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Weddings

Loudoun Magazine Fall 2012

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Summer 2012, Vol. 11, No. 2 15 N. King. St.• Leesburg VA 20176 703.771.8800 • Fax: 703.771.8833

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PUBLISHER Norman K. Styer nstyer@leesburgtoday.com EDITOR Therese P. Howe thowe@leesburgtoday.com MAGAZINE DESIGNERS Elizabeth Phillips Pinner Melanie Livingston

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GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Bill Getlein Chris Allison ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES Colleen Grayson Paula Grose Tonya Harding

Kym Harrison

Vicky Mashaw

Andrea Ryder

Susan Styer CONTRIBUTORS E.S. Biddle, Chris Geiger, Alexandra Greeley, Emily Hummel, Buzz McClain, Dezel Quillen, Cecilio Ricardo Jr., Lalaine Estella Ricardo

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LOUDOUN MAGAZINE (ISSN 1537-0356, USPS 022-697) is published quarterly by Leesburg Today,

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LOUDOUN MAGAZINE (ISSN 1537-0356, USPS 022697) is published quarterly by Leesburg Today, 15 N. King St. Leesburg VA 20176. Advertising rates available upon request. To subscribe or obtain assistance with a current subscription, call (703)771-3328. Subscription price is $25 per year. Single copies $4.95. POSTMASTER, SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO LOUDOUN MAGAZINE, PO Box 591, Leesburg, VA 20178-0591. Periodicals postage paid at Leesburg VA and at additional mailing offices. Copyright 2012 by Leesburg Today. All rights reserved. No part of LOUDOUN MAGAZINE may be reproduced physically or electronically without the written permission of the publisher. LOUDOUN MAGAZINE is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork.

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act.

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*Prices, terms, features and savings subject to change without notice. Certain restrictions apply. Not to be combined with any other offer. See community Sales Consultant for details. Lot premiums may apply and community association fees are required. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. K. Hovnanian® American Mortgage L.L.C™., 3601 Quantum Boulevard, Boynton Beach, FL 33426. NMLS# 3259. Licensed by the Virginia State Corporation Commission S U M M E#MC2661. R 2 0 1 2MHBR #3149 3

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Table of Contents

2012 . VOLUME 11 . NUMBER 2

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DEPARTMENTS 6 CALENDAR 8 NEIGHBORS by E.S. Biddle

Blue Ridge Hospice CEO Ernie Carnevale makes each day count. 13 HEALTH & BEAUTY by Lalaine Estella Ricardo

Salons and spas offer skin-deep sun care in time for the summer.

FEATURES 7 HAPPY BIRTHDAY HOSPITAL by Therese Howe

Inova Loudoun Hospital celebrates 100 years.

8 FARM TO FORK by Therese Howe

New faces come to the table for annual culinary celebration.

28 LOUDOUN’S WINESCAPE by Dezel Quillen and Therese Howe

We take you Off the Beaten Path, help you Wine Down the Summer and spread

18 DINING by Alexandra Greely

Scenic vistas spice up culinary presentations at local restaurants. 55 AT HOME by E.S. Biddle

Water features, native plants make for enticing outdoor spaces.

news heard Through the Grapevine. ABOUT THE COVER Chris Geiger and his son take in the view at Bear’s Den on the Appalachian Trail. Photography by Cecilio Ricardo Jr.

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38 SUMMER DAYCATION by Buzz McClain

Day trips offer quick getaways for fun and adventure.

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HERE’S TO LIVING WELL.

You’re cordially invited to discover all the benefits of a Social Membership at Creighton Farms.

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reighton Farms, Greater Washington’s most extraordinary club community, invites you to visit and learn about all the benefits of a social membership at The Club at Creighton Farms. From fine dining in the exquisite surroundings of our new clubhouse to overnight accommodations in luxurious club rooms that reflect the casual elegance of the club’s Virginia horse country setting, social members at Creighton Farms enjoy the very best of everything. Schedule a visit today to see: The Grille Room Superb cuisine in an elegant private-club setting Jack’s A casual, relaxed pub named for golf legend Jack Nicklaus The Club Rooms Luxurious overnight accommodations for members and their guests Private Dining Rooms Perfect for corporate or family get-togethers And much more! Treat yourself, your family, friends and business associates to elegant, private dining and so much more at The Club at Creighton Farms. To schedule a visit and personal tour, call Attila Harai, General Manager, at 703-957-4800.

22050 Creighton Farms Drive, Aldie, VA 20105 | www.creightonfarms.com | 703-957-4800 SUM M ER

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SUMMER 2012

June

Calendar

JUNE 29 LANSDOWNE CELEBRATES AMERICA LANSDOWNE RESORT Celebrate Independence Day early with a jazz concert by The Sharon Thomas Experience at 7 p.m., followed by a massive Zambelli fireworks display over the Potomac River at about 9:30 p.m. For more information, call the resort at 703.729.8400.

JULY 23-28 LOUCOUN COUNTY FAIR

August

July

JULY 12-15 A CHORUS LINE FRANKLIN PARK ARTS CENTER, PURCELLVILLE The Piedmont Arts Foundation puts on the popular 1975 musical about Broadway dancers auditioning for a chorus line. Performances take place 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door. Buy tickets online at www.piearts.org or call 540.338.7973. JULY 14 KEY WEST FESTIVAL BREAUX VINEYARDS, PURCELLVILLE The “Vineyard in Paradise” is celebrating its 7th annual festival with island-inspired food, wine tastings, live music, craft vendors, vineyard hayrides, wine-a-ritas, kids’ activities and more from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. From 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. on, relax to reggae by The Archives, followed by the Key West Band. For ticket info and more, visit www.breauxvineyards.com. JULY 21 PURCELLVILLE WINE AND FOOD FESTIVAL DOWNTOWN PURCELLVILLE Sample some of the area’s award-winning wines and gourmet foods at the town’s first culinary festival. Area wineries including 8 Chains North, Fabbioli Cellars, Bogati Bodega and North Gate Vineyard will be participating. For updates and more info, visit purcellvillewineandfood.com. JULY 23-28 LOUDOUN COUNTY FAIR LOUDOUN FAIRGROUNDS, LEESBURG Back for its 77th year, this traditional fair features 4-H animals, livestock auctions, carnival rides, a mini demolition derby, educational demonstrations, the kiss-a-pig contest, and dozens of other fun carnival events. Daily admission is $10 for 13 years and older, $5 for kids 6 to 12 years. On July 25, Children’s Day, kids younger than 15 are admitted free. Carnival rides are extra. You must 6

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from local restaurants, blackberry wine tasting by Bluemont Vineyard and for the kids the farm’s 5-acre play area and tiedye activities. For info on admission and more, visit www.greatcountryfarms. com.

LEESBURG TODAY PHOTO ARCHIVE

bring cash, no credit cards are accepted at the front gate. For more info on weekly passes and more, visit www.loudoundcountyfair.com JULY 27-29 TWELFTH NIGHT FRANKLIN PARK ARTS CENTER, PURCELLVILLE Community theater group Not Just Shakespeare performs the comedy of shipwrecked twins Viola and Sebastian who find adventure and romance on the land of Ilyria. Performances at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15; purchase by calling the center at 540.338.7973. JULY 28 BLUEMONT BBQ BASH/BLACKBERRY BONANZA GREAT COUNTRY FARMS, BLUEMONT If you’re looking for some of the best barbecue in the country, you’re going to want to sample the entries in this Kansas City Barbecue Society State Certified BBQ Competition. Besides the barbecue, other festival activities include blackberry picking, live music, a Waiters Race with contestants

AUG. 4 THE IMMORTALS FRANKLIN PARK ARTS CENTER, PURCELLVILLE Catch the final precollege concert of a teen group that has enjoyed resounding success in the county, having played at Youth-Fest, Rock the Field, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The group was formed by students of Frank Keims’ Loudoun Music Instruction in Lovettsville. Tickets are $7 for the 7 p.m. performance. Call 540.338.7973 to buy tickets. AUG. 18-19 LUCKETTS FAIR OLD LUCKETTS SCHOOL, LUCKETTS This old-fashioned fair at the Old Lucketts School features more than 100 crafters, antiques, delicious country foods and old-time country demonstrations. There will also be live bluegrass bands playing in an outdoor gazebo. Kids will enjoy pony rides, a petting zoo, face painting, and hands-on farm and nature exhibits. Admission is $5 per person, free for children under 6 years. For more info, visit www.theluckettsfair.com. AUG. 25 SPARTAN RACE MORVEN PARK, LEESBURG Spectators are invited to watch this extreme competition featuring muddy courses and enjoy festival activities. Live music and other entertainment also available. Tickets are $15, which gets you admission and $5 Spartan bucks good at the merchandise tent. Cash is encouraged, as limited credit card services will be available. Visit www.spartanrace.com for more info. LOUDOUN

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I LISTEN… AND BEAUTIFUL HAPPENS.

PHOTO COURTESY OF INOVA LOUDOUN HOSPITAL

HOSPITAL CELEBRATES PAST, LOOKS TO FUTURE

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ven as Inova Loudoun Hospital officials have taken time this year to reflect proudly on a century of successfully serving the community, their eyes remain firmly on the future and what it holds. “We’ve got pretty good coverage around the county, and what we are today is a pretty comprehensive community hospital,” newly appointed CEO Patrick Walters says, pointing to the current system of a main campus at Lansdowne, the historic campus in Leesburg that’s undergoing a $32 million renovation, urgent care centers in South Riding and Purcellville, a new facility to come in Lovettsville, and an emergency care center planned for Brambleton at the intersection of Loudoun County Parkway and the Dulles Greenway. “In the longer term, our goal is to be a very advanced community hospital that serves the needs of the community so folks don’t have to go outside of Loudoun County for very many services,” Walters says. Currently not quite half the patients who need advanced services leave Loudoun County for other facilities with certain specialties, he adds. “Looking at the population dynamics for aging, growth and so forth as well as the way the region is likely to develop in the next 25 years, we think it will be very necessary to have a comprehensive advanced medical center serving the community. SUM M ER

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“So in the next 20 or 25 years I clearly would see our expansion into a broader trauma capability at the hospital, which would require some additional expansion in our emergency room and emergency room care services.” In the near term, Walters points to other expansions, besides the Cornwall renovation, that are in the works: * Increasing the size of operating rooms at Lansdowne to accommodate a new robotic system and other medical equipment for minimally invasive surgery * Expanding perinatal services from a couple days a week to 24 hours, 7 days a week and expanding obstetrical services for mothers deemed likely to have high-risk births * Adding gynecological cancer specialty services * Creating a “bed tower” at Lansdowne that will house private, larger rooms, which in turn will require new supporting facilities “We’ve got quite a bit of construction and development that’s planned right now that folks will be seeing in the next five to 10 years,” Walters says.

