden and Ike Redden Jason Miller Bill, Vanessa, Austin, Jacob Tipton David Armstrong

Nathan Duncan Terry & Sue Taylor Nathan Duncan Terry Brown Johnna Stottlemyre Able Acres Mark Fraser Jill Lanham Terry & Sue Taylor David J Thomas Jennifer Keys Kate Thompson Nathan Duncan

DOE OF EXCELLENCE Name KATIE GINNY

Owner

Richard Derrick Kimble Thomas & Jacqueline Redden and Ike RBMG KITTY KITTY BANG BANG Redden HME BOER GOATS SERENITY Heather Entler HARMONY HILL BEST KEPT SECRET Jason Miller SAKB JAZZY’S MOON Sydney Baty FIRE BUSH FARM BLOOD’S FASHIONISTA Larry & Deirdre Hillman FFLF MOOMOO Lucio & Astra Feliciano

18 - The Boer Goat

Breeder Edward, Josh, Tonjia & Katie Mayne Thomas & Jacqueline Redden and Ike Redden Heather Entler Jennifer Keys Sydney Baty Larry & Deirdre Hillman Lucio & Astra Feliciano


BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

JUNIOR AMERICAN

ABGA hires new youth coordinator Hey y’all, this is Monica, (the new youth coordinator). I’m going to tell y’all a little about myself. I grew up on a small Jersey Dairy in Lometa, Texas until I was in the fifth grade, about old enough to start helping out. My third grade year I raised 18 bottle babies, we had an endless supply of milk so it was easy to do. That was also my first year to show at our county show. After that year I was hooked on showing goats. In 2007 (my seventh grade year) I got hooked showing registered Boer goats. My mom and I started going to shows around Texas once a month. In 2011, we went to our first Nationals, and won Senior Division Grand Champion in both the Junior and Open show. That laid the foundation of me raising and showing Boer goats. In 2013 I started college at Redlands Community College earning my associates degree in Animal Science. Then in 2015 I went to college at Angelo State University getting my Bachelors degree in Animal Sciences. At the time I was also working for Frey Show Goats helping raise and manage about 250 head of goats. I also ran a BioPRYn lab to pregnancy test on cattle, sheep and goats. I am now working at the American Boer Goat Association. I am so excited to help the youth get their start in the Boer goat industry.

Monica

What are the benefits of joining the JABGA?

Why join the JABGA?

Becoming a member of the JABGA allows you The Junior America Boer Goat Association (JABGA) offers a world of opportunities to youth. Members of the JABGA are eligible for: the opportunity to travel and compete in shows across the country. The JABGA provides the perfect chance to meet new friends who have the • Registering goats with the Association same interests as you. • Receiving six issues of the Boer Goat Another great reason to join the JABGA is to • Participation in junior activities including conferences, improve your leadership skills while doing things shows and other contests you enjoy. • Receiving monthly issues of the JABGA newsletter Finally, the JABGA is a support system for you • Showmanship competitions as you grow and improve your herd into more • Leadership training (officers and directors) than just a project, but a great business to carry • National Junior Recognition Program on into the future. The JABGA offers scholar• Scholarships ships every year to active JABGA members to • Information on fitting, tattooing, judging, advertising further their education. and promotion

The Boer Goat - 19


Q-Fever numbers on the rise in humans What does that mean for goat operations? With the number of Q-fever cases on the rise in humans, it is important for owners of ruminant animals to be on the lookout for signs and symptoms.

There are a few diseases that can wipe out a kid crop before it even hits the ground. Q-Fever is one of those. Caused by a bacteria, Q-Fever is found in domesticated and wild animals throughout the United States (and the world). Q-Fever is important because it is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it can be spread from animals to people.

Q fever in animals

Farmers should inform their workers/staff about the possible risks and precautions while working with livestock. • Wash hands thoroughly several times a day (especially if grossly contaminated) and always before eating, smoking and after finishing work for the day • Wash skin wounds immediately with soap and running water and cover with a waterproof dressing • Treat potentially infected animal tissues, such as afterbirths and aborted lambs, with care and respect. Handle with waterproof gloves • Use additional personal protective equipment (includ-

Signs of disease are very uncommon but abortions (including large outbreaks) may occur in cattle, sheep and goats. The Q fever agent is unusual because it survives in Boer Goat 2018_Layout 1 the environment for many months as an infectious sporelike form which is resistant to heat, drying and disinfection.

