Page 1

INSIDE The Challenge: How Green is your business? ... Page 3 J ULY 2012 VOLUME 9 NO. 8

30 Under 30:

Loudoun's Up & Coming Young Professionals James Gilliam

Rebekah Hess

Jennie Kander & Dana Burgess

Michelle Kellogg

Sara Rechenbach

Jeff Richards

Meredith Amonson

Ryan Ellis

Jackie Paige

Nathan Thomas

Stuart Morris

Dane Mullins Laura Ritchie

Kent Baily

Jamie Ream

Lisa Braun

Spenser McKenna

Billy Whittington

Brad DeHaven

Kevin Arbogast

Dhruva Rajendra

Christie McGuire

Brooke Waldron Amy Phelps

Charvi Ganatra

Christina Diederich

Hassan Ahmed

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage

PAID Permit #78 Springfield, VA

Ashley Kennedy

Abigail Gribbin


PAGE 2 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

A message from the business community to the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors:

Thank you for your hard work and careful consideration of Loudoun County’s participation in the Dulles Corridor Rail Project. Your commitment to invest in the long term economic health of Loudoun County is greatly appreciated by the entrepreneurs, job creators and commercial taxpayers in your community. Committee for Dulles

Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce

Dulles Area Transportation Association

Loudoun Rail Now

Dulles Corridor Rail Association

Northern Virginia Association of REALTORS©

Dulles Regional Chamber of Commerce

Northern Virginia Transportation Alliance

Dulles South Alliance

Visit Loudoun

Loudoun CEO Cabinet

Washington Airports Task Force

Dulles Area Association of REALTORS®

Associated Builders and Contractors - VA Chapter


Loudoun Business | PAGE 3

JULY 2012

Young Professional Group Builds Community

Businesses Challenged To Go Green

By Therese Howe, Staff Writer As Loudoun supervisors considered recently whether to opt into the extension of Metrorail service to Loudoun, young members of the workforce testified in support of the Silver Line extension. That show of solidarity came about thanks to the efforts of a group that was established three years ago in response to employers voicing concerns about retaining and recruiting young talent to Loudoun. “The Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce created the Young Professionals Committee as a way to create a network amongst this young cohort so that they could build relationships in their age group,” Chamber CEO Tony Howard said. “It's one additional root that they can put down in this community and it helps their bosses because it helps with retention. Without that network, it becomes that m uch easier for them to say, 'I'm going to live in Dupont or Adams Morgan.' That's why Metro was so important because folks of their generation are much less inclined to be dependent on the automobile. They want options, they demand them. They want mixed-used, live-work-play environments, that's what they're looking for.” The committee's first event at the Wine Kitchen in downtown Leesburg in February 2009 drew about 30 people, Grafton DeButts, a founding member of the initiative and the Chamber's liaison to the committee, said. Since then, “more than 400 young professionals have come through our events,” he said. Besides the monthly networking social that meets the first Tuesday of the month, the program has included an Executive Engagement series in which business leaders hold an informal session with a small group of members. “We do a 90-minute session and they tell us their story,” DeButts said. “And at the same time I encourage young professionals if you've got a question, this isn't a 45-minute presentation with Q&A at the end; this is a free-flowing conversation where we're able to engage with them during any part of their story, to ask questions. I also encourage the speakers to fire questions back. “We don't want to learn about the Continued On Page 9

Semper Technology President Mark Lenko, left, talks recycling at the Green Business Challenge Coffee Series. Potomac Falls Lube and Express CEO Pat Wirth, above, shows

Therese P. Howe/Loudoun Business

one of her firm's green products.

Chamber Urges Area Firms To Join Annual Competition By Therese Howe, Staff Writer Pat Wirth thought her business, Potomac Falls Lube and Express, was pretty environmentally responsible. After all, the automotive quick lube industry had for years emphasized recycling many of its waste products, including anti-freeze, batteries, fuel filters and oil filters. But as a result of participating in last year's Green Business Challenge, sponsored by Loudoun County government and the Loudoun Chamber of Commerce, she discovered that her business could recycle almost 95 percent of the trash generated. “We used to have two trash containers, one for regular trash and one for the recyclables, and we had to switch them,” she daid. “So now, we have a much bigger one for recyclables and a very small one for the stuff that goes to the landfill. “And on top of that, we recognized that some of the things that we were throwing out, we could actually sell as scrap metal and get paid for it, (such as) leftover pads and rotors from when we do brakes.” That kind of anecdote is exactly what Chamber CEO Tony Howard could use to encourage companies to participate in the annual challenge, a pointsbased competition that was started in 2010. “What we're looking to do is to recognize and honor those businesses that are implementing business-effective, environmentally sustainable practices

DID YOU KNOW? Businesses in Loudoun are required to recycle at least one principal material that is generated in the largest quantity. For more information, go to www.loudoun. gov.

and systems,” he said. “Many companies are realizing if you can cut your energy use, you can cut your costs. We're always striving to find anything we can do to make us more cost-effective and cost-efficient as a business.” This year's contest is under way, and businesses can register online on the Chamber's website at www.locogreenbiz.org throughout the process. Participants fill out a scorecard as they perform the items on the checklist, and winning businesses in different categories are recognized at a fall gala. “When someone completes the scorecard, they're not just checking a bunch of boxes, they actually have to do quite a bit of work to get it done,” Howard said. “We had 38 participants in year one and we got up to 62 last year so we had exponential growth one year over next. We're hoping to maintain that level this year, if not improve on it.” While most business owners

would agree that environmentally sustainable practices are something to aspire to, other factors come into play. Brian Jenkins of Monk's Barbecue, for instance, would love to use compostable silverware and plates to serve his customers on the weekends he operates at Corcoran Vineyards. But, “the price points on them are really high. When you're first starting out, margins are everything and when you're trying to grow your business, spending so much money—three times as much sometimes—on compostable materials is not feasible.” Howard said he understands the sentiment and that one of the aspirations of the contest is to help drive down costs of “green” materials by creating more of a demand for them. The challenge also strives to share resources and information so business owners can find out more about how they can get help with their efforts. “I find there's significant positive response to our Green Business Challenge efforts and that people really just want to do the right thing. Especially when it's really not cost-prohibitive or hard to do, they are going to work hard to make certain they're doing the right thing.” To register for the Green Business Challenge, go to www.locogreenbiz.org. The Chamber is sponsoring a coffee series July 31 and Aug. 28 where business owners can learn more about the contest. The series takes place from 8-10 a.m. at the GWU Science & Tech Campus in Ashburn.


PAGE 4 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 ABIGAIL GRIBBIN, 18 PRESIDENT EDUCATION FOR SAN PABLO

When Hurricane Stan hit Guatemala in 2005, Abigail Gribbin was able to witness the devastation firsthand and make the move to provide relief for the locals. At the time, Gribbin was in seventh grade living in Guatemala with her family. Six years later—at the age of 17—she started the nonprofit organization called Education for San Pablo, which provides education scholarships for Guatemalan children in need. Immediately after seeing the destruction, Gribbin and her family began delivering food and relief packages to the villages around San Pablo. The transition from providing food to funding education, however, came from a simple question. “My dad asked the town leader what else they needed,” she said. The answer was education scholarships. In 2011, the idea to take a year off after graduating from Loudoun County High School and start the organization arose. Gribbin said the decision was easy to make considering she was already a year ahead in school. Aside from a delay with the organization’s tax exemption status, everything has gone pretty smoothly, Gribbin said. Today, there are 40 children enrolled in the program striving for a higher education and a better way of life. One of the women in the program is even going to become a social worker after her education is complete. The future seems to be pretty bright for Gribbin’s business, as well. “We want to get a health clinic built,” she mentioned. Plans for this are expected to take place within the next six to eight months. In addition to these future plans, Education for San Pablo also runs a housing program for widows. Although Gribbin is going to Virginia Tech in the fall to pursue a degree in chemistry, she wants to remain fairly engaged with the organization as well as continuing to take trips to San Pablo. “I don’t want to ever have to stop giving funds to this town [San Pablo],” Gribbin said. Her aspirations for the organization are a prosperous future through the help of much-needed attention from anyone and everyone. ~ Patrick Szabo

AMY PHELPS, 26 DISPATCHER LOUDOUN COUNTY FIRE-RECUE

Amy Phelps was working as a volun-

teer emergency medical technician in West Virginia when she found her love for firerescue services. “I had a knack for staying calm in emergency situations,” Phelps said. “Dispatch appealed to me because it was something I had never done before. It was the other side of the coin. All the action starts with me.” Phelps has worked in Loudoun County Fire-Rescue for four years—one as a call taker and three as a dispatcher, handling the calls that come into 9-1-1, whether they are dispatched to Loudoun County Fire-Rescue, the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office, the Leesburg Police Department, Virginia State Police or the airport police. “You have to be on your game 100 percent of the time,” Phelps said of the highdemand job. “The person on the other end of the phone needs you on the top of your game. “At the end of the day, to know I made a difference in someone’s life. That at a moment when somebody needed someone, I was there,” she said, noting despite all the training she went through, and continues to go through, not everything about being a dispatcher can be taught. “I believe you have to naturally have something to be able to have that sixth sense about what people need,” she said. “You can learn the skills, but being in that moment and being able to handle it, and then not only at that time but afterwards—you can’t learn that.” In addition to working as a dispatcher, Phelps has dug into many other aspects of work at Loudoun County Fire-Rescue. She is working on the first-ever annual report about the communication division, its work and accomplishments. She is also helping with the purchase of a new computer-aided dispatch system, a side project that has taken her to conferences outside of Loudoun to learn about the newest technologies and programs. “I am trying to absorb everything,” she said. “If I am going to be here, this is the system I am going to be using, so I want to know everything about it.” Phelps is getting her master’s degree in public administration with a concentration in dispatch management through the county’s tuition reimbursement program, and she says she has a goal of one day heading the dispatch center. “I really want to be the person who brings all the goals of this division together.” ~ Erika Jacobson Moore

ASHLEY KENNEDY, 25 FOUNDER AND OWNER THE RUN AROUND HOUND

Ashley Kennedy has clothed a dog in pajamas before bedtime and said a prayer with another canine before dinnertime— these are just the little tasks she does to keep her customers happy. Kennedy is the founder and owner of The Run Around Hound, a full-service pet concierge that caters to animals of all breeds and species. The list of services Runaround Hound offers is endless as well, as Kennedy said she dedicates herself to every pet owner’s individual needs. “We do daily dog walks, in-home pet sitting, pet taxi to take a dog to the groomer or vet, we run pet errands to pick up food, prescriptions or treats—anything that is related to pet services we can definitely cater to,” she said. “We are also a 24-hour service company, so we are always working around the clock.” Devoting herself to the lives of animals wasn’t Kennedy’s initial plan for herself. After high school, she worked in a number of corporate offices as a receptionist, but quickly realized she needed to make a career change. “I wasn’t happy and didn’t feel like I was fulfilling what I was supposed to be doing,” she said. “I gave dog walking a try, and I was a dog walker for about two to three years. Ever since that first day of dog walking, I knew it was a lifetime thing. I couldn’t see myself doing anything else except being around pets—it is so rewarding.” In August 2010, Kennedy officially

opened The Run Around Hound—which is based out of her Ashburn home—expanding on the idea of dog walking. For now, she only has two people working for her. However, she would like to expand the company in the future to target Fairfax County, Reston, McLean and Great Falls instead of just Loudoun, specifically the Ashburn, Sterling and Leesburg areas. But for now, Kennedy is focusing on juggling the business mainly on her own, as what she calls “The Pack Leader.” ~ Lindsey Brookbank

BROOKE WALDRON, 28 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SPROUT THERAPEUTIC AND RIDING CENTER

Brooke Waldron was all set to be an equine vet. She had grown up riding hunter/jumpers in McLean and went on to ride for the equestiran team at the University of Delaware, where she graduated with a degree in pre-veterinary medicine. That's when her professional journey took a detour. “I ended up deciding I really liked to teach so I kind of just changed things in the midst of my college career and ended up getting my master's in education,” she said. She helped open Stone Hill Middle School as a seventh grade life science teacher and became head of the science department. “I loved every minute of it,” she said, but life would again take her on a new professional path when her cousins called to offer her the opportunity to build a therapeutic riding center on a 27-acre soybean farm in Aldie. “I thought about it for a brief moment Loudoun Business welcomes Letters to the Editor. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number.

