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1 July 2013 Section One e off Two Volume e 42 r 28 Number

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Jordan elected to serve as the NYS FFA District 3 President ~A24 Columnists Paris Reidhead

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Crop Comments Lee Mielke

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Mielke Market Weekly Auctions Alternative Energy Classifieds Farmer to Farmer Manure Handling

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INSERTS: (in some areas) Case IH Small Farm Quarterly

Ice cream licking cow draws attention ~ Page A4 “Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against anyone among your people, but love your neighbor as yourself. I am the Lord.” ~ Leviticus 19:18


Section A - Page 2 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Farming Stone Arabia’s Dutch Barn Farm

by Elizabeth A. Tomlin Although they appear to be quite ordinary farmers, raising sheep and chickens on their 95-acre farm in Stone Arabia, NY, husband and wife team Marc Kratzschmar and Judy St. Leger are unique in the world of farming. “My regular job is working for SeaWorld,” St. Leger states. “I determine why pelicans and dolphins are dying. The job is pretty exciting and has taken me to some awesome places. But when push comes to shove, I think Stone Arabia, NY is where I’d rather be most of the time.” St. Leger, originally from Colonie, NY, attended SUNY Cobleskill for 2 years before transferring to Cornell to study Agricultural Science and receiving her DVM from Cornell. “I trained in food animal diagnostic pathology in California through UC Davis at the Diagnostic lab. But I don’t work with food animals on a day-to-day basis.”

Kratzschmar, originally from Germany, works for a software company based in Pennsylvania and also works from home, traveling as needed. “We coordinate our schedules so that someone can be on the farm to look after things,” said St. Leger. St. Leger and Kratzschmar moved to the Stone Arabia location in 2009. “Because the property was in the hands of a single family for many generations, this farm is much the same as it was in the 1800s,” reports St. Leger. Although much of the property was in need of repair, the couple was willing to take on the commitment, restoring one building each year and are currently having the main Dutch barn renovated. St. Leger says they intend to manage the farm business as an integrated livestock program and biodynamic farm, hoping to farm the acreage in a sustainable manner.

Judy and Marc feed their flock. Photos by Elizabeth A. Tomlin

Husband and wife team Marc Kratzschmar and Judy St. Leger examine a newly born lamb at their Dutch Barn Farm.

“In 2010, we started using sheep to improve our pastures. Our first sheep were a small flock of ‘learner’ sheep borrowed from our Amish neighbor.” Once they established their skills with the sheep, they brought in 30 ewes the following year. “They are whiteface, market ewes with a mix of Dorset, Fin, and Ile de France in their genetics.” The herd was expanded in 2012 with two more small flocks to meet the business plan goal, which was to have 50 ewes. “We have a fabulous purebred Texel ram that we acquired from Gretchen Subik of Hilltop Acres in Fonda,” said St. Leger. The Texel breed is characterized by a short, wide white face with a black nose, widely placed, short ears and no wool on the head or legs. “We sell the lambs after a summer on pasture. The Texel in them helps them to grow rapidly and develop good muscle. We are very proud of these lambs.” The lambs, which are raised for herd replacements or meat, are marketed in the fall either directly to consumers or to butchers. “We’d love to do more direct to consumer marketing and we hope to over time. The Cornell Cooperative Extension folks have been very helpful in teaching us how to make this happen.” Gwen Hinman comes from New Hampshire in the spring, a week or two before lambing, to shear the sheep. “Gwen has been shearing for some time. She spent time perfecting her craft in New Zealand — and it shows! She does an excellent job!” Wood panels are used to create a chute in the barn, and St. Leger said, “each sheep trots out one at a time for a quick exam and vaccinations — then on to get shorn. The sheep look lovely when Gwen’s done!”

Last year, the wool was sold at the Washington County Wool Pool. Free-range chickens are also raised at Dutch Barn Farm. Manure is composted and used to fertilize the hops, veggies, and hay fields on the farm. “This traditional approach to smallscale farming is what we want our farm to be,” St. Leger comments. All of the income generated from the farm activities goes back into financing the restoration of the farm. “A few years ago, New York State grants to promote restoration of barns were discontinued. Without the income from the animal enterprises, we could not afford our restoration efforts. We have worked on one barn a year since we got the farm in 2009. This year’s project is the biggest ever — we’re working on the Dutch Barn. We don’t need it to hold sheep — yet, but it stores hay in the winter and we will use it to dry hops this fall.” Kratzschmar said he chose farming for many reasons. “One is that I think that the preservation and encouragement of sustainable small scale mixed farming is important as a source of food. Another is that I like the countryside in upstate New York where the historic fabric is of small-scale farms. Operating such a farm preserves the countryside. A third is that the work of farming, at least at the scale that we do it, is very satisfying.” Although, he adds, his full time job does take up most of his time and supplies the majority of his income. “But I don’t know of a single farming family where one or more members don’t have off-farm jobs — even among our Amish neighbors, and I think that this has been true historically,” Kratzschmar stated. “We’d like to own a place that is the kind of farm people think of when they imagine what a farm should look like,” said St. Leger.


by Steve Wagner “The world’s most widely adopted biotech trait, Roundup Ready® soybeans, is set to go off patent soon in the U.S. — the last applicable Monsanto-owned patent is expected to expire in 2014.” In cutting-to-thechase fashion, the Monsanto press release’s first line explains it very clearly. Other things Monsanto wants you to know are bullet-pointed below: • Monsanto is amending all Roundup Ready soybean trait licenses to extend through the final patent expiration. As a result, the last crop year for which Monsanto will collect royalties on the technology is 2014. • Licensees have no obligation to destroy or return seed due to expiration of the Roundup Ready soybean trait licenses. • Monsanto will not use variety patents against U.S. farmers who save varieties containing the Roundup Ready trait for planting on their own farms after expiration of the trait patent. Farmers should check with seed suppliers regarding the policy for seed varieties developed by other companies and contain the Roundup Ready trait. • Monsanto will maintain full global regulatory support for this first-generation technology through 2021. This will allow grain from the 2014 crop to be sold and processed. We will continue to monitor and assess the planned use of this first-generation technology beyond 2021 and work

with appropriate stakeholders on any extension of regulatory support that may be needed. • Seed company licensees who choose to work with Genuity™ Roundup Ready 2 Yield technology will be able to continue to sell varieties with Roundup Ready after the patent expires. There is no need for them to stop selling Roundup Ready technology in order to sell the new trait. • Universities will also be able to offer soybean varieties containing the Roundup Ready trait. A number of universities have been breeding with the Roundup Ready soybean trait for a number of years and they will be able to continue this both now and following expiration of the patent. A sidebar to the last bullet point of the expiration process is that the end of Roundup Ready 1 could lead to new university-based crop-breeding programs that might make seed technology more freely available even though it might cost them corporate financial support. Is this the case at Penn State? “Not in the short term,” according to Penn State Agronomist Greg Roth, PhD. “Part of the problem of the erosion of the breeding programs has been the difficulty in capturing some of the value from the species that they’ve developed. When farmers replant the seed, then there’s no economic incentive for the universities or other people to develop breeding programs; somehow maintaining that value connection is critical. In some way, universities

Dr. Greg Roth, Penn State Agronomist.

Dr. Greg Roth speaks at a recent field trial at the Penn State research Station in Lancaster County, PA. Photos by Steve Wagner

have to figure out how to capture some of that economic value to support even traditional breeding programs let alone molecular-based breeding programs that are engineered by industry. We are not in a position to develop a soybean breeding program because of the Roundup seed going off patent.” Patent Protection, Innovation and Choice The fact that Monsanto and other biotech companies continue to invest in the development of new soybean traits that will benefit farmers shows the U.S. patent system provides incentive for innovation. The transition of Roundup Ready soybean technology into the public domain represents another benefit — patent expiration provides a means for public access to this technology. This system motivates individuals as well as companies, to invest in all types of new technologies that make U.S. farmers and our economy more competitive. Roundup Ready Trait and Soybean Variety Patents Despite the advantage of the Genuity™ Roundup Ready 2 Yield trait, some farmers may want to use Roundup Ready soybean technology following the end of the trait patent. Many Roundup Ready varieties are also covered by variety patents and plant variety protection certificates. Monsanto will continue to enforce its intellectual property, including variety patents, with respect to commercial and developmental use of patented Roundup Ready varieties after the patent expiry. However, as stated above, Monsanto will not use variety patents against U.S. farmers who save soybean varieties containing the Roundup Ready trait for planting on their own farms after patent expiration. One school of thought maintains that wider availability of inexpensive Roundup Ready seed could worsen the problem of weeds that are resistant to glyphosate. Is that too much speculation? “I would say so,” says Roth. “The marketplace is pretty well saturated with Roundup Ready and many farmers are moving towards alternative herbicides to supplement their Roundup applications.” The real question is what

happens when the patent actually expires? What choices will farmers have? “It’s complicated,” Roth says. “A lot of Roundup Ready soybeans now are Roundup Ready 2, the second patented event that is not expiring. Many seed companies are rapidly moving toward those genetics.” Another issue Roth foresees is that some of the Roundup Ready 1 genetics contain other patented technologies that prohibit the replanting of the seed grown from those varieties. To be clear, this does not reference seed-saving. “What they’re talking about,” says Roth, “is you growing the seed and using it in the second year. In that case, the farmer is violating the agreement they signed with the seed company,” which is, basically, that they would not do that. Another potential question in the minds of farmers is whether the Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield seeds will afford advantages other than those inherent in Roundup Ready 1. Roth says, “The second one, not in all cases, is reported to have better placement of the gene, and better backgrounds of genetics for superior performance. Having said that, there are some Roundup Ready 1 varieties that have done exceptionally well. So it is not crystal clear. “Biotech regulations are varied across the world. A major issue in the development of biotech products in the future is the streamlining of the registration in Europe, Japan, China, especially those countries.” Roth notes that checking the websites of companies which deal with transgenic soybeans that they involve pest resistance, multiple herbicides, disease resistance, nutritional qualities, and they have a 10-year release plan of maybe 15 things besides just the Roundup Ready. “The issue,” says Roth, “is they’ve got to figure out how to get all those materials through the registration process in other countries. In some cases there could be trade barrier issues related to the soil registration, along with possible differences in philosophy about GMOs in Europe versus the United States. It’s unsure how much each of those things contributes to that complexity of the process.”

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What happens when Monsanto’s Roundup Ready soybean patent expires?


Section A - Page 4 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Ice cream licking cow draws attention by Sally Colby If a dairy cooperative situated on a major highway wanted to draw the attention of people driving by, what would be the obvious choice? A cow. But not just any cow. The fiberglass creation, named Lady LeWinDa Milkzalot, is a year-round fixture on the lawn of the Lowville Producers Dairy Cooperative in Lowville, NY. Standing more than 11 feet tall and 16 feet long, the oversized Holstein is hard to miss. Recently, Lady LeWinDa has been drawing more attention than usual with the addition of an ice cream cone that’s just the right size for her. Kent Widrick, general manager of Lowville Producers Dairy Cooperative, says that Lady LeWinDa normally stands alone to greet visitors, but in honor of ‘June is Dairy Month’ and the recent heat, the co-op arranged to borrow a giant ice cream cone from Schulz’s Restaurant. Widrick says the photo of the cow with her oversized sunglasses and big pink tongue licking the ice cream was posted on the coop’s Facebook page, where it drew the attention of numerous fans. “We’re a cooperative owned by about 200 dairy farm families,” said Widrick,

explaining the role of the coop in the community. “We bring milk in from about 25 miles or so.” Widrick added that the co-op is located in an area that’s heavy in dairy farms, and although there are fewer farms than in the past, the existing farms are producing more milk. Widrick says that most of the milk handled by the co-op goes to Kraft for Philadelphia Cream Cheese, and to Hood for ice cream and fluid products. A store at the co-op offers a selection of locally produced cheeses, which are popular with both area residents and visitors. Other local products offered at the store include bologna, syrup, honey and a selection of gift boxes. A mail order side, accessible through the coop’s website, provides a convenient way for customers throughout the United States to purchase fresh dairy products. “One of our claims to fame is our squeaky fresh cheese curd,” said Widrick. “We’re also known for our aged cheddar. We have three-year-old cheddar, five-year-old cheddar and some nine-year-old cheddar.” The coop encourages people to have their picture taken with Lady LeWinDa and submit the photos to be posted on their Facebook page.

The cooperative has been serving area dairy farmers for more than 75 years, and this year will participate in CWT (Cooperatives Working Together), an organization that helps increase overseas sales of dairy products. The voluntary

program was designed by dairy farmers through the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) to benefit family farmers. Visit the Lowville Producers Cheese Store on line at www.gotgoodcheese. com

Immigration policy affects access to affordable food DFA chairman delivers remarks at immigration forum Current immigration policy is threatening access to quality, affordable food in this nation, DFA Board Chairman Randy Mooney asserted during a U.S. Department of Agriculture forum on comprehensive immigration reform today in Kansas City. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was the keynote speaker at the event, hosted at the American Royal building in Kansas City’s historic West Bottoms district. Former Kansas City mayor and current Congressman Emanuel

Cleaver also voiced support for immigration policy reform. “Because of America’s farmers, we enjoy abundant, safe and affordable food in this country,” Mooney said. “In order to ensure that continues, we need Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform. For the dairy industry — an industry where there is no such thing as a day off — there is no viable visa program to provide a legal, stable and knowledgeable workforce that ensures milk and other dairy products get into

Cover photo by Kent Widrick Giant fiberglass cow — named Lady LeWinDa MilkZalot — licking her larger than life ice cream cone in Lowville, NY.