8/6/18 1:33 PM Page 1

Q fever in people

(since 1982)

Infection usually results from inhaling the resistant spore form on dust particles contaminated with animal birth products (such as afterbirths), dung or urine; animal hides, wool or fur are other potential sources. Very occasionally, outbreaks occur in urban areas, probably caused by wind-borne bacteria spread from nearby livestock premises. Infection can also be acquired via contact with infected materials through skin abrasions, or, very rarely, from unpasteurized milk and tick bites.

Avoiding human infection on farms

Working with animals inevitably involves close contact with contaminated material so good personal hygiene is very important. Relevant regulations require farmers to adopt appropriate measures to minimize exposure.

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• •

ing face masks and goggles) for high risk activities, such as when handling abortions during confirmed Q fever outbreaks, using a pressure washer in lambing sheds, or working in very dusty livestock areas Store protective clothing separately from work clothing and do not wear contaminated or dusty work clothing at home If disposable face masks are used, these should conform to EN149-FFP2 standards Do not drink unpasteurized milk, or eat or smoke in animal areas.

Good farm practices can help reduce human and animal health risks. These include, but are not limited to: • Maintaining a closed flock or herd, but if not possible then quarantine and carefully observe replacements for three to four weeks before introduction • Investigating farm abortion and stillbirth outbreaks and consult your veterinary surgeon as appropriate • Isolating aborted animals until discharges cease; restrict access by animals and people where possible. Wind borne spread of Q fever is known to occur, therefore it is important to control airborne spread of the organism by minimizing the generation of dust and aerosols where possible • Being aware that contaminated aerosols can be spread by ventilation systems expelling air from livestock buildings into areas frequented by workers

Treating soiled bedding removed from buildings where birth and abortions have occurred as a potentially high risk contaminated waste product. Promptly remove all afterbirths, aborted and stillborn kids, and heavily contaminated litter. Regularly clean and disinfect kidding sheds, calving pens and similar buildings to prevent accumulation of potentially contaminated material. Before using a high pressure hose after mucking out, dampen down first using a low pressure spray to reduce production of fine aerosols. Although Q fever is not susceptible to common farm disinfectants, they still help to control other important diseases • Avoiding cleaning out buildings and moving soiled bedding on windy days, and take care to avoid spillage, particularly onto public roads or footpaths • Do not burn bedding or abortion material on a bonfire because it may increase risk of aerosol spread,especially in windy weather. It should be composted in a stack well away from livestock for several weeks followed by turning the exposed surface inwards and allowing it to heat up for several more weeks • After stacking and composting for at least 3 months, spread manure onto arable land well away from people or livestock. • Keep dogs and cats away from abortion material and parturition products. • Control ticks and other parasites on livestock.

The Boer Goat - 21


Quick Q & A on Q-Fever What is Q fever?

• Q fever is a disease in people and animals caused by the germ (bacteria) Coxiella burnetii. • In animals, the disease is also known as coxiellosis (pronounced cox·e·el·low·sis).

What are the symptoms of Q fever in animals? • Infected animals usually appear healthy. • Infected, pregnant animals may experience abortions late in pregnancy.

Who is at risk?

Anyone who has contact with animals infected with Q fever bacteria, especially people who work on farms or with animals. Examples of high-risk jobs include: • Livestock farmers • Slaughterhouse workers • Veterinarians • Animal or laboratory researchers

How is it spread?

• Q fever is most commonly spread to people by infected farm animals, including goats, cattle, and sheep. People can get Q fever by: • Touching feces, urine, milk, or blood from an infected animal. • Breathing in dust that contains Q fever bacteria. • Touching a newborn animal or birthing products (placenta, birth fluids) from an infected animal. • Drinking raw (unpasteurized) milk.

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22 - The Boer Goat

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Treating Hoof Rot by Coni Ross