Loudoun Business is published monthly by Leesburg Today

15 N King Street NE Leesburg, VA 20176 www.leesburgtoday.com

Editorial Department

703-771-8801

Advertising Department 703-771-8800 Classified Department

703-771-8831

Fax Number

703-771-8833

All rights reserved. No part of Loudoun Business may be reproduced physically or electronically without the written permission of the publisher. Loudoun Business is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of Virginia’s policy for achieving equal housing opportunity throughout the Commonwealth. We encourage and support advertising and marketing programs in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, elderliness, familial status or handicap. All real estate advertised herein is subject to Virginia’s fair housing law which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, elderliness, familial status or handicap or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept advertising for real estate that violates the fair housing law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. For more information or to file a housing complaint call the Virginia Fair Housing office at (804) 367-8530. Toll free call (888) 551-3247. For the hearing impaired call (804) 367-9753. Email: fairhousing@dpor.Virginia.gov. Web site: www.fairhousing.vipnet.org.


Loudoun Business | PAGE 5

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 and thought, 'Well gosh, to combine horses, which I've always loved, and teaching, which I really love to do, is the best of both worlds,” she said. So she and her husband, Steve, sold their Ashburn home and moved their young daughters to the farmhouse in Aldie. “I thought about it for a brief moment and thought, 'Well gosh, to combine horses, which I've always loved, and teaching, which I really love to do, is the best of both worlds,” she said. So she and her husband, Steve, sold their Ashburn home and moved their young daughters to the farmhouse in Aldie. “My cousins invested a good chunk of money into building the barn of my dreams; they just said that as long as I stayed within a budget I could build what I needed. So I went to a bunch of therapeutic centers and took notes to learn as much as I could and then built our center. And then while I was doing that, I was getting my certification in therapeutic horseback riding.” They opened the center in the fall of last year and hit the ground running. After starting with just seven clients, they quickly began working with more youths thanks to partnerships with county agencies including Loudoun County Public Schools, Juvenile Court Service Unit and youth shelters. Her work with special needs and at-risk children has earned her many fans, including one parent who recently nominated her for the Lady Godiva Program, which recognizes inspirational women around the country. “Brooke is not only launching a business that is built on helping people with disabilities grow and succeed, she is doing this while raising two babies of her own,” Pamela Steuart said in her nomination. “She works harder than anyone that I have ever met.” ~ Therese P. Howe

Fortessa—a Sterling-based company that sells tableware to high-end restaurants and hotels, as well as to consumers via an online store—Ganatra oversees its online marketing campaigns and social media program. “Email is a big chunk of what I do— email marketing campaigns and analytics, trying to use what we find through online track-

ing to see what we can learn about our consumer behavior,” she said. Ganatra started working for Fortessa in 2011—it is her first job after attending college—and said she is still learning new things not only about the position and company, but also about the Northern Virginia area. When she landed the job, Ganatra moved from her home in Philadelphia to Loudoun. “It was a little bit different at first because I didn’t know anyone in the area,” she said. “However, I think compared to where I am from—Delaware originally—I think Loudoun County has a lot more to

do than most other places, so it has been quite a smooth transition.” ~ Lindsey Brookbank

CHRISTINA DIEDERICH, 27 PROGRAM MANAGER RESTON LIMOUSINE

If you're looking for suggestions about which of Loudoun's 30-some wineries to visit with family or friends, Christina Diederich is your girl. In addition to managing large conventions and groups for Reston Limousine, she plans private wine tours in DC's Wine Country. “I would send them to Continued On Page 5

Mastering the

Inside Job

CHARVI GANATRA, 24 DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER FORTESSA

Charvi Ganatra believes marketing resembles applied psychology—which is why she sought a job as a digital marketing manager with Fortessa, Inc. after earning her master’s degree in psychology in at the University of Pennsylvania in 2010. “I was doing more theoretical research and doing tests on specific reasons to find out more about people’s behavior through patterns [in college],” she said. “Marketing is kind of the same in a business setting—figuring out consumer behavior. It was quite a direct application, and I enjoy a lot more working with so many people and working with something that is tangible.” As digital marketing manager at

Because interior construction often calls for detailed craftsmanship, quick turn-arounds and working in occupied space, Merritt has created a team dedicated specifically to these projects. We build to fit a wide variety of

MD Office: 410.298.2600 VA Office: 703.858.2725 www.MerrittConstructionServices.com

environments — contemporary, office, retail, historic, green and hi-tech — so there’s peace of mind knowing that we have the expertise to create a workplace that reflects your company’s culture and vision.

Site Development • Construction • Redevelopment • Design-Build • Interiors


PAGE 6 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 30 Under 30

SOUS CHEF

To the casual diner, sous chefs Nathan Continued From Page 5 Thomas and Stuart Morris would appear to Bluemont Vineyard, Breaux Vineyards and be monsters in the back of the house. On Sunset Hills Vineyards—those are the big- a busy Friday night, they're working on 800 ger ones. If I were to [choose] smaller ones, to 1,000 orders; just this Mother's Day, they 8 Chains North is really nice, they're so estimated feeding about 2,600 diners in the friendly and you can go sit out on the back popular Broadlands restaurant. “I was so deck. And I like Notaviva.” sick of eggs by 4 p.m.,” Thomas said jok Her knowledge of the terrain came ingly. through experience over the years with The fast-paced environment of a busy Reston Limousine. “I never knew Virginia kitchen is what draws the duo to an indushad a wine country until I started work- try that keeps you on your feet for long ing here. I was like, 'Oh, there's vineyards hours on just about every day of the year. here?'” the Ohio transplant said. “Not everyone can work in a kitchen,” A 2007 graduate of Bowling Green said Thomas, a graduate of the New England State University where she majored in tour- Culinary Institute in Vermont. “Not everyism, Diederich one can handle the stress. … I've heard moved to the area it being referred to as going to battle. It's in 2008 to become the same thing. an intern with a Not many peoFalls Church desple understand tination managewhat you do, ment company. and there aren't When the compamany people who ny went through understand that a downsizing, she you have to work transitioned into a position with one of her every holiday. major vendors, Reston Limousine. You don't have After trying on different positions weekends.” for the best fit, she proposed expand- “It's work, ing her responsibilities to more of the work, work,” hospitality management work she enjoys. added Stuart, Management approved the idea, and she who grew up in began working on major events such as Sterling and got First Lady Michelle Obama's 2010 com- his start in the mencement address at George Washington industry as a University, which drew almost 15,000 peo- line cook when ple. the restaurant More recently, she managed transpor- opened in 2006. tation for the Virginia Wine Country Half He worked his Marathon in June. “I was up at 4 in the way up and became sous chef two years morning, making my way to the wineries ago. and hotels making sure they were picking Thomas also is responsible for workguests up to transfer runners to the race.” ing with farmer Tim MacLean in coordi Large events such as these require nating what will be grown on the one-and a lot of patience and empathy, she says, -a-half-acre boutique garden a short diswhen dealing with hot and tired people tance away from the restaurant. The site who just want to return to their hotel and is home to specialty fruits, vegetables relax, or with frustrated drivers who have and herbs that they don't normally get. been at the wheel all day and have been Although Willow Creek Farm is just one of badgered nonstop by sometimes grumpy 14 establishments in Clyde's Restaurant riders. “You just need to be firm and calm Group, '”we are allowed to be as creative because there are so many people you as we want,” Thomas said. “We get a lot of need to get what you want to do. I've seen freedom here. We get to work with a lot of people do it the other way and it doesn't Loudoun County farms and get some stuff always work out. So I've learned: Be nice that the people in DC wouldn't be able to and ask nicely.” get.” ~ Therese P. Howe Roommates who share a home in Leesburg, their camaraderie is evident CLYDE'S WILLOW CREEK FARM in their shared opinions on everything NATHAN THOMAS, 28 from their favorite restaurant other than SOUS CHEF Clyde's—Fireworks Pizza in Leesburg—to their favorite Clyde's menu items—Buffalo STUART MORRIS, 26 Chicken Wings. They part ways, however,

when it comes to sharing one of Thomas' pastimes: competitive shotgun shooting. “I did it once, but that was it,” Stuart said, with a grin and a shake of his head. ~ Therese P. Howe

DANE MULLINS, 19 OWNER DANE'S HOMETOWN SERVICES

robotic welding,” he said, adding that whatever he does he will take much of what he learned as a young business owner—both the financial stress and the rewards of hard work—with him. ~ Danielle Nadler

DONE JUST RIGHT DANA BURGESS & JENNIE KANDER, 29 Dane Mullins seems to be 19 going on 40. He spends his days doing backbreak- OWNERS ing work, tilling gardens, mowing massive lawns, excavating trenches and bush hogging, and when he’s done he balances budget books and outreaches to community members bring in more clients. Mullins is now in his fifth year as owner and operator of Dane’s Hometown Services, an estate and farm maintenance company. Throughout high school—first at Loudoun Valley High School and then at Woodgrove High School—he balanced his role as a student, a friend, a son and a business owner. He worked every day after school and on weekends to keep up with the demand for services. And since he gradated from Woodgrove in June, the amount of time he dedicates to his company and its clients has only multiplied. “It’s a lot of work, and you grow up really fast,” he said, sitting behind the wheel of a forklift in his work boots and Wrangler jeans. Mullins has left his mark on western Loudoun. He volunteered his time and drummed up donations to build Walter the Wolverine, Woodgrove’s motorized mascot, out of metal and fiberglass, and welded a barbecue smoker for the school. He is also creating a two-mile walking trail that will connect three outdoor classrooms on Woodgrove’s campus, also a project he’s donating. “It’s really just a big cycle,” he says of why he donates so much of his time and money. “I give back to the community, but they give back to me, and I want to thank them for that.” M u l l i n s plans to attend Ferris State University in Michigan to study welding engineering. He earned his welding certification through Monroe Technology Center and recently took second in Virginia’s SkillsUSA collegelevel competition. He also applied to the CIA’s Co-Op Program, which would give him a chance to use his certification in network cabling. “My dream job would be something in