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Schulz

FARM TO FORK BRINGS NEW FACES TO THE TABLE GOODSTONE INN CHEF WILLIAM WALDEN HOSTS FARM TO FORK NEWCOMERS

Em Ba Ge

NOOM SERMBHONGSE AND HIS MOTHER VISIT KEVIN GROVE AT QUARTER BRANCH FARM

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ith any luck, an Asian staple is now growing alongside lettuce, radishes, spinach, kale and other greens on a small farm in Lovettsville, thanks to a new collaboration fostered by the annual Farm to Fork culinary festival. Farmer Kevin Grove already had been growing Thai basil on his 2-acre Quarter Branch Farm, but Thai chili was new to him. He had been given 20 of the plants early in the growing season by Noom Sermbhongse of Aiyara Thai restaurant in Leesburg, who wanted to get a head start on his Farm to Fork menu. Sermbhongse wasn’t sure what the price would be when Grove resold the produce to him, but he thought it was worth a try. “I want to see Thai plants growing in the U.S. and see how this goes. I think if they have new things on their farms, they have a unique opportunity to go to farmers markets (and say), ‘I have Thai chilis.’ That’s more customers for them too. It’s good for everybody.” 8

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Their relationship has not only meant new produce on the farm, but also new uses of other crops. For instance, Sermbhongse and his mother, who is the chef at Aiyara Thai, have been frustrated for years when buying cilantro at grocery stores. “When they cut cilantro, they take the stem out, they take the root out and they throw it away. But we can use it. We use the root like an herb to make curry. It’s hard to find here; when you go to grocery, they have only the leaf. My mom says, ‘Where are the roots? I need the roots to make the curry!’” After meeting Grove, Sermbhongse asked him if he would harvest and sell him the entire plant. “The request was unusual,” Grove says. “It’s kind of neat, for a change, to pick the whole plant. ... It’s nice to know people can benefit from the whole plant.” Fostering relationships between farmers and restaurateurs has been the driving force behind the success of Farm to Fork, which is building on its last year’s successful debut and takes place July 26-

Aug. 5 this year. “I think every returning chef will be cooking up new dishes, so the dining will be new and fresh (no pun intended), all around!” founder Miraim Nasuti says. “Something real special for me is another ethnic restaurant is on board joining Aiyara Thai, and that’s Rangoli Indian Restaurant in South Riding, which is fantastic. “As well, we have Loudoun’s only upscale bowling alley aboard this year, King Pinz at The Villages of Leesburg, and Chef Shane Weese there is awesome. He’s personally visited six farms – that’s is more than I could ask for and truly in keeping with the mission of Farm-toFork Loudoun: developing meaningful relationships and fostering education. “King Pinz also adds to an aspect of Farm-to-Fork which is important to me: having price point diversity as they now join Fireworks in the category of familyfriendly options,” Nasuti says. L o u d o u n M a g a z i n e

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Schulz Homes.Loudoun Mag.2012

12/16/11

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GOT SOLAR? Reduce Your Dependence On The Grid Solar Domestic Hot Water

Energy-Saving CFL (Compact Fluorescent Lights) and LED (Light Emitting Diode) Lighting

Solar PV (Photovoltaic) Panels

bsite to Visit our we e video view YouTub Biggest n e v e S e h T “ Custom Mistakes in Building”

Emergency Back-Up Generator

Blown Cellulose Insulation (R-21 Walls, R-40 Attic)

High-Performance Thermal Insulated Windows & Doors

Geothermal Ground-Source Heat Pump

Hydronic Radiant Floor Heating

HOME, SWEET, HYBRID HOME Your Lot or Ours. “We continue to believe, as we have for over 25 years, that if you are collectively considering price, quality construction, and uniqueness of design you can’t make a better choice than Schulz Homes.” — Dale Schulz

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www.schulzhomes.com

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SCHUL Z

HOMES CORPORATION

schulzh@verizon.net

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Neighbors

‘MR. THRIFT’ SEIZES THE DAY BY E.S. BIDDLE

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midst the seemingly infinite trinkets and treasures, knickknacks and clothing racks in the Blue Ridge Hospice Thrift Shop, perhaps the most valuable find is Mr. Thrift himself, Ernest “Ernie” Carnevale Jr., president and CEO of Blue Ridge Hospice. Emerging with a smile from behind a white curtain screening the shop’s backstore machinations, he settles himself in the comfortably cluttered upstairs office of the Purcellville shop and laughs as he admits,“My wife calls me ‘Mr. Thrift.’”And with good reason, for Carnevale pioneered the establishment of the hospice’s six thrift shops to augment federal funding. The Purcellville location opened in mid-2004 as the flagship operation. A longtime Leesburg resident, Carnevale assumed the leadership role at Blue Ridge Hospice nearly 13 years ago after many years in health care administration, including a stint at the former Loudoun Hospital Center. Though familiar with hospice through his work in health care, it was a profoundly personal experience that drew Carnevale to hospice care in a professional capacity. “It was probably due to my mother’s experience in hospice,” he says. She was battling brain cancer, and one day he got the call: “Hospice says you need to come home,” he remembers. He immediately flew up to Rhode Island to be with her before she died, about 24 hours later. What struck Carnevale deeply was the level of care offered by hospice. The hospice nurse had been so personally involved in his mother’s care that through all the ups and downs of her treatment, she knew precisely when to make that crucial call. And she had been right. 10

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Thus, when the opportunity arose to combine his health care administrative expertise with hospice services, “I felt that with all the great work that had been done with my mom, I wanted to become involved,” he says. Carnevale not only strives professionally to keep Blue Ridge Hospice running smoothly but also has incorporated the Zen-like hospice philosophy into his personal life. One of the tenets of hospice care, says Carnevale, is to “meet the patient where they are today, to make this the best day they can have. I try to apply that to my own life.” And that life includes a variety of endeavors beyond hospice. Carnevale has been a member of the Rotary Club of Leesburg since 1992 and has served as both president of the club’s Perry Winston Scholarship fund. He is an adjunct professor at Shenandoah University’s School of Business and a past board member of the Loudoun Community Free Clinic and Loudoun Abused Women’s Shelter. And then there’s Scrooge. Carnevale became involved in local theater productions with his son, Ben, and most notably did a recent turn as Ebenezer Scrooge in a local production of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. “After doing such big things for hospice, it’s nice to be directed (by someone else) for a change,” he says,

BLUE RIDGE HOSPICE CEO ERNIE CARNEVALE, SHOWN AT THE PURCELLVILLE THRIFT SHOP

adding that his wife, Patti, who works as a private family therapist in Loudoun County, is “incredibly supportive” of his theatrical endeavors and offers honest criticism. He and Patti met in Rhode Island while both were working at a residential center for disabled children and have been married for 39 years. Their son Ben, 25, is living and working in Harrisonburg. Though acting may temper the reality of hospice care, Carnevale cannot help but consider the struggles he witnesses daily as he contemplates his own life. “For me, driving my car is a big one,” he says, referring to the inevitable loss of once inviolable abilities.“Or if my son came to me and said, ‘Dad, you can’t live by yourself anymore.’” Nonetheless, working in hospice care has been life-altering in countless ways.“It’s been an incredible ride. It’s no longer a job – it’s what I do,” he says.“I can’t see myself doing anything else, other than being a professional golfer.” His eyes twinkle as he grins, knowing what his golfing buddies would say.

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Reimagine retirement.

25

years and thriving! But who’s counting?

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e’re very busy at Shenandoah Valley Westminster-Canterbury! Celebrating our 25th anniversary in 2012, we’re looking forward to providing many more years of incomparable service to you, a vibrant community of seniors. At Westminster-Canterbury, you’ll embrace the good life – free of concerns about home maintenance and secure in our financially predictable Lifecare program. You’ll dine on fine cuisine in our bistro, tavern, and formal dining room, swim in our oversized pool, hike on our 65-acre campus, and enjoy onsite concerts by world-acclaimed musicians. Most important, you’ll share the best of times with friends old and new. To learn more – and discover why AARP chose Winchester as one of the top five spots to retire in the U.S. – join us for a Lunch & Learn session. Reserve your seat for July 17, August 14, September 18, September 25, or October 9. All programs begin at 10:30 a.m. RSVP at 540.665.5914 or 800.492.9463. In the meantime, explore our community – and browse floor plans of apartments and cottages – at www.svwc.org. Discover why nearly 400 residents love calling Shenandoah Valley Westminster-Canterbury home!

Shenandoah Valley Westminster-Canterbury | 300 Westminster-Canterbury Drive, Winchester, VA 22603 540.665.5914 or 800.492.9463 | www.svwc.org 12

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SUMMER CARE IS SKIN DEEP B Y L A L A I N E E S T E L L A R I C A R D O P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C E C I L I O R I C A R D O

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ith three active children ages 9, 11 and 14, Lansdowne resident Kim Bowers knows all too well that the summer months mean lots of time being outside. “We have a pool, so we’ll spend hours outdoors,” she says. Bowers knows firsthand what kind of skin

damage can result from prolonged sun exposure. She first walked into Radiance Salon and Medi-Spa at the Lansdowne Town Center a few years ago because she noticed brown spots on her chest.

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fter a consultation, she underwent a noninvasive Intense Pulsed Light, or IPL, treatment to have the spots removed. IPL devices send specific concentrated beams of light through the skin that are absorbed by the melanin, or dark, pigment. IPL is also called photorejuvenation and is commonly used to treat sun-damaged skin, rosacea and brown spots. “I’m trying to undo everything bad I’ve done to my skin,” she says. With one treatment, Bowers saw a significant reduction in her brown spots. “It hurt a bit. It felt like an intense sunburn,” she says. “It’s not enjoyable at all, but the results were worth it.” Taking care of your skin is important throughout the year, but it is during the summer months that we should take extra precautions. The most common skin problems that occur in the summer result from spending more time outdoors in the good weather, says Dr. Roberta Moreland, a dermatologist with Loudoun Dermatology Associates. Moreland usually sees an uptick in the season in patients with melasma, a dark skin discoloration that appears on the face. It is a common skin disorder associated with sun exposure. “If you must be out in the sun, generously apply a broad spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a SPF of 30 or above to all exposed skin, wear protective clothing, hats and sunglasses, and seek shade,” she advises. Tan or brown spots brought on by too much sun exposure that appear in middle-aged or older people can be prevented. But by the time most people notice them, the damage has been done. “Meticulous use of sunscreens is necessary to prevent further darkening,” Moreland says. If the spots change in color or shape, or start bleeding, a dermatologist should be consulted, Moreland says. “Aestheticians can be helpful in recommending daily

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OPPOSITE PAGE: CHRISTINA SULLIVAN GETS A CHEMICAL PEEL FROM MASTER AESTHETICIAN KIM MARINETTO, A REGISTERED NURSE AND OWNER OF AVIE MEDSPA . TOP: REGISTERED NURSE MELANIE SCHWARZ CONSULTS WITH A CLIENT AT RADIANCE SALON & MEDI-SPA.