Hoof rot is called a lot of things, but it is big trouble for goats. Goats with hoof rot can become so crippled that they can not forage, do not retain body condition, and many times will not breed, or loose the pregnancy prematurely. Hoof rot is caused by two organisms. The foot rot caused by Dichelobacter nodosus. This is usually a less severe disease, but can become serious if untreated. This infection usually involves the tissue between the digits, but can spread to the underlying hoof tissue, and invade the muscle and bone if untreated, or inadequately treated. Virulent hoof rot is contagious, and is caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This bacteria is an anaerobe (lives in the absence of oxygen). Many times hoof rot involves both types of bacteria. There are some treatments that help: Zinc foot baths, and treatment of the individual animal with antibiotics, and removal of ALL hoof that contains dirt, or pockets of dirt. Hoof rot usually occurs when weather conditions are wet and warm, and if the bacteria is present, and the skin of the animals foot is exposed to the bacteria, infection ensues. I sold some goats to a lady who was injured and unable to care for them. She had allowed another person to bring a goat to her premises with hoof rot, and the bacteria was introduced into her soil. I received all of these goats back, and ALL of them had hoof rot on more than one foot. I treated as follows with excellent results. Keep in mind, the bacteria can only live 10 days without a host, so if you can get them cleared up, and get them on fresh pasture, you will have this problem solved. First: Prepare a place to isolate the animals for at least 10 days on dry ground. Second: vaccinate for hoof rot, there are cattle and sheep vaccines available, and both will work in my experience. If using the cattle vaccine, give half the label dose given SQ. Trim the hooves off short, and remove all pockets of dirt, even if the animal’s hooves must be quicked. This removes gross infective material from the hoof. I scrubbed the feet of that bunch of goats with a stiff brush and pure chlorine bleach. ( not Clorox, it is not pure chlorine) There were 100 head average size does in this group I gave 10cc Penicillin SQ, vaccinated them, and left them penned in a dry lot with grass hay, mineral and salt. On day two, I started them on a Sulfa drug in the water, at a rate of

18 - The Boer Goat

1 gram (1,000mg) per goat. In summer, a goat will drink at least 1.5 gallons/day minimum, non lactating. I put 100 gallons of water in the trough, and 100 grams of Sulfa drug (Albon or Sulmet will do). I turned off the float to the trough to prevent dilution of the drug. After all water was consumed, I turned the float back on. The goats were treated for 9 more days at 750 mg/day/goat. Each goat that was limping had the offending foot treated with Koppertox every day until the limping ceased. Hoof trimming was done as needed during the 10 day period. The goats were kept penned for 14 days, and the vaccination repeated. As the goats quit limping, they were moved to an intermediate pen. Every goat that limped after the second vaccination was boostered again, even if it had only been a few days after the last booster, hooves scrubbed with chlorine bleach again, and given an extra 1 gram of Sulfa drug. As you move goats to the intermediate area, either inspect hooves, or run them through a foot bath made with 1 pint chlorine per 10 gallons of water. This will help prevent contamination of the intermediate area. By the end of 10 days, all but 5 older does had quit limping. Treatment continued on that 5 head, and a few that relapsed. Some of the goats ended up having been boostered 5-6 times before the hoof cleared up. One doe had so much tissue between the digits that I cut the tissue out, cauterized it, treated the area with Furazolidone ointment and, and wrapped with vet wrap for 2 days. (Furazolidone is no longer approved for food animals use Chlorahexadine ointment) Sulfa drug at 750 mg/day was continued in the water. As goats in the intermediate pen did not limp, I moved them to the pasture, and gradually got all of them cleared up. Most were well in 14 days. A few, including the 5 old chronics took as long as a month to cure. I kept them on that high dry pasture for the remainder of the summer. They were boostered one more time before winter. All remained well after that, even the 5 old chronics. The key is to keep them dry, and keep them vaccinated. Updated 6-23-2011 Nuflor is very effective in treatment of hoof rot if there are only a few individuals to treat. I start with 6cc/100lbs sq, clean between the digits with Iodine. On day two 3cc/100lbs SQ and Nuflor between the digits topical. Update April 6 2017

The Boer Goat - 23


Rumensin in the feed helps prevent erosions in the Rumen caused by Coccidiosis. These erosions; which may be asymptomatic in adult goats, are an entry point for Fusobacterium Necrophorum to invade the bloodstream of the goat. When this happens, liver abscess can occur, and is often fatal. Aggressive treatment will be necessary to save the animal. It is preferable to prevent when possible. Fusobacterium Necrophorum or Dichelobacter nodosus can cause serious infection, or even death if untreated. This is what I do and what works for me.