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Country Folks (ISSN0191-8907) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and additional entry offices. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA, N.Y. State FFA, N.Y. Corn Growers Association and the N.Y. Beef Producers. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., Production.................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com V.P., General Manager......................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com Managing Editor.............................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor..................................Gary Elliott, 518-673-0143......................... cfeditor@leepub.com Page Composition.........................Michelle Gressler, 518-673-0138 ...................mmykel@leepub.com Comptroller.......................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148...................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator..................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager.....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman.................................Harry Delong, 518-673-0154...................... hdelong@leepub.com Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160 .......................Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office .......................518-673-0149 ..................................amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .......................subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com Ad Sales Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0104 Territory Managers Patrick Burk ...................................................Batavia, NY ................................................585-343-9721 Tim Cushen ...............................................Schenectady, NY ...........................................518-346-3028 Ian Hitchener ...............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Mark Whitbread..........................................Skaneateles, NY................................... ..........315-317-0905 Ad Sales Representatives Jan Andrews .........................................Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0110 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ...........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0108 Kathy LaScala...................................katelascala@gmail.com...........................................913-486-7184 Sue Thomas ........................................suethomas1@cox.net ..........................................949-305-7447 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

...in the arms of someone who loves you! Photo by Melody Reynolds

the dairy case, our lunch programs and more.” Mooney emphasized that the need for qualified workers is an issue bigger than dairy, pointing to specialty crops such as lettuce, strawberries and apples that also require labor that is not desirable to domestic workers. Similarly, a shortage of workers affects crop farmers, directly for their own farms and for farmers who buy their product. “Without immigration reform, we’re making it more difficult for farmers to harvest their crops,” Mooney said. “As a result, we are going to make it more difficult for consumers to access affordable food. We could even risk allowing more of our food production to move overseas.” “We are fortunate to have a food system that allows us to deliver safe, quality, affordable food to our families,” Mooney said in closing. “Immigration reform is important for all of agriculture, for rural America, for consumers and for the nation’s economy.” Mooney’s sentiments were echoed by Secretary Vilsack. “We are blessed by the most productive, most innovative and most hardworking farmers and ranchers,” Vilsack said. “American agriculture is the greatest in the world, but we risk that if we don’t have certainty in our farm policy and we don’t have comprehensive immigration reform.” Additional participants in the event included the Agricultural Business Council of Kansas city; Kansas City Chamber of Commerce; Bibles, Badges and Business for Immigration Reform; and Kansas Business Coalition for Immigration Reform.


“The House did the American people a true injustice today,” National Grange President Ed Luttrell said after learning that the legislative body failed to pass the Farm Bill in a 195-234 vote. The Grange, America’s oldest agriculture and rural advocacy group, has been a significant supporter of the bill that Luttrell said would have offered stability to one of the nation’s leading industries. “Last year’s extension of the Farm Bill was extremely disappointing to the ag community and the House’s failure to pass the bill today just deepens this frustration,” Luttrell said. “The Farm

Bill isn’t just about farming and agriculture. It’s about jobs, energy, and our nation’s overall recovery in this still struggling economy. One in 12 American jobs depend upon agriculture and without the strength and stability provided by the Farm Bill, our nation’s farmers and ranchers will be unable to make rational, informed decisions about the future.” National Grange Legislative Director Grace Boatright said the failure comes mainly from proposed cuts to the 80 percent of Farm Bill spending marked for the Supplemental Nutrition

Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps. “Cuts to the SNAP program were undoubtedly the cause of today’s Farm Bill rejection in the House, which is especially frustrating because I believe that the Senate and House bills had a lot of common ground on which to build. It’s going to be a long and dreary road from here as the Washington ag community regroups and reevaluates its work on this issue,” Boatright said. Boatright said the continued inability of Congress to move forward on even the most crucial measures is disappointing.

“Unfortunately, American agriculture and the millions of people who benefit from it can’t wait for Washington to resolve its issues. We needed action today and I know I speak for our more than 160,000 members when I say we are incredibly disappointed by the House’s failure to pass this vital piece of legislation.” Boatright and Luttrell agreed that there is public misunderstanding about aspects of the bill, but say Congress should be more aware than the average American of the need to pass legislation that gives farmers a better safety net, enhances conservation, stabilizes and enhances safety measures for food and assists in the promotion of our products in foreign markets.

Failed Farm Bill bad for taxpayers, resources “The House farm bill failed commonsense conservation standards, and it failed to get enough votes to pass.” WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. House of Representatives failed to pass a farm bill that if enacted, would have been the worst in at least 25 years for fish and wildlife. The House bill failed any test of responsibility that taxpayer dollars wouldn’t be spent in ways that harm our land, water, wildlife and the public good. It’s critical to enact a fiveyear farm bill this year that protects conservation. “The House farm bill failed commonsense conservation standards, and it failed to get enough votes to pass,” said Larry Schweiger, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation. “Reasonable measures to protect taxpayers and natural resources must be included a farm bill. The National Wildlife Federation will continue to fight for a farm bill that includes a link between conservation compliance and crop insurance, and a National

Sodsaver program.” Most significantly, the House bill would have created a new loophole in a longstanding requirement that farmers who receive taxpayer subsidies refrain from draining wetlands or farming erosion-prone soils without a conservation plan — because the bill failed to extend these protections to crop insurance premium subsidies, the largest subsidy farmers receive. This could lead to the draining of 1.5 to 3.3 million acres of wetlands and greatly increased soil erosion and nutrient pollution into our lakes, streams, rivers and coastal waters. Major agricultural groups, including the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Corn Growers, along with fiscal groups, including Americans for Tax Reform and the National Taxpayers Union supported closing this damaging loophole.

What next? by Bob Gray There are several scenarios as to what might happen next following the defeat of the Farm Bill. All of them are fraught with uncertainty and potential problems. Here is a list of possible scenarios given where we are at this point. • Extend current Farm Bill law: The extension of current law runs out on Sept. 30. It will not be easy politically to extend the provisions of the 2008 Farm Bill again, even for a short period of time. However, given the fact it is almost July and current law runs out in just 90 days, it may be the only immediate option. • Restructure a new Farm Bill on the House side: There would have to be some very tough negotiations at the House Agriculture Committee level to come up with a bill that would straddle all of the differences that exist between House members on SNAP and the Farm Commodity programs. It will be interesting to see what the House Agriculture Committee does next. • Negotiate an agreement with the Senate on their version of the Farm Bill: This might be the most plausible route since the Senate passed their Farm Bill with good bipartisan support. But again the issue of SNAP — $4.5 billion in cuts in the Senate Bill

compared to the $20.5 in the failed House Bill — will remain a contentious issue. The shape and cost of the Commodity programs will be a major factor as well. And would Mr. Goodlatte mount another effort against any Senate/House Farm Bill agreement if it contained the Dairy Security Act? He is likely to be emboldened by the strong vote of support he received in the House. • Split the nutrition programs from the Farm Bill and go with separate bills: This could be a prescription for disaster since it would give opponents and proponents of SNAP and the commodity programs a chance to make deeper cuts and significant changes that could make a split Farm Bill totally unpalatable. • Revert back to original Farm Bill law: Here we go again. The federal dairy support price would jump to over $38 per hundredweight. Not a very viable option for Members of Congress, but possible if nothing is done by Sept. 30. • None Of The Above: Could be but I can’t think of any other options right now. However, they are out there. Source: NDFC E-letter for June 21

“It is outrageous that the House Agriculture Committee leaders opposed this wholly reasonable, basic conservation provision to protect the public good,” Schweiger said. The House bill also would’ve failed taxpayers and wildlife by continuing to provide perverse incentives to farmers who plow up fast-declining native grasslands, even where the land is unlikely to produce a good crop.

“Failing to trim incentives that lead to destruction of one of the nation’s most endangered ecosystems to support marginal crop production is just the height of irresponsibility, squandering both taxpayer dollars and our precious natural resources,” Schweiger concluded. For more National Wildlife Federation news visit www.nwf.org/ news

Farm Bill defeat a blow to dairy On June 20, John Wilson, Senior Vice President Dairy Farmers of America, made the following statement “Despite the agriculture community’s best effort, with a vote of 195–234 the U.S. House of Representatives failed to pass a Farm Bill today. “Earlier in the day, the GoodlatteScott amendment stripped the Dairy Market Stabilization Program from the underlying bill. “Regardless of the loss on GoodlatteScott, Dairy Farmers of America remained supportive of final passage of the Farm Bill to keep the momentum going on a bill that is vital to so many aspects of the American agriculture sector. Farm families across the nation rely on the provisions in the Farm Bill, and that they will continue to operate under outdated and inadequate policies is truly disappointing. “DFA members joined farmers across

the nation in voicing their support of this Farm Bill, and their engagement was instrumental in securing needed dairy policy reform in the version of the bill brought to the floor. “Although today has been disappointing, the dairy industry has shown its resiliency in the past, and continued optimism and action is the only option as we look to the future. We express sincere thanks to all who made calls, attended meetings and sent important emails to their legislators. This participation is imperative as we look to the future and make dairy policy reform a reality. “The dairy industry has many advocates on Capitol Hill and we owe our appreciation to those in Congress who supported our efforts. I am confident that this support will not falter as we continue our pursuit of meaningful dairy policy reform.”

Farm Bill Follies: Time to cut hay? Andrew Novakovic is a professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Science’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. He comments on the failure of the House of Representatives to pass Farm Bill legislation — and whether a bill will be passed by year’s end. Novakovic says: “The vote was highly partisan. While this was expected, I am surprised at how highly partisan it was. Where one goes from here is indeed a conundrum. The Senate bill remains viable through the remainder of this 113th Congress. “Regardless of this political strategy, it will be tough sledding to find a new way to package a farm bill that will get the requisite majority support. It will be up to the now chastened leadership of the House Agriculture Committee to find this magical combination. I am not

optimistic. “What does this mean for getting a Farm Bill before the extension of the last one expires? I think the House Agriculture Committee will be lucky if they can end the summer with plausible changes that offer any hope of a positive vote by the House this fall. “Is it possible that the Congress won’t be able to get a Farm Bill done in 2013 at all? Unfortunately, that can’t be ruled out. There is plenty of time to complete the legislative process well before December but the trick is finding the new combination of programs that will garner that majority vote in the House and be acceptable to the Senate. “I suggest we all go back to cutting hay and making yogurt and let this business stew in its own juices for a while. It will be quite some time before this train gets back on the tracks.”

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Grange President: House’s failure to pass Farm Bill a ‘true injustice’


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Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant They don’t “cry” wolf Recently, my eyes-ofTexas contact emailed me an “in your face” type article dealing with health side effects associated with a common form of genetic engineering (GE) in field crops. The GE trait in question is the insertion of a gene into field crops so as to orchestrate the formation of the toxin naturally present in the bacterium Bacillus thuriensis. The article which appeared on the CollectiveEvolution website was titled “New Study Links GMO Food to Leukemia: GMO Bt Cry-Toxins May Contribute to Blood Abnormalities.” B. thuringensis (Bt) is a bacterium commonly used as a biological pesticide. It is a microorganism that produces toxic chemicals, occurring naturally in the environment, usually isolated from soil, insects and plant surfaces. Prior to a recently published Brazilian study, Bt was thought to be toxic only to insects, but recent studies are proving otherwise. (And some of this stuff is a little technical.) Associated with the release of spores, B. thuringiensis forms crystals of proteinaceous insecticidal delta-endotoxins (called crystal proteins or Cry proteins), which are encoded by cry genes. In most strains of B. thuringiensis, the Cry genes are located on a plasmid (in other words, Cry is not a chromosomal gene in most strains). Dr. Bélin Poletto Mezzomo and his team from the Department of Genetics and Morphology at the Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Brasilia recently performed and published a study done involving testing Bacillus thuringensis toxin (Bt toxin) on Swiss albino mice. This toxin is the same one built into crops (such as corn and soy), which have been genetically modified to manifest insecticidal properties. Studies are showing that Bt toxins found in such GE crops are harmful to mammalian blood by damaging red blood cells (RBCs). RBCs are responsible for delivering

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

oxygen to the body tissues through blood flow. Bt is a bacterium commonly used as a biological pesticide... a microorganism that produces toxic chemicals. It occurs naturally in the environment, and is usually isolated from soil, insects and plant surfaces. Prior to this study, Bt was thought to be toxic only to insects, but recent studies are proving otherwise. Dr. Mezzomo and his team of scientists at University of Brasilia recently published a study that involved Bt toxin and its effects on mammalian blood. According to the study, the Cry toxins that are found in GE crops like corn and soy, are much more toxic to mammals than was previously thought. The study was published in the Journal of Hematology and Thromboembolic Diseases. Advances in genetic engineering promise the expression of multiple Cry toxins in Bt-plants, known as gene pyramiding. Therefore, studies on non-target species are requirements of international protocols to verify the adverse effects of these toxins, ensuring human and environmental bio-safety. Due to its growing use in agricultural activities, Bt presence has already been detected in different environmental arenas, such as soil and water. Thus the bioavailability of Cry proteins has increased, and for bio-safety reasons their adverse effects should be studied for non-target organisms, which appear to be suffering collateral damage. Studies are also needed to evaluate the persistence of Bt toxin and its stability in aquatic environments… as well as the risks to humans and animals exposed to potentially toxic levels of Bt through their diet. Thus, by using Swiss albino mice, the Brasilia study aimed to evaluate the hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of four Bt spore-crystals. Scientists tested levels ranging from 27 mg to 270 mg over a seven day period, it was remarkably evident that the Cry toxins were hemotoxic, even at

the lowest doses administered. Hemotoxins destroy red blood cells, disrupt blood clotting and cause organ degeneration and tissue damage. The number of RBC’s (red blood cells), as well as their size, were significantly reduced, as were the levels of hemoglobin for oxygen to attach to. Every factor regarding

RBC’s indicated some level of damage for all levels of toxin administered and across all Cry proteins. The tests clearly demonstrated that Cry proteins resulting from the Bt toxin were cytotoxic (poisonous to cells), particularly bone marrow cells. Studies continually show that these proteins kill blood cells by targeting the cell membranes of RBC’s. Mezzomo’s work strongly suggests that further studies are required to clarify the mechanism involved in the hematotoxicity found in mice, and to establish

the toxicological risks to non-target organisms, especially mammals, before concluding that these microbiological control agents are safe for mammals. In its original (non-genetically-modified) form, Bacillus thuriensis was a precise crop protection management tool for controlling insect pests. In my opinion, pre-GE Bt could be considered a “rifle approach”. In the minds of the Brazilian researchers just cited, genetically engineered Bt is, by comparison, a “shotgun approach”, with stray pellets hitting

bystanders. innocent These Brazilian scientists didn’t even touch on the known fact that targeted tests have successfully developed resistance to the Bt trait in its increasingly universal form in GE crops. Proof of this fact is the acquired ability of armyworms to devour crops genetically modified to yield Cry proteins. It appears that a strange irony is unfolding, in which mammals suffer more from this modern technology than the invertebrates which were originally targeted.