regimens for skin care with over-the-counter products but your dermatologist can decide if prescription medications are needed.” Melanie Schwarz, a registered nurse at Radiance who does laser and other treatments, sees quite a few clients coming to her for management of their sun spots. While most spots are benign and generally

don’t require medical treatment, some people have an aesthetic desire to have them removed, Schwarz says. Most of the clients at Radiance begin their first visit with a stop at the Visia machine, a light-sensitive camera that does a detailed photo analysis of the skin. This complimentary analysis helps determine

the best course of treatment, whether that is the use of topical lotions, prescriptionstrength creams, chemical peels, laser or microdermabrasion. “The number one thing we do is ask what the client’s concern is,” Schwarz says. “Then we try to address it with a regimen that is comfortable for them. ” If someone is very sensitive to pain, for example, IPL may not be the best course of action.” At Avie Medspa and Laser Center in Leesburg, all clients are first seen by Dr. Betsy Vasquez or a nurse practitioner to help determine the best course of treatment. The first step usually focuses on healing sundamaged skin. “That’s about hydration and nursing the skin back to a healthy, normal state,” says owner and master aesthetician Kim Marinetto, who is also a registered nurse. “Treatment depends on the severity of the condition and how aggressively the client wants to turn their condition around.” Some treatments, such as laser peels, require five days of down time. There are treatments that can take up to six months before results are evident. Non-ablative laser treatment is often called the “lunch time

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laser treatment “ because there is typically no down time. “It’s not as aggressive but can still trigger collagen production.â€? The skin is the body’s largest organ capable of renewing itself and when properly stimulated will make collagen and elastin, which are proteins that give skin its firmness and flexibility, that youthful glow. “It’s like the heart building muscle,â€? Marinetto says. “Just as you exercise to maintain your heart muscle, you should take steps to maintain your skin.â€? And the first exercise Marinetto prescribes is the daily use of sun block. She especially recommends blocks that contain zinc or titanium dioxide because they are physical blocks, unlike the chemical blocks and lotions generally sold over-the-counter. “The ultimate protection you need is a physical block, and these are made of minerals so they’ll actually help heal the skin,â€? she says.“While chemical sunscreens are cheaper, you have to look for a quality sunscreen by reading the label.â€? A client like Bowers now has to work to remain spot-free by taking precautions when outside and once or twice yearly IPL follow-ups at Radiance. She tries to impart lessons she’s learned to her children about caring for their skin. “I am always stressing to the kids that everyone has to use sunblock,â€? Bowers says. “I am especially always running after the my 9-year-old son, spraying after him. ‌I’ve had enough damage to last a lifetime and I wouldn’t want the same for them.â€?

TREATING SUNBURN Dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology recommend treating a sunburn with: • Cool baths to reduce the heat. • Moisturizer to ease discomfort caused by dryness. After bath, path yourself dry, but leave a little water on the skin. Then apply moisturizer to trap the water in your skin. • Over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream to help ease discomfort • Aspirin or ibuprofen to help reduce swelling, redness and discomfort • Drinking extra water to help prevent dehydration. With any sunburn, you should avoid the sun while your skin heals. If your skin blisters, you have a second-degree sunburn. Allow blisters to heal untouched. If blisters cover a large area, such as the entire back, or you have chills, a headache or fever, seek immediate medical care.

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COOKOLOGY OWNER MARIA KOPSIDAS AND HER BOYFRIEND, SEAN CASKIE, AT BLUEMONT VINEYARD, WHICH IS OFFERING WINE DINNERS WITH A VIEW THIS SUMMER.

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AL FRESCO DINING WITH A VIEW B Y A L E X A N D R A G R E E L E Y P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C E C I L I O

P A T I O S

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eorge Gershwin captured summer’s mood with his lyrics, “Summertime, and the livin’ is easy...” What Gershwin forgot to mention is that summertime also lures us outdoors to eat: Think grassy picnics, picturesque settings with tempting meals, fine wines, possibly candlelight and perhaps even a

cool breeze.

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So

in Loudoun County, what’s hot this summer—and not just the weather? The restaurants and wineries that serve the outdoor-dining public with wine dinners, cooking classes, vegetable picking, live music and even a tour of a productive garden. What follows is a small sampling of some of the hottest—well, coolest—Loudoun destinations.

The Restaurant at Patowmack Farm 42461 Lovettsville Road, Lovettsville High atop a hillside sits a unique restaurant: Overlooking the Potomac River and the verdant vista of Virginia and Maryland woodlands, Patowmack Farm commands one of the region’s most arresting views. But beyond that, its restaurant with its indoor dining room and outdoor terrace provide the right setting for high-end, local, organic seasonal menus, created by Executive Chef Christopher Edwards. According to Patowmack Farm’s owner, Beverly Morton Billand, the restaurant’s menu is framed around the farm’s fresh-picked organic produce, with locally produced meats and sustainable seafood adding the final menu element. “We grow as much as possible,” she says, designing the menu seasonally – with daily changes as fresh produce becomes available in our fields, adding that Edwards is often seen hand-picking 20

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the ingredients just before serving. To add to patrons’ pleasure, Billand invites local musicians to perform on certain dates during dinner and brunch. “Inviting different groups to play at the restaurant is rewarding,” she says. “Our guests enjoy their music and we enjoy the chance to showcase such talented musicians.” Dining for brunch during beautiful weather is often done outdoors while dining for dinner is normally in the glass conservatory. Because sitting on the terrace provides such a relaxing view, patrons often request to dine outdoors under the open-air tent. Even during rain, it is sublime. Billand is always concerned that the guests are comfortable, and one night when it rained hard, she asked if they would like to move indoors. She was quickly told, “No. This is so wonderful.” Visitors may indeed find Patowmack Farm enchanting and beautiful. But for farm lady Billand, the farm and its restaurant are much more. “It’s

living a dream,” she says.“Who ever would have known I’d own a restaurant? It’s just like it was meant for me.” Clyde’s Willow Creek Farm 42920 Broadlands Blvd., Ashburn This particular Clyde’s restaurant (one of 15 in the restaurant’s group) proves that the sounds of splashing water plus a covered flagstone terrace accented by wisteria vines equal outdoor dining success. Located directly behind the main restaurant, the terrace features a raised pond edged with floating greens and home to fish and a water-spouting crane statue. Coins sparkle at the bottom, the reminders of wishful patrons passing by. While the terrace does not provide mountain vistas, it does offer a footpath to the organic garden about one-quarter mile behind the restaurant, where on-site gardener Tim Maclean tills L o u d o u n

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Loudoun Summer Ad 2012_Leesburg Spring Loudoun Publication 6/7/12 10:02 AM Pag

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the soil and grows some of the produce for the restaurant’s use. The balance comes from such local farmers as Potomac Vegetable Farm, Lost Corner Farm, Endless Summer Harvest and Ayershire Farm. Note: If you’re lucky, you may find Farmer Tim in the garden, and ready to discuss what’s growing. But perhaps the key draw to Willow Creek Farm’s outdoor dining scene comes from not only the terrace’s charm but also from the restaurant’s American food, the efficient and friendly service, and the special events management has planned for entertainment. As General Manager Paul Fox explains, “At Willow Creek we have live music every Friday and Saturday nights from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. and it features acoustic acts as well as full bands. We always prefer to have the music play on the patio when the weather permits and most of our acts do covers of popular sing-along-style classic rock.” To further bolster its popularity, the restaurant plans to host Our Sunday Supper at the farm with Loudoun County wines and fresh veggies from the garden on June 24, and the New Belgium Beer Dinner on Aug. 15. You can keep up with Willow Creek activities by checking out the Clyde’s website at www.clydes.com. S U M M E R

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Lansdowne Resort 44050 Woodridge Parkway, Lansdowne Sitting out on the terrace adjacent to the resort’s On the Potomac dining room, guests are rewarded with peaceful vistas of the Potomac River Valley and seemingly endless stretches of Virginia’s green woodlands. Closer, they can view the golf courses and nearby clubhouse. Rock walls and manicured hedges enclose the terrace, further setting the scene for a picturesque culinary experience at one of Loudoun’s foremost restaurants. The resort is in the midst of planning several food, wine and spirits events throughout the summer to pair with the imaginative menu created by Executive Chef Wes Rosati and his culinary team. Be sure to visit the resort’s website at www.landsdowneresort.com for updates in their Calendar of Events section.

Bluemont Vineyard 18755 Foggy Bottom Road, Bluemont Great Country Farms 18780 Foggy Bottom Road, Bluemont Cookology 21100 Dulles Town Circle, Dulles Town Center Combining forces and energies, the trio of Maria Kopsidas (owner of Cookology in Sterling) and Mark and Kate Zurschmiede (owners of Bluemont Vineyard and Great Country Farms in Bluemont), has drawn up a summer full of cooking and dining fun. According to Kopsidas, whose popular Dulles Town Center venue provides cooking classes and wine dinners for patrons, moving these events out to the small village of Bluemont gives patrons a choice of countrified cooking on the farm or high-end wine dinners at the vineyard, which sits on a hilltop and commands a view of Virginia all the way to Tysons Corner. For those selecting a farm experience, Kopsidas explains, one day a week will be devoted to a kids’ pick-and-cook mini camp. On Saturdays, an ideal time for families to gather and tour the farm, participants will pick and cook their meal, then picnic out by the farm’s pond or in one of its 22

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barns. A picturesque rural setting, the farm must resemble Loudoun in its earlier days, though the owners have installed a country store with gifts and, in season, freshpicked vegetables. For casual Friday night “date nights” on the farm, couples can join a hands-on cooking class with Cookology chef Brad Spates. “They will cook in tandem,” explains Kopsidas. “For example, the husband grills and the wife makes sauces.” Using the vegetables they’ve just picked from the farm, the participants collaborate on creating and cooking the meal — afterwards, they sit down to eat under the stars. Across the road and up the hill at Bluemont Vineyard, the trio has planned for fancy wine dinners — appropriately called “Chef’s Table”— a combination of hands-on cooking and chef’s demos with Spates overseeing the kitchen activities. When guests finish with the cookpots and sit down for the meal on the vineyard’s terrace with

Goodstone Inn 36205 Snake Hill Road, Middleburg Enjoy serene views of the 265-acre estate while dining on Executive Chef William Walden’s Modern American French Country cuisine, prepared using ingredients fresh from the estate’s farm.

its stunning vistas, sommelier Mary Watson and Bluemont’s winemaker, Bob Rupy, will present appropriate wines for the six- to 12-course dinners. Planned dates for wine dinners are June 22 and 29, July 27, and Aug. 17, 24 and 31. Kopsidas admits hoping to put on a sort of Iron Chef event, inviting top area chefs out for a kitchen challenge — and, presumably, dinner afterwards. She is also planning other events at the farm, including Beach at the Farm for singles, corporate team events and bridal events, and Watson plans to plant an herb garden where she will conduct wine tastings and pairings. To view the full list of classes and events, and for more information, visit cookokologyonline. com/blog/farm. L o u d o u n