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Live cover/flushes available. Kathie and Katie Diemer 21718 W.atompkin@vt.edu Ave | Hawkeye, IA 52147 Aaron Tompkins 336-363-4639 diemersboergoats.com DHTBG RED’S REVENGE diemersboergoats@gmail.com

Trimming helps keep hooves in good health

Trimming goat hooves may not be the most glorious jobs, but it

is one of the most beneficial tasks. Without proper maintenance, hooves collect bacteria that can lead to hoof rot and other ailments. The amount of time between trimmings varies depending on a variety of factors, including the terrain the animals are on, the age of the goat, level of activity, nutritional level and even the breed. Goats that are raised in smaller pastures that are “clean” (relatively free of debris and rocks) or in confinement will typically require more frequent trimmings than goats that are raised on vast pastures and pastures that contain things for the animals to climb on. Each animal will require observation to determine when the hoof needs to be trimmed, there is no set trimming interval. Once you become familiar with how the hoof is supposed to look, it will become easier to identify when it is needed. A properly trimmed hoof should look like that of a newborn kid.

24 - The Boer Goat

• Online Webcast of Auctions


What’s cooking tonight? Southwestern Goat Stoup • 1-1.5lbs goat stew meat or ground goat • 1 lg chopped onion • 2 celery stalks • 4 med size potatoes (cubed) • 1 lg can corn (drained) • 1 lg can diced tomatoes

• 2 15oz cans pinto or borracho beans (drained) • Tbsp Worcestershire sauce • 2 pkg McCormick or other stew seasoning • 1/2 cup flour • 1qt chicken stock

Trim and cut stew meat into bite-sized pieces. In a bowl, combine 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 pkg stew seasoning. Toss meat into cup and coat. In frying pan, with just enough oil to coat bottom, brown floured stew meat. Drain and add to large crock pot with chopped onion, cubed potatoes, diced celery, drained corn, Worcestershire sauce, 1.5 pkg stew seasoning and diced tomatoes. Stir in stock and cover mixture by 1 inch. Cook in crock pot on high for 6 hours or on low for 10 hours. Check liquid level half way. Add drained beans during the last hour. Serve topped with shredded cheese, sour cream and avocado slices.

Goat Facts • Goats were one of the first animals to be tamed humans and were being herded 9,000 years ago. • Coffee was first discovered when goat herders noticed the animals acting very energetic after nibbling on coffee beans. • The phrase 'getting someone's goat' comes from the (unsportsman-like) practice of stealing the competition's goat to unsettle the horse before the race. • Each kid has a unique call, and along with its scent, that is how its mother recognizes it from birth – not by sight. • Goats’ pupils are rectangular. This gives them vision for 320 to 340 degrees (compared to humans with 160-210) around them without having to move and they are thought to have excellent night vision. • The rumen in a mature goat holds four to five gallons of plant material.

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(931) 437-2514 The Boer Goat - 25


Ad & Mailing Dates 2020 Deadlines Issue

Ads Booked

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Jan. 1

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Symptoms of mineral deficiencies: Selenium deficiency: Weak muscles, trouble breathing. Zinc deficiency: Stiff joints, skin problems, low interest in breeding, deformed hooves, excessive salivating. Copper deficiency: Coarse hair, hair that curls at the end only, abortion, stillbirths, weight loss, low milk supply. Calcium & Phosphorus (usually found together) deficiency: Rickets, milk fever. Iodine deficiency: Goiters. Iron deficiency: Anemia, weakness. Sodium deficiency: Licking the ground or eating dirt. Manganese deficiency: Slow growth in kids, reduced fertility and stillbirths. Boron: joint problems, arthritis

Coccidiosis control Coccidiosis is caused by microscopic protozoan parasites called coccidian (Eimeria spp.). Coccidia go through a complex "life cycle" in the intestinal cells of goats. In the process, they produce large numbers of eggs (technically called oocysts) that are passed in the feces. In the process of growth and multiplication in the goat intestinal epithelial cells, the coccidia may destroy many intestinal cells. Like all other diseases, the best form of control is prevention. Cleanliness is one of the best ways to keep coccidia out of a herd. Many goat feeds have preventatives included so be sure to read your labels. These include decoquinate and monensin. There are medications available, but a vet consultation will help narrow down the cause and provide an adequate remedy. Over-the-counter medications may not be labeled for goats so a vet's prescription may be necessary.