Best friends since they met at Waterford Elementary School more than 25 years ago, Dana Burgess and Jennie Kander have united their personal relationship with a business one through their new events planning venture, Done Just Right. “The best part of working with my best friend is that we complement each other very well,” Kander said. “My weaknesses are Dana’s strengths and vice versa. This prevents us from stepping on each other’s toes and allows us to work effectively and efficiently on all of our client work.” Kander studied communication at George Washington University as an undergraduate and then at Johns Hopkins for a master’s degree, while Burgess received a degree in psychology at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania. “Our educational backgrounds have helped us really understand how to communicate successfully with people. However, our creativity and unique ability to relate with our clients is innate,” Kander said in an email. “I have worked in the public relations industry managing a variety of events for many clients for nine years. Dana has been a pharmaceutical sales rep—and has organized events for her company and clients. Through our professional experience as well as our less-formal training (i.e. experience hosting and designing events for friends and family) we were able to build a solid understanding of what works and what doesn’t.” Although they work with clients around the DC metropolitan area, the Loudoun natives decided to stay in the area with their business “because we have a genuine interest in the people in our community. Loudoun is full of wonderful and creative people and over the past year, we've thoroughly enjoyed helping our community create and execute their events. Since we've spent the last 29 years in Loudoun County, we have an in-depth


Loudoun Business | PAGE 7

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 ~ Therese P. Howe

DHRUVA RAJENDRA, 23 OWNER RAJEDTECH CONSULTING

When Dhruva Rajendra realized his dream of becoming a tech entrepreneur, he didn’t waste any time making it a reality; he hit the ground running starting not one, but two technology companies this summer. Rajendra, a 2006 Dominion High School graduate, launched his first company, Rajedtech Consulting, a technology consulting group that helps businesses identify and resolve internal issues. He’s since added four clients to his roster. Swrmit (pronounced swarmit) is Rajendra’s second entrepreneurial effort. The stealth start-up company will fully launch this fall, but the idea behind it was conceived more than a year ago when Rajendra worked as a corporate strategy analyst at CTIS, a global innovative technology company. He observed a key gap in the way people communicated in the workplace. He knew that he wanted to devote his time to addressing this issue. “How do we create more engagement in our work force,” he asked himself. To answer that question, he assembled a team and implemented software designed to help businesses build stronger and closer relationships in the internal sphere of their company. Some would say his efforts as an entrepreneur are quite ambitious but for him it all comes down to helping people. “I love helping people solve problems,” he said. At 23, Rajendra is constantly looking forward to what the future of technology systems will bring. However, he says, “the challenge for the next few years is to humanize them”—connecting people through technology which is exactly what he plans to do. ~ Niketa Woodley

City. Co-founder Megan Pollard studied film at Old Dominion University and Laura Ritchie got her degree in fashion merchandising and marketing before the pair worked as event designers at a local catering company. After creating an especially memorable event, “we knew we had something special between us,” Ritchie said, and they decided to form their own company in 2009. A year later, Christie McGuire was brought in to help with a large and complex corporate launch. “The event was a smash hit, and it was clear that Megan, Laura and I were a perfect fit,” McGuire said, adding that she was asked to join the company as a lead event designer. “We truly enjoy everything from a lux, classic DC themed fete at one of our gorgeous historical hotels in the city to a creative DIY backyard barbecue with beers being served out of a canoe! Bring it on!” Ritchie said. In June, they opened their first office in downtown Leesburg, attracted by a unique combination of “historic charm, modern conveniences and hip atmosphere that is really starting to build up,” Ritchie said. “Loudoun County is so rich in his-

tory and vintage charm but it is also becoming such a fastgrowing, modern place to be. We truly have everything we need right here,” Ritchie added. “We have a wonderful following here in Loudoun and really enjoy our relationships with the vendors in this area.” However, we do travel quite a bit and service everywhere from Virginia Beach, the Eastern Shore, downtown DC, Alexandria and even a handful of destination events. The majority of our work is certainly in the Northern Virginia and DC area with probably 30 percent being in Loudoun County specifically.” With a five-star rating on Wedding Wire and recognized as “One to Watch” in Washingtonian’s 2012 Bride and Groom

With the owners' backgrounds in fashion and film, it's little wonder that creativity abounds in one of Loudoun's newest events planning companies, Events in the

HASSAN AHMED, 22 EMR TECHNICIAN NOVA MEDICAL & URGENT CARE CENTER

Misplaced patient charts and illegible handwriting are things of the past in many doctors' offices thanks to the introduction of electronic medical records, and at Nova Medical & Urgent Care Center, the implementation of the EMR system has come in large part because of Hassan Ahmed. Originally a pre-med student at Virginia Commonwealth University who grew up in Sterling, Ahmed came to Nova Medical seeking an internship during a school break. “They said, 'Well are you any good with computers?' And I said, 'Yeah, I guess I could do computers.' And they said, 'Why don't we turn this into a job so that way you could shadow doctors but also do some work for us.'” He started by entering information from paper charts into the electronic system, and continued working with Nova Medical on his winter and summer breaks. Continued On Page 8

Does Your Network Perform Like It Should? Take Advantage of Our Experienced, Certified Engineers • • • • • • • • • • • •

EVENTS IN THE CITY CHRISTIE MCGUIRE, 27 LEAD EVENT DESIGNER LAURA RITCHIE, 29 CO-FOUNDER, DESIGNER

Magazine, the young company has firmly established itself on the regional wedding vendor scene. ~ Therese P. Howe

Consulting / Network Design & Setup Co-Location / Private Cloud Solutions 24/7/365 Network Monitoring On-Site & Remote Help-Desk Support Firewall / Intrusion Prevention Systems Email Encryption Services by Zix Banking Integration Specialist Internet / Email / Web Hosting Data / Voice Cabling Installation Servers / Routers / Switches / Desktops LAN / WAN / Wireless / VPN Services T1 / Fiber / VOIP / Internet Access

Visit us at www.ansnetworks.com talented professionals develop and implement solutions with only one TECHNOLOGY WITH A GOAL ANS’ purpose in mind: to help our clients achieve their mission objectives.

Advanced Network Solutions 45300 Catalina Court, Suite 104 Sterling, VA 20166

Call Today for a Free Network Evaluation 703.444.9700 or email: info@ansnetworks.com Call Today for a Free Network Evaluation


PAGE 8 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 30 Under 30

Continued From Page 7 He became so interested in the work that he decided to switch his major to computer science and moved back to the area last year. He's currently attending Northern Virginia Community College and plans to transfer to George Mason University to get his degree in computer science. Under the supervision of Medical Director Dr. Christopher Connolly, Ahmed's responsibilities over the years have expanded to customizing the system's forms and training new hires on the program. He's enjoyed the variety of jobs, and his new role as the go-to person when someone has a computer question. “We have an outside company that we have for a lot of the IT stuff but as far as somebody in the office, people call me the IT guy around here. “I didn't really know anything about EMRs at first so when I came here I just learned a lot about them. They're really making a big difference in doctors' offices, and more and more offices are adapting them. For me, since I was there from close to the beginning, it was sort of a step-bystep process … and slowly moving more and more away from paper, and so I've kind of seen the change of how EMR can affect things. It's been really cool to see how much it helps and I'm glad to have been a part of that.” ~ Therese P. Howe

JACKIE PAIGE, 22 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER MODERN MECHANICAL

An outgoing go-getter who started networking at local business events at the age of 17, Jackie Paige landed her first position with Modern Mechanical even before she graduated last spring from West Virginia University. “I was very lucky to have four job offers right out of college and start two days after walking across the stage for graduation,” she said. She credits her mother, Gale Paige of CEXEC, with showing her the ropes by taking her to networking mixers throughout her high school and college years. . “My senior year during spring break I went to about four or five different BNI groups and I said, 'I'm looking for a full-time job, I'm graduating and this is my degree, this is what I want to do.' And I had four job offers that I luckily got to choose from even

before finishing my finals.” Not one to rest on her laurels, she got straight to work three days after graduation and started her new career as Modern Mechanical's public face on the social scene. “I'm constantly meeting new people at different networking events and meetings. I'm always out and about, there's no typical day for me,” she said. When it comes to giving back, the line between business and pleasure is often blurred, and she can be found working with nonprofits even on her days off. Most recently, she teamed up with younger sister Vanessa to play volleyball and raise $4,270 for the breast cancer awareness group Side-Out Foundation. She's joining forces with her mother to organize an Aug. 1 barbecue fundraiser at Fortessa in Sterling for Final Salute, an organization that provides housing and other services to homeless female veterans and their families. Working with her mom and forming their own consulting business is her dream, she said. “[My mom] has the Queen of Networking title, so naturally I'd be the Princess of Networking. ... We like to help people get where they want to be.” ~ Therese P. Howe

JAMES GILLIAM, 23 FOUNDER BLUE PRETZEL STUDIO

When James Gilliam graduated from James Madison University in December, he finished school with the promise of a full-time position for L-3 Stratis, a defense contractor where he interned the summer before. After a rough fall for the company, however, they rescinded his offer, and he was left in the cold. Unlike many recent college graduates, instead of getting a part-time, temp job somewhere, Gilliam decided to strike out on his own and start his own graphic design company. After a few months of planning and a few small projects, Gilliam’s company, Blue Pretzel Studio, is open for business. Gilliam has a team of five contractors working with him to help with projects such as designing book covers, which he’s already done for a Russian-American author's two English releases, logos and T-shirts, like for a Nashville-based band called Hummingbird, or websites, like for a Washington, DC-based fashion blog. Blue Pretzel’s also done work with the Children’s National Medical Center, Gilliam said.

“It was scary,” Gilliam said of starting his own business. “Luckily, I have a very supportive family, I wasn’t burdened with student loans. If there was a time to do it, it might as well be now.” Gilliam, an Ashburn native, is also a painter and a musician, but as a 23-yearold, he’s unique in that he’s already an entrepreneur, and on his way to being a successful one at that. He said while clients may initially be skeptical of a design firm with a team of 23-year-olds, their work—and their previous clients—speaks for itself. Still, being young has its disadvantages. Most young adults Gilliam’s age aren’t aware of the process it takes to even get a business started, such as going through the process with the Chamber of Commerce, the Internal Revenue Service and getting all the requisite permits. For Gilliam and Blue Pretzel—a name he came up with to invoke a tangible and playful image that sticks in potential clients’ minds—after having a job offer pulled out from under him less than a year ago, the future is looking bright. ~ Ethan Rothstein

JAMIE REAM, 27 PASTRY CHEF AND GARDE MANGER CHEF LANSDOWNE RESORT

Chef Jamie Ream’s natural habitat is the kitchen at Lansdowne Resort, where she has been creating delectable desserts as pastry chef since 2007. Recently she's also been working as garde manger, chef in charge of preparing cold foods for the resort's restaurants and guests. This means her daily tasks are unpredictable. “I can spend half my day making chocolate mousse and decorating a wedding cake and spend the second half of my day grilling chicken for a cold salad,” she said. A graduate of the Pennsylvania Culinary Institute, Ream has a Le Cordon Bleu diploma in patisserie and baking. Before working at Lansdowne, she was a pastry cook at the Ritz Carlton in Pentagon City. As a 22-year-old chef entering the business, Ream had to prove herself to succeed. “I just met a chef who had faith in

me and gave me a chance,” she says. Ream enjoys being able to use her creativity at work every day, particularly with the cakes. “I love doing wedding cakes and other special occasion cakes; that’s kind of why I do what I do,” she says with a smile. In the future, Ream dreams of climbing the kitchen hierarchy and making her mark as a woman in an often male-dominated field. “You don’t see a lot of female executive chefs or sous chefs. To prove the world wrong would be kind of cool,” she said with a laugh. ~ Samantha McClain

JEFFREY RICHARDS, 27 TEACHER SANDERS CORNER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

For three years, Jeffrey Richards’ job was to provide elementary school kids with fun activities, as well as enhance their behavior, social and physical skills as part of an after-school program called CASA. It didn’t take him long to realize he wanted to work with the students more than he could during the short program— he wanted to teach. “I was really into the after-school and recreation aspect and then I got more into wanting to teach the kids more and help them grow more in a focused setting,” Richards said. While teaching in a fun environment with arts and crafts was rewarding for Richards, he wanted to get more involved in the school and classroom. “I felt like the school provided that more focused setting so that I could have a bigger and better impact,” Richards explained. With that in mind, he decided to become a special education teacher with the hope of helping the students who needed extra assistance in learning. In 2011, he became a teacher's aide in a special education classroom at Sanders Corner Elementary School. “I have the opportunity to structure my learning around the interest of the kids—if we’re learning numbers and the kids like bugs or cars we can go into counting with bugs or cars,” Richards said. “One of my favorite parts is creating a unique learning environment for a unique learner.” Richards enjoys bringing that creativity to teach his students different subjects and he will continue to do just that when Continued On Page 10


Loudoun Business | PAGE 9

JULY 2012

Therese P. Howe/Loudoun Business

Members of the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce's Young Professionals group meet for a networking social at The Green Turtle in Leesburg.