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fantastical dreamscape will delight patrons of Run Rabbit Run’s outdoor dinner theatre production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream this summer. Run Rabbit Run Director Meredith Bean McMath has chosen to create a shorter adaptation of one of William Shakespeare’s most well-known romantic comedies. “I took my cue from Puck’s final monologue,” McMath says. “I believe this romantic comedy is best presented as a dream full of magic and surprise – a place where even the scenery might come to life.” To bring the magical and mysterious atmosphere of A Midsummer Night’s Dream to patrons in the most engaging way, Run Rabbit Run is again teaming up with 868 Estate Vineyards and Grandale Farm Restaurant in Neersville. With 868 Estate hosting the outdoor performances this summer, audiences will find themselves immersed in the beautiful, bucolic scenery of the Blue Ridge Mountain valley. “The (Grandale Farm) hilltop has the highest elevation of the surrounding area, which makes for a great view,” partner Peter Deliso says. “Grandale’s beautiful views provide their own magic,” McMath adds, “and the shows are only being offered in the evening – just to enhance a dream-like ambiance. But dreams can get a little crazy, too, and there are things we can do on the hills at Grandale that can’t be done on a stage. I can’t wait to surprise our audiences.” According to Deliso, Grandale Farm’s transition to 868 Estate Vineyards includes enhancing landscape design and renovating the former Gran Hall into a tasting room. Though these renovations will reduce production space in terms of indoor theater, 868 Estate Vineyards will “continue the (dinner theater) programs of Grandale Farm. If anything – we’ll expand upon them. We will continue supporting Run Rabbit Run, for sure, as well as the arts in Loudoun County,” Deliso says, pointing out that paintings by local artists now hang in Gran Hall and the restaurant. Though A Midsummer Night’s Dream was planned before the change in ownership, all parties both new and established are working together to create a well rounded production for their guests. “I’ve seen what she does. Meredith does a very nice job directing,” Deliso says. “People will be very pleased with what they find and will continue to be pleased.” Part of the evening’s magic will be conveyed in the dinner portion of the production. “Late July is a fantastic time to enjoy a meal from the farm’s bounty of fresh vegetables,” Executive Chef Author Clark Jr. says. “And I plan to create light, fresh, local fare to pair with a perfect summer evening” – as well as select wines being offered in the tasting room. L O U D O U N

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Recipes Patowmack Farms Summer Squash Salad Chef Christopher Edward’s note: Julienne cuts are thin and like a matchstick in size and shape. Chiffonades are thin slices, resembling a ribbon. This salad is best eaten quickly. Dress and season the squash only just before you are ready to eat it. I use this salad as a garnish for fish dishes in the restaurant, but it is delicious on its own as well. 3 zucchini 3 yellow summer squash 1 sweet onion, preferably Vidalia 12 large basil leaves 15 chives Zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil Sea salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste Julienne the outer part of the zucchini and squash, avoiding the seeds, and set aside. Peel the onion and slice very thinly; set aside. Chiffonade the basil leaves, and thinly slice the chives; set aside. In a large bowl, combine all the prepared ingredients, and zest the lemon over top. Finish by dressing the salad with the olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly, allow to marinate for 5 minutes, and enjoy. Serves 4 to 6 Clyde’s Willow Creek Farm Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp Willow Creek Farm Pastry Chef Amy Harper concocted this blissful summer dessert that depends on fresh, seasonal fruits. For any leftover topping, pack it into a resealable zipper bag and refrigerate or freeze it. Filling 1 pint local strawberries, hulled and quartered 5 to 8 stalks local rhubarb, diced ½ cup sugar Zest and juice of 1 orange ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract Ice cream for serving

S U

Sprinkle the fruit with the sugar, orange zest and juice, and vanilla extract, and marinate for about 20 minutes. Divide the M M E R 2 0 1 2

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filling into individual dishes or spoon into one large, 9x12-inch family-style baking dish; set aside. Crisp Topping 1 pound all-purpose flour 1 pound granulated sugar 1 pound brown sugar 1 ½ cups old-fashioned oatmeal 1 ½ cups grated coconut 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 pound cold unsalted butter 6 ounces chopped walnuts (optional) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine the first 6 ingredients in a bowl of a standup mixer, and mix on low; if using nuts, add them with the dry ingredients. Cut the butter into small pieces, and add to the mixture. Mix on low until all the butter combines with the ingredients and no more pieces are visible. Spoon the topping over the fruit filling. Bake the dessert for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the topping is golden brown and the juice is bubbling. Let it cool slightly, and serve with ice cream. Serves 6 to 8 Bluemont Vineyard, Great Country Farms and Cookology Brad Spates’ Waygu Beef with Honey Hoisin Glaze 2 tablespoons hoisin sauce 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon honey 1/4 teaspoon chili powder 1/4 tsp paprika 1/2 tsp dried basil 1/2 tsp ground dry mustard About 5 (8-ounce) tenderloin steaks, or filets mignon In a bowl combine the first seven ingredients, whisking until evenly mixed. Pour half of the marinade over steaks, and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Preheat the grill. Grill or sear steaks to desired doneness. Brush remaining marinade mixture over finished steaks before serving. Serves 5 to 6 people

Recipe: Wasabi Mashed Potatoes 6 redskin potatoes, washed and cubed 1/4 cup butter 1/4 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons powdered wasabi 1 teaspoon minced garlic Salt and pepper, to taste Place potatoes in a pot and cover with water. Boil potatoes for 20 minutes, or until tender. Drain and return to the pan. Add butter, cream, wasabi, garlic, salt and pepper. Mash roughly with a fork. Serve warm. Serves 3 to 4 Lansdowne Resort Summer Risotto Chef Wes Rosati’s simple risotto makes a lovely introduction to a summer meal. He suggests serving this with a delicious glass or bottle of Doukénie Winery’s Sauvignon. ½ cup olive oil 2 tablespoons minced celery 2 tablespoons minced carrot 2 tablespoons minced onion 8 ounces Arborio rice About 4 cups vegetable stock 6 ounces butter for sautéing the peas 4 tablespoons English peas 1 ounce Cherry Glen Crottin Cheese, diced Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Combine the celery, carrot, and onion, and sauté in the hot oil for several minutes. Add the remaining olive oil and the rice, and stir well. Slowly add the vegetable stock, a little at a time and stirring after each addition; continue until all the stock is added and absorbed by the rice and the rice is cooked. In a separate skillet, heat the butter over medium heat, and sauté the peas. Add them to the rice mixture. Stir in the cheese, and continue cooking until the cheese is melted. Season with salt and pepper, and serve. 2 servings

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Winescapes Loudoun

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off the Beaten

Path S

BY DEZEL QUILLEN

ome wineries are not on the main trail, but are well worth the extra mile up an old dirt road and a few humps and bumps to reach. Here are a few you should visit this summer! FABBIOLI CELLARS 15669 Limestone School Road, Leesburg www.fabbioliwines.com ocated in Leesburg, a short country drive up a tree-lined narrow gravel road is where you’ll find Fabbioli Cellars. Owner and operator Doug Fabbioli, a passionate and engaging gentleman who often chats about sustainable agriculture practices and respect for the land, has been making well-balanced (namely red), savory wines in Loudoun County since the late 1990s. Spring into summertime with several new wine releases from Fabbioli Cellars! Try their newly released 2011 Something White – a floralscented and refreshing 50/50 blend of Vidal Blanc and Traminette with white peach notes. Enjoy picnic or light summer fare with Fabbioli’s Rosa Luna, a 100 percent Sangiovese dry Rosé with watermelon and peach scents and stone fruit flavors. For a sweet ending (or beginning), enjoy a splash of Fabbioli Cellars’ Una Pera, a 100 percent Asian pear wine or Loudoun County’s most popular dessert wine – Fabbioli Cellars Raspberry Merlot (Hint: pairs nicely with chocolate desserts). For $10, opt for a wine tasting that includes both food and chocolate pairings. Cheese, meats, breads and delicious cheese and fruit spreads are available for purchase in the tasting room. You can also pack a picnic basket and relish the great outdoors while enjoying a bottle or glass of your favorite Fabbioli Cellars wine.

L CORCORAN VINEYARDS & CORCORAN BREWING

CORCORAN VINEYARDS AND BREWING CO. 14635 Corky’s Farm Lane, Waterford www.corcoranvineyards.com www.corcoranbrewing.com

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oes she like wine? Does he like beer? Do you both like BBQ? Then head to the historic village of Waterford and visit Corcoran Vineyards and Brewing Company. The tasting room is housed in a circa 1750s restored log cabin farm house that overlooks a beautiful serene pond. The brewery is housed in a newly constructed building that’s just a hop, skip and a jump away from the tasting room. And speaking of hops, owner Lori Corcoran tells me things are hopping at the brewery right now. Some of their beers are aging gracefully in bourbon casks and many are ready to be poured and enjoyed. 30

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Selections include Hops the Bunny, an American IPA; the Grey Ghost, a double IPA; and the Wheatland – a popular summertime seasonal beer. The onsite beer garden has 10 varieties of hops and features patio seating. For summer wines, Corcoran Winery is pouring a fragrant and refreshing Viognier and several new fun wines like BlackJack, a blackberry and Chambourcin blend; Cello, Corcoran’s version of the traditional Italian limoncello; and RAZ, a semi-sweet raspberry Merlot wine. Monks BBQ will be at Corcoran every weekend smoking ribs, brisket, pork, and chicken finished off with “Corcoran” BBQ sauces made with their beer and wine. In addition to the traditional coleslaw, new side items this summer include fried pickles, hushpuppies, homemade potato chips and yummy baked beans. Grab your beer, wine and BBQ, and picnic around the pond on a beautiful summer day.

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information on summertime special events and live music on the patio.

HIDDENCROFT VINEYARDS 12202 Axline Rd, Lovettsville www.hiddencroftvineyards.com iddencroft Vineyards is a hidden gem in Lovettsville situated on 26 blissfully quiet, secluded acres. Owners Clyde and Terry Housel have several new wine releases in the tasting room this summer that are sure to quench your thirst. Bring a picnic lunch and relax on the expansive deck overlooking the farm and vineyard while enjoying a bottle of their newly released Chambourcin dry Rosé or Grandma’s

H FABBIOLI WINES AND MC2 CONFECTIONS

CASANEL VINEYARDS 17956 Canby Road, Leesburg www.casanelvineyards.com asanel Vineyards is tucked away on 40 picturesque acres and boasts two ponds – one featuring a walk-out gazebo, a spacious patio, and a restored circa 1800s stone barn tasting room. Cool off this summer with the newly released Norton rosé wine – a light and fruity wine bursting with bright red fruit flavors that is a perfect match for barbecue fare. Casanel Vineyards’ Viognier and Don Lorenzo’s White, an off-dry blend of 65 percent Chardonnay and 35 percent Pinot Gris are two other warm weather and versatile sippers that pair beautifully with food. Until the end of October, Chef Miriam will be onsite serving up fresh and local gourmet foods to pair with a warm summer afternoon and Casanel Vineyards’ wines. Check out the winery’s website for

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Love Potion – a popular, crowdpleasing blueberry wine. Other warm weather sippers include Hiddencroft Vineyard’s Vidal Blanc, Traminette, and a lineup of unique fruit wines. Salami, cheese, and crackers are available for purchase in the tasting room to pair with your favorite Hiddencroft wine. Hiddencroft Vineyards has a small town flavor that makes for a good time in a beautiful setting and relaxed atmosphere.