26 - The Boer Goat

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The Boer Goat - 27

1/1 1/2 1/3 1/4 1/5 1/6 1/7 1/8 1/9 1/10 1/11 1/12 1/13 1/14 1/15 1/16 1/17 1/18 1/19 1/20 1/21 1/22 1/23 1/24 1/25 1/26 1/27 1/28 1/29 1/30 1/31 2/1 2/2 2/3 2/4 2/5 2/6 2/7

Bred

5/26 5/27 5/28 5/29 5/30 5/31 6/1 6/2 6/3 6/4 6/5 6/6 6/7 6/8 6/9 6/10 6/11 6/12 6/13 6/14 6/15 6/16 6/17 6/18 6/19 6/20 6/21 6/22 6/23 6/24 6/25 6/26 6/27 6/28 6/29 6/30 7/1 7/2

145 day

6/5 6/6 6/7 6/8 6/9 6/10 6/11 6/12 6/13 6/14 6/15 6/16 6/17 6/18 6/19 6/20 6/21 6/22 6/23 6/24 6/25 6/26 6/27 6/28 6/29 6/30 7/1 7/2 7/3 7/4 7/5 7/6 7/7 7/8 7/9 7/10 7/11 7/12

155 day

2/8 2/9 2/10 2/11 2/12 2/13 2/14 2/15 2/16 2/17 2/18 2/19 2/20 2/21 2/22 2/23 2/24 2/25 2/26 2/27 2/28 3/1 3/2 3/3 3/4 3/5 3/6 3/7 3/8 3/9 3/10 3/11 3/12 3/13 3/14 3/15 3/16 3/17

Bred

7/3 7/4 7/5 7/6 7/7 7/8 7/9 7/10 7/11 7/12 7/13 7/14 7/15 7/16 7/17 7/18 7/19 7/20 7/21 7/22 7/23 7/24 7/25 7/26 7/27 7/28 7/29 7/30 7/31 8/1 8/2 8/3 8/4 8/5 8/6 8/7 8/8 8/9

145 day

7/13 7/14 7/15 7/16 7/17 7/18 7/19 7/20 7/21 7/22 7/23 7/24 7/25 7/26 7/27 7/28 7/29 7/30 7/31 8/1 8/2 8/3 8/4 8/5 8/6 8/7 8/8 8/9 8/10 8/11 8/12 8/13 8/14 8/15 8/16 8/17 8/18 8/19

155 day

Bred

3/18 3/19 3/20 3/21 3/22 3/23 3/24 3/25 3/26 3/27 3/28 3/29 3/30 3/31 4/1 4/2 4/3 4/4 4/5 4/6 4/7 4/8 4/9 4/10 4/11 4/12 4/13 4/14 4/15 4/16 4/17 4/18 4/19 4/20 4/21 4/22 4/23 4/24

8/10 8/11 8/12 8/13 8/14 8/15 8/16 8/17 8/18 8/19 8/20 8/21 8/22 8/23 8/24 8/25 8/26 8/27 8/28 8/29 8/30 8/31 9/1 9/2 9/3 9/4 9/5 9/6 9/7 9/8 9/9 9/10 9/11 9/12 9/13 9/14 9/15 9/16

145 day

8/20 8/21 8/22 8/23 8/24 8/25 8/26 8/27 8/28 8/29 8/30 8/31 9/1 9/2 9/3 9/4 9/5 9/6 9/7 9/8 9/9 9/10 9/11 9/12 9/13 9/14 9/15 9/16 9/17 9/18 9/19 9/20 9/21 9/22 9/23 9/24 9/25 9/26

155 day

Bred

4/25 4/26 4/27 4/28 4/29 4/30 5/1 5/2 5/3 5/4 5/5 5/6 5/7 5/8 5/9 5/10 5/11 5/12 5/13 5/14 5/15 5/16 5/17 5/18 5/19 5/20 5/21 5/22 5/23 5/24 5/25 5/26 5/27 5/28 5/29 5/30 5/31 6/1

9/17 9/18 9/19 9/20 9/21 9/22 9/23 9/24 9/25 9/26 9/27 9/28 9/29 9/30 10/1 10/2 10/3 10/4 10/5 10/6 10/7 10/8 10/9 10/10 10/11 10/12 10/13 10/14 10/15 10/16 10/17 10/18 10/19 10/20 10/21 10/22 10/23 10/24

145 day

9/27 9/28 9/29 9/30 10/1 10/2 10/3 10/4 10/5 10/6 10/7 10/8 10/9 10/10 10/11 10/12 10/13 10/14 10/15 10/16 10/17 10/18 10/19 10/20 10/21 10/22 10/23 10/24 10/25 10/26 10/27 10/28 10/29 10/30 10/31 11/1 11/2 11/3