Continued From Page 3

not have had outside of the chamber,” he said. “I don't think most local people would think their circle of friends revolves around the Chamber of Commerce but with Loudoun YP, I've found that their circle of friends have come through the Chamber of Commerce,” he added. Kevin Arbogast, a 26-year-old operations and portfolio manager with Toth Financial, is a testament to that statement. “I actually really enjoy doing the networking events through the chamber, because you meet amazing people there, great business people, great community leaders,” he said. Through their social and civic efforts, “we are creating community,” DeButts said. “We don't need to create jobs and we don't have the ability to create the Reston Town Center. We don't have the ability to create an urban setting but we can work to create community, to forge relationships, to provide some type of professional development and professional relationships. “It's really about building relationships and building a unified community of young professionals here in Loudoun.”

For information call 540.751.1435 or www.blueridgeeagles.com

Everyone needs a hero. We are surrounded daily with our local heroes, the First Responders in Loudoun County. These women and men risk their lives for us — every day. • First •

ST

Re s p o n d e r s

technical side of their business but what really makes them tick as a leader. And what are the take-aways that we can apply to our lives now to help us be more successful in the future.” Another aspect of the initiative when it was first started was that as the young professionals received support through the committee, they would then be asked to give back to the community in the form of some type of service, DeButts said. He was surprised, however, to find that was an interest from the outset. “This group, they're wired differently,” he said. “They think about community service before they think about their own professional development in a lot of ways. It's like, 'hey, let's build community and OK, let's go get involved somewhere, let's do something.'” “We've actually developed a subcommittee just for volunteerism,” Committee Vice Chair Victoria Rawlings, director of client services for AR Group, said. At the monthly committee meetings, the group identifies the fundraisers and charities that members will participate in, which have included Loudoun Youth and its Step Up competition. While DeButts agrees that Loudoun still has some ground to cover when it comes to offering the night life and entertainment that many young professionals are drawn to when deciding where to live and work, he believes the committee has been able to make inroads when it comes to retention. Many of the young workers “who have been involved in our initiative have chosen to stay in Loudoun County because they see this community being formed and because they have friends that they may

The next Loudoun Young Professionals networking social takes place Aug. 7 at Lost Rhino Brewery in Ashburn. To register, go to www.loudounchamber.org.

g o l f Cl a s s i c

Dulles Rail

• 2 0 1 2 •

On behalf of the Valor Foundation’s Board of Directors we would like to take this opportunity to express our sincerest appreciation for the community support received throughout the year and especially for our main fundraiser held on May 8th — the 6th Annual — 2012 First Responders Golf Classic. Funds raised are available for our local heroes who may become injured or killed in the line of duty, and also help the Valor Foundation provide scholarships each year to children of our First Responders. We would like to thank INOVA Loudoun Hospital, our platinum sponsor — as well as our valued additional tournament sponsors, golfers, volunteers and 1757 Golf Club for hosting us this year. The Valor Foundation is deeply grateful for your support and generosity. It is through the support of donations like yours that we are able to continue to support law enforcement, fire and rescue organizations in our community. For additional information about the Valor Foundation, or to make a donation, please visit: ValorFoundation.org. Again, thank you for your support! Sincerely, Valor Foundation Board of Directors


PAGE 10 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 30 Under 30

Continued From Page 9 he begins his second school year in the classroom this fall. “The kids drew me to wanting to work with them,” he said. “They’re rewarding to work with and inspiring.” ~ Danielle Nadler

ENT BAILEY, 30 SOCIAL SCIENCE TEACHER LOUDOUN VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

Kent Bailey has always been interested in international relations. But recently, as a social science teacher at Loudoun Valley High School, he’s applied that interest to expanding the international relations program. Bailey focuses his efforts on sparking students’ enthusiasm about the world outside Loudoun. “The thing that I want more than anything is just for them to understand how life works and how different cultures are in other parts of the world,” Bailey said. During the 2010-11 school year, Bailey went to Hungary through the Fulbright program, which provides teachers with grants to teach in other parts of the world. He was one of six U.S. teachers selected to teach in Hungary, and the experience there opened several doors for Bailey. One of those was the opportunity to start a new exchange program between Hungarian students and Loudoun Valley students. He is also organizing a student trip to the Model United Nations conference in Budapest, Hungary, for the upcoming school year. Bailey worked with Model UN during his time in Hungary and kept in touch with the people to extend the opportunity to 15 Loudoun students. The students will be the first delegation to come from the U.S. to the conference in Hungary. Bailey is providing extensive international exposure to his students and assuring that they understand the world. “I tell my students every day that they have an opportunity to live and work abroad,” he said. “I want them to understand that it’s a big world and they don’t have to be confined to the U.S., not that there’s anything wrong with that.” ~ Danielle Nadler

KEVIN ARBOGAST, 26

OPERATIONS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGER TOTH FINANCIAL

On the ground or in the air, Kevin Arbogast is flying high. Just two years after graduating with a finance degree from the University of Akron, OH, he's the operations manager and a portfolio manager at Toth Financial, a highly regarded Leesburg investment firm founded in 1986. As of June 30, the company managed about $83 million in assets. Besides handling day-to-day client operations, Arbogast is a co-adviser on 10 different client portfolios. With his hand in almost all aspects of the company's operations, multi-tasking comes as second nature to him. Known as a hard worker, he prides himself on achieving goals. “I've been told many times that if you want a project done, give it to Kevin, he'll get it done,” he said. He also can be counted on to have a steady head in what can sometimes be a high-stress environment. “You know, when the clients call in and the market's dipping down and they want to get out of everything. You gotta keep 'em calm and remind them of the long-term strategy and approach, get them to look at the long term and not the day to day.” It's the people he works with and for, however, who keep him energized. “It's just such a good environment (with) the people that work here. And then on top of that we have great clients; some of the nicest, most amazing people I've met through this company. I love making those connections. That's what keeps me going.” Outside work, you can find him out with friends enjoying new restaurants or at one of the wineries, running a 10K or playing out on the greens. “My favorite course is Creighton Farms by far. I don't deserve to be on it, though. It's an amazing, amazing golf course and I'm not that great of a golfer at this point. But it's something I enjoy doing, I love being outside on a golf course.” In about three months' time, you'll also find him in the pilot's seat. He's been taking lessons at Leesburg airport to obtain his private pilot's license. “The company owns an airplane and we use that to go to client meetings, whether it's a few counties or states away. It is a Beechcraft Baron, which is a twin-engine prop plane. I can't fly that one yet, but that is the long-term goal, to be the corporate pilot here.” Whether it's trying out new restaurants with friends or sampling some of the

county's award-winning wines, Arbogast is making the most of his time here in Loudoun. “Having moved down here from Ohio and just seeing the job opportunities …. the whole economic engine down here is just different from anywhere else and I'm ready to capitalize on that.” ~ Therese P. Howe

LISA BRAUN, 28 VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION SPECIALIST LOUDOUN COUNTY FIRE-RESCUE

For Lisa Braun, working as the volunteer recruitment and retention specialist for Loudoun County Fire-Rescue comes naturally. “I have grown up around service,” Braun, who has been an active fire-rescue volunteer in Purcellville since 2006, said. “I have three siblings in the military, one of my sisters is a paramedic, and I worked in the police department before.” She also has a penchant for doing anything that someone may say girls are not strong enough or capable enough to do. “I definitely have that, ‘I’ll show you’ thought,” she said with a laugh. But at the core, volunteering in firerescue is her passion, and she is excited to have the opportunity to pass that on. “When you’re passionate about something, you want to get other people passionate about it, too.” Her position makes Braun at times a jack-ofall-trades in the fire-rescue system, handling anything and everything that comes her way— from maintaining an information database for volunteers to access when they need something to jumping in and helping with a training class or a McGruff Camp where needed. Braun, who lives in Purcellville, earned her college degree in education and said there is a lot of teaching involved in her day-to-day work, particularly about what Loudoun combination system—between career and volunteer personnel—really is. In addition, she maintains the county’s recruitment website, www.answerthecall. info, which requires her to reach out to people who have expressed interest in volunteering and get them acclimated into the system. She also helps companies who are looking to recruit new members, and helping current volunteers with whatever they need. Her job takes her into the various volunteer companies for meetings, where

she can get ideas about where the hurdles are and how to get over them. She is also helping to develop successful processes for the volunteer program to reduce the risk of someone dropping out. But one of her favorite aspects of her job is organizing the Firefighter Family Day and graduation. “I love doing those because you get to be with people and you get to see them so excited to see their family member doing what has kept them away from home all those days and nights,” she said. “It’s really rewarding.” While she does not know where the future will take her with Loudoun County Fire-Rescue, Braun said she sees service being a continued part of her work. “If I am not helping someone, fixing something, doing something to benefit the whole, I wouldn’t find working as rewarding.” ~ Erika Jacobson Moore

MEREDITH AMONSON, 28 ZONING ASSOCIATE TOWN OF PURCELLVILLE

Almost a year into her job handling zoning complaints and violations for the Town of Purcellville, Meredith Amonson has found that patience and empathy go a long way when dealing with the public. “A lot of individuals and business owners just don't understand the ordinances,” she said, so she'll often explain the situation “before coming down with an iron fist. Many people aren't even aware they're in violation of the ordinance. A 2007 James Madison University graduate in geography, Amonson started her professional career as a zoning technician with Fairfax County government before moving on as a geographic information system analyst for Tetra Tech, a Reston environmental engineering and consulting firm. The work was isolating, however, and these days she's enjoying interacting with citizens and business owners on a daily basis. A western Loudoun resident, she also appreciates the shorter commute. “Going from Bluemont into Fairfax, that was an incredible hike, especially with all the development on Rt. 50. So I am glad to be back in my neck of the woods.” Spending less time on the road has meant she is able to devote more of her attention to her other interests: gardening and raising chickens and pigs. The latter has become a small side business, which she operates as High St. Farm. A devotee of sustainable lifestyles in which you grow