VILLAGE WINERY AND VINEYARDS 40405 Browns Lane, Waterford www.villagewineryandvineyards.com illage Winery and Vineyards is a small family owned and operated farm winery and vineyard located just outside of the historic village of Waterford. The tasting room is housed in a restored farm house that sits next to a towering and eye-catching old rustic barn. Owner

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Kent Marrs has several new summertime releases for you to try in the tasting room, including a light and refreshing 2011 Cabernet Franc dry rosé and a crisp and refreshing 2011Viognier. Both of these wines are great for backyard get-togethers and family barbecues. Besides wine grapes,Village Winery specializes in wines and products made from elderberries. Next to making fairly good dry to semi-sweet wines, elderberries and elderberry-based products are widely sought out for their high antioxidant levels and health benefits. So, keep cool and stay healthy all summer long with a well-chilled glass of Kent’s elderberry-apple or raspberry-elderberry wine. Kent also makes other unique fruit wines that are perfect patio or deck sippers. This year Village Winery is moving forward to reduce their carbon footprint in the world and bring better value to their loyal customer base. Solution:

KENT MARRS AND BLOSSOM

box packaging vs. bottles. Customers now have the option to purchase any Village wine in 9.46 liter boxes (equivalent to just over a case), which is priced as low as $6 per box depending on the wine you want. This is a great idea for summer parties, tailgating and other festive occasions. The next time you visit Village Winery try all their delicious elderberry-based products and say hello to Summer the cat and Blossom, the winery’s Brown Swiss cow that is part of their children’s 4-H project and comes from Oak Spring Dairy, where the winery gets their artisanal local cheeses from. 31

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wining down

summer

the BY DEZEL QUILLEN

W

ith summer’s welcome sunshine and longer days, you can find a myriad things to do in Loudoun County. Whether you’re looking for a day trip or an overnight stay, summer is a great time to explore the Loudoun County wine trail and all it has to offer. Also known as DC’s Wine Country for its relative proximity to the nation’s capital, traipsing along the Loudoun County wine trail is a pleasant respite from the hustle and bustle of the big city. The county plays host to downtown dining, historic charm-filled towns, a unique blend of mom-and-pop shops, a resort and spoil-yourself spa, and more than 30 wineries and tasting rooms. Each winery has its own unique personality and offers wine for every palate preference ranging from dry to sweet and all good things in between. In addition to delicious wine, some Loudoun County wineries offer concerts, events and festivals throughout the warm summer months. With the new season, it’s time to get excited about 32

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refreshing summer white wines, rosés and light-bodied reds – wines that generally pair well with picnic and light summer fare. So put on your shorts and flip flops and check these Loudoun County wine producers out this summer. Be sure to check each winery’s website for additional event, festival and tasting room information. And don’t forget the sunscreen!

SUNSET HILLS VINEYARD 38295 Fremont Overlook Lane, Purcellville www.sunsethillsvineyard.com Aptly named, the winery provides an

ideal setting for enjoying a glass or bottle of wine with friends and family and watching the spectacular sunset beyond the mountains. All summer long, Sunset Hills will be open until 8 p.m. every Friday evening for Sunset Fiesta Fridays. Frozen wine-a-ritas (a crowd favorite) and a light fare menu will be available for purchase and there will be live flamenco/Latin-inspired music to snap your fingers, move your legs and shake your hips to. Can’t make it out Friday? Then check out Tropical Thursdays. Two Thursdays a month, Sunset Hills will be open until 9 p.m.and have live tropical/reggae music, more of the popular frozen wine-a-ritas, as well as a number of refreshing summer wines to choose from. Both of these fun-filled events are great ways to kick off the weekend! Do you ant to learn more about wine? L o u d o u n M a g a z i n e

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Sunset Hill Vineyard will feature a series of winemaker educational events once a month with their winemaker, Nate Walsh. Sign up at their website; the more you learn about wine, the more you will appreciate and enjoy it!

DOUKENIE WINERY 14727 Mountain Road, Purcellville www.doukeniewinery.com Looking for a great way to say good-bye to the busy work week and hello to a relaxing

want to miss extending all the way through the fall.

WILLOWCROFT FARM VINEYARDS

TARARA WINERY

38906 Mt. Gilead Road, Leesburg www.willowcroftwine.com

13648 Tarara Lane, Leesburg www.tarara.com Tarara Winery is nestled in the woods amidst a peaceful setting and sits on 475 scenic acres. Every Saturday evening through Sept. 29, Tarara Winery will host their hugely popular“Sounds of Summer”concert series.

DOUKENIE WINEMAKER SEBASTIEN MARQUET

weekend? Check out Doukenie Winery! Every Friday night, all summer long through Oct. 12, Doukenie Winery will host Bistro Nights. Enjoy authentic Italian pizza pie from Moto’s brick oven pizza restaurant with your favorite Doukenie wine. The winery recommends pairing the pizza with its newly released Le Vin Rouge 2009, an everyday drinking, food-friendly Merlot and Cabernet Franc blend or the Dionysus 2009, a special release of 100 percent Merlot wine produced from block No. 1 of the estate vineyard. Sit next to the relaxing pond or on the deck overlooking the farm while listening to live music and basking in the summer sunshine with family and friends. For the warm months of summer, swirl, sip and savor a glass of Doukenie Winery 2010 Mandolin, a refreshing, lightly sweet blend of Traminette, Vidal Blanc and Seyval Blanc. Farm cheeses, warm bread, crackers and salami can be purchased in the tasting room to pair with your favorite Doukenie wine. Be sure to visit Doukenie Winery’s website as they have events that you don’t S U M M E R

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Panoramic views of Loudoun Valley and the Blue Ridge Mountains greet guests at Loudoun’s oldest winery, which has expanded its summer tasting room operations to 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. In the red barn tasting room, sample seven of their best wines, from off-dry to full-bodied. Willowcroft also offers specialty tasting packages for groups of 10 or more, providing cheese, chocolate or hors d’oeuvres with the sampling. Summer whites to sip on the terraced slopes include the 2011 Harmony, which sparkles with honeysuckle and citrus notes; 2011 Cabernet Blanc, with strawberry notes; 2011 Albarino, aged in steel and finished in oak; 2011 Chardonnay Cold Steel, an un-oaked Chardonnay fermented in stainless steel; 2010 Seyval, a light and crisp sipper with citrus notes. If the heady flavors inspire you to try your hand at it, owner and winemaker Lew Parker is offering a two-part home winemaking seminar this summer, taking place July 8 and Aug. 5.

TARARA WINEMAKER JORDAN HARRIS

Pack a picnic basket, grab your lawn chairs and head outdoors to listen to great local music. The concert stage is set against the backdrop of beautiful Shadow Lake and wooded serenity. Sit back, relax and enjoy the show with a bottle of Tarara Winery 2011 Rosé; a crisp and refreshing wine that’s perfect for summer sipping. Other selections to cool off with during the warm months are the 2011 Viognier – Virginia’s signature grape variety, and the 2011 Boneyard White, an interesting blend of Chardonnay, Viognier, Petit Manseng and Pinot Gris. Check the Tarara Winery website for band listings.

WILLOWCROFT FARM VINEYARDS

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Happy

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L O U D O U N M A G A Z I N E

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py Trails To You

LOUDOUN IS HOME TO APPALACHIAN TRAIL’S ‘ROLLER COASTER’

BY CHRIS GEIGER PHOTOGRAPHY BY CECILIO RICARDO JR. S U M M E R

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through the

grapevine BY Therese Howe

PETER DELISO, LEFT, AND CARL DIMANNO AT ELEVATION 868

868 ESTATE VINEYARDS Located on the historic Grandale Farm property, the creation of the latest destination on the Loudoun Wine Trail brings farm to table dining to a new level in the county. The partners behind the new project are Peter Deliso, Wendy Charron and Carl DiManno, a consultant and former winemaker at Sugarloaf Mountain Vineyard. After purchasing 90 acres next to Grandale Farm Restaurant, they convinced partners Tom Orme and Chef Author Clark Jr. to join the project and merge their 30 acres to create the estate. “You don’t really find a lot of vineyards with a gourmet restaurant attached to it. So our feeling now is we have the ability to offer the full set of services, including the vineyard experience, the tasting room, the wine, we have catering on site, we have a restaurant on site. We have desserts and 34

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sandwiches and all sorts of things,” Deliso says. Until the estate’s 10 acres of vines begin producing fruit, the newly transformed Gran Hall tasting room is serving DiManno’s Revolution wines and Chatham Vineyards’ Church Creek label – all made with Virginia fruit. The partners envision having more than 35 acres under vine to produce 10,000 cases yearly and eventually building a 6,500-square-foot facility at the hilltop where the tasting room would be transferred. “There’s a hill up there which is not readily obvious from the road,” Deliso said. “But when you get up there what you’re going to find is that hilltop is the highest elevation in this valley (between the Blue Ridge and Short Hill mountains, known as Between the Hills). The elevation is 868, hence 868 Estate Vineyards. It has a gorgeous view of the valley and the hills and

the mountains. Certainly Grandale does too but our ultimate goal is to put our tasting room up on that hill,” Deliso says. “The plan is to establish our beach head here, get our business off the ground, and then in 2013, God willing, to get the financing to go ahead and build that tasting room up on the hill and take advantage of the views that are up there because they really are quite spectacular.”

PIEDMONT EPICUREAN ARTS CENTER Doug Fabbioli of Fabbioli Cellars has launched the Piedmont Epicurean Arts Center, which offers classes for those who wish to learn more about the winery industry as well as those who want to learn more about the product. The Professional Series, for instance, offers classes in vineyard management and tasting room operations, L o u d o u n M a g a z i n e

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Wet Yard! Wet Basement! while upcoming Enthusiast Series courses include such themes as “Pairing Wine and Cheese” and “Summer Farmers Markets and Wines to Pair.” The center “is an evolution from the classes I have been teaching through the

level.” He has partnered with wine consultant Lucinda Smith and wine educator James Koennicke in the venture, for which they have ambitious plans.“Over the next few months we are looking to start a cheesemaking series as well as the distilling series,” Fabbioli says.“The DOUG FABBIOLI LEADS A CLASS IN VINEYARD MANAGEMENT culinary program is getting under way winery for a number of years,” Fabbioli says. as well. We will “Last year we did a program called ‘So You have our home winemaker class as well Want to Get into the Wine Industry.’ This as workforce classes on wine production went very well and exposed the need for so and harvest. We are trying hard to curb the much more education in our rural economy, enthusiasm we have for this venture to keep both on the enthusiast as well as workforce each class high quality and focused. We can

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KAREN, LES AND ANNETTE BELL AT CANA VINEYARDS

do so much but want to make each step a sound and smart one.”