155 day

6/2 6/3 6/4 6/5 6/6 6/7 6/8 6/9 6/10 6/11 6/12 6/13 6/14 6/15 6/16 6/17 6/18 6/19 6/20 6/21 6/22 6/23 6/24 6/25 6/26 6/27 6/28 6/29 6/30 7/1 7/2 7/3 7/4 7/5 7/6 7/7 7/8 7/9

Bred

10/25 10/26 10/27 10/28 10/29 10/30 10/31 11/1 11/2 11/3 11/4 11/5 11/6 11/7 11/8 11/9 11/10 11/11 11/12 11/13 11/14 11/15 11/16 11/17 11/18 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 11/23 11/24 11/25 11/26 11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 12/1

145 day

Goat Gestation Chart (Based on 150-Day Gestation) 11/4 11/5 11/6 11/7 11/8 11/9 11/10 11/11 11/12 11/13 11/14 11/15 11/16 11/17 11/18 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 11/23 11/24 11/25 11/26 11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 12/1 12/2 12/3 12/4 12/5 12/6 12/7 12/8 12/9 12/10 12/11

155 day


Trailer during livestock trs Keeping yoursafety livestock andyour your familysa Keeping your livestock and family

M

oving goats from one location to another is inevitable. And, whether you are headed to a show, to the vet or to a sale or auction, it is necessary to take precautions so that you and your livestock are safe. Goat producers use several means of transportation to move animals from point A to point B. Goat boxes, stock trailers and horse trailers all have unique safety requirements, but they all have one thing in common -- they are moving precious cargo.

Small transporter

Small animal boxes are convenient to move a small number of animals. Most boxes fit between the wheel wells of a pick-up. If you are loading and unloading heavy animals into a tote, be sure to have a ramp to safely walk animals into the transporter. Open boxes may need an additional cover. Tarps can be used as protection from sun and wind; however, it is critical that these items be secured to the box and checked throughout the trip. Boxes also may need to be tied down depending on the weight and style of the tote. Regular vehicle maintenance should apply whether using a box or a trailer to transport animals.

Small Trailers / Horse Trailer

Longer excursions or for hauling a larger number of animals requires a horse or stock trailer. Trailer safety,

2428 - The Boer Goat - The Boer Goat

including proper maintenance and operation, is critical to the safety of everyone on the road. Not only is it important to protecting the animals, but it also important because our image as producers rests on the operation of well-maintained trailers. Family operations make up the largest percentage of goat production and according to Amanda Wickman, program manager at the Southwest Ag Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention and Education, accidents happen when inexperienced or young helpers on family farms are not trained properly. “Young people who help hook up a trailer need to be trained on hand signals and communication,” she said. “This has to be a slow process, and when you are hitting the gas - brake - gas - brake, there is a lot of room for error.” Wickman recommends lining up trailers from outside the danger zone to prevent being crushed. “We see so many people get crushed when someone uses the wrong pedal. You can always pull up and back up again, but once you’ve pass the point of no return, it is too late.” Recognizing other pinch points is also critical to your own safety. Cut gates should be secured open or closed to prevent accidental injuries. “If you can tie or secure animals from the outside of the trailer, you minimize the risk to yourself.” If you are carrying tack, be sure to secure the tack so that it doesn’t shift or fall on animals or you when you open doors. Safety for trailers also includes knowing the legal limits of a trailer load. If you are involved in a vehicle accident with


ck transportation safeon onthe theroad road yilysafe by by Karla Karla Blackstock Blackstock

of nowhere in the middle of the dark. Be sure you carry the appropriate jack and tools for these types of on-the-road fixes. Be sure to know who you can call to complete your haul or stall your animals if the repair will take longer than expected. If a breakdown prohibits you from reaching your destination, be sure you have bedding and an adequate source / means of providing water to stressed animals. Finally, be sure that your trailers have adequate ventilation. Exhaust from vehicles and heat can cause toxicity or heat strokes if animals do not have proper air flow.