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Do I want to reduce manure odor coming from my farm? Yes. An anaerobic digester is an excellent addition to a manure management system for the reduction in near odorless effluent for spreading on fields. The odor issue is becoming more and more of a problem as new residential housing developments are built closer and closer to the family farms of America. These new home owners find the smell of manure spread on fields offensive. What type of digester do I need? It depends on what type of manure management you are currently using, whether it is a scraped, flushed or belt system. The amount of water added to the manure from milking parlors and flush systems will have an impact on which digester is best suited for your farm. The reason this is important is because it affects the total volatile solids in the influent entering the digester.

Also, the area of the country you live in plays a major role in the decision of which type of digester is to be used. In warmer areas of the country a covered lagoon is an option, because this type of digester uses ambient temperature to digest the manure. Lagoons are typically built at a lower cost. In the colder climates of the country, Complete Mix, Plug Flow or Temperature Phase (TPAD) digesters are preferred, because these types are easily heated. Do I want to generate electricity to power the farm? Possibly. Depending on the type and size of your animal operation and the way you are currently handing your manure, if this will be a viable option. Some reports have shown that at least 300 cows would be needed to produce enough biogas to generate electricity to meet all the power needs to run the farm. The additional cost involved in adding an en-

gine generator set need to be considered. Do I want to sell excess electricity to the power grid? This can be an expensive add-on to your manure management system. Depending on how many animals you have, how much biogas can be produced to run an engine generator set to supply enough electricity to sell to your local power company. The biggest obstacle in the past has been to get a good price for the power you sell to the power grid. Power companies are not always willing to pay you enough per kW hour to off-set the cost of the engine generator set over a reasonable amount of time. Some U.S. states are starting to realize the potential of on-farm electric generation. Each individual state has their own financial assistance loan and/or grant programs for the construction of digester facilities. Source: Penn State Extension

Page 7 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Thinking about an anaerobic digester for your farm in Pennsylvania? Ask yourself these questions


Section A - Page 8 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!

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May Supply • 120 Mid-Atlantic Irrigation Co., Inc • 101 Morris Distributing • 228 Morton Buildings, Inc • 115 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 310 Outback Heating, Inc • 108 Outside Heating, Inc • 314 P. Bradley & Sons • 104B, O-2 PA Country Equipment • 202A, 203 PBZ LLC • 104A Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-13 ProAg • 153, 154 Quality Craft Tools • G Quality Metal Works Inc • 184, 185 Recyc Systems, Inc • 313 Rockbridge Farmers Coop • 148 Rockydale Quarries Corp • 160 Ryder Supply Company • 302 Stor-Loc • 320, 321 SuKup Manufacturing • 181 T.A. Seeds • 113, 114 Taylor Manufacturing, Inc • 211 Tech Mix Global • 305 The Power Connection, Inc • 136, 137 Tractor Care Inc • 176, 176 Trissel Equipment Sales • 107 Trouble Free Lighting • 146 United DHIA • 306 Valley Feed Co • 300 Valmetal / Jamesway Farm Equipment • 174 Virginia Bin Service • 312 Virginia Farm Bureau • 177 Virginia Silo • 166 Whitesel Brothers Inc • 128 Williams Brothers Tree & Lawn Service • 303 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-9 Zimmerman Cattle Control • 104A Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 151, 152 SKID STEER RODEO SPONSORS Virginia Farm Bureau ~ Diamond TROPHY SPONSOR Virginia Farm Bureau

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Don’t Miss These Exhibitors!! Advanced Agra Service, LLC • 131 Agco Corp • 180, O-3 Agri-King • A Agri-SC • 126 Airgas • 141, 142 American Farm Products • 304 Animat, Inc • 328 Augusta Co-op Farm Bureau • 127 Bath Fitter • 308 Beverage Tractor • 100, 102 Binkley & Hurst Lp • 178 Bonny View Farm • 120A, 121 C&C Farm Supply • 134, 135 Cargill Animal Nutrition • 145 Channel • 318 Charvin Farm Ag Plastics • 215 Chemgro • 166 Christian Farmers Outreach • 322 Cobra Torches • 309 Conklin Agrovantage • 319 Crop Care • 104A Cummings & Bricker Inc • 105, 106 Dupont Pioneer • 129 Dyna Products • O-14A Family Farm Casualty Ins. Co • 169 Farm Credit • 125 Farmer Boy Ag • 118, 119 First Bank & Trust Co • 138 Fisher Auto Parts • 230 For-Most Livestock Equipment-Garber Farms • O-7 GCR Tire Center • 162, 163 General Fertilizer Equipment • 103 Growers Mineral Solutions • 155 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 109 Haybuster / Duratech • 332, 333 Headwaters Contruction Company, Inc • 327, O-2AA Headwaters Soil & Water Conservation District • 132, 133 Helena Chemical Company • 150 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 156, 157 Houff’s Feed & Fertilizer • 130 Huffman Trailer Sales • O-1 IBA, Inc • 112 Independent Ag Equipment (formerly GVM) • 122, 123 Iva Manufacturing • 179 James River Equipment • 330 Koch Agronomic Services, LLC • 144 Kuhn North America, Inc • 329 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • 124 Lancaster Farming • O-21 Lanco-Pennland Milk Producers • 161 Lawrence Ag Equipment • 104 Liskey Truck Sales • O-4A Marco Metals LLC • 324

May Supply • 120 Mid-Atlantic Irrigation Co., Inc • 101 Morris Distributing • 228 Morton Buildings, Inc • 115 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 310 Outback Heating, Inc • 108 Outside Heating, Inc • 314 P. Bradley & Sons • 104B, O-2 PA Country Equipment • 202A, 203 PBZ LLC • 104A Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-13 ProAg • 153, 154 Quality Craft Tools • G Quality Metal Works Inc • 184, 185 Recyc Systems, Inc • 313 Rockbridge Farmers Coop • 148 Rockydale Quarries Corp • 160 Ryder Supply Company • 302 Stor-Loc • 320, 321 SuKup Manufacturing • 181 T.A. Seeds • 113, 114 Taylor Manufacturing, Inc • 211 Tech Mix Global • 305 The Power Connection, Inc • 136, 137 Tractor Care Inc • 176, 176 Trissel Equipment Sales • 107 Trouble Free Lighting • 146 United DHIA • 306 Valley Feed Co • 300 Valmetal / Jamesway Farm Equipment • 174 Virginia Bin Service • 312 Virginia Farm Bureau • 177 Virginia Silo • 166 Whitesel Brothers Inc • 128 Williams Brothers Tree & Lawn Service • 303 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-9 Zimmerman Cattle Control • 104A Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 151, 152 SKID STEER RODEO SPONSORS Virginia Farm Bureau ~ Diamond TROPHY SPONSOR Virginia Farm Bureau

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586

Page 9 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!


Section A - Page 10 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Industry groups cheer New York bioheat legislation State on path to cleaner air, green jobs through advanced biofuel inclusion in heating oil ALBANY, NY — In late June, the New York State Assembly and Senate passed legislation that sets a new standard for all heating oil sold in the state, requiring it to contain at least two percent biodiesel (B2, known in the industry as Bioheat®) by 2015. A broad range of industry and environmental groups voiced support for the legislation, which will reduce air emissions and create jobs throughout the nation’s largest heating oil market. “America’s advanced biofuel and Bioheat are a great fit for New York’s heating oil market” said Shelby Neal, NBB Direc-

tor of State Governmental Affairs. “Creating a standard that includes at least 2 percent biodiesel will replace about 30 million gallons of petroleum annually with a cleaner burning, renewable fuel.” Biodiesel is the first alternative fuel designated as an advanced biofuel by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to reach a billion gallons of annual production. It is domestically produced from agricultural coproducts and byproducts such as soybean oil, animal fats, and recycled cooking oil. “New York State’s crop farmers are growing more and more soybeans every year,” said Julia Robbins, Executive Director, New York Corn and Soybean Associa-

tion. “This policy will help provide New York farmers with a new market for the state’s soybean oil.” New York City, the largest municipal consumer of heating oil in the country, has already taken advantage of biodiesel’s benefits by instituting a citywide 2 percent biodiesel requirement in October of 2012. “Extensive testing has clearly shown that biodiesel blended with traditional heating oil is safe, seamless, and actually improves fuel efficiency through cleaning and preserving equipment,” said John Maniscalco, CEO of the New York Oil Heating Association. “This law extends these tremendous benefits to all New Yorkers and will provide the state

F UEL with the cleanest, most sustainable heating oil in the country.” Not only is Bioheat cleaner, it creates economic activity that benefits consumers. “A uniform fuel standard for Bioheat across New York State will promote investment in the heating oil industry and increase the number of green collar jobs and overall opportunity in the state,” said John A. Catsimatidis, CEO of United Biofuels, Inc. “These are jobs that can’t be shipped overseas and provide economic activity in our own communities.” The legislation calls for all heating oil sold in the

City of New York, Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, and Rockland counties to contain at least two percent biodiesel by Oct. 1, 2014, and all heating oil sold statewide to meet this standard by July 1, 2015. The legislation will become effective upon the governor’s signature. The legislation was supported by the City of New York, Office of the Mayor; New York City Citywide Administrative Services; Environmental Defense Fund; American Lung Association in New York; New York League of Conservation Voters; WE ACT for Environmental Justice; Environmental Advocates of New York;

New York Public Interest Research Group; Empire State Petroleum Association, Inc.; Oil Heat Institute of Long Island; New York Oil Heating Association, Inc.; United Metro Energy Corp.; New York Corn and Soybean Growers Association; and the National Biodiesel Board. To be called biodiesel, the fuel must meet the strict quality specifications of ASTM D 6751. Biodiesel has been tested extensively in both onroad and space heating applications. It is produced in nearly every state in the country and last year supported some 50,000 jobs nationwide.

AEC applauds the Obama Administration for moving forward on climate change “The advanced ethanol industry stands behind the Obama Administration in their effort to address climate change,” said Advanced Ethanol Council (AEC) Executive Director Brooke Coleman. “The President is right to identify the Renewable Fuel Standard and existing federal regulations as critical to the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from

the energy sector. Pound for pound, advanced ethanol is the most carbon reductive alternative to gasoline in the world, and the RFS is driving the commercial deployment of our industry.” The AEC noted, however, that climate action is not just about average global temperature. “The need to address climate change is not just about carbon dioxide and ris-

ing sea levels,” added Coleman. “We’re talking about a global race to commercialize next generation fuels as conventional oil becomes increasingly scarce and new unconventional reserves only come online at considerable expense. Inaction is not just irresponsible from a climatological perspective, it puts the United States further behind in the

global race to develop new energy industries, create new American jobs and ensure that high and volatile gas prices do not continue to paralyze economic growth.” The AEC recently released a progress report demonstrating the commercial progress of the advanced biofuels industry. The report demonstrates that the cellu-

losic biofuels industry is reaching commercial deployment just five years after the passage of the RFS and notwithstanding the global economic downturn. The AEC noted that maintaining the RFS and removing inequities from the federal tax code favoring the development of fossil fuels are critical to the ongoing development of low carbon, renewable fuels.

“What we need at this point is for Congress to establish a path and stick to it,” added Coleman. “The ongoing politicization of this issue just means that clean energy industries are going to build their new facilities on Chinese or Brazilian soil instead of in the United States. That’s a bad outcome for both political parties.”

Growth Energy hails Supreme Court’s decision not to hear E15 challenge Following the Supreme Court’s decision not to hear the American Petroleum Institute and other ethanol opponents’ challenges to E15, Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, released the following statement: “Today is a true victo-

ry for the American biofuels industry. Time and again Big Oil has challenged E15 and Growth Energy’s Green Jobs Waiver in attempts to deny consumers a choice and savings at the pump and today marks the end of these

baseless challenges. “The highest court in the land has spoken — they have unequivocally rejected the attempts of Big Oil and other opponents of ethanol to challenge the EPA’s sensible decision to permit the sale of E15. Now that the final word has been issued, I hope that oil companies will begin to work with biofuel producers to help

bring new blends into the marketplace that allow for consumer choice and savings. “This was not just a victory for consumers, but also for America’s energy security, economy and environment. As our industry continues to produce homegrown American fuels that reduce our dependence on foreign oil, we will also continue to create jobs

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In the June 17 issue of Country Folks a portion of the following article was missing. Below is the

article in its entirety. We apologize for any inconvience this may have caused.

AgriLabs and Country Folks partner to bring you ‘Farm Calls’ question and answer column Starting this issue, Country Folks will feature a regular questionand-answer column for dairy producers. “Farm Calls” will feature questions about herd health

and dairy management submitted by readers, and responses from the team of veterinarians and specialists from AgriLabs®. “Partnering with the vet-

erinary experts at AgriLabs to address herd-management topics that are top-ofmind for dairy producers is a win for all of us,” says Joan Kark-Wren, Country Folks editor. “Their wealth of dairy knowledge and real-world experience will offer a fresh perspective for our readers.” To submit a question about managing dairy cattle of any age, simply email jkarkwren@leepub.com. Readers can then look for answers in future issues as space permits. “We are pleased to partner with Country Folks to make our seasoned veterinarians available as a resource for readers,” says Adam Yankowsky, business unit manager, AgriLabs.