CANA VINEYARDS Anticipated to open this summer, Cana Vineyards and Winery in Middleburg rests on a hilltop overlooking the western slopes of the Bull Run Mountains. Ashburn entrepreneurs Les and Karen Bell purchased the 43-acre parcel in January 2011 after discovering it while on a leisurely drive a couple of years before. Designed as a bright red barn, the plans for the tasting room and production facility call for a two-story gazebo, veranda and patio.“We’d like it to be comfortable any time of year,” Karen Bell says, as her husband points out the building’s radiant heating and cooling integrated with an 800foot geothermal well. The entire operation has been a family affair, from the planting of 3 acres of Petit Verdot, Viognier and Petit Manseng to the design of the bottle labels by their son, David, who is a commercial artist in Brooklyn. Daughter Annette, an engineer by trade, has been in charge of everything from marketing to planning the tasting room. Working with executive winemaker Allan Kinne, they’ve overseen the

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production of their initial 1,200 cases, which include a Riesling, Viognier, Traminette, Rosé, Cabernet Franc and a premium Petit Verdot/Merlot blend they call Le Mariage. Adding a touch of sweetness to the portfolio are a couple of fruit wines: an apple and a raspberry-apple that incorporates berries harvested on the property. Named for the Galilee site where Jesus turned water into wine, Cana’s sloping vineyards offer perfect drainage and elevation, the Bells say. “The cold air goes down through the vineyard and right down to the valley, it doesn’t stop on our vineyard. …We also designed it the way it is so that water doesn’t stand. We did (the rows of plants) north-south because we didn’t want the water to puddle,” Les Bell says. “We almost feel like God designed this for a winery.”

BOXWOOD WINERY Previously accessible by appointment only, the Middleburg winery owned by John Kent Cooke has opened to the public for the first time since its establishment seven years ago. The move transfers the satellite Tasting Room location in downtown Middleburg to the winery, which will host visitors 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday through Sunday. In the winery’s tasting room, guests will be offered flights of current vintages including Boxwood, Topiary, Trellis and Rosé. Wines by the glass or bottle will be available to enjoy in the courtyard, which offers scenic vistas of the vineyard. If you’re bringing a large group of six or more, the winery asks that you reserve space in advance. Call 540.687.8778 for more information.

L o u d o u n M a g a z i n e

6/15/12 12:23 PM


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D

id you know that quietly nestled along Loudoun’s westward border lies one of America’s most storied hiking trails? It’s hiding in plain sight. Once people find it, even a short hike along its cool, shaded pathway is a welcome reprieve from the hustle and bustle of our modern life just a few feet or miles away. Come take a walk with me as we explore Loudoun’s little slice of one of the most famous trails in American history.

First, let’s get some perspective. The Appalachian Trail, or “AT,” runs roughly north and south up the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia’s Springer Mountain to Maine’s Mount Katahdin, traversing 14 states and more than 2,100 miles. Every year, millions of people hike the trail as “day hikers” out for a day, “section hikers” hiking a specific section over one or more days and “through hikers” hiking the entire trail all in one year. Anyone who completes the entire trail whether in one stretch or through a series of smaller hikes over a lifetime can earn the coveted “2,000 miler” status from the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. Here in Loudoun, we border or encompass a little more than 30 miles of the AT beginning a couple of miles north of its crossing of Rt. 7, at the Virginia/West Virginia border, and heading south down to Rt. 50 at Ashby Gap. Along our westward flank, we also border a 16-mile stretch into Harper’s Ferry, WV, which offers mostly easy hiking and a chance for great ice cream at the end! Of course, you don’t have to hike all 30 miles to fully appreciate what the trail has to offer. Even a short loop or a weekend overnight with some hot dogs and s’mores by the fire can give you a fabulous time you just can’t get at a 4-star hotel (fires in hotel rooms are, after all, discouraged). Plus, it can be done at a fraction of the cost. The trail and most of its shelters and campsites are free. Many of the camping supplies needed can be bought inexpensively or scrounged from the attic or yard sales. Now, let’s take a closer look at the portion of the trail here in Loudoun. As Rt. 9 climbs the Blue Ridge heading westward, there is a parking area just after crossing into West Virginia on the north side of the road. From that trailhead, it is approximately 13.5 miles south to Snickers Gap, Rt. 7 (parking available). Alternatively, you can head north on the trail from Rt. 9 40

approximately 6 miles into Harper’s Ferry National Park. Our family likes to grab big ice cream cones after this section before we climb into one of the park’s shuttles back up to the parking lot. It’s about a 3 hour walk one way at a comfortable pace and the terrain is easy enough for my 3-year-old to handle comfortably. The trail southward from the Rt. 9 parking lot begins by following the crest of the ridge which affords gentle ups and downs and an easy walk through the woods. Then, a few miles before Rt. 7, one of the more famous sections of the AT, the “Roller Coaster,” begins and marks the beginning of a more challenging, but fun, portion of the trail. The Roller Coaster gets its name because the trail moves up and down a series of moderate to steep ascents and descents – one right after another. Only the last 3 miles of this section are within the famed Roller Coaster. Though, for even an experienced and fit hiker, this portion is considered moderate to strenuous and extra

L O U D O U N M A G A Z I N E


What to Bring Before heading on any hike of any length it’s important to be adequately prepared. Here is a short list of backpacking essentials for a day hike and overnight. DAY HIKING Be sure to have the following for each person in your group: • Day pack – can be a simple school backpack or a pack specifically designed for this purpose • Water – At least 1 liter • Water filter or purification tablets (in case you need more) • Emergency blanket • Map and Compass • Firestarter (matches, lighter, and/or flint and steel) • Simple first aid kit (bandages, band-aids, tape, sunscreen, bug spray, pain reliever and extra medication if you’re taking it) • Good shoes that have been worn at least 1 week prior, boots are fine but with a light load sneakers can be more comfortable • Small flashlight • Enough food for your trip plus a little extra just in case • Extra clothes including socks, a windbreaker and season appropriate clothes • Emergency poncho, the weather can surprise you! • Toilet paper (outhouses, or “privies”, are available at most shelters) • Pocket knife • Camera if you want to take pictures

OVERNIGHT HIKING

You’ll need everything you bring for day hiking plus: • Shelter – tent or tarp and ground cover (optional) with stakes or tie-outs • Sleeping bag and pad – lighter is better but make sure you’re comfortable in them before stepping into the woods • Cook kit – A metal pot or container that holds water, bowl or plate, spoon or spork, cup, and camp stove (if fires are not permitted) with fuel • Extra food including meals and snacks • Extra toiletries like toothbrush and toothpaste • Change of clothes and/or warmer clothes for the evening (pants and long-sleeve shirt or windbreaker) that are season appropriate time should be allowed to complete it. Don’t worry. There are plenty of places to camp and relax along the way. With an early start, this section can be completed with plenty of time to slide into your car, or pitch a tent/grab a bunk at Bear’s Den Hostel (about 1/2 mile south of Rt. 7 on the trail). Alternatively, you could stop short and stay at the PATC-managed Blackburn Trail Center (donations accepted) or the David Lesser Shelter (free and first come, first served) in order to break it up into two smaller sections. On the two-day trip our family did, we chose to do the whole thing on the first day, then bunked at Bear’s Den to enjoy the beautiful facility and many amenities it boasts. If you can squeeze a stay in, we highly recommend it. S U M M E R

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After passing Rt. 7, it is approximately 14 more miles to Ashby Gap (Rt. 50), much of which is still within the Roller Coaster. Heading south from Rt. 7, after a little over a half a mile, you arrive at Bear’s Den Rocks, a local favorite rock outcropping with an expansive westward view of the Shenandoah Valley. For a short but challenging 1.2-mile loop, this is a great way to dip your toe into day hiking. The turnoff for the hostel is on the left just beyond the overlook if you’ll be staying the night. Still further south, you’ll pass two more trail shelters along the way (Sam Moore and Rod Hollow shelters), cross a few trailside springs and streams, see the remnants of local history and travel through several cool hollows. If you have

a chance, pop in at a shelter for a break and crack open the shelter log to read some notes from other hikers who did the same, spent the night, or came in to maintain it. It’s always an interesting read and there is something so very welcome about sitting on an actual seat. At the end, parking is available on VA 601 just 0.2 miles north of Rt. 50, though you’ll need a sharp eye to spot it. If you can, grab a trail guide from the Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s website (www.appalachiantrail.org), which will give you great information about key points of interest and help you find the parking lot! When we hiked the Loudoun portion of the trail it was two days of hot and humid July weather. Thankfully, the trail was shaded by a green canopy of leaves most of the way and those cool hollows really were a cool respite when the temps begin to soar something we very much appreciated as we walked up and down the hills. On the trail in the spring you’ll see a wide variety of beautiful wildflowers. In the summer, different plants emerge and the many trees earn the trail its nickname, “The Green Tunnel.” By fall the trail is adorned in beautiful golds, coppers, reds and purples both above and below, all with a crisp tang to the air. And in winter, with the leaves off the trees and the land in repose, your now unobstructed eye can take in much more of the surrounding landscape. So don’t wait for the perfect moment or the right time. Go ahead. Get on out there. Let the magic of the trail grab a hold of you, even for just a couple of hours on a weekend afternoon. With a little preparation you’re sure to have an experience that will challenge and reward you. And maybe, just maybe, you’ll discover a whole new world you never knew existed both on the trail and within yourself.

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My Summer Daycation

By Buzz McClain

Note to Libby: De feature opens her

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ACE ADVENTURE RESORT AND ADVENTURE SPORTS CENTER INTERNATIONAL

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: Destinations here

THRILL SEEKERS CAN MAKE A SPLASH WHITEWATER RAFTING WITH ACE ADVENTURE RESORT AT RAM’S HEAD, NEW RIVER GORGE, IN WEST VIRGINIA, THIS PAGE, AND AT ADVENTURE SPORTS CENTER INTERNATIONAL IN MARYLAND, OPPOSITE.

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ACE ADVENTURE RESORT IS DEDICATED TO OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES TO GET THE HEART RACING, SUCH AS RAPPELLING, RAFTING AND PADDLEBOARDING.

through them at breakneck speeds. ACE seems to be all-inclusive when it comes to offering extreme adventures that will wear you out: ATV tours in the mud, horseback riding through forested trails, paintball wars on a battlefield, paddleboarding under waterfalls, mountain biking along a cavernous gorge, rock and rope climbing the face of a sandstone cliff ... And there’s a bar. Thankfully. Best of all, most of these activities are geared for kids, except for the bar. You start your day at ACE either climbing out of your sleeping bag in your tent, rolling out of a bunk in a cedar log chalet or rising from your double bed in a cabin that belonged to a U.S. president (Harry S. Truman). After a quick breakfast of your own devising – scrambled eggs and bacon over a campfire – or acquiring one at a lakeside café, you head off toward your first adventure of the day. PHOTOS COURTESY OF ACE ADVENTURE RESORT

You don’t have to go very far

in this region to discover, explore and enjoy any number of exotic, fun and informative destinations, destinations others travel thousands of miles to visit. You’re lucky – you’re only a day trip away.