General Safety

a loaded trailer, you could be at fault if you do happen to exceed the trailer’s load limits. Also, all trailers must be in good condition and have plenty of tread on the tires. A sound trailer with working lights, safety chains, working hitch and good tires is critical when moving livestock. Below is a list of items that should be checked for safety. Spare: Periodically check the age of all tires, including the spare. The last four digits of the DOT number on the sidewall indicate the month and year of the tire was manufactured. Even if a tire has never been used, it can be unsafe. Dry rot and other issues can cause a tire to deteriorate over time. Most manufacturers recommend replacing tires more than seven years old regardless of wear. Before heading out for a long road trip, check the tire pressure on all tires. Safety Chains: Make sure safety cables and chains are securely latched and connected. Working hitch: Always double check that the trailer hitch is securely latched and that the correct-sized ball is used. Lights: Ensure that the electrical connection is plugged in and secured. Bumpy roads can cause a disconnect if not secured. Check lights to be sure that all turn signals and running/perimeter lights are working properly. Brakes: Be sure that all brakes and the brake controller is working properly. The majority of the United States requires a controller when a trailer exceeds 3,000 lbs, but some are as low as 1,000 lbs. Check your state regulations regarding your requirements at https://drivinglaws.aaa.com/. Remember that breakdowns do happen. And, you are not alone if you believe these only happen to you in the middle

If you are hauling livestock for another breeder or owner, be sure you understand your insurance policy and confirm coverage on the trailer and the animals that you are hauling. Load and unload livestock carefully to minimize stress. If animals appear unhealthy, do not load them. Chances are that the stress will have a greater impact on their health. Also check for additional blind spots. Putting either a box on the bed of your truck or a trailer behind it will cause additional blind spots.

“Accidents happen when inexperienced or young help on family farms are not trained properly. Young people who help hook up a trailer need to be trained on hand signals and communication.” Finally, consider your own emotional state of mind. “Most of the time, accidents happen when someone is in a hurry,” Wickman said. Exhaustion, frustration or agitation also can lead to an aggressive driver. Be sure you give yourself plenty of time to reach your destination so that you are not stressed. And, if your trip takes you in the night hours, be sure you know your own limitations. You can find additional information and youtube video on goat safety, as well as cattle and horse trailer safety at http://www.swagcenter.org/resourcesvideos.asp.

The Boer Goat - 25 The Boer Goat - 29


AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Calendar OF EVENTS 2019 Show

Date

Location - State

Contact

KMGA Winter Prairie Circuit Oktoberfest Boer Goat Show JABGA Cowboy Country Area 2 Regional Show Cowboy Country Show Cisco FFA Fall Classic

Nov 2 – 3 Nov 2 – 3 2-Nov 3-Nov Nov 9 – 10

Great Bend, KS Turlock, CA Stillwater, OK Stillwater, OK Eastland, TX

Teresa Simmons Sue Hobby Traci Day Traci Day Danny Arnold

Kiamich Classic

Nov 9 – 10

Poteau, OK

Carrie Lockhart

National Peanut Festival JABGA Region 5 Show Big Country Boer Goat Show NAILE Junior Boer Goat Show NAILE Open Boer Goat Show Green County Fall Show Comfort FFA Fall Classic American Premier Boer Goat Show Yellow Rose Classic

9-Nov 16-Nov 17-Nov 20-Nov 21-Nov 30-Nov Dec 14 – 15 19-Jan 20-Jan

Dothan, AL Abilene, TX Abilene, TX Louisville, KY Louisville, KY Fort Gibson, OK Comfort, TX Fort Worth, TX Fort Worth, TX

Nelson Adams Terry Taylor Terry Taylor Catherine Riley Catherine Riley Mark Seabolt Bruce Lott Stefan Marchman Stefan Marchman

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Photos from Around the ABGA

Jennifer Morga n

Matthew

auer

Schoenb

Meghann Morse

. Amber McKinney

Angelika Munter Karlie Murry

Amber McKinney

Misty Griffen

The Boer Goat - 31


Classifieds ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS

COLORADO

IOWA

IOWA

MARYLAND

MINNESOTA

MISSOURI

MISSOURI

OKLAHOMA

TEXAS

TEXAS

TEXAS

JASON HEATHER KAYLEE EMILY

COIN

QUALITY BOER GOATS IN NORTHEASTERN COLORADO

Cell: 970-371-6488 E jcknboergoats@yahoo.com

W www.jcknboergoats.com

MARYLAND Heather Gleason 443-974-7606 mintvalleyfarmmd@gmail.com Specializing in color and quality.

Check us out under our Facebook page: MVF Boer Goats

PARKER SPOTTED GOATS Offering high fertility breeding stock with pasture raised hardiness & high meat production. Fullblood and percentages. Paula Parker, Harper Texas (830)459-7428

TEXAS

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Fall 2019

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