“This partnership is a perfect fit with the AgriLabs’ commitment to provide both veterinarians and producers with information to help maintain healthy herds. We’re looking forward to learning more about what’s on your mind through Farm Calls.” AgriLabs (www.agrilabs.com) is a leading animal health, sales and marketing organization with distribution throughout the United States. Through technology transfers and cooperative development agreements, AgriLabs continues to introduce state-of-the-art products for beef and dairy operations. AgriLabs vaccine brands include Titani-

um®, I-Site XP®, PULMO-GUARD®, MpB Guard®, Cobalt and Master-Guard®. Other widely used cattle and calf products include AgriTags, Colostrx®, StressMate™, Achieve® PRO, Hydra-Lyte® and Respond®. Achieve, AgriLabs, Cobalt, Colostrx, I-SITEXP, Master Guard, MpB Guard, ProLabs, PULMOGUARD, Respond and Titanium are registered trademarks of Agri Laboratories Ltd. AiM-L. Hydra-Lyte is a trademark of Lloyd Inc. StressMate is a trademark of Sterling Technology. Farm Calls Your questions answered by dairy herdhealth experts Q: Lately, I’ve seen more cases of lameness in my transition cows and have heard that rumen acidosis could be the cause. Should I make changes in my fresh-cow ration? A: Neither diet nor rumen acidosis are probably the cause of lameness in your transition cows, though rumen acidosis and lameness can appear simultaneously. A change in your fresh-

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cow ration will not prevent lameness. In recent years, researchers have found that a cow’s enzymatic and hormonal changes can predispose a transition cow to lameness. The same enzymes and hormones that relax the muscles and ligaments around the birth canal at calving can also relax the suspensory apparatus areas around the foot bone and cause the third phalanx to sink, resulting in lameness. The condition is a response to the comfort level of the cow during the transition period. To reduce the risk of lameness, you should provide a transition cow with adequate bedding and stall size, do not force the cow to stand for extended periods and minimize the cow’s exposure to hard surfaces. Early warning signs of lameness include an arch in the back, cowhocked rear legs and improper tracking. Q: I like to feed colostrum directly from a calf’s dam but am unsure about the colostrum quality from

AgriLabs A13

Page 11 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Correction


Section A - Page 12 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You The Kitchen Diva by Angela Shelf Medearis Red, White and Blueberries! Americans celebrate July 4th, also known as Independence Day, often without knowing the fascinating history about how this celebration came into being. “Taxation without representation!” That was the battle cry of the 13 colonies in America that were forced to pay taxes to England’s King George III with no representation in Parliament. As dissatisfaction grew, British troops were sent in to quell any signs of rebellion, and repeated attempts by the colonists to resolve the crisis without war proved fruitless. On June 11, 1776, the colonies’ Second Continental Congress, meeting in Philadelphia, formed a committee to draft a document that would formally sever ties with Great Britain. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer, crafted the document. (Nevertheless, a total of 86 changes were made to his draft.) The Continental Congress officially adopted the final version on July 4. The following day, copies of the Declaration of Independence were distributed, and on July 6, “The Pennsylvania Evening Post” became the first newspaper to print the extraordinary document. The Declaration of Independence has since become our nation’s most cherished symbol of liberty. On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration

were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks. The custom eventually spread to other cities and towns, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain. Congress established Independence Day as a holiday in 1870, and in 1938 Congress reaffirmed it as a holiday, but with full pay for federal employees. Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, firework displays, picnics and the playing of the “The StarSpangled Banner” and marches by John Philip Sousa. Invite this delicious Red, White and Blueberry Cheesecake to your Independence Day holiday as we celebrate the wonderful history of this great country! (Additional information courtesy of PBS Online.)

Red, white and blueberry cheesecake 2 cups halved, pitted, sour or sweet cherries, fresh or frozen (thawed, drained; see Note below) 2 cups blueberries, fresh or frozen 3/4 cups granulated sugar or sugar substitute, divided 1/4 cup water, plus 4 teaspoons 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice 1/2 box (14-ounce) graham crackers 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, toasted 1/3 cup canola oil or melted butter

2 packages (8 ounces each) reduced-fat cream cheese (Neufchetel), softened 2 cups nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt 6 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1. Set aside 6 or 8 cherries and 6 or 8 blueberries for garnish. Combine remaining cherries and blueberries, 1/2 cup sugar or sugar substitute, 1/4 cup water and the lemon juice in a large saucepan and bring to a boil. Combine cornstarch with 4 teaspoons water, then stir into the berry mixture; return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring constantly, until the liquid thickens and looks syrupy, about 1 minute. Remove from heat. 2. Process graham crackers in a food processor until finely ground. Add walnuts and pulse until finely chopped. Transfer to bowl; stir in remaining 1/4 cup sugar or sugar substitute. Drizzle with oil or butter and stir to combine. Press into bottom of a 9by 13-inch baking dish. Place cherries and blueberries that were set aside for garnish on top of the graham cracker crust. 3. Beat cream cheese, yogurt, confectioners’ sugar and vanilla in a medium bowl with an electric mixer until smooth, scraping down the sides as necessary. Spread over the berries and crust. Spoon the cooked berry mixture over top. Cover and refrigerate until cold, about 3 hours. NOTES: To pit fresh cherries: A hand-held cherry pitter is the right tool for the job, and it also works for olives! Or pry out the pit with the tip of a knife or vegetable peeler. To toast walnuts: Cook in a small, dry skillet over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until fragrant and lightly browned, 2 to 4 minutes. (c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

This week’s Sudoku solution


WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Center for Food Safety applauds the passage of a pollinator protection amendment on June 19 that was offered by Congressman Alcee Hastings (D-FL) to the Farm Bill, a fitting and positive development during National Pollinator Week. “Honey bees and other

pollinators have been suffering record-high population losses,” said Andrew Kimbrell, executive director of Center for Food Safety. “Pollinators are vitally important to agriculture and are an integral part of food production. These critical species are at the front lines of pesticide expo-

sure and it is high time that the government do more to protect them.” The Hastings amendment, which passed 273149 with 81 Republicans and 192 Democrats voting in favor, seeks to better improve federal coordination in addressing the dramatic decline of managed and native pol-

linators as well as direct the government to regularly monitor and report on the health of pollinators including bees, birds, bats and other beneficial insects. In the United States, pollination contributes to $20-30 billion in agricultural production annually. In North America, honey bees pollinate nearly 95 kinds of fruits, including many specialty

crops like almonds, avocados, cranberries, oranges and apples. “This year has shown the highest honey bee losses since colony collapse began; it is a clear message that we need to do more to protect pollinators. The Hastings amendment is a much needed win for pollinators everywhere and we hope it compels the government to do more to protect these vital species,” added Kimbrell. Earlier in June, Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA)

filed a nearly identical amendment to the Senate Farm Bill but it was not voted on prior to the Senate passing its bill. The Center is confident that the Senate will support the pollinator protection language when the two bills go to conference. For more information about the Center’s Pollinators & Pesticides Campaign please visit www.centerforfoodsafety.org/issues/304/pollinators-and-pesticides

ment or replacer.

measure the antibody concentration of colostrum using a Brix refractometer or colostrometer. You should also use a colostrum supplement or replacer if the dam is a mastitic cow or tests positive for bovine leukosis, persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea or Johne’s disease.

AgriLabs from A11 my first-calf heifers. When should I consider using a colostrum supplement or replacer? A: Because a calf is born with almost no natural resistance to disease, it requires antibodies from the first feeding of colostrum from its mother for immunity. Heifers generally produce inferior colostrum than mature cows. So, if your heifer is unable to provide adequate quantity or quality of colostrum, you should use a colostrum supple-

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For quantity, a calf requires 12 to 15 percent of its body weight in colostrum within one hour of birth to get the antibodies it needs. For quality, colostrum should have a thick, creamy texture and color with a high antibody concentration. I suggest using a Brix refractometer, which scores the quality of the colostrum on a numerical scale and the colostrum can be tested at any temperature. You should always

Have a question about managing dairy cattle? Email jkarkwren@leepub.com and then look for answers in future issues as space permits.

Come Hear The Truly Inspiring Story of a Courageous Farmer Who Refused to Let His Disability Defeat Him. Whether you’re able-bodied or not, Ed Bell’s personal story of triumph over the challenges of a physical disability will inspire and motivate you. Ed will present his keynote speech, "Living and Learning, One Hat At A Time" at Empire Farm Days

August 7, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. In the all-new Country Folks Accessibility Center Located adjacent to the Health & Safety Center Rodman Lott & Son Farm, Seneca Falls, NY The Country Folks Accessibility Center will also feature: • Assistive Technology Exhibitors • AT Product Demonstrations • Farm Safety & Accessibility Demos • Health Screenings • Occupational Therapy • Accessibility Counseling & Referral Services Empire Farm Days will be held August 6-8, 2013 Rodman Lott & Son Farm 2973 State Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY 13148 For additional information, call 877-697-7837 or visit empirefarmdays.com

Page 13 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Center for Food Safety applauds passage of pollinator protection amendment to Farm Bill


Section A - Page 14 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!

Come See Us at

AG PROGRESS DAYS Jan. 7-8-9

Booth ECMB - ECM Bldg

AUGUST 13, 14, 15 2013 2014 Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4, Thurs. 9-3

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Farm bill collapses in House; Republican chairman laments “a dysfunctional body full of dysfunctional people.” But the bill’s crushing defeat — also suggests congressional dysfunction has reached a new apex. The current farm bill expires Sept. 30. If nothing is done, farm policy could revert to a 1949 law — the last time a permanent farm bill was

With defeat of 2013 Farm Bill, House fails soybean farmers and American agriculture

passed. That would dramatically change subsidy rates and programs. Bradd Vickers, President of Chenango County Farm Bureau in New York says “We hope our elected officials will return to Washington and finish the job for America’s farmers and ranchers, and the many other families who benefit from the farm bill.”

Chenango County Farm Bureau believes the Farm Bill’s crushing defeat suggests that congressional dysfunction has reached a new apex.

Chenango County Farm Bureau was represented at a Farm Bill Now rally in Washington, D.C. Photos courtesy of Chenango County Farm Bureau

The American Soybean Association (ASA) voiced its extreme disappointment and frustration following a vote by the House of Representatives to reject the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013. With a vote of 195 to 234, the farm bill failed to pass the House following two days of debate. ASA President Danny Murphy, a soybean farmer from Canton, MS, issued the following statement on today’s development: “Today’s failure leaves the entire food and agriculture sector in the lurch. Once again, the nation’s soybean farmers and the 23 million Americans whose jobs depend on agriculture are left holding the bag. “This bill would have reinforced the farm safety net, promoted our products in foreign markets, strengthened the

fast-growing biodiesel industry, enhanced conservation programs; not to mention the stable, affordable and safe supply of food, feed, fiber and fuel that it would have ensured for all Americans; all while addressing our collective fiscal and budgetary obligations. Now, none of those benefits can be realized and a debilitating uncertainty extends from farmers to consumers as we all face the expiration of farm bill programs on Sept. 30. “It is incumbent on both Republicans and Democrats to find a way forward for American agriculture.”

Page 15 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Farm bill collapses


Section A - Page 16 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Farm Bill Goes Down in Defeat In the House of Representatives Issued June 21, 2013 The Farm Bill war moved to the House this week where U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte (D-Va.) and others introduced the so-called GoodlatteScott amendment, known as H.R. 1947, the “Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management (FARRM) Act of 2013).” The amendment removed the Dairy Market Stabilization Program (DMSP), part of the Dairy Security Act included in the base text of the FARRM Act, replacing it with a stand-alone margin insurance program. The action drew fire from National Milk (NMPF) which charged that dairy farmers strongly oppose efforts to gut the farm bill’s dairy title through the Goodlatte-Scott amendment. The House voted 291135 in favor of it though the victory was short lived because the overall Farm Bill went down in defeat, 234 to 195. Cuts in the Food Stamp program were blamed so financing for farm and nutrition programs is on hold. The bill will go back to the Agriculture Committee to make changes. An NMPF press release stated; “The decision to adopt the Goodlatte-

Scott (G-S) amendment as part of the House’s farm bill is a disappointment to America’s dairy farmers who recognize this amendment for what it is: an effort to ensure that dairy processors get a government-insured supply of cheap milk.” “The House rejection of its Agriculture Committee’s dairy proposal, which included margin insurance plus market stabilization, is a fiscally reckless vote, with negative implications for the dairy producer sector, but also for the entire farm bill,” NMPF charged. “By eliminating the market stabilization component, the Goodlatte-Scott amendment removed the cost control mechanism from this measure, greatly increasing government and taxpayer cost exposure.” Meanwhile; the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) reported that a new study from Cornell University shows that the proposed dairy program will cost more than the Goodlatte-Scott amendment. The study, “2013 Farm Bill Dairy Title Proposal Redistributes Program Benefits toward States with Larger Farms,” also finds that the currently pro-

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posed Dairy Security Act is significantly weighted to benefit large farms. IDFA’s Jerry Slominski said; “As did the Congressional Budget Office, the Cornell report finds that the Dairy Security Act will cost taxpayers more than the alternative. The report also contradicts a previous study from the University of Missouri, which claimed the opposite.” Both the Dairy Security Act and the GoodlatteScott proposal will replace the current Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) program with a new margin insurance program for producers. Under both alternatives, larger producers will be provided an improved and effective safety net to help them through difficult economic times. But only the Dairy Security Act adds a second program for dairy farmers that is intended to increase milk prices by imposing government limits on milk production. The Goodlatte-Scott amendment helps small farmers by requiring lower premium payments from smaller farms and higher premiums for larger producers than does the Dairy Security Act, according to IDFA, and, “more than 90 percent of all dairy farmers, those with fewer than 200 cows, will pay less for margin in-

surance under Goodlatte-Scott than the Dairy Security Act.” In another political issue, NMPF’s Board of Directors approved a resolution opposing any Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement that “does not provide for significantly increased access to the Canadian dairy market.” The Board also urged the U.S. Trade Representative and USDA to “negotiate an agreement with Canada that eliminates

barriers to trade and provides for mutually open dairy markets.” May milk production in the top 23 producing states totaled 16.5 billion pounds, up 0.9 percent from May 2012, according to USDA’s latest Milk Production report. The 50-state total, at 17.7 billion, was up 0.8 percent. Revisions dropped the April estimate by 20 million pounds to 16.1 billion, up 0.2 percent from April 2012.