ACE Adventure Resort The minute you pull into the gravel parking lot and see the three-story-high inflatables on the glistening lake, your inner redneck begins to scream “yee hah!” This 1,500-acre resort is carved out of a mountaintop that was scraped away years ago by miners; happily, trees grew back and now there are humans zip-lining 44

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THE NATIONAL D-DAY MEMORIAL SPONSORS A 1940s FAMILY DAY FESTIVAL ON JULY 21 FEATURING LIVING HISTORY ACTIVITIES AND MORE.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL D-DAYMEMORIAL FOUNDATION

Make sure your day bag has everything you need for all of your activities, because you won’t be coming back until dark. (And I’d recommend a minimum of a three-day weekend to do several activities.) You can start off nice and easy with kayaking or fishing, all of it guided (most of the activities are accompanied by trained professional hippie types who live at ACE) and top it off with a greasy crawl through an obstacle course made of mud (you need five of you) or do the ultimate in thrill-seeking – whitewater rafting. The Upper New is for kids, with lots of up and downs and swimming in jetties; the Lower New is for beginners of all ages who want real white water; but the Gauley River, propelled by controlled damn releases, is the ultimate, with stomach-churning steep drops, impossibly tight and powerful channels and up to Class V rapids that you’ll talk about at the office for weeks to come. When it’s over, send the kids to climb those oversized inflatables on the lake while you enjoy a beverage on the sandy beach.

in mid-climb up the wall, and the sculpture truly gives you a sense of What It Must Have Been Like – particularly when you see the tiny splashes in the pool around the feet of the running soldiers. Enemy bullets! Brilliant.

Potomac Eagle Scenic Railroad “Look, an eagle!” We were no further out of the station than someone in the A VINTAGE DIESEL CHARTER ROUNDS THE CORNER IN RURAL SOUTH BRANCH VALLEY, WV.

The National D-Day Memorial While the World War II Memorial in Washington gets all the attention, no less impressive is this private memorial to one of the most decisive battles in the history of war. Its poignancy is magnified by its location: Bedford, VA, was the U.S. town that suffered the highest per capita losses in the D-Day fight. Twentythree “Bedford Boys” perished during or because of the Invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944; at the time, the rural town had 3,200 residents. The memorial sprawls over 88 Blue Ridge hillside acres, welcoming you with an English Garden and an ornate, 44-foot high granite arch and Victory Plaza; you walk through a solemn tribute to the fallen soldiers – 9,000 Allied soldiers died in the battle – illustrated with bronze busts of the battle’s leaders and heroes. The centerpiece is the reflecting pool that has several life-sized statues of soldiers in battle gear appearing to dash through the water toward a rock wall; at least one is face down in the water and another is wounded and helped by a compatriot; other soldiers are 46

PHOTO BY NICK MCLEAN

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THE BEAUTIFULLY PAINTED B&O TRAIN ON THE POTOMAC SCENIC RAILWAY CROSSES THE SOUTH BRANCH OF THE POTOMAC IN ROMNEY, WHERE IT WAITS FOR PASSENGERS NEXT TO ONE OF THE MANY HISTORIC HOMES THAT LINE THE VALLEY, BELOW.

PHOTOGRAPHY THIS PAGE BY NICK MCLEAN

front of the train was getting the attention of everyone else to look at the large brown bird flying along next to us. It was thrilling to see the big bird, a young bald eagle, but it came as no surprise to veterans of the excursion ride. The dieselengine Potomac Eagle rambles along at 25 miles an hour for three hours along the northeast-flowing South Branch of the Potomac River in West Virginia; as it happens, there are nesting bald eagles every three miles along the six-mile stretch of forested river canyon. Seeing an eagle isn’t guaranteed but the conductor, Richard Liken, said he couldn’t remember in all his years making the trek and not

seeing an eagle. And we saw at least a dozen in our 34-mile round trip “ride to nowhere” from Romney to the Sycamore Bridge and back (the train goes out 17 miles then comes back on the same 17-mile track). “Look, an eagle!” We heard it so often we had to ignore it sometimes in order to go to the snack car and get popcorn and hot dogs. Veterans of the ride brought their own lunches in coolers, while others paid a bit more and sat in the climate-controlled Classic Club Car, which includes light snacks and dessert. We enjoyed the rickety regular car, with padded seats facing each other and glass windows you can open for fresh air. Two cars away was an open-top car, affording a convertible-like view of the sky – and the eagles.

ASCI Adventures “The World’s Only Mountaintop White Water Course” is a manmade river channel that replicates what you would encounter in the wild – and I mean wild. This is where Olympic contenders come to get better at beating the water; this is also where rank amateurs such as I come to get beaten up by the fake river. My kayak instructor told me we’d make it around the one-third mile course three times in the two-hour Total Beginner class, which turned out to be just me. As it happened, we made it around exactly once as the roiling, rolling, churning, boiling river prevented me 48

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ADVENTURE SPORTS INTERNATIONAL CENTER

ACE Adventure Resort Where: Oak Hill, WV, about five hours southwest of Leesburg; break up the drive with an antiquing stop in old town Staunton How much: Lodging ranges from $399 a night for the three-bedroom Truman Lodge, former weekend cabin of President Harry S. Truman, to $15 if you bring your own tent. Each activity has its own price but there are many things to do for free. Half-day zip line tours are $85, less for children (everything is less for kids); paintball is about $50; whitewater rafting average $120. Info: www.aceraft.com or 1-800-787-3982

The National D-Day Memorial Where: Bedford, VA, about three-and-a-half hours straight down I-81 from Leesburg How much: $7 for adults, $5 for students 6 to 18, free for those under 6. Guided walking tours are worth the $3 per person ($2 for students). Info: www.dday.org or 1-800-351-DDAY

Potomac Eagle Scenic Railroad Where: The Wappocomo Station where the excursion begins and ends is a mile or so north of Romney, WV, about 90 minutes due west of Leesburg. How much: $48 for adults, $20 for children 6 to 16; under 6 are free. The Classic Club Car is $80, $30 for children. Prices change in October when the train gets very popular as a way to see the astounding autumn colors. Info: www.potomaceagle.info or 304-424-0736

Adventure Sports Center International Where: McHenry, MD, near Wisp Ski Resort, about three hours west of Leesburg on I-68 in Maryland. How much: Prices vary by day, size of the group and activity. Guided lessons for singles range from $50 to $70 for rafting, kayaking and river boarding. Info: www.adventuresportscenter.com or 301-387-3250

Hershey, The Sweetest Place on Earth Where: Hershey, PA, located a little more than 100 miles northeast of Leesburg How much: Admission to various attractions varies; one-day tickets to Hersheypark are $56.95 for visitors 9 to 54 years, $35.95 for children 3 to 8 years. Info: www.hersheypa.com or 1-800-HERSHEY S U M M E R

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Come Play! A DV E N T U R E S A B O U N D ! • White Water Rafting • Water Tubing • Zip Line • Kayaking • Canoeing • Team Building • Fishing • Hiking • Camping • Events & More! Harpers Ferry Adventure Center, formerly BTI Whitewater/Butts Tubes, is located at the northern tip of Loudoun County, Virginia, near Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. We offer a wide range of exciting and affordable outdoor adventures! You can spend the entire day or multiple days having fun on both the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers, in the beautiful tri-state area of Maryland,Virginia, and West Virginia.

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WRITER BUZZ McCLAIN BEFORE AND AFTER, BELOW, HIS KAYAK TRIP MISHAP AT ADVENTURE SPORTS CENTER INTERNATIONAL.

a

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You won’t be able to refuse some of the

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BUZZ McCLAIN

from paddling more than 10 yards before getting dumped – again and again. It was futile, but fun, really. I so mean it. A highlight, of sorts: My 14-year-old son Luke took a private river board lesson – where you hang onto a small padded board and swim through the rapids on your belly – and as I came around a boulder I saw him and his instructor taking a break on a rock ahead (they had been around the course three times). With great effort I paddled over to see how he was doing and in his typical “cool kid” manner said,“Fine,” and gently pushed my inflatable kayak back into the rushing stream – where I was instantly broadsided by a raft with six paddlers who knocked me sideways down the tallest waterfall. It was my biggest flip of the day, one that had a river guard diving in to see if I was OK. I was, and I saw my son was horrified to see that he’d nearly killed his dad. We laugh about it now, but . . . PHOTO COURTESY OF ADVENTURE SPORTS CENTER INTERNATIONAL

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HOCKEY AT GIANT CENTER

PHOTO BY THERESE HOWE

WATCHING HERSHEY BEARS

HERSHEY: NOT JUST AN AMUSEMENT PARK

H

ershey’s most well-known tagline may be The Sweetest Place on Earth, but a lesser known and just as appropriate one is that “there’s something fun for everyone.” Sure, the main attraction is the 110-acre Hersheypark and its latest thrill ride, the $25 million mega-coaster Skyrush reaching 200 feet above the ground and traveling more than 75 mph. With more than 65 rides and attractions, including The Boardwalk waterpark, Hersheypark draws more than a fair share of season pass holders from Northern Virginia. But my hockey-loving family is sweet on the Hershey Bears, the affiliate team that goalie Braden Holtby played for before blowing everyone away with his performance for the Washington Capitals in the Stanley Cup playoffs. We watched our first game 22 rows up from the rink from an Executive Hospitality Suite that offered complimentary pizza, sliders, mini crabcakes and drinks – spoiling us forevermore for the regular seats we are now resigned to. However, for less than the price of one seat at a Caps game, we can get a package for a family of four that also includes hot dogs, popcorn and drinks to watch the most loved AHL franchise (they’ve been No. 1 in fan attendance for the sixth year in a row)! We’ll be taking time this summer, though, to go beyond Giant Center and check out the numerous attractions that make Hershey fun for everyone: ZooAmerica , an 11-acre, walk-through zoo with more than 200 animals (admission is free with a Hersheypark ticket) Hershey’s Chocolate World and its free chocolate tours The 23-acre Hershey Gardens, which has a Children’s Garden and Outdoor Butterfly House Dutch Wonderland, which has attractions geared to kids younger than 12 I’m not a big concertgoer or theater fan, but for those who are, playing this summer at the Hershey Theatre are traveling Broadway shows such as Mama Mia (through July 1) Beauty and the Beast (July 24-29), concerts with Randy Travis (July 21) and Meat Loaf (Aug. 21), and for the preschool set, The Wiggles! Celebration (Aug. 11). Accommodations are available for all types of budgets, from camping at the Hershey Highmeadow Campground to luxury rooms at The Hotel Hershey, home to The Chocolate Spa.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF WiLDWOOD LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION, THIS PAGE, AND LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATES, OPPOSITE PAGE

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ENHANCING THE GREAT OUTDOORS B Y

WAT E R

F E AT U R E S ,

E . S .