Loudoun Business | PAGE 11

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 your own food, Amonson says she's always wanted to raise her own meat. “I think eating meat is a privilege and the livestock we eat should be treated humanely and respectfully. The commercial meat industry in America, especially factory farming, is probably the core opposite of the purpose of why I raise my animals.” ~ Therese P. Howe

MICHELLE KELLOGG, 29 PRODUCTION MANAGER JOURNEY THROUGH HALLOWED GROUND PARTNERSHIP

Michelle Kellogg's past, and present, is steeped in history and the humanities. While working on her art history degree at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, she spent a year abroad studying the material culture of museums at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. After graduating in 2005 and working for two years as an assistant director at a Charlottesville art gallery, she returned to Scotland to pursue her master's degree in museum and gallery studies at the University of St. Andrews. She made good use of her year there, interning at Hill of Tarvit Mansion House, a 20th century National Trust Property home; designed an exhibition on scientific exploration at St. Andrews Museum; and worked with the Scottish Fisheries Museum on its redesign. She returned to the United States and is now production manager with the Waterford-based nonprofit Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership. The organization is dedicated to raising awareness of the rich cultural heritage throughout the Rt. 15 corridor running through four states. “I love getting to travel and meet with lots of different partners within our National Heritage Area, which runs from Gettysburg to Monticello. We work closely with museums, cultural heritage sites, national parks, historic towns, elected officials and a variety of other organizations, meaning I get to see and do something a little different every day,” Kellogg said. As much as she enjoys the travel, though, the Ashburn resident's love of all things historic gives her an appreciation for the county. “The beauty and charm of the historic small towns that make up Loudoun is unparalleled. I am very fortunate to work in the idyllic village of Waterford, which is like taking a step back in time every day when I

head to the office.” As production manager, Kellogg designs and implements the group's annual donation program; maintains the constituent database; oversees all merchandising; and plans events such as donor dinners and the annual gala. She also has coordinated a Book Talk series that so far has included noted authors Tony Horwitz, Adriana Trigiani and Dennis Frye. “My primary interest is making history and culture accessible and interesting,” Kellogg said. “My long-term mission is to help museums and cultural heritage organizations develop financial and environmental sustainability plans to ensure our collective history is still available for future generations.” ~ Therese P. Howe

OASIS PLANTSCAPING BRAD DEHAVEN, 29 OWNER BILLY WHITTINGTON, 28 VICE PRESIDENT

When Brad DeHaven and Billy Whittington say their business is growing, they mean it. Interior landscapers who maintain a client list of about 60 businesses from

Professional Business Connections St. Anthony & Dad, please help!

Grow Your Business With Marketing 1 Hour Marketing Brainstorming Session $250 CCS Innovations is a full-service marketing and creative rm specializing in small-mid size business strategies and audits. Visit us online! strategie

ccsinnovations.com 703.945.3791

www. w

JOE FLEMING PAINTING CONTRACTORS

Residential & Commercial

✦ Specializing in Custom Residential Interior & Exterior Painting

703-771-1494 LICENSED

FREE ESTIMATES

INSURED

Call 703.771.8831 to advertise.

Baltimore to Alexandria, they've recently expanded their reach south into North Carolina, thanks to a recent hire of a trusted friend. “My goal would be to be the premier provider for interior plant services on the East Coast and as far down as North Carolina up to Pennsylvania,” DeHaven, who started the company after branching out from the family business in 2005, said. “I want to have a team of people who are as passionate to come into work, and I want to create that environment where they want to be a part of what we are growing and kicking butt and having fun.” Whittington echoes the focus on others in his vision for the future, saying his desire is “to have a sustainable business

that provides jobs for other people. I think the opportunity to provide a career for someone else is my ultimate goal.” Former college roommates at Salisbury University in Maryland, where DeHaven played football and Whittington played soccer, they have continued their sports participation, but now mostly as coaches. DeHaven coaches swim teams in the summer, and Whittington leads a girls' travel team in soccer and trains a boys' team in Chantilly. They also maintain an active lifestyle through their business. “We do interior landscaping, green walls, holiday decorations, rentals, floral—anything that has to do with interior plants,” DeHaven said. “As far as exterior work if it's small-scale hotel fronts or building fronts we maintain those, but anything large we partner up with a couple of exterior companies to subcontract it out to them. “We get the flexibility to move around; we're not sitting in an office,” Whittington said. “We're constantly visiting different sites and we're providing something that helps provide a little bit of happiness in Continued On Page 12


PAGE 12 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

30 UNDER 30 30 Under 30

Continued From Page 11 people's days. People love seeing plants in their office, especially when we get flowers and they get switched out, we give the old ones for them to take home. They love that kind of stuff. It's kind of cool.” ~ Therese P. Howe

REBEKAH HESS, 25 ENGLISH TEACHER YOUNG ADULT PROJECT, LOUDOUN COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

life and I think that it's a real honor that they are willing to open up to a teacher that way.” And the learning process has become a two-way street. “My students and colleagues teach me to be strong, to listen better, to continually improve, to try new things, to allow others to help me when I need it, and to overcome my introverted nature in order to be a better teacher..” ~ Therese P. Howe

RYAN ELLIS, 22 “I knew that I wanted to be a teacher RACECAR DRIVER GRAND-AM SERIES since 6th grade,” Rebekah Hess said. “I had a really amazing teacher and she really inspired me to go into education. I wasn't sure about the specific subject for a while; I was torn between English and history because I really love the humanities. But I had two teachers in high school that leaned me toward English,” the 2004 graduate of Stone Bridge High School said. She went out of state, to Lee University in Tennessee, for her undergraduate degree in English Literature but returned to the commonwealth for a graduate degree in secondary English education at the College of William and Mary. “When I got out of grad school I knew that I would love to work in Loudoun,” Kellogg said. After receiving a call from the school system's Young Adult Project, she interviewed and got the job with the alternative education program that targets at-risk students. “Our goal is to help them transition successfully back to their home school, help them develop in certain areas: socially, academically, emotionally so that they can be a more successful student in their home school. “I liked the program but honestly, I was unsure because the population of students is really different from anything I had been exposed to before,” she said. “But … it's turned out to be better than I expected, much better than I ever anticipated it would be.” Smaller classes have meant better opportunities to get to know students personally. “It's a real honor that they come to trust me in such a short amount of time to share what's going on in their lives or let me help them in very specific ways in the classroom and personally. I've had students come to me and ask for advice for something that's going on in their personal

From go-karts to some of America’s top series of racing, Ryan Ellis has been proving himself behind the wheel since he was only 4 years old. At 22 years old, Ellis races full-time in the Continental Tire Series of Grand-Am while still finding time to pursue a marketing degree at George Mason University. It was the influence of his father’s life as a racer that led to Ellis’ desire to do the same. At age 4 he began his go-karting career, which was soon to be followed by quarter midget racing and late models in NASCAR’s weekly series. His road racing experience, however, came from his move to racing with the Sports Car Club of America and the National Auto Sport Association. It was shortly after this transition that Ellis got involved in the more professional side of racing with the Volkswagen TDI Cup for two years. For the past year-anda-half, though, Ellis has been racing in the Grand-Am series as a full-time racer. He has also periodically raced in different divisions of racing like the NASCAR Nationwide series of just four weeks ago. Ellis clearly has more than one plan— regardless of how different and secondary for him it may be. He attends George Mason University and will be graduating next year with a bachelor’s degree in marketing. “You always have to consider that your main plan,” he said about college. “How many people try to become professional race drivers and actually make it to the point they can support themselves or a family?” Nevertheless, his plans don’t seem to be built around school. For the time be-

ing, Ellis wants to find a ride in the Rolex Series of Grand-Am racing while occasionally driving as a road course specialist in NASCAR. Yet, his main goal is a bit different. “In the end I want to end up in NASCAR.” Regardless of where he ends up, Ryan Ellis will continue to be one to showcase his racing abilities in many diverse auto-racing atmospheres. ~ Patrick Szabo

SARA RECHENBACH, 23 SALES MANAGER NATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTER

A fan of James Patterson's thrillers, Sara Rechenbach's career trajectory has been as fast-paced as one of the favorite author's novels. Hired by the National Conference Center an intern last summer who rotated among the sales, housekeeping and front desk departments, Rechenbach was picked up as an account executive following her graduation with a hospitality degree from Virginia Tech last year. And just about two months ago, she was promoted to a sales manager position. “I love it. Everybody here is so wonderful,” she said. “It's really a learning experience. NCC is a training facility so I'm always in a learning environment and I'm just soaking everything up. I'm fresh out of school so I still have a lot to learn.” She's catching up by doing a lot of research into her new specialty markets, religious and corporate groups in a variety of industries from transportation to retail to manufacturing to media. “I love the challenge of selling. I used to work in a toy store in high school and to me, selling is like a giant game, a puzzle you have to try to figure out with the client and what their needs are so they can have the best experience possible.” Originally from Richmond, the Ashburn resident is making her way around the county's attractions. “There are a lot of fun things to do around here, I like going to all the wineries in Leesburg and that area.” She also is still catching up to the whirlwind pace of her career. “Honestly I'm just so floored by the idea that I'm just a little over a year out of school. I was an intern, account executive and here I am sales manager. This time last year I was just a month out of school. I still can't believe it.” ~ Therese P. Howe

SPENSER MCKENNA, 24 FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGER ON THE POTOMAC RESTAURANT, STONEWALLS TAVERN, LANSDOWNE RESORT

To describe Spenser McKenna as a busy guy would be a complete understatement. As manager of two large restaurants at Lansdowne Resort, McKenna’s day is filled with duties ranging from public relations work to managing kitchen staff. And he wouldn't have it any other way. “I love being busy,” he said. “There’s never any down time. If there is, you’re not doing something right.” Because the resort hosts a variety of events from parties to business conferences, McKenna has gained expertise in coordinating events in different circumstances along with managing his 35-member staff. “Working within the resort and running the restaurant in that capacity is an endeavor because you have so many different people that are pulling you in different directions.” Joining the AAA four-diamond resort only a month after graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in New York, McKenna is committed to acquiring as much experience as he can. “I’m not out on Friday nights, I’m here,” he said. “I chose to jump into the workforce at 21 and start running.” He has wanted to work in the industry since he was 5 years old after watching his parents run their business, “The Coffee Pot Restaurant,” in New Hampshire. “It is breakfast and lunch all day, 6:30 a.m.-4 p.m., seven days a week. ... They have been making homemade American breakfast and lunch for over 32 years now.” While his future plans include running the family’s restaurant in six years and an establishment of his own, he has enjoyed the close-knit culture at Lansdowne. “We’re all a big family,” he said, adding that it's helpful for high-stress occasions, such as when 250 people from Dulles airport are sent to the resort for the night at 11 p.m. Despite his busy schedule, McKenna makes time for hobbies, such as Bikram yoga, the gym, concerts and foodie day trips. “I adore food and whenever I can, I escape either to NYC or DC for culinary excursions to try new restaurants.” ~ Samantha McClain


Loudoun Business | PAGE 13

JULY 2012

Therese P. Howe/Loudoun Business

Middleburg Bank Celebrates 88 Years Jane Williams, official greeter and a 32-year employee with Middleburg Bank, hands out ice cream to customer service representative Brittany Harshman at the bank’s Middleburg location. Middleburg Bank celebrated the milestone July 1014 by giving out free ice cream treats and thank you gifts at all locations.