California output was off a half-percent from a year ago. Wisconsin was up 1.2 percent. New York was up 2.1 percent, Idaho up 0.3 percent, Pennsylvania up 2.3 percent, Minnesota was up 1.8 percent, Michigan up 2.5 percent, New Mexico was down 1.1 percent, Texas was off 0.8 percent, and Washington was up 1.5 percent. The May increase was expected, according to FC Stone ana-

Mielke A21

Is your dairy farm ready to grow? by Beth Dahl, WNY Dairy Modernization Specialist, Harvest NY Dairy farms are getting bigger. Good, bad or indifferent, this is a nationwide trend, and New York farms are no exception, with the average dairy farm in New York sending 45 percent more milk out the door each day in 2011 as compared to 2000. The reasons for a dairy farm to expand are numerous and varied, and many factors have to be considered prior to significant herd growth. There is no right or wrong place to start when making a decision about expansion. Many farms grow slowly over time, gaining a small percentage each year, and as needed, will make small modifications to allow for

these additional cattle over time, but find themselves “maxed out” or in need of significant investment to outdated facilities. Others may consider growth when faced with a change in operations — such as inclusion of additional family or partners in the farm business. Regardless of why, dairy owners should ask themselves a few questions to gauge their preparedness for growth. • Does the current financial situation of your farm allow for cash flowing additional debt, and how much debt are you comfortable taking on? • Do you have longterm access to adequate land to grow feed and handle manure for the additional milking cows and youngstock? • Do the key decision

makers in the business have the interest and management capability to take on additional cows? • Is herd growth and the resulting capital investment in keeping with the strategic and personal goals for your farm business and family? If the stakeholders in your farm agree to the answers to these questions and that growth is in your future, you have a wealth of resources in western New York, including the Dairy Modernization Specialist, to improve the process of creating a business plan, designing facilities, acquiring financing, and adapting operational strategies to encompass more cows. Source: Ag Focus, June 2013


A great opportunity awaits a young lady living in Susquehanna County to meet entertainers, talk with exhibitors, award ribbons, and greet people of all ages who come to enjoy the fair. In addition, she will receive $500 from the Harford Agricultural Society and a $100 scholarship from the Pennsylvania Trappers’ Association. The runner-up, or alternate, will receive $300 and each remaining

contestant receives $25 for competing. Contestants must be between the ages of 16 and 20. Poise, the ability to communicate, and a love for the Harford Fair should be possessed by those entering the contest. The winner of the contest will serve as the Harford Fair Queen for 2013 and will represent Harford Fair throughout the week of the fair and at the State Fair Compe-

tition in Hershey in January, 2014. In addition, she will be asked to make guest appearances throughout the year. To enter, young ladies must submit a 300 word essay entitled “What My Fair Means to My Community.” As a part of the contest, she will give a 3-5 minute speech on “Why You Should Come to My Fair.” She will have a personal interview with the contest judges which

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Rachael Grosvenor, the 2012 Harford Fair Queen, represented the fair in Hallstead during the Community Fun Day on June 22 while some of the directors distributed brochures for this year’s fair, which will be held on Aug. 19-24. Photo courtesy of Harford Fair

gives her a chance to explain the content of her essay and to answer any questions the judges may have. All contest rules and entry forms can be found at www.har fordfair.com. Entry forms are due Aug. 1, and the competition is Monday, Aug. 19, the first full day of the Harford Fair. So if you or anyone you know is interested, check out the information on the Harford Fair website. It is fun, rewarding, and a great opportunity for a young lady in Susquehanna County.

Page 17 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Would you like to be the Harford Fair Queen?


Section A - Page 18 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Economics of anaerobic digesters for processing animal manure by William F. Lazarus, University of Minnesota Digesters are of interest with regards to climate change, energy, air quality, and water quality. However, digesters are capital-intensive and difficult to maintain. Profitability of a farmbased digester usually requires utilizing the energy, carbon credits, tipping fees, and marketing other co-products such as manure solids that are separated out and composted. Terminology and types of digesters Anaerobic digestion is the process in which microbes in the absence of oxygen convert volatile acids in livestock manure into biogas consisting of methane, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of water and other compounds. The methane produced by this process can be burned to generate electricity and/or heat. Under favorable circumstances, there is also a potential for purifying the methane into a marketable, natural gas-grade biogas suitable for household and industrial use. Rather than using the biogas to generate electricity, a few digester systems are beginning to upgrade the biogas to natural gas standards and trucking or piping it to off-site industrial users. One U.S. digester operator is following Sweden’s lead by powering milk trucks with compressed biogas. Digestion itself has little effect on the nutrient content of manure, but integrated nutrient removal systems have been proposed that would use digester energy to power other equipment that would divert nutrients away from land application to other uses. In addition to generating renewable energy, anaerobic digestion leads to reduced odor pollution, fewer pathogens, and reduced biochemical oxygen demand. Digestion stabilizes the volatile organic compounds that remain in the manure so that they can be landapplied with fewer objectionable odors; so many farm digesters have been installed to address

neighbors’ complaints. There is little change in the nutrient value of the manure and organic matter that passes through the process, which can then be used as fertilizer. For more information, see Environmental Benefits of Anaerobic Digestion. There were 151 digesters operating at commercial livestock farms in the United States as of May 2010, according to the U.S. AgSTAR website. While the focus here is on manure, any organic matter (“digestate”) can be processed in a digester. Wastewater sludge, municipal solid waste, food industry wastes, grain industry and crop residues, and paper and pulp industry wastes are other materials that are processed in digesters. Addition of organic matter from offfarm sources to a farm

Manure Handling digester is referred to as “co-digestion”. The additional material can increase biogas output and can also generate “tipping fees” paid by the off-farm source. Digester designs The three main designs for farm-based digesters are the covered anaerobic lagoon, plug-flow, and complete mix (or continually stirred tank reactor). The solids content of the material to be digested is an important criterion in the choice of digester design. Plug-flow digesters work best at a solids content of 11–13 percent, so they work well with dairy manure from operations that collect it by scraping or other methods that do not add much additional water. Complete-mix digesters work at a wider range of 2–10 percent solids, which makes them suitable for a greater variety of materials including swine manure and pro-

cessing wastes as well as dairy manure. Variations on these three basic designs have been developed to enhance biogas output and/or to deal with varying moisture levels and other digestate characteristics. Livestock facilities best suited for digesters It is not practical to run the manure from all livestock through digesters. The potential for methane production from livestock waste depends on size of the farm operation, freshness of the waste, and concentration of digestible materials in the manure. Free-stall dairy operations with daily-scraped alleys work well with digesters because the manure does not get mixed with dirt or stones and is moved into the digester while fresh. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and

getting credit for it Digesters reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as measured by warming potential. However, some people are confused by the fact that a digester doesn’t reduce CO2. The methane from a digester is destroyed through combustion in an engine, flare, or other device. Combustion actually produces CO2 and water (H2O). Methane (CH4) is considered to be around 23 times as powerful as CO2 in its effect on global warming, however, so the overall impact of converting CH4 to CO2 is considered beneficial. Burning biogas reduces greenhouse gas emissions in two ways: first, when manure is stored in a conventional liquid handling system without a digester, it typically emits a certain amount of methane-containing biogas. When that methane is collected

in a digester and burned, it then will not escape into the atmosphere and cause warming. Second, electricity generated from that digester biogas will typically replace fossil fuel-generated electricity. There will be a reduction in CO2 emissions from not burning that fossil fuel. There are at least two ways that a farm digester operator can generate revenue by burning biogas that contains methane. One way is to sell carbon credits. Such sales are generally handled through a thirdparty intermediary aggregator firm that audits the digester initially to verify the methane quantity and aggregates those quantities into an account that is sold to a buyer who has committed to some level of greenhouse gas reduc-

Economics A19


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tion. The aggregator then monitors performance over some agreed-upon contract period. Another way of generating revenue is by marketing renewable energy credits (RECs) to an electrical utility that is under mandate to generate part of their electricity from renewable sources. In Minnesota, for example, utilities must obtain at least 25 percent from renewable sources by 2025. The REC value would typically be negotiated as part of the power purchase agreement between the utility and the digester operator. More stringent water quality regulations are also pressuring livestock operations to minimize nonpoint nutrient losses and in the future may also of-

fer nutrient credit trading opportunities to generate additional revenue. Air and water quality Digestion converts volatile organic compounds in manure to more stable forms that can be land-applied with fewer objectionable odors; so many farm digesters have been installed to address neighbors’ complaints. Nutrients do not disappear in a digester, although some may settle out. Organic nitrogen is converted to ammonium during digestion, so the ammonium level in the digestate typically rises. This conversion may make the nitrogen more rapidly available to the crop once land applied, which may offer opportunities to change appli-

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cation rates and timing. Without a change in nutrient amounts, adding a digester is unlikely to have a large impact on water quality. Digesters are often included along with manure storage facilities, solids separators, and composting facilities in an improved overall system. Taken together, the system may offer great opportunities to improve water quality by transporting the manure nutrients to fields where they are most needed and applying them when the crops need them most. Manure fiber utilization Use of separated dairy manure fiber for bedding is common, despite concerns that it might increase mastitis problems. The concern is greatest in warm and moist conditions. Determining the impact on mastitis is complicated by a number of factors, including different ways of measuring the concentration of bacteria in bedding (by weight on a wet or dry basis or by volume); changes in bacterial levels in bedding during the time it sits in the stall; the relationship between bacteria in the bedding and on teat ends; and the impact of bacteria in bedding and on teat ends on the occurrence of mastitis and on milk quality. More research is needed to clarify the impact of bedding type on mastitis, in the context of the many other management factors on a typical dairy farm. The economic value of solids as an off-farm soil amendment appears to vary widely, depending on the seller’s marketing expertise and location. Capital and requirements and operations and maintenance costs The capital requirements to install a digester will vary widely depending on digester design chosen, size, and choice of equipment for utilization of the biogas and/or for separating out manure fiber. The current capital cost range for complete digester systems is estimated at $1,000 to $2,000 per cow depending on herd size, with the cost to maintain an engine-generator set at $0.015 to $0.02/kWh of electricity generated. An

Economics A20

Page 19 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Economics from A18


Section A - Page 20 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Economics from A19 AgSTAR regression of investments made versus herd size at 19 recent dairy farm plug-flow digesters gave a result of $566,006 + $617 per cow in 2009 dollars. Ancillary items that may be incurred are charges for connecting to the utility grid and equipment to remove hydrogen sulfide, which could add up to 20 percent to the base amount. Figuring the ancillary items at 10 percent, the investment works out to $1.2 million for a 700-cow dairy operation, going up to $2.7 million for 2,800 cows. A similar regression for thirteen mixed digesters gave $320,864 + $563 per cow. A solids separator would add up to another 12 percent to these amounts. There is considerable interest in digester designs that are economically feasible for smaller farms, but some digester components are difficult to scale down. A complete mix digester with separator installed on a 160-cow Minnesota dairy farm in 2008 cost $460,000, or $2,875 per cow. Another recent study found that the electrical generation

equipment made up on average 36 percent of total investment for a group of 36 digesters, suggesting that substantial cost savings may be possible in situations where the biogas can be used for heating rather than to produce electricity. Public incentives The federal government and many states offer incentives for installing digesters. The 2008 Farm Bill included two grant and loan programs that cover digesters — the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) and the ValueAdded Producer Grant Program. REAP provides grants of up to 25 percent of project cost and loan guarantees of up to $25 million. Value-Added Producer Grants can provide planning costs and working capital. Utilities will also sometimes underwrite part of the cost of the electrical generating equipment. Potential challenges when installing a digester While most farm-based digesters in the U.S. generate electricity with the biogas, negotiating an

acceptable agreement with the local utility is often a challenge. Arranging financing and obtaining permits are other challenges that producers have noted. A potential concern with accepting off-farm wastes is that on livestock farms with small land bases, the livestock manure alone may already have too much nitrogen and phosphorus for the cropland available. Imported nonfarm organic wastes would contain additional nutrients which could exacerbate the cropland nutrient imbalance. The tipping fees and added gas output need to be weighed against potentially greater manure hauling costs to take the effluent to more distant cropland where the nutrients can be utilized. The bottom line A digester is a major capital investment, and calls for a careful engineering and economic analysis of the particular situation. Consultants and computer decision tools are available to assist with the analysis. Published digester eco-

nomic assessments tend to show that the most successful digesters are those that have generated added value from separated manure fiber, charged tipping fees from accepting off-farm food

processing wastes, or had a nearby high-value use for the biogas or electricity. Pathogen reduction is another frequently-cited benefit of digestion. Electricity sales alone are not usually

enough to cover costs. Even an unprofitable digester may be regarded as successful if it provides nonmonetary benefits such as odor control. Source: www.extension.org

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lysts who didn’t expect the report to have much impact on the markets. USDA’s latest Livestock Slaughter report shows that the pace of dairy cow slaughter in May fell 1.4 percent below last year, according to the June 20 Daily Dairy Report (DDR). Dairy producers sent 247,700 head to slaughter this May, which is 3,600 fewer cows than last year and 20,300 fewer than in April. “Based on the reduced slaughter, May’s higher year-overyear milk production, in part, appears related to an expanding milking herd,” the DDR said. The July Federal order Class I base milk price was announced by USDA this week at $18.91 per hundred-

weight (cwt.), down 2 cents from June, $3.40 above July 2012, and equates to about $1.63 per gallon. That raised the 2013 Class I average to $18.32, up from $16.34 at this time a year ago, and compares to $18.55 in 2011, $14.60 in 2010, and $11.08 in 2009. The AMS surveyed butter price averaged $1.5590 per pound, down 9.9 cents from June. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.6826, up 4.6 cents. Cheese averaged $1.7806, down 5.8 cents, and dry whey averaged 57.1 cents, down fractionally. Looking “back to the futures;” second half Federal order 2013 Class III contracts portended an $18.48 per hundred-

weight average on June 14. That figure slipped to $18.35 as of late morning June 21. Checking the cash dairy markets which awaited Friday afternoon’s May Cold Storage report; block cheese closed Friday morning at $1.7250 per pound, up a quarter-cent on the week and three quarter-cents above a year ago. Barrel closed at $1.7175, down 5 1/2-cents on the week but 2 1/4-cents above a year ago. Only one car of block traded hands on the week and none of barrel. The AMS-surveyed U.S. average block price fell to $1.7552, down 2.2 cents. Barrel averaged $1.7709, up 0.9 cent. Cheese production re-