B I D D L E

GR EENE RY

M A K E

FO R

E NTICING

B A C K YA R D

S PAC E S

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s the steamy days of summer settle in, many flee to the seashore, lake or pool, but you don’t have to leave home to enjoy the pleasures of water. With a little imagination, you can capture the magical essence of flowing

water right in your own backyard. Whether it’s a simple urn bubbling over or a naturallooking stream cascading into an elaborate pond, more and more people are turning to water features to enhance their outdoor space.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF WiLDWOOD LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION, AND SUNRISE LANDSCAPE AND DESIGN, BOTTOM

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veryone loves the soothing sound of running water,”says Joe Markell, owner and president of Sunrise Landscape and Design in Sterling, noting the popularity of smaller water features such as urns, water walls and statuary. “You can pretty much run water out of just about anything,”agrees Jason Dengler, owner of Wildwood Landscape Design and Construction in Purcellville. “For example, you could have a sculpture pouring water, or drill a hole in a decorative boulder”to fashion it into a bubbler. (Originally, a bubbler was known as a water fountain; its current usage indicates any object from which water bubbles upward.) “In suburban neighborhoods, people like it because it masks noise,”he continues. “The white noise of running water makes street noises go away.” Maintenance is the primary issue when considering a water feature, with the amount of available space coming in a hard second. “The trend is toward ‘pond-less’ water features,” says Paul LaPointe, owner and designer of River’s 56

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Edge Landscapes in Bluemont. While all types of water features are self-contained systems, the pond-less features, such as bubblers or water walls, are easier to clean, says LaPointe. “And you still get the effect of visual movement and sound.” A pond-less water feature uses a cistern and can run off of as little as 10 gallons of water, but most bubblers use between 50 to 200 gallons. At the high end, a pond system incorporating a stream, waterfall and pond can use as much as 150,000 gallons, according to David Adams, owner and president of Landscape Associates in Aldie. In comparison, a typical pool holds 25,000 to 30,000 gallons.

Selecting a water feature will depend on the nature of the space to be used as well as the type of design preferred, either natural or formal, he says. Homeowners should consider “whether they’re avid water gardeners or do they want something lower maintenance?” So while there is no denying the splendor of a babbling brook plummeting into a Koi-laden pond, such a setup does require care. “It is a hobby,” Dengler says. “You’ll always be tinkering with it.” It is not only the amount of water involved but the addition of fish and plant life that ups the ante in taking care of the system. But the results are L O U D O U N M A G A Z I N E

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rewarding: “Kids love the pond, with the running water and the fish and frogs,”Markell says. When deciding on aquatic plants to embellish a pond, Markell suggests thinking in layers. “You want plants at all different levels to help clean up naturally,”he says, from bog-type plants which thrive in just inches of water to floating plants like water hyacinths to aquatic plants with a root system, such as water lilies. “You are developing an ecosystem,”he says. “Plants help you keep a good balance and a good balance is key”in maintaining a pond water feature. “Plants help naturalize a water feature,”notes Dengler. “If it’s all stone, it doesn’t look natural. You really have to mix in the plants to help green it up.” Fish and other wildlife add another dimension to the ecosystem. Koi, an ornamental variety of domesticated common carp, are a popular addition to water gardens, as are goldfish, Markell says. “If you add fish, you have to give them protective areas where they can hide, like ledges, tunnels or deeper water,”he says, noting that natural predators such as herons are always a threat. 58

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Predators are not the only creatures drawn to a pond. “The frogs, toads and tadpoles will come,”he says. “It’s neat to see them develop.” “The day you build (a pond), you will hear the frogs at night. I don’t know how that happens,” Dengler says with a laugh. But bubblers, brooks and ponds are not the only elements of an enticing summer yard. Knowing when and how to water is essential to keeping lawns, shrubs and gardens looking their best during the dry, summer months. KEEPING LAWNS GREEN

“Turf, during the hot season, requires no less

than two to three days of water a week,”Adams of Landscape Associates says.“It’s quite different from plantings, which like a deep watering once or twice a week. Turf likes frequency, but not as much water.” Watering lawns early in the morning is most effective, LaPointe of River’s Edge says. In the afternoon, evaporation will occur, while night watering encourages fungal growth. And for plantings, shrubs and trees, a slow, steady trickle is optimal, for it conserves moisture L O U D O U N M A G A Z I N E

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and saturates the roots. “If you have the water on full blast, there’ll be a lot of water runoff,”LaPointe says. “We’re in a funny area,”he continues, referring to the heavy clay soil of the region.“For a couple of months the soil is soaking wet. So plants must tolerate a high amount of moisture and also be drought-resistant.” The soil is difficult to get wet because there is a lot of runoff, Adams adds. “And then if it is wet, it’s hard to dry.” To compensate, introduce organic and compost material, Dengler of Wildwood Landscape Design says. “One of the best ways to manage moisture is to have a lot of organic matter in the soil bed. It helps retain moisture so you don’t have to water as much.”

Now You’ll KNow where Your TeeNagers are oN F r i d aY N i g h T

CARING FOR PLANTS

The experts also recommend mulching as a means of preventing water loss. “Mulching very much helps, provided that the proper type of mulch is being used and that it is being used properly,”says Adams, who recommends either shredded bark or leaf compost mulch. “Wood chip mulch takes longer to break down and doesn’t necessarily help plants quite as much.” Adams cautions homeowners against over-mulching, noting that a 1- to 2-inch covering is sufficient. In addition to retaining moisture, mulch adds nutrients to plants and discourages weeds, which thrive in hot, dry conditions. In addition to mulch, irrigation systems also offer a hands-free solution to ensuring plants are watered adequately, but there are several caveats. “When you use an irrigation system,”Adams says, “it is important that the turf zone (settings) are different from the planting bed zones. We see quite a bit of overwatering, which sometimes is more detrimental than not watering at all. It’s quite a big problem.” Adams also points out that the watering requirement of mature plants is less than those of younger plants. Overwatering can occur, he says, when the irrigation settings initially targeted to a newly planted landscape are not adjusted to reflect the maturity of the plants. If the irrigation settings are changed correctly as the plants grow, “that’s where you can conserve on water, that’s where you can scale back,”he says. Another crucial component of an eye-catching outdoor area during the summer months is selecting plants, shrubs, and trees compatible with the planting space. “Know your sun exposure and know your drainage patterns,”recommends Dengler, who advocates using native plant species when possible. He also cautions homeowners that drought-resistant does not mean no water is required.“Sometimes, when they hear drought-resistant, they get the wrong message and think they don’t have to water the plants,”he says. “It’s important to choose your palette of plants very wisely”for a droughtresistant landscape, says Adams, noting that the goal is to have a balance of trees, shrubs and perennials that all have low water requirements. When considering a lawn, tall fescue and turf-type grasses fare best because they are bred for heat, says Markell of Sunrise Landscape.“It’s hard because we are in a transition zone between warmer and cooler season grasses.” He points out that it’s natural for grass to brown.“The grasses will go dormant (in high temperatures) but will come back again with the cooler temperatures and when there’s more moisture.” So whether it’s maintaining a lush green backyard, relaxing to the sound of bubbling water or watching Koi dart about a fern-shaded pond, homeowners this summer can be content knowing that they’re putting their water to good use. S P R I N G

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VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A • MHIC #12

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• Siding • Roofing • Doors

703-934-4020

VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A

www.NuhomeOnline.com

VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A • MHIC #122697 VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A • MHIC • #122697 VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A MHIC #122697

MHIC #122697

VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A • MHIC #122697 # NAT-33399-1

# NAT-33399-1 # NAT-33399-1

SEE REVERSE

NAT-33399-1 VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A#• MHIC #122697

SEE REVERSE SEE REVERSE

AURORA SERVICES INC

# NAT-33399-1

VA Lic. Class A #2705-064938A • MHIC #122697

SERVING NORTHERN VIRGINIA, WASHINGTON DC& & MARYLAND YEARS serving northern virginia , washington , dc marylandFOR for1818 years

AURORA SERVICES, INC.

AND AURORA SERVICES BEGAN..... # NAT-33399-1

SEE REVERSE

Custom Iron Gate Design Automatic Gate System Installation SEE REVERSE

Our story began in 1995 by purchasing automatic gate system accounts from another gate contractor who could no longer find adequate solutions to their customers needs.

SEE REVERSE

Simply showing up and offering honest assessments as to the condition of many existing gates systems is what we believe helped to restore faith and trust. We work very hard, in a professional manner, to provide solutions and equipment suitable for individual needs.

We have made a conscious decision not to flood the market with advertisement promoting our business. We selectively advertise in a few upscale publications and believe that our client base is what drives our business growth. A satisfied client is the most important testimony to our success!

YOU ARE OUR SUCCESS!

AURORA SERVICES, INC.

We love the business of creating, working with clients to bring their desires and vision of elegance to their home.

P.O. Box 90 Amissville, VA 20106 _Tel: 540-937-2400 _Fax: 540-937-8958 http://www.auroraservicesinc.com

P.O. Box 90 Amissville, VA, 20106 ph: 540-937-2400 • fax: 540.937-8958 auroraservicesinc.com

We are bound by our personal code of conduct, always honest and reliable. If we stray from that compass point we have lost our own integrity!

AND AURORA SERVICES BEGAN....

Our story began in 1995 by purchasing automatic gate system accounts from another gate contractor who could no longer find adequate solutions to their customers needs. Simply showing up and offering honest assessments as to the condition of many existing gate systems is what we believe helped to restore faith and trust. We work very hard, in a professional manner, to provide solutions and equipment suitable for individual needs. We have made a conscious decision not to flood the market with advertisement promoting our business. We selectively advertise in a few upscale publications and believe that our client base is what drives our business growth. A satisfied client is the most important testimony to our success!

YOUR ARE OUR SUCCESS!

We love the business of creating and working with clients to bring their desires and vision of elegance to their home. We are bound by our personal code of conduct, always honest and reliable.

If we stray from that compass point we have lost our own integrity! 62

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Professional Business Connections Robin Short

Julie’s Custom Upholstery & Drapes

Realtor, Assoc. Broker ABR ePRO SFR

Direct: 703-728-2172

Email: shorthr@msn.com www.RobinShort.com Entire MLS can be found at: RobinShort.com Search area market statics at: RobinShort.com/statistics

703-771-3043

www.juliescustomupholstery.com 43037 Saint Clair Lane • Leesburg, VA 20176

Serving Northern Virginia

Designer Fabrics & Trim

Home Accents • GiftwAre • GArden Art • cerAmics • wAll Art • liGHtinG • furniture • frAmes • Accessories • lAmps

In-Home Design Consultation Available

THE FINAL YARD fabrics décor & design

s

33 e. Gerrard st., winchester • 540-678-0085 www.thefinalyard.com • workroom on site oudoun’s

CoLLision

Terry’s BLoudoun’s CoLLision T speCiaLists ’ B s s ’s erry Body shop ’s Body L ’ C shop speCiaLists oudoun s

oLLision

Phone: 540-338-5500 • Fax: 540-338-6317 Home: 540-668-6212 101 N. Bailey Lane • PO Box 940 Purcellville, VA 20134

Who’s Looking At Your Lawn?

A Buyer’s&Seller’s Best Friend SM

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Jim&Jennifer Kerr 703.622.5700 Cell/Text 703.636.4100 www.LabradorRealty.com LabradorRealty@gmail.com

L BRADOR

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CHANG’S CleANiNG ServiCe Serving Loudoun County for 13 years

• Residential and Commercial • Move-in or Move-out • Professional Cleaning 571-259-4632 fchang1258@gmail.com • changcleaningservices.com

Mowing • Mulching • Fertilization

Lawn Care Even Your Neighbors Will Love

www.rockwaterfarm.com 703-568-1267 S P R I N G

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Weaver’s Quality Custom Painting

Drywall • Plastering Pressure Washing • Carpentry Exclusively Residential • Interior & Exterior

“We’re big enough to do it right & small enough to care”

703-901-6910

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LAST SHOT Photo by Therese Howe

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Loudoun Magazine Summer 2012