Sterling Women hosts Grl Pwr Grl Pwr founders Bria Toussaint and Royal Phillips, recent high school graduates whose young lives have been marked by trauma and violence, including the murder of Toussaint's father, shared their personal stories at the July Sterling Women networking luncheon. During their presentation, the teens discusssed the program they created to boost self-esteem and teach leadership skills to elementary schoolaged girls. The monthly networking event was founded by Reston Limousine CEO Kristina Bouweiri, shown above with the girls. To register, visit www.sterlingwomen.org.

Loudoun County Needs the Arts My father runs an art gallery called the Berkshire Art Gallery, and my mother runs an estate sale business. Through the gallery and the estate sales, my parents taught me to have a deep appreciation for art. Although my formal educational background includes computer science and finance, I was extremely interested in music throughout my twenties. I played the keyboard and sang backup in a band and even had the chance to open up for a few big names in New York City—but that’s a story for another day… Between my parent’s influence and my music and education experiences, I developed a great appreciation for the arts and the impact they can have on an individual’s personal and intellectual development as well as the direct tie to science and math. As a result of those experiences I became an advocate of STEAM education—that’s STEM plus the arts. Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo were not only great scientists and mathematicians, but also unbelievable sculptors and painters. In the same regard, music theory is basically math—rhythm, patterns, and the adding and subtracting of note values. Perhaps most importantly, the arts fuel creativity. And creativity fuels our economy. I was told a few months ago that there weren’t many artists in Loudoun County. I dismissed the comment because it was completely misinformed—Loudoun County has a wealth of artists and a thriving art community. The Loudoun Arts Council is active, providing leadership and support to a healthy, vibrant artistic and cultural community. But regardless of how misinformed that comment was, it got me thinking—what if business leaders feel the same way? What if business leaders are unaware of Loudoun’s thriving arts and cultural community? Or worse yet, what if business leaders don’t believe that the arts in Loudoun County are a worthy investment? Let me put it simply: the arts ARE important to our region’s economic prosperity. As the leader of an IT security company, I can say first hand that our company thrives on the creation of innovative solutions. That innovation stems from creativity... and that creativity is fostered through the arts. In case there are any naysayers who don’t believe in the positive impact the arts can have, I’ve outlined a few reasons that a strong arts community will benefit Loudoun County. Five reasons Loudoun County benefits from the arts: 1. Community Building. The arts help restore our cultural traditions and remind us of our regional heritage. In the same way, the arts revitalize our sense of community. By attending concerts or art galler-

A Business Perspective

Lens on Loudoun Business

ies showcasing local artists, we are supporting our neighbors. That support creates a more tightly knit community. 2. Lifeblood of Tourism. Tourism is tightly linked to our arts and cultural community. The Loudoun tourism industry is thriving—but where would Loudoun tourism be without the art galleries, performing arts or performance venues? Where would it be without the cultural activities like vineyard tours or local festivals? Arts and culture bring character and charm to Loudoun, which makes it a more attractive place to visit. 3. Livability Factor. A community that values arts and culture increases the quality of life for its residents. Primary quality of life factors include lifestyle, public transportation, environmental quality, a vibrant music and art scene, and natural outdoor amenities. Mixed-use developments like OneLoudoun and Kincora promise to incorporate all of those quality of life factors, focusing on increased cultural experiences (think: Reston Town Center). These new developments are essential because they add flavor to an otherwise vanilla region and make Loudoun a more attractive option for potential businesses and workforce. 4. K n o w l e d g e Economy. Loudoun is a hightech region and because of that we have a knowledgebased economy, which depends on attracting and retaining knowledge-based employees. These knowledgebased employees are the intellectual backbone of our economy. We want to continue to improve the quality of life in Loudoun, or the livability factor, to attract these skilled thinkers. 5. Innovative Habitat. A knowledge-based economy calls for an innovative and creative workforce. Innovative solutions are formed through creative thinking—the same creative thinking that may be used to add paint to a canvas or to turn words into poetry. These innovative thinkers are drawn to a creative community. They also have the career flexibility to choose where they want to live and work—and if Loudoun fails to provide a strong creative environment, then that innovative workforce may choose to locate elsewhere. What can we do? Support the local arts district—both on and offline. Attending local arts and culture events is important, but it is also important to spread the message. Not only the message that Loudoun County needs and values the arts, but also that Loudoun has a thriving arts community. Take a moment to visit the Loudoun Arts Council website and see how you can help promote the creative community in Loudoun. Every little bit helps.

By John Wood


PAGE 14 | Loudoun Business

JP Events & Consulting CEO Tina Johnson was honored with the President's Award recently in recognition of her service, dedication, and support of the Greater DC chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners. Johnson, the board's special events chair, has been involved with the NAWBO chapters in Northern Virginia and the metropolitan DC area for the past eight years. Middleburg Financial Corp. CEO and President Gary R. Shook has been named chairman-elect of the Virginia Bankers Association, and will take the helm of the organization in 2013. Before joining Middleburg Financial in 2006, Shook was senior vice president at Fauquier Bankshares. Among his civic positions, he has served as a director of the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce; vice chairman of the Fauquier Chamber of Commerce; and chairman of the Bluemont Concert Series. The Town of Leesburg recently promoted two current staff members to top management positions: Renée LaFollette as director of Capital Projects and Annie Carlson as Information Technology manager. LaFollette had been serving as acting director of capital projects since October 2011, and now formally assumes the responsibility for the design and construction management of the town's capital improvement projects. Carson, formerly a Senior Management and Systems Analyst with the town’s Finance Department, now supervises daily operations of the town’s Information Technology Department. She also is responsible for implementing information technology-related projects in the current budget and developing a long-term strategic plan for the Town’s information technology needs. Loudoun County Chamber CEO Tony Howard has been elected as the next president of the Virginia Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives, based in Richmond. Howard has served as the county's CEO and president for the past six years and takes over the VACCE position from Vicki Gardner, executive director of the Smith Mountain Lake Regional Chamber of Commerce. His installation as president took place at VACCE's annual meeting at Smith Mountain Lake June 22. Katie E. Verbano has joined the National

Conference Center as a sales manager who will specialize in the pharmaceutical, healthcare and life sciences corporate segments. A graduate of Penn State University, Verbano previously was government sales manager at Hyatt Regency at Crystal City and sales manager at LXR Luxury Resorts Inc. in Cocoa Beach, FL. Dr. Grace Keenan, founder of Nova Medical & Urgent Care Center, was honored with a 2012 Brava! Women in Business Award by Washington SmartCEO magazine. Kennan will join 24 other recipients at an awards ceremony July 24 at the Kellogg Conference Center at Gallaudet University. James Wehr, president of Loudoun Habitat For Humanity, has been recognized for his volunteer work with a Community Service Award and $10,000 grant by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company. Wehr, a Hamilton resident and a volunteer with the group for the past six years, was one of 11 winners from around the country who were recognized. Inova Loudoun Nursing and Rehabilitation Center has earned a Silver – Achievement in Quality award by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living for its outstanding performance in providing high-quality long-term care. The Inova program was one of 52 facilities nationwide to receive the silver award this year. “ Dulles-based Allegra Print has been ranked on Quick Printing magazine's 2012 Top 100 Printers in North America. “I am very excited for our employees who have worked so hard to keep our customers happy. Our commitment to new technologies and service have assisted in our continued growth,” company President John Flynn said. Inova Loudoun Hospital is partnering with Loudoun Soccer to train coaches on health-related subjects including concussion awareness this fall as part of a new partnership program. “This is an opportunity for us to work directly with one of the largest youth sports organizations in our community and help educate and equip people who can have a significant impact on the health of the 7,500 children that participate in Loudoun Soccer,” H. Patrick Walters, CEO Inova Loudoun Hospital, said.

Rail Vote Proves That Citizens Can Make A Difference History will record that it was on July 3 when the Board of Supervisors voted to approve the County’s investment in the Dulles Corridor Rail Project. While this was the date of the Supervisors’ historic vote to ensure Loudoun remained a part of the rail project, and would reap the proven economic and transportation benefits that rail will bring, the real turning point on this decision happened a month earlier. That turning point occurred on June 4, when the Loudoun Board of Supervisors held a public input session to hear from constituents and community leaders on Dulles Rail. That evening, the citizens, business leaders and employees of this community spoke with eloquence, with force and with a consistent message: approve Loudoun County’s support for the completion of the Silver Line to Ashburn. In the process, they effectively drowned out the irrational and often belligerent noise from the anti-rail crowd that threatened this project, and proved beyond any doubt that Loudoun County overwhelmingly supports the Dulles Rail Project. But this outcome almost didn’t occur. To their credit, the anti-Rail crowd was ready for a fight and secured the first 10 speakers slots at the public input session. Though after that, the rout was on. It is estimated that after a slow start, more than 80% of the next speakers – more than 150 Loudouners made their voices heard that evening – stood before Loudoun’s supervisors and expressed their strong and unequivocal support for the county’s investment in the Silver Line. They were business owners and young professionals, working parents and retired citizens, representatives of business organizations and non-profit groups, Democrats, Republicans and independents. They came from every walk of life and from every corner of the County. And their message was focused and consistent: the opportunity to connect Loudoun to the rest of the National Capital region via the Metrorail system was far too valuable for the Board of Supervisors to miss. What is most significant about this out-

From The Chamber

In Brief

JULY 2012

come is that the vast majority of the evening’s speakers have rarely, if ever, stood before their elected representatives in a public setting to express their thoughts on a public policy issue. They are not activists, lobbyists or others who are immersed in the business of government. As many political and government leaders well know, most of the constituents they hear from are those who are adamantly in favor of or opposed to a particular project or legislation. Many of the folks who spoke in favor of Dulles Rail on June 4 or who wrote letters to their Supervisors told me, both before and after that evening, they were alarmed to learn that the Board had any doubts about Loudoun’s involvement. Most assumed that the county’s decision to was already made, or that their elected leaders would make the only logical decision and support the rail project. When they found out that the Board of Supervisors might have been leaning against the project and that Loudoun’s once-in-a-lifetime opportunity was in peril, they were nothing short of outraged. Then, they quickly mobilized into that citizen who is unafraid to look their elected representative in the eye and tell them: “this project is important to me and my family and I urge you to support it.” In the process, they proved the skeptics and cynics wrong. They showed that it is possible for ordinary citizens and business leaders to have their voices heard by the powerful, to make a difference on the important issues confronting their community. Some day in the future, when the Silver Line is completed to Moorefield Station in Ashburn, when Loudoun’s economy has grown stronger and the areas around our train stations have become vibrant communities where Loudouners live, work and play, those who spoke out in favor of the Dulles Rail Project will be able to look back with pride. And they will be able to say: “I played an important role in making this happen.”