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mains very active with additional Class I milk supplies finding their way to the vat, according to USDA’s June 17 Dairy Market News (DMN). “While inventories are steady, buyers are looking to acquire product for third quarter in case summer production slows manufacturing,” DMN said, and “cheese demand is felt to be increasing.” Cash butter saw a 3 1/2-cent drop on the week to $1.50, 9 cents below a year ago. Two cars found new homes. AMS butter averaged $1.5688, up 1.9 cents. Butter production varies across the country, according to DMN. Churn operators indicate cream is available and cream demand from

ice cream was higher the second week of June and luring cream loads away from the churn. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.73, up 2 3/4-cents on the week. Six cars were sold on the week. Extra Grade remained at $1.70. AMS powder averaged $1.6816, down 0.2 cent, and dry whey averaged 57.42 cents per pound, up 0.6 cent. Storms across much of the U.S. the week of June 10 affected late planting schedules, according to DMN. Heat in the southern tier of states was stressing cows and production was beginning to show signs of slowing down. Northern areas of the country were cooler. Delays in planting and

TRACTORS 2007 N.H.TG305 255 HP, Front/Rear Duals, Deluxe Cab, 1750 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $129,500 2011 N.H.T6030 4wd, Cab w/NH 840 TL Loader, 800 Hrs. . $79,900 2007 N.H.TT60A 2wd Utility Tractor, 60HP, 1056 Hrs. . . . . . $13,995 2007 N.H. TC55DA 4wd, ROPS, EHSS, Rear Remote, New New Holland 270TL Loader, 251 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,995 2001 N.H.TN75 w/810TL Loader, 4wd, ROPS, 3564 Hrs. . . $20,625 2009 N.H. T8020 200HP, Rear Duals, Deluxe Cab, 1604 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,500 1969 IH Farmall 856 2wd, Recent Engine, Clutch and TA, Fast Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900 2011 N.H. T7.210 4wd, Rear Duals, w/NH 850TL Loader, 1800 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $123,000 2012 N.H. T6050 4wd, Bar Axle, 16x16 SPS Trans w/NH 845TL Loader, 800 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $86,250 2010 Mahindra 5035 Shuttle Trans. w/Ldr, R1 Tires, 440 Hrs. $24,995 2006 Kubota L3430 4wd, Cab w/AC, HST Trans., Loader, Front Boom & Snowblower, 2550 Hrs... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,625 2009 N.H. Boomer 3040 4wd, Factory Cab, HST Trans. w/NH 250 TL Loader & Woods 90X Backhoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2010 NH T4030 4wd, Cab, 75 HP, w/NH 810TL loader, 190 Hrs, Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500 2009 Kubota MX5100 4wd, ROPS, Loader, 384 Hrs, Like New $22,500 2005 JD 790 4wd, w/Loader & Front JD Snowblade, 8x2 Trans, R4 Tires, 218 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,950 1950 Farmall H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,750 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder. . . . . . . . . $4,200 N.H. 824 2 Row Corn Head for a N.H. 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900 1999 N.H. 824 2 Row Corn Head to fit N.H. 900 . . . . . . . . . . $2,800 2000 N.H. 930B 6' 3pt. Finish Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,820 2002 Woods SS74 3Pt. Snowblower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,150 2007 N.H. BR740A Round Baler, Twine Only. . . . . . . . . . . . $18,950 2011 N.H. BR7060 Silage Special Round Baler w/Crop Cutter, Hyd. Reverser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,500 2004 N.H. 451 3pt 7' Sickle Bar Mower, Like New . . . . . . . . . $6,400 2003 Avalanche 1416 Windrow Merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 2007 Krause 7400-24WR Disc Harrow 23' 11” w/Tine Levelers. $30,625 2011 Landpride RCM5615 15’ Batwing Rotary Cutter . . . . . $11,200 N.H. 990W Pickup Head for NH 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 2004 N.H. 1432 13’ Hydraswing, 2 Point Swivel Hitch, Flail Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 2008 Krause 8200 31WR-31’ Disc Harrow w/Tine Levelers . $35,000

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late harvest of forages have processors worried about continued milk supplies. Class I usage levels are lower as schools end their sessions. On a brighter note, USDA reports that April fluid milk sales were up. An estimated 4.3 billion pounds of packaged fluid products were sold in the U.S., up 1.1 percent from April 2012. Conventional fluid sales were up 0.6 percent while total organic fluid sales were up 13.5 percent from a year earlier. Things are also tough down under. FC Stone’s June 17 eDairy Inside Opening Bell reports that New Zealand dairy sector debt nearly

Mielke A22

2005 N.H. 1432 13’ Hydraswing Discbine, Drawbar Swivel Hitch, Flail Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 2000 Vermeer 504L Round Baler, 4x5 w/Kicker Wheels, 2 Available Your Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 JD 1710 Chisel Plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,800 JD 30’ Disc Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,875 Kinze 12 Row Corn Planter - Mechanics Special . . . . . . . . . $13,750 1993 N.H. 166 Hay Inverter w/Extension. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,800 1998 Krause 4941WR Disc Harrow 24’4”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 NH 320 Square Baler w/70 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,300 2008 NH 1432 13’ Hydraswing Discbine, Drawbar Swivel Hitch, Flail/Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 Knight 3130 Reel Auggie Mixer Wagon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 2000 N.H. 1431 13’ Hydra Swing Discbine w/Rubber Roll Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,500 1987 N.H. 316 Square Baler w/.75 Pan Thrower, Nice Cond. . $4,995 Grimm Hay Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $595 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2012 N.H. W50BTC Compact Wheel Loader w/Cab, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $71,250 2012 N.H. W80BTC Compact Wheel Loader w/Cab, Glide Ride, Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $86,000 2012 N.H. C227 Compact Tractor Loader, Cab w/Air, Pilot Control, 72” Bucket, Air Seat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,750 1998 Hyundai HL760-3 Wheel Loader, 5310 Hrs.. . . . . . . . $56,000 2010 N.H. W130BTC Tool Carrier w/Bucket & Forks, 1069 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $119,500 2012 Case 221E Compact Wheel Loader w/Cab, 151 Hrs., Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $74,950 2005 N.H. LB75.B TLB, Cab w/Air, E-Hoe, Glide Ride, 3480 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,000 Cam 6 Ton 18’ Full Tilt Trailer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,480 ATTACHMENTS 2009 FFC 96” Hi Flow Snowblower, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 2011 N.H. McMillion Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9” Auger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950 2011 N.H./Harley 72” SSL Power Rake, Like New. . . . . . . . . $7,495 2012 N.H./Bradco SSL Trencher, 6”x4' Dig, Like New. . . . . . $4,995 2012 N.H./Sweepster 72” SSL Broom, Like New . . . . . . . . . $4,995 COMING IN SOON 2004 NH FX40 Sp. Harvester w/Pickup & 6 Row Corn Head, 4wd, Processor, 3035 Engine Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POR 1990 Hesston 8400 Sp. Windrower w/14’ Dual Sickle Header, 1255 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POR

Page 21 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Mielke from A16


Section A - Page 22 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Mielke from A21 tripled the past decade to $30.5 billion in 2012. Some New Zealand farmers are expected to have difficulty servicing their loans in the year ahead, despite potentially higher milk prices. Meanwhile; the June 18 Insider Closing Bell reported that Tuesday’s GlobalDairyTrade (GDT) auction prices started to climb. The weighted-average price for all products rose 1.1 percent, and five of the seven products that traded posted higher averages. Butter prices rose 4.7 percent to $1.7804 per pound. Adjusted to 80 percent fat, the price was $1.7369. Skim milk powder rose 3.2 percent to $1.9432; whole milk powder climbed 2.2 percent to $2.1174; and anhydrous milkfat advanced 1.7 percent to $2.0815. Cheddar prices fell 6.5 percent to $2.0765 per pound. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted four requests for export assistance this week to

sell 310,852 pounds cheese to customers in Asia and North Africa. The product will be delivered through September 2013. At our deadline we were awaiting word about what adjustments, if any, California’s Department of Food & Agriculture (CDFA) will make in the state’s minimum milk pricing formulas. However, results of a new study indicate California’s dairy producers could benefit from joining the Federal milk marketing order system. DairyBusiness Update editor Dave Natzke reminded listeners in Friday’s DairyLine that CDFA issued temporary changes to minimum milk pricing formulas last winter, resulting in about a 25 cent per cwt. increase in the price paid to California dairy producers early this year. Those adjustments expired in May, however, and another hearing to consider additional adjustments was held on May 21. CDFA was expected to an-

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nounce any changes the afternoon of June 21 along with its July Class I milk prices. I’ll have details next week. Meanwhile; members of three major dairy cooperatives, producing about 80 percent of California’s milk, commissioned a study last winter to see if the state’s dairy producers should join the Federal milk marketing order system as a means to improve milk prices. Results of the study conducted by Dr. Mark Stephenson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Dr. Chuck Nicholson, Penn State University and commissioned by California Dairies, Dairy Farmers of America, and Land O’Lakes, are sketchy, according to Natzke, but the coop leaders believe the study shows that joining the

Federal order system would benefit dairy producer pay prices. Staff from the three coops are planning membership meetings to share specific results of the study, and will begin to draft Federal order language to initiate the process, Natzke said. One piece of enabling legislation has already been introduced in Congress. That bill would allow for

California’s unique “quota program” in any new Federal order. Creating a Federal order is a complex and lengthy process, requiring petitioning of the USDA, scheduling and conducting hearings and, ultimately, putting it to a producer vote, which would require a two-thirds majority vote for implementation, Natzke reported, and

some estimate the process could take 14 months or more. “So, in the meantime, California dairy producers will still be looking to CDFA to provide temporary price adjustments,” Natzke concluded. Complete details are found in this week’s DairyBusiness Update or log on to www.dairyline.com .

1983 IH 5088 MFWD, cab, air, 4830 hrs, 138 PTO HP, like new 20.8x38 and 18.4x26 radials, duals PTO, 3 remotes, very, very clean original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000

1987 NH 311 baler, hydraulic bale tension and NH 70 hydraulic drive bale tension, extra sharp and clean, one owner, low use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500

2002 NH TS110 MFWD cab, air, 16 speed, PS LHR, 27 MPH, 3443 hrs, 18.4x38 radials rear, 14.9x28 fronts, 10 front weights and fender, 4 remotes, very clean, runs ex$27,500

2010 JD 7430 MFWD, cab, air, 20 speed power quad LHR front suspension 1920 hrs ex 18.4x42 radials on bar axles ex 16.9x28 radials front with JD 741 SL loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$92,500 2010 JD 85D hydraulic excavator cab, air, front blade 36 inch bucket side swing boom 16 in rubber pads on steel undercarriage only 520 hrs, like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$78,500 5-2008 JD 6230s cab, air, 24 speed power quads 2 premiums 3 standards 1100 hrs up . . . . . .JUST IN 2006 JD 6420 IVT MFWD cab, air 3859 hrs ex 18.4x38 and 14.9x24 radials 3 remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$41,500 2005 JD 8220 MFWD, cab, air, 1809 hrs 3 ptos 4 remotes ex 20.8x42 radial axle duals ex 480/70R/30 fronts 18 front weights quick hitch very very sharp one owner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$125,000 2000 JD 444H rubber tired loader 5030 hrs cab, 8ft bucket JRB quick coupler auxiliary hydraulics real good 17.5x25 tires very clean dry tight runs ex.....$45,000 quick tatch forks available . . . .$3,500 2000 JD 7610 MFWD, cab, air, 16 speed power quad 20.8x38 radials rear 16.9x28 radials front fenders 3 remotes 2700 one owner hrs very sharp . .$60,000 1996 JD 6200 MFWD cab, air, 16 speed PQ RHR 4665 hrs, 18.4x34 on R+P axles 14.9x24 fronts 3 remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 1956 JD 420U ex 14.9x28 rears 3ph wide front front weights very clean one owner runs ex . . . . .$5,000 2010 Gehl 6640E skid steer pilot controls 80 hp cab with heat and a/c hi flow hydraulics, 12.-16.5 tires 674 hrs ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 2008 NH T6030 Plus MFWD, cab, air, 16 speed power shift LHR 1900 hrs, buddy seat ex 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials 4 remotes NH 850TL SL loader super sharp clean looks like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$58,500 2006 NH TS100A MFWD Deluxe cab, air, 16 speed powershift LHR 1991 hrs ex 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials front fenders 4 remotes factory loader prep very clean and sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,500 2005 NH TM140 MFWD cab suspension 3277 hrs 18 speed full powershift 4 remotes plus mid mount joystick ex 18.4x42 radials on bar axles ex 14.9x30 radials front fenders and weights real clean sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,500 2001 New Holland TL 90 MFWD, Deluxe cab, air, 76 hp, 3497 hrs, ex 18.4x34 and 380/85R/24 radials 24 speed LHR very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . .$24,500

1999 NH 8870 MFWD, cab, air, 710/70R/38 and 480/70R/30s 4900 hrs, 4 remotes very clean sharp one owner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$47,500 1981 Ford 6700 2WD factory cab dual power 18.4x34 rears dual pto and remotes only 1000 hrs on new complete engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 1976 Ford 5600D 8 speed 16.9x30 rear tires 4954 hrs remotes clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1977 MF 1105 factory cab 4664 hrs multi power ex 18.4x38s dual pto and remotes very clean and sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1978 MF 285D multi power dual remotes 4443 hrs ex 18.4x34s rear real clean sharp one owner . .$9,000 1968 MF 135D clean original 14.9x28 rears runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 1985 Komatsu WA350-1 rubber tired articulating loader 3 1/2 yard 9 ft bucket 5600 hrs real clean tight runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 1996 CIH 5230 Maxxum MFWD, cab, air, 90 hp 5.9 Cummins power LHR 18.4x38 and 14.9x24 fronts 4300 hrs CIH 520 Sl loader ex original one owner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 1992 CIH 5220 2WD cab, air, 80hp, powershift LHR only 3218 hrs ex 18.4x34 radials dual pto and remotes ex original one owner . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1994 CIH 995 2WD cab, air, 85HP turbo ex 18.4x30 radials dual pto and remotes hi-lo shift IH 2250 loader very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 1981 Case 1490 2WD 75hp, cab, air, power shift ex 18.4x34s dual pto and remotes 5600 hrs, clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1977 IH 986 cab, air, good TA 3ph dual remotes and pto ex 20.8x38s clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,750 1998 Agco White 8410 MFWD, cab, air, full power shift LHR 145 hp 3 remotes dual pto 20.8x38 and 420/85R/28 radials front fenders 6123 hrs clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 1981 White 2-135 MFWD factory cab 5100 hrs 540+1000 pto 3 remotes 20.8x38 radials 18.4R26s front very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1977 White 2-70 MFWD, laurin cab 5510 hrs, 18.4x34 rears 13.6x24 fronts with Lessard SL loader front pump runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 1976 White 2-105 factory cab 6174 hrs ex 20.8x38s dual pto and remotes very clean runs ex . . .$8,000 2002 Komatsu D39EX Komstat hydrostatic drive 6 way dozer 1248 hrs 1900 lbs 9ft blade ROPS and sweeps super nice low hour ex . . . . . . . . . .$36,000

AC ED40 diesel tractor 40 hp 3ph runs good .$3,500 NH 575 wire tie baler hydraulic hitch hydraulic bale tension and pickup head with 77 pan type kicker ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 1988 NH 326 baler with model 70 hydraulic drive bale thrower hydraulic bale tension ex . . . . . . . . .$5,500 Allis Chalmers small square pto baler . . . . . . . .$500 2009 JD 582 silage special 4x5 round baler crop cutter edge to edge mesh wrap or dual twine tie wide pickup head 6700 bales very sharp ex cond $22,500 Claas 66 Rollant 4x5 round baler netwrap and twine ex cond ex baleage baler one owner . . . . . . . . .$6,000 2003 CIH RBX 452 round baler 4x5 same as NH BR740 wide pikcup head bale ramps ex belts ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 NH 644 silage special round baler wide pickup head bale ramps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JUST IN 2007 NH 1412 discbine impeller conditioner very clean ex low usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine, late model rubber rolls ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 Kuhn 5001 TH 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder ex cond low use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Krone 1010 swadrow 32 ft rotary hayrake ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 Kverneland 3ph 3bt plow ex cond . . . . . . . . .$1,000 AC 3ph balance head 7ft sickle bar mower . . .$1,000 MF 3ph dyna balance sickle bar mower all guards and knives new ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 NH 62LB loader never used fits NH TM series $5,000 Loader brackets for JD 640 loader for JD 6000 series tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$500 CIH or Hesston 8581 big bale accumulator for big square baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 JD front suitcase weights . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$100 each JD and IH rear wheel weights . . . . . . . . . .$150 each 14.9x28 clamp on duals 20.8x38 clamp on duals 20.8x38 9 bolt axle duals IH 9 bolt 3 1/2 inch hubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1000 20.8x42 radial clamp on duals . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 COMING IN 2008 JD 458 silage special netwrap able ramps density gauge 2007 JD 7130 premium 2WD cab air power quad 2500 hrs corner post air seat 18.4x38s on R+P axles 2006 JD 5425 MFWD 1507 hrs JD 542 SL loader 9+3 trans

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by Phoebe Hall

Life through wet seasons as well as droughts Here I sit, 50 years later, thinking back to the birth of my third son. He was born prematurely and had breathing problems. Because I was nursing, I couldn’t go home without him, so I sat in the hospital physically well, but worried about my baby. I felt lonely, but was not truly alone; my Savior was with me. After a few days, my baby was healthy and I gratefully took him home. However, his troubles were not over yet. At one month of age, after hours of painful crying,

he had surgery for a strangulated hernia. I had no idea how dangerous that could be. The things we discover by becoming parents! Happily, we got him to the Doctor in time and outwitted Satan again. Another downside to this situation was that my husband had spent so much time with me in the hospital he had fallen far behind in the farm work. It took a lot of long days to make up for lost time in the fields. On a brighter note, that year we were one of the few farms in the northeast to have a cherry crop due to a late spring freeze. The lake

lage of the wedding pictures of all the kid’s weddings recently, we noticed another interesting weather fact from our third-son’s life. There, in front of the church, standing beside the getaway-car, was our son and his new bride. But what we also noticed behind them was the large lake in the corn field across the road. The year was June, 1989 and we had just lived through one of the worst and wettest springs on

record, on the heels of the 1988 drought. About a week after that picture was taken, the rains quit for the remainder of the year, resulting in a severe drought. I’d have to say that this year is a piece of cake compared to some of the ones we’ve had to endure in the past. The reason they call it ‘weather’ is because you don’t know ‘whether’ it will be good or bad. Is the climate really changing? It’s always chang-

ing…isn’t it? An elderly retired farmer always said, “I’ll really start worrying when the politicians start controlling the weather.” By the way; our youngest son owns more animals than we do, with all his beef, pork, sheep, and fowl. The torch has been passed on! But God is my helper. He is a friend of mine! God has rescued me from all my trouble. (Psalms 54:4&7a) TLB

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Page 23 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

A Few Words

saved us that time, but in the fall we had an early freeze the first week of September resulting in field corn freezing along with the grapes. After that, it was all salvage, or as some say, ‘trying to make lemonade out of lemons’. Thank goodness for the cherry crop bonus! The fall frost nearly did us in. Last week we uncovered some of our son’s handiwork behind the barn. Engraved long ago in the cement, carved by his hand, we saw his name and the date. It was May, 1980 and spring had been one deluge after another just like this year so we decided that we should pour a cement pad from the barn, down over the creek, to the pasture. It certainly has helped keep the cows out of the mud in the wet years. While looking at a col-


Section A - Page 24 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

FFA Banquet at Northern Adirondack Central School

Kristen Carpenter, NAC FFA Reporter The FFA Banquet was held on Friday, June 7, at Northern Adirondack Central School to recognize achievements the members of the FFA had received for the 2012-2013 school year. We were proud to inform our community that there were 200 guests and 87 FFA members present at the banquet. We awarded those members who received their Discovery, Greenhand, Chapter, Proficiency, and Empire degrees. We awarded some members with a Star Award. Austin Trombley took home the Star Award for the Discovery Degree, Mathew Brior, Chelsey Trombley, and Hanna Otis took home the Star Award for the Greenhand Degree, and Loyal Gregory took home the Star Award for the Chapter Degree. We would all like to say goodbye to those members who are leaving us this

year as they were a very important part of our FFA family. Nick Forcier, Katherine Parrotte, Allison Seymour, and Bailey Beers will be missed by each and every one of us as they move on to another part in their lives. We are proud of their accomplishments and dedication to the FFA. Empire Degree recipients were Nick Forcier, Allison Seymour, and Alden Kerr. The Empire Degree requires a great amount of work and a requirement of 300 hours of work experience or $1,000 to complete their application. An agricultural related field is also required. We honored the 5th and 6th grade FFA members who have taken part in activities and other events in FFA this year. We also recognized those members who took part in the New York State FFA Convention in the competitions of Ag Mechanics, Floriculture, Jr. Chapter Meeting, Farm Business

(From left to right) Our graduating seniors, Katherine Parrotte, Allison Seymour, and Nicholas Forcier receiving scholarships from our Chapter Alumni.

Management, Quiz Bowl, Jr. Tool ID, Food Science, and Maple Science. We are proud to announce that our Boy Maple Team placed second in New York State consisting of Nick Forcier, Alden Kerr, Mitchell Garceau, and Matt Brior. The FFA would like to give a big thanks to our Chapter Alumni and all people and businesses that have

helped us and supported us throughout the year. A big thank you also goes out to Tileigh Sturtevant and Isabelle Almodovar for singing for us during the banquet. We wouldn’t be the chapter we are now without them. Congratulations to all members who received a degree, award, or recognition, and farewell to those who have said their goodbyes.

Jordan elected to serve as the NYS FFA District 3 President

(From left to right) Aubrey Kerr, Nicolle Brothers, Matt Brior, and Chelsey Trombley receiving their Greenhand Degree. Photos courtesy of Northern Adirondack Central School FFA

4-H District Public Presentation event held 4-H Members from Herkimer, Madison, Oneida and Oswego Counties converged upon Tractor Supply in Rome, NY, on Saturday May 11, from 11 a.m.- 4 p.m., to participate in 4-H North Central District Public Presentations. All of the youth participating at Tractor Supply in Rome have completed various levels of competition to reach the 4-H District Event. In the past the District Event was the pinnacle of accomplishment for these participants. This year the 4-H State Event has been resurrected and provides our senior speakers an opportunity to compete against fellow New York State 4-H Members at Cornell on May 18. The following youth represented Oneida County at the District Event: Samantha Fairchild, Whitney Semans, Katie Wilson.

Both Samantha and Whitney qualified to represent Oneida County at the 4-H State Public Speaking Event at Cornell University. Cornell Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development programs connect youth to the resources of Cornell University and the land-grant system, strengthening the next generation of inventors, entrepreneurs and problemsolvers. Activities and events inspire and shape youth, give them opportunities to master skills, enrich their knowledge, and work with others who can positively influence them. To become involved in 4-H, contact your local Cornell Cooperative Extension office 315-736-3394 or visit this website: http://cce. cornell . e d u / Yo u t h / P a g e s / 4 - H Yo u t h Development.aspx.

Greenwich FFA is proud to announce that Gabrielle Jordan was recently elected to serve as New York State FFA District 3 President. As District 3 President, Gabby will be responsible for representing 15 northeast chapters at the state level. She will travel around the area and state throughout the next year attending leadership conferences, meeting FFA members and agricultural advocates, and serving New York State FFA at various events. Gabby’s public speaking and teamwork experiences with the Greenwich FFA will help her as she

speaks to groups interested in agriculture and organizes workshops in schools. Her SAE (Supervised Agricultural Experience) is in outdoor recreation and dairy science. Gabby works as a ski instructor at Willard Mountain and as a counselor at the Town of Greenwich Arts and Crafts Program. She also shows cows at the Washington County Fair, is a member of the National Honor Society, and a part of the statewinning FFA Parliamentary Procedure team. She is looking forward to spending her next year advocating for agriculture and working

with students and local leaders.

Gabrielle Jordan, New York State FFA District 3 President. Photo courtesy of Greenwich FFA

Cornell Cooperative Extension Memorial Scholarship Award

Cornell Cooperative Extension is pleased to announce the awarding of a $500 scholarship to graduating senior, Abagail Pilbeam daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Pilbeam of Stittville, NY. This award is made possible through the Mary Planow, Shirley Nessle, Bruce Field, Eric Kresse, Alberta Schallenberg, and Melissa Vaill Scholarship Fund. The program is designed to promote the 4-H Youth Development Program mission; to enable youth to develop the knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and behaviors to be competent, caring adults.

Applicants are invited to interview based on applications submitted to Cornell Cooperative Extension. Criteria for this scholarship include; that the applicant be a graduating senior, have been actively involved in Oneida County 4-H for a period of at least three consecutive years and be accepted into a two or four year college, trade, technical or business school. Questions regarding this scholarship or additional information can be obtained by contacting Jeanette Lewis at Cornell Cooperative Extension, 315736-3394 extension 108.


by Katie Navarra Grazing livestock have the potential to maximize or exceed their daily intake requirements ultimately leading to increased production than if fed stored forages. “Well-managed pastures are generally higher in quality than any other forage,” Karen Hoffman, Resource Conversationalist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, said. Livestock allowed to graze consume the plant when it is in the vegetative stage of growth before it sends out a seed head. “The plant will be lower in fiber, which means it is more easily digested by the animal, with the help of bacteria in the rumen of the animals that have one,” she added. Pastures also

tend to be higher in protein and energy than other forages due to the stage of plant growth. Furthermore, grazing animals are outside and able to absorb natural vitamins and minerals, including Vitamin D. Why graze? Grazing can allow the farmer to reduce the cost of feeding animals. “They (the animals) do the work of harvesting, it’s high quality, and generally doesn’t need to be supplemented with expensive feeds,” Hoffman said. High-producing dairy animals are an exception. “It is recommended that some supplemental energy be fed as pasture can’t meet their energy needs alone,” she added. Providing pastures for grazing has the potential to reduce feed costs, but “it all depends,” said

Mick Bessire with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties, “to make grazing as profitable as possible you have to keep costs under control and have a process of evaluation.” Management and operating practices play an important role to making grazing a more efficient and more profitable endeavor. “I have seen farms with 100 cows and 500 acres that can’t make it; however, I have seen farms with 150 cows and 250 acres do very well,” he said. How much pasture do I need? Successful grazing requires daily monitoring of the animal’s health, body condition score, fluids intake and productivity. “(Farmers) need to be

Management and operating practices play an important role to making grazing a more efficient and more profitable endeavor. Photo by Scott Bauer

particularly mindful of/familiar with the animal’s body condition score,” Bessire explained. The animal’s health should be monitored on a daily basis. The pastures should also be checked daily for the amount of forage available to ensure the ani-

mals have enough to eat. The animal’s age and stage of development will require different amounts of forage. “Yearlings or those in lactation take more forage than a dry cow,” he said. For example, a dry cow requires 2.5 percent of its body weight in forage whereas

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a yearling needs 3 percent and lactating animals need 3.5 percent. The soil type and the type of forage available play a critical role in determining how many animals a pasture can support. “Up to 30-40 percent clover is the best option,” he said, “clover supports more animals than straight grass and it provides nitrogen fixation to help fertilize the soil.” In general, the ratio of animals to pasture land is determined using animal units. Each animal unit is equal to 1,000 pounds of body weight. Pastures with decent soil and good forage coverage should be able to support one animal unit per acre. Bessire said, “horses eat an awful lot and are actually equivalent to 2 1/4 animal units meaning it takes 2 1/2 acres for one horse.”