By Tony Howard


Loudoun Business | PAGE 15

JULY 2012

Firms Earn Good Will With Aid After Storm By Therese Howe, Staff Writer In the aftermath of the derecho windstorms June 29 that left tens of thousands in the county without power for days, businesses large and small stepped up to provide relief and aid to the community, their employees and other companies. At the peak of the outage, 35,200 Dominion customers and 9,875 Novec customers were in the dark, utility representatives said. In response, Dulles Town Center joined county government facilities in opening as an overnight cooling center July 1 and 2 for those who wanted a good night's rest. “We wanted to be as accommodating as possible to help community members plug back into the world and get reconnected,” Marketing Director Dan Cook said. About 25 to 50 people came the first night, he added. “It was not a lot but people definitely came in to cool off and check their cell phones or plug in their cell phones.” Besides the allure of air conditioning, the center's food court also was an attraction for residents unable to cook at home. “The food court was bustling all throughout the weekend [of June 30 and July 1],” Cook said. Other restaurants saw increased business that weekend, including Clyde's Willow Creek Farm. Three of the Washington, DC, restaurant group's locations lost power, but other than “a little blip for a couple of minutes,” the Ashburn restaurant had no issues, Private Events Manager Melissa Carroll said. Feeling lucky that Willow Creek Farm was spared from having to throw out thousands of dollars of food as other restaurants had to, Carroll offered help to colleagues in downtown Leesburg such as Palio Ristorante Italiano and Lightfoot

Danielle Nadler/Loudoun Business

Dulles Town Center welcomed residents who wanted to connect their laptops and phones after a windstorm cut electricity to almost 40,000 Loudoun customers.

Restaurant. “As far as the restaurants in Leesburg, we're all a small tight-knit community,” Carroll said. Knowing the stress involved in potentially having to cancel say, a wedding rehearsal dinner, she said that offering to stand in their place as a venue was “the right thing to do.” Many grocery stores also dealt with thousands of dollars in food losses, yet still provided the community with aid. Harris Teeter distributed more than 40,000 10-pound bags of ice to nine locations in Maryland and Northern Virginia, including at its Ashbrook Commons Plaza and Purcellville stores. “Our customers support us every day when they choose to shop in our stores; we want to be their community partner as well,” Communications Manager Catherine

Reuhl said. “We were in a position to help those affected, and we wouldn't have had it any other way.” The gesture was appreciated by customers who left messages on the company's Facebook page, including a Middleburg customer who wrote, “Thank you for the ice on Saturday in your beautiful new store in Purcellville. You rock.” Grateful guests also wrote on Lansdowne Resort's Facebook page, lauding the hotel for providing discounted rates after the storm. “We are one of the hundreds of thousands in Northern Virginia—Vienna— experiencing the effects of Friday's Thunderstorm,” one fan wrote. “No power—no A/C for the past four days. Lansdowne offered us a grat rate with total understanding and support.”

Lansdowne Resort Marketing Manager Phil Werz noted while news reports indicated hotels in the District increased rates, “we actually offered a 'storm rate' exclusively on our Facebook page. That rate was $99 per night on Sunday, July 1 and Monday, July 2. We sold out both nights, mainly because of the generous rate we provided for people who had lost power and had no air conditioning.” Other large businesses in Loudoun that don't serve the public nevertheless provided aid to hundreds of their employees. Neustar, for example, surprised its more than 750 staffers in the DC area, including 640 on the Sterling campus alone, with an offer to subsidize hotel stays and meals for employees who lost power. Company executives decided to extend their cafeteria hours and allowed employees to bring in their families. The company also offered a daily subsidy of $100 toward a hotel bill and $50 toward food for staff. “It was just so nice,” Director of Communications Susan Wade said. “Honestly, I've lived in DC for 22 years and worked for a number of different large companies, and I've never seen a response like this. It was pretty cool.” Others felt the same way. “We've heard from lots of our employees about how extraordinary this is, that they'd never seen anything like it before,” Senior Vice President and General Counsel Scott Blake Harris said. “What's interesting is that when we were deciding to do this at the senior executive level it didn't strike us as extraordinary,” he said. “We very much think of ourselves as an employee-oriented culture and we think about what we can do to make the work experience a good one, and this was a direct outcome of that.”

Sunrise Landscape Helps At Arlington National Cemetery Staff from Sterling-based Sunrise Landscape & Design traveled to Arlington July 9 to participate in the 16th annual Renewal and Remembrance event at Arlington National Cemetery. Owner Joe Markell, Landscape Management Coordinator Tom Kniezewski and Field Supervisor Andy Dannenberg, along with junior staff members, spent the day in sections 28, 51 and 52 of the cemetery. They applied lime to replenish the lawn, working alongside more than 400 other volunteers who trimmed trees, installed landscaping, maintained irrigation and other tasks. In all, participating landscape companies and individuals contributed more than $200,000 in labor and goods to the national landmark this year— that adds to the more than $2 million in contributions since the event’s inception. The event is sponsored by The Professional Landcare Network, an association representing more than 100,000 lawn and landscape professionals in the United States and Canada.

From left, Tom Kniezewski, Joe Markell and Andy Dannenberg of Sunrise Landscape & Design at the16th annual PLANET day of service at Arlington National Cemetery. This the eighth year that Sunrise Landscape & Design has participated in the event.


PAGE 16 | Loudoun Business

JULY 2012

Home Makeover Sale! Home Makeover S

Home Makeover Sa Sale Ends August 31st

TILE & STONE

HARDWOOD

Whole House

Ends August 31st 3SaleRoom Special Sale Ends August 31st Hardwood Floor

Wall To Wall Carpet HARDWOOD

TILE & STONE

TILE & STONE

BRONZE HARDWOOD

SILVER PACKAGE

PACKAGE

LAMINATE

FREE BRONZE PACKAGE

GOLD PACKAGE

SILVER PACKAGE

GOLD PACKAGE

I N S TA AT I4390 ON 1850 FURNITURE 2750L L 2775 3690 3500

$

er Sale!

$ INCLUDES

$

$

$

MOVES WITH ANY PURCHASE OF CARPET & PAD! Up to 1100 sf completely installed Up to 500 sf completely installed Including: upgraded pad, w/lifetime warranty, Including: shoe molding, pickup and disposal pickup and disposal of old carpet & pad. of old carpet pad. All products are 100% All products have 5 to 15INCLUDES yr wear and stain hardwood & have lifetime structure and up to warranty. INCLUDES 25 yr wearRemodeling warranty verity to choose from. Basement Specials 2014Kitchen Remodeling Specials

FREE Financing

till BRONZE PACKAGE Ask for $12,850 details

THOUSANDS OF STYLES AVAILABLE

I N S TA L L AT I O N

GOLD PACKAGE

$18,790

BRONZE PACKAGE

HUNDREDS LAMINATE

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 12’ KITCHEN)

• CABINETS (12 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• CABINETS (20 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 35 SQ.FT.)

• GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 45 SQ.FT.)

• KNOBS & HANDLES

• 4” GRANITE BACKSPLASH, KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

• FULL HEIGHT GLASS & TILE BACKSPLASH AND TILE FLOOR • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

SILVER PACKAGE

& PAD

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 7’ BATHROOM)

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 8’ BATHROOM)

OFSTYLES STYLES AVAILABLE THOUSANDS OF AVAILABLE $THOUSANDS 250

STAIRS & RUNNERS

• GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 55 SQ.FT.)

OFF

• FULL HEIGHT GLASS OR STONE BACKSPLASH & PORCELAIN OR STONE FLOOR

Kitchen Remodeling Specials Kitchen Remodeling Specials

• DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

23 Years

INCLUD of Bathroom Remodeling Spec REMOV FURNITURE FURNITURE OF OL Excellence MOVES WITH ANYPURCHASE PURCHASE OF$7CARPET &$9 PAD! $23,500 MOVESBASEMENT REMODEL DOUBLE DEAL OF CARPET ,500 & PAD! ,850CARPE WITH ANY

SILVER PACKAGE

• CABINETS (4 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

INCLUDES REMOVAL OF OLD CARPET & PAD

FRREEEE F I N S TA L L AT I O N $

• KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

&

*

EVERY $3,000 YOU SPEND

• 24” VANITY CABINET, TILE FLOOR AND AROUND TUB (5 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

RECEIVE UP TO 8 FT. OF CABINETS

FREE

• 36” VANITY CABINET TILE FLOOR (10 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• VANITY SINK AND PLUMBING

• BATH LIGHT AND TOILET

• FRAMED SHOWER ENCLOSURE

• VANITY SINK, FAUCET AND FIXTURES

• DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION

• FRAMED GLASS SHOWER ENCLOSURE

Basement Remodeling Specials Basement Remodeling Specials

Home Makeover Sale! ON 250 250 &FREE OFF OFF FREE F R EHome E Home Makeover Sale!Makeov

T

ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING.

PACKAGE BRONZE BRONZE PACKAGE

• DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

• DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION &

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

• MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING

ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING.

$23,500 $23,500

• DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION

BRONZE PACK BRO

BASEMENT DOUBLE DEAL BASEMENTREMODEL DEAL $7,50 FAIR PRICES AND GREAT SERVICE ONLY REMODEL AT ABBEYDOUBLE DESIGN CENTER $ (PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

• CABINETS (4 CHOICES AVAILABLE) • CABINETS

*CANNOT BE COMBINE WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES, SALE OR CLEARANCE ITEMS. EXPIRES 08/31/12.

SILVER PACKAGEAPPLIANCE HOOK-UP GOLD PACKAGE SILVER PACKAGE GOLD PACKAGE

$12,850 $18,790 $18,790 $12,850 (PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

FOR BAR OR KITCHEN

• CABINETS (12 CHOICES AVAILABLE) • CABINETS

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 12’ KITCHEN)

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 7’ B

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 12’ KITCHEN)

• CABINETS (20 CHOICES AVAILABLE) • CABINETS

INCLUDES (4 CHOICES AVAILABLE) (12 CHOICES AVAILABLE) (20 CHOICES AVAILABLE) • KNOBS & HANDLES • GRANITE COUNTERTOP • GRANITE COUNTERTOP Sale Ends August 31st No REMOVAL Interest • GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 35 SQ.FT.) (UP TO 45 SQ.FT.) STERLING • KNOBS & HANDLES • GRANITE COUNTERTOP • GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 55 SQ.FT.) OF OLD (UP TO 35 SQ.FT.) (UP TO 45 SQ.FT.) No Down • GRANITE COUNTERTOP • 4” GRANITE BACKSPLASH, • FULL HEIGHT GLASS & TILE 21465 PRICE CASCADES PLAZA TILE & STONE HARDWOOD • FULL HEIGHT GLASS OR STONE BACKSPLASH AND TILE FLOOR (UP TO 55 SQ.FT.) CARPET • FULL HEIGHT GLASS & TILE &• 4” GRANITE BACKSPLASH, PAD!KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & Payment BACKSPLASH & PORCELAIN PLUMBING STERLING,VA 20164• FULL HEIGHT GLASS OR STONE OR STONE FLOOR KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & BACKSPLASH AND TILE FLOOR • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET ** & PAD BACKSPLASH & PORCELAIN for 2 Years PLUMBING • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & PLUMBING (703) 450-8181 • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET &

AILABLE

(PRICE

$$

*

*

• 24” VANITY CABINE FLOOR AND AROUN • 24” VAN (5 CHOICESFLOOR AVAILAB

RECEIVE UP TO RECEIVE UPLEESBURG TO 8 FT. OF CABINETS (5 CHOI • VANITY SINK AND P 8 FT. OF CABINETS

&

161 FORT EVANS RD. • VANITY STAIRS & RUNNERS • FRAMED SHOWER E LEESBURG,VA• 20175 • FRAMED DEMOLITION & INST (703) 779-8181 • DEMOLI

LAMINATE

EVERY $3,000 YOU SPEND

• KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET FOR BAR OR KITCHEN • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION **NOT & PLUMBING VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES OR OTHER OFFERS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT.• SEEKITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & STORE FOR DETAILS. EVERY $3,000 YOU SPEND • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING *CANNOT BE COMBINE WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES, SALE OR CLEARANCE ITEMS. EXPIRES 08/31/12. ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASE & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP PLUMBING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING. APPLIANCE HOOK-UP ALSO APPLIES TO ALL FLOOR PURCHASES LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPL • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING *CANNOT BE COMBINE WITH ANY OTHERINCLUDES OFFER. NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES, SALE OR CLEARANCE ITEMS. EXPIRES 08/31/12. ALL PACKAG LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING. APPLIANCE HOOK-UP LOCATION O INCLUDES REMOVAL GREAT SELECTION OF BRAND FURNITURE NAME CABINETS & SHOWER FIXTURES • CARPET • HARDWOOD • LAMINATE • TILE & STON Sale Ends August 31st Sale Ends August 31st OF OLD MOVES CARPET WITH ANY PURCHASE OF CARPET & PAD! BRONZE PACKAGE GOLD PACKAGE & PAD STAIRS & RUNNERS TILE & STONE HARDWOOD SILVER PACKAGE TILE & STONE HARDWOOD LAMINATE

DEAL

TO NETS

OR PLUMBING STONE FLOOR

& APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

www.AbbeyDesignCenterVA.com FOR BAR OR KITCHEN

I N S TA L L AT I O N

Bathroom Remodeling Specials

$7,500

FAIR PRICES AND GREAT SERVICE ONLY AT ABBEY DES

THOUSANDS OF GREAT STYLES AVAILABLE $9,850 $17 ,750 FAIR PRICES AND SERVICE ONLY AT ABBEY

No Interest STERLING Basement Remodeling Specials No Down 21465 PRICE CASCADES PLAZA No Interest $12,850 $18,790 STERLING,VA $23,500 20164 STERLING BASEMENT REMODEL DOUBLE DEAL Payment No Down 21465 PRICE(703) CASCADES for 2 Years RECEIVE I UPO TO N I N$PLAZA S TA L L 8AT FURNITURE 450-8181 FT. OF CABINETS

EE

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 7’ BATHROOM)

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 8’ BATHROOM)

• 24” VANITY CABINET, TILE • 36” VANITY CABINET TILE FLOOR Kitchen Remodeling Specials FLOOR AND AROUND TUB (10 CHOICES AVAILABLE) BRONZEAVAILABLE) PACKAGE SILVER PACKAGE GOLD PACKAGE (5 CHOICES • BATH LIGHT AND TOILET • VANITY SINK AND PLUMBING • VANITY SINK, FAUCET AND • CABINETS • CABINETS • CABINETS ** • FRAMED SHOWER ENCLOSURE FIXTURES INCLUDES (4 CHOICES AVAILABLE) (12 CHOICES AVAILABLE) (20 CHOICES AVAILABLE) (PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

FREE

• TILE FOR SHOWER WALLS (UP TO CEILING), TUB SURROUND

Bathroom Remodeling Specials BRONZE PACKAGE

$7INCLUDES ,500

SILVER PACKAGE

GOLD PACKAGE

$9,850

FRE

$17,750

I N S TA L L A 250 STERLING,VA WITH 20164 ANY PURCHASE WITH ANY PURCHASE OF & OF CARPET & www.AbbeyDesignCenterVA.com OFF FREE (703) 450-8181 THOUSANDS OF STYLES AVAILABLE THOUSANDS OF STYLE

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

Payment CHEN for 2 Years**

. EXPIRES 08/31/12.

(PRICE BASED ON 8’ X 10’ BATHROOM)

• 72” VANITY CABINET, TILE FLOOR (15 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 12’ KITCHEN)

• KNOBS & HANDLES

• GRANITE COUNTERTOP • GRANITE COUNTERTOP • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION • FRAMED GLASS SHOWER (UP TO 35 SQ.FT.) (UP TO 45 SQ.FT.) • GRANITE COUNTERTOP ENCLOSURE (UP TO 55 SQ.FT.) MOVES • 4” GRANITE BACKSPLASH, KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

• FRAMELESS GLASS SHOWER ENCLOSURE • 2 BATH AND 4 RECESSED LIGHTS • TOILET, VANITY SINK, FAUCET,

*

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 7’ BATHROOM)

REMOVAL OF OLD CARPET PAD!• • VANITY SINK AND PLUMBING FRAMED SHOWER ENCLOSURE & PAD • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION

• FULL HEIGHT GLASS & TILE • FULL HEIGHT GLASS OR STONE AND FIXTURES BACKSPLASH TILE **NOTAND VALID ONFLOOR PRIOR PURCHASES OR OTHER OFFERS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. BACKSPLASH & PORCELAIN • MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING OR STONE FLOOR • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET • MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & PLUMBING • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & EVERY $3,000 YOU SPEND ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION PLUMBING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING. • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING *CANNOT BE COMBINE WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES, SALE OR CLEARANCE ITEMS. EXPIRES 08/31/12. LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING. APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

• 24” VANITY CABINET, TILE FLOOR AND AROUND TUB (5 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

FOR BAR OR KITCHEN

**NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES OR OTHER OFFERS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS.

(PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 8’ BATHROOM)

INCLUDES FURNITURE MOVES • VANITY SINK, FAUCET AND

(PRICE BASED ON 8’ X 10’ BATHROOM)

• 36” VANITY CABINET TILE FLOOR (10 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• 72” VANITY CABINET, TILE FLOOR (15 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• BATH LIGHT AND TOILET

• TILE FOR SHOWER WALLS (UP TO CEILING), TUB SURROUND

FIXTURES

• FRAMED GLASS SHOWER ENCLOSURE

• FRAMELESS GLASS SHOWER ENCLOSURE • 2 BATH AND 4 RECESSED LIGHTS • TOILET, VANITY SINK, FAUCET, AND FIXTURES

www.AbbeyDesignCenterVA.com • MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING

ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING.

• DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION

• MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION

Kitchen Remodeling Specials Kitchen Remodeling • Specials Basement Remodeling Specials Bathroom Remodeling•Specials Basement Remodeling S GREAT SELECTION OF BRAND NAME CABINETS & SHOWER FIXTURES CARPET HARDWOOD • LAM

FAIR PRICES AND GREAT SERVICE ONLY AT ABBEY$18,790 DESIGN CENTER T ABBEY DESIGN CENTER $12,850 $18,790 $23,500 $12,850 $23,500 BASEMENT REMODEL DOUBLE DEAL BASEMENT $7 500 $9 850 $17 750 REMODEL DO No Interest Years GREAT SELECTION OF BRAND NAME CABINETS & SHOWER FIXTURES • CARPET •23HARDWOOD No Down $ $ of 250 250 & 23 Years& LEESBURG Payment Excellence for 2 Years 161 FORT EVANS RD. OFF OFF of FREE FR www.AbbeyDesignCenterVA.com BRONZE PACKAGE

SILVER PACKAGE

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

• CABINETS (4 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• CABINETS (12 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 35 SQ.FT.)

• GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 45 SQ.FT.)

• 4” GRANITE BACKSPLASH, KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

• DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING.

GOLD PACKAGE

**

BRONZE PACKAGE

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 12’ KITCHEN)

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN)

STERLING

• CABINETS (4 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• CABINETS (20 CHOICES AVAILABLE)

• KNOBS & HANDLES 21465 PRICE CASCADES PLAZA • GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 55 SQ.FT.) STERLING,VA 20164 • FULL HEIGHT GLASS & TILE • FULL HEIGHT GLASS OR STONE BACKSPLASH AND TILE FLOOR BACKSPLASH & PORCELAIN (703) 450-8181 OR STONE FLOOR • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

• KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & **NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES OR OTHER OFFERS. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. PLUMBING • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

LEESBURG,VA 20175 (703) 779-8181

RECEIVE UP TO GRANITE COUNTERTOP 8 FT. • OF CABINETS (UP TO 35 SQ.FT.)

*

EVERY $3,000 YOU SPEND

Excellence

• 4” GRANITE BACKSPLASH, KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

• DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

FOR BAR OR KITCHEN

ALLCLEARANCE PACKAGE DEALS AREEXPIRES BASED ON08/31/12. EXISTING *CANNOT BE COMBINE WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES, SALE OR ITEMS. LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING.

SILVER PACKAGE BRONZE PACKAGE

,

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 10’ KITCHEN) (PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 7’ BATHROOM)

GOLD PACKAGE SILVER PACKAGE

,

(PRICE BASED ON 10’ X 12’ KITCHEN) (PRICE BASED ON 5’ X 8’ BATHROOM)

LEESBURG 161 FORTRD. EVANS RD.#135 161 FORT EVANS NE UNIT

• CABINETS • 24” VANITY CABINET, TILE (12 CHOICES AVAILABLE) FLOOR AND AROUND TUB CHOICES AVAILABLE) • (5GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 45 SQ.FT.) • VANITY SINK AND PLUMBING • FULL HEIGHT GLASS & TILE • FRAMED SHOWER ENCLOSURE BACKSPLASH AND TILE FLOOR

CABINETS • • 36” VANITY CABINET TILE FLOOR (10 (20 CHOICES AVAILABLE) CHOICES AVAILABLE) • KNOBS & HANDLES • BATH LIGHT AND TOILET • GRANITE COUNTERTOP (UP TO 55 SQ.FT.) • VANITY SINK, FAUCET AND FIXTURES • FULL HEIGHT GLASS OR STONE BACKSPLASH & PORCELAIN • FRAMED GLASS SHOWER OR STONE FLOOR ENCLOSURE • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING • MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING • DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION APPLIANCE HOOK-UP

LEESBURG,VA 20175 (703) 779-8181 • DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION • KITCHEN SINK, FAUCET & PLUMBING

• DEMOLITION, INSTALLATION & APPLIANCE HOOK-UP ALL PACKAGE DEALS ARE BASED ON EXISTING LOCATION OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLY & PLUMBING.

GOLD PACKAGE

,

(PRICE BASED ON 8’ X 10’ BATHROOM)

• 72” VANITY CABINET, TILE FLOOR (15 CHOICES AVAILABLE) • TILE FOR SHOWER WALLS (UP TO CEILING), TUB SURROUND

*

• FRAMELESS GLASS SHOWER ENCLOSURE • 2 BATH AND 4 RECESSED LIGHTS

• TOILET, VANITY SINK, FAUCET, $3,000 YOU SPEND ANDEVERY FIXTURES • MEDICINE CABINET & PLUMBING

No Interest

FOR BA

*CANNOT BE COMBINE WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. NOT VALID ON PRIOR PURCHASES, S

• DEMOLITION & INSTALLATION

GREAT SELECTION OF BRAND NAME CABINETS & SHOWER FIXTURES • CARPET • HARDWOOD • LAMINATE • TILE & STONE • AREA RUGS

VA.com

REC 8 FT.

FAIR PRICES AND GREAT SERVICE ONLY AT ABBEYFAIR DESIGN PRICES CENTER AND GREAT SERVICE ON STERLING

No Interest

STERLING LEESBURG

23 Years

Loudoun Business July 2012  

The July 2012 issue of Loudoun Business: 30 Under 30

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you