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Page 25 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Grazing livestock


Section A - Page 26 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

House of Representatives rejects Farm Bill Fortenberry’s payment limit reform amendment passes On June 20, the House of Representatives rejected final passage of the House Farm Bill by a 234-195 vote. In an even more historic move, however, the full house voted, 230 to 194, in favor of an amendment offered by Representative Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE) that would cap farm program

payments so they support family farmers and ranchers, not passive investors and mega-farmers. “We thank Representative Fortenberry for leading the charge to close the gaping loopholes that have made a mockery of farm program payment limitations,” said Traci Bruckner, Assistant Policy Di-

rector at the Center for Rural Affairs. “Representative Fortenberry’s tireless advocacy for reducing the subsidies that mega-farms use to drive family farmers out of business is laudable,” continued Bruckner. According to Bruckner, the final passage of the House Farm Bill failed in

part because of huge cuts to the food stamp program and because the rules established for the debate did not allow for further consideration of needed reforms to federal crop insurance premium subsidies. The House Rules Committee did not allow amendments that would have reduced pre-

mium subsidies for those making over $750,000 in adjusted gross income. Nor did they allow a vote on an amendment that would have placed a cap on federal crop insurance premium subsidies to mega-farmers. “Representative Fortenberry’s amendment was a good amend-

ment, an historic silver lining, in a farm bill that otherwise did not adequately reflect rural America’s most important priorities,” added Bruckner. “The failure of this farm bill vote sends a clear signal that the Farm Bill needs much greater reform to achieve passage.”

tile the soil is and its ability to absorb nutrients. Soil that has been neglected may be short on micronutrients. “(You) need to look at the micronutrients as part of the tool kit these days in convention and organic agriculture because we have not been putting these back into the soil and it is out of balance,” he added. Soil pH is an important part of the pasture’s ability to produce high-quality forage. “This part of the world (Columbia and Greene County, NY) is naturally acidic,” he said. Grasses and legumes do well with a pH of 6.2-6.5. If pH is too low or too high prevents plants from picking up other nutrients in the soil. Soil samples can be taken to local Cooperative Exten-

sions for testing. “Know your soil and what’s in it and amend it,” he emphasized. A plant that is not receiving adequate nutrients will pass the lack of nutrition onto the animal leading to poor nutritional health for the animal or the need to supplement with grain or hay to keep the animal well fed. Getting started with grazing Incorporating grazing into the feeding routine requires planning and preparation. Infrastructure and acreage are important considerations. Newly converted lands or leased lands may require fencing and a water source. “If you are leasing land make the agreement for a long enough period of time to make it worth the infra-

structure investment,” Bassire said. Tax breaks and other incentives are available to land owners who consider leasing property to farms. “There is a lot of land that is under-utilized, especially in New York,” Bessire said, “I get calls every day from people looking to lease out under-utilized land.” Funding is available through the Soil and Water Conservation Districts, the USDA and NRCS. Ultimately, neighbor relations is key. Liability and infrastructure can be stumbling blocks to connecting landowners with livestock owners,

but developing solid relationships with neighbors go a long way in smoothing this over. Once pastures are established, create a grazing management plan. “Rotational grazing can produce almost double the amount compared to continuous grazing,” Bassire explained. In a rotational system the animals are allowed to graze 1-3 days and are then moved to another pasture. The vegetation is given enough time to rebound and regrow. The length of the rest period varies based on the season. In the spring it averages two weeks, but can be as many as four to six during

the middle of the summer. In conventional grazing, the livestock prefer the young tender grass rather than taller grasses. An overgrazed root system contracts and cannot take up nutrients to sustain growth. The growth slows down and turns into fodder. “Determine how many acres are needed, and how often to rotate the animals through the pastures/paddocks,” Hoffman concluded, “It’s a balance between forage supply and forage demand and making sure there’s enough pasture for the amount of time they are in the paddock.”

Grazing from A25 Pasture health critical A pasture’s nutritional value is directly related to its soil type, pH and fertility. Soil types are measured on a scale of 1 to 8. “A type 1 soil is capable of producing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre,” Bessire explained, “a type 3 is only able to produce between 3 to 3.5 tons of dry matter per acre.” A Soil Survey Handbook is available and includes charts by county that indicate the tonnage of dry matter the soil will likely produce under optimum conditions. “If the soil is good and at optimum fertility and pH that is a good start,” he said, “but some sort of harvest is needed (i.e. hay) is the only sure way to measure.” The pasture’s viability is also based on how fer-

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HAY & FORAGE CIH DC132 Discbine Deere 1327 Discbine Hesston 17’ Tedder Jiffy Block Deck Kuhn 6T-3200 Rake Kuhn GA4120 Rake Kuhn SR110 Rake Kuhn FC4000 Kuhn SR11V Rake Kuhn 4120 Rake NH 900 Forage Harvester NH 451 Sickle Bar New Idea 5209 Pequea Bale Wagon CONSTRUCTION Case 621B Wheel Loader Case 1845C Skid Steer Kubota KX121-3 Excavator PLANTING & SEEDING CIH 955 Dry, 4x CIH 955 6x11 CIH 900 Liquid, 6x CIH 5300 18x7 Drill Deere 7000 Dry, 6x IHC 5100 21x7 Drill

Deere 7200 6x Vac Hardi 500 Gallon Sprayer IH 5100 Drill 18x7 White 5100 4x Liquid White 6100 4x Dry Planter COMBINES A&L Grain Cart CIH 1020 17 1/2’ CIH 1660 CIH 1460 CIH 1043 Corn, 4x CIH 2144 CIH 2388 CIH 1020 20’ CIH 963 6x CIH 1063 6x CIH 1660 RWA IH 943 Corn 4X IH 1420 Killbros 475 Cart UM 625 Cart MISCELLANEOUS 1480 Combine Parts 1440 Combine Parts 1460 Combine Parts IH 710 & 720 Parts Plow Pronovost P800 Snowblower

2991 State Highway 5S • Fultonville, NY

518-853-4500 www.randallimpls.com ©2007 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com


Soil and agronomic factors (e.g., soil test P level, pH, organic carbon content, texture) have a well-known influence on P availability to crops, but what about the type of P fertilizer? When it comes to pre-

dicting P availability, research indicates that agronomic factors are much more important than the source or form of P fertilizer. Virtually all P for phosphate fertilizer is mined from “phosphate rock”,

which is largely apatite (a calcium-phosphate mineral). Most phosphate fertilizers for commercial production are produced by treating phosphate rock with sulfuric or phosphoric acid. Further treatment with

anhydrous ammonia yields a large class of fertilizers known as the ammonium phosphates. Monoammonium phosphate (MAP), diammonium phosphate (DAP) and ammonium polyphosphate (APP) are

the most common commercial sources of fertilizer P. They are all highly water-soluble (>90 percent) and release orthophosphate (P taken up by plants and microbes) to the soil solution as they dissolve. The polyphosphates in APP must be hydrolyzed to orthophosphate before crops can utilize, but this reaction occurs rapidly enough in soils where P availability is similar among ammonium phosphates. While research suggests MAP and DAP act similarly on a P-for-P basis in terms of P availability, DAP has more ammonium (18-46-0) than MAP (typically 1152-0) and increases pH in the fertilizer band more than MAP. Some yield reductions have been observed where DAP has been banded on higher pH soils, so MAP is recommended for banded P applications on alkaline and calcareous soils. What about liquid versus dry P fertilizer? Since both dry and liquid-based P fertilizers deliver orthophosphate to the soil solution, crop yield and P uptake tends

to be similar for equivalent amounts of P applied from dry or liquid fertilizer. The fact that liquid P fertilizers are already in solution might seem like an advantage, especially under dry conditions, but this amount of water is an extremely small fraction of the amount held in the crop rooting zone at field capacity. The bottom line with inorganic P fertilizers is that common fertilizer P sources applied at equal rates perform similarly when applied the same way under the same conditions. Fertilizers that contain 60 percent water-soluble P have been shown to be effective at meeting crop P needs over the season. Consideration should be given to soil pH and whether MAP or DAP is preferable when banding/incorporating P fertilizer. Price differences between MAP and DAP vary annually and should also be considered when planning your P fertilizer needs. Learn more at: www.extension.umn.edu Source: Miner Farm Report, May 2012— Eric Young

The Tire Shop A Multi Line Dealer

NEW & USED TIRES • TIRE REPAIR AUTO ACCESSORIES ON THE FARM TIRE SERVICE CUSTOM WHEELS • OIL CHANGES 155 Erie Blvd., Canajoharie, NY

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Best Quality • Best Service • Best Price

Page 27 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Phosphorus (P) fertilizer options: Does source matter?


July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Section A - Page 28


Your Country Folks Classified Ad Representative I’m here to make it easy for you to place your ad.

Call Me FREE On Our 800 Phone Line From Anywhere in the Continental United States

1-800-836-2888 Or Fax (518) 673-2381 Attn. Peggy E-mail: classified@leepub.com

Deadline is Wednesday at 3 PM

We Accept MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express

Payment May Also Be Made by Check or Money Order

RATES

(Per Zone) FIRST 14 WORDS

One Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9.25 Two or More Weeks . . . . . . . . . $8.25 ea. wk. Each Additional Word . . . . . . . 30¢ per wk.

Lee Publications, Country Folks Classified, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Page 29 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Hello I’m P eggy


Section A - Page 30 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!

Jan. 7-8-9

2014 Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4, Thurs. 9-3

YORK FAIRGROUNDS 334 CARLISLE AVE, YORK, PA 17404

Come See Us at Empire Farm Days Booth 1022 SW Main Tent

AUGUST 6, 7, 8 2013

Rodman Lott & Son Farms • Seneca Falls, NY

DONT MISS THESE EXHIBITORS!! ABC York • W-320, W-321 ABM • E-363 ABS Global • W-309 ACR Metal Roofing & Siding Dist • 128 Adams Supply • E-346 ADM - Crop Risk Serivces • 212 AET Consulting, Inc • 260 Ag Com Inc & Miller Chemical • E-359, E-360 Ag Essentials • 258, 259 Ag-One Associates • 236, 237, 238 AgChoice Farm Credit • 234 Agpoint Construction Services • 426, 427 Agri Analysis Inc • 437 Agri-Basics, Inc • 242, 243 Agri-Dynamics, Inc • 413 Agri-King, Inc • 126 Agri-Nutrition Consulting, Inc • L-300 Agri-Plastics Mfg • W-357 Agri-SC • 209 Agri-Service, LLC • O-104 Agri-Trac US • W-330 Agromatic Inc • 219, 220 AIC Dairy Technologies • 532 Albers Dairy Equipment • W-300, W-301 Alltech, Inc • 217, 218 American Farm Products • 531 Anderson Group • W-348B Animal Medic • E-373 Appleby Systems, Inc • 537 Art Farm USA • 247, 248 Atlantic Power Solutions Inc • W-335, W-336 Atlantic Tractor • W-353 Augusta Seed • 538 Automatic Farm Systems • 121 AutoVent LLC • 241A B&R Distributing, Inc • S Baker Ag Lime • 208 Balsbaugh Insurance Agency, Inc • E-348 Beco Equipment • 721, 722 Beiler-Campbell Realtors & Auctioneers • L-306 Beka Max of America • 527 Bergman Mfg Inc • 274 Bernard C. Morrissey Insurance • 424 Binkley & Hurst Lp • E-352 BioFertile LLC • 435 Bio-Vet, Inc • W-313 Bobcat of York Sales & Rental • E-379 BouMatic • 120 Brecknock Builders, LLC • 518, 519 Bush Hog Inc • E-353 Business Lease Consulting, Inc • W-325 CBM Lighting • L-212, L-213 Cargill Feed & Nutrition • E-315 Cedar Crest Equipment • 130 Cen-Pe-Co • W-351 Channel Bio, LLC • 232, 233 Chemgro Seed • W-323, W-324 CK Replacement Stalls • 443 Class of America • 102 Clean Cutter Flail & Tiller Blade Co • 419 Cobra Torches • 526 Conewango Products Corp. • 223, 224 Conklin Company • 529, 530 CowKühlerZ • 270 Crop Production Services • 200, 201, 202, 203 CRV • 211 Cummings & Bricker Inc • E-354 Custer Products Limited • J, K, L Dairy Marketing Services, Diary Cooperative Inc, Dairy Farmers of America, Dairy One Cooperative • E-340, E-341, E-342, E-343 Dairymaster USA, Inc • E-367 Deer Country • W-353 Delaval, Inc • 227B, 228, 229, 230, 231, 229A Dick Meyer Co., Inc • 284 Diller Ag Equipment • O-312 Doeblers • W-339, W-340 Donegal Insurance Group • 401 DTN / The Progressive Farmer • W-311 DuPont - Pioneer • E-349, E-350, E-351 Dyna Products • O-307 Dyna Tech Power • 250, 250A

E&F Ag Systems, LLC • E-311 EasyFix Rubber Products of North America • 528 Eli Fisher Construction • 441 EM Herr Equipment, Inc • 446 Emm Sales & Service, Inc • E-369, E-370 Equipment Service • 442 Esch Mfg • E-375 Everett Cash Mutual Insurance Group • E-314 Evergreen Fence Inc • 433 Express Flighting Supply • Q Farm and Land Realty Inc • L-301 Farm-Land Bale Wrappers LLC • W-356 Farmco Mfg • O-308 Farmer Boy Ag • 125 Feedmobile, Inc • E-368 Fight Bac / Deep Valley Farm Inc • E-313 Finch Services • W-353 Fisher & Thompson, Inc • 110 F.M. Brown’s Sons, Inc • 409, 410 For-Most Livestock Equipment - Garber Farms • 451 Franklin Builders • 225, 226 Fulton Bank • 206 Garber Metrology • W-338A GEA Farm Technologies, Inc • 104A Genex Cooperative, Inc • W-312 Glatfelter Pulp Wood Co • 711 Goodville Mutual Casualty Co • E-316, E-317 Great Plains Mfg., Inc • W-348A Gro-Mor Plant Food Inc • 127 Growers Mineral Solutions • 246 Growmark FS, LLC • E-321, E-322 H&S Manufacting Co. Inc • W-354, O-304 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 445 HARDI North America Inc • E-371 Hershey Ag • E-300 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 444 Hill Top Tire • 220A Hillside Ag Construction, LLC • W-337, W-338 Hoard’s Dairyman • L-208A Homestead Nutrition, Inc • 285, 286, 287 Hoober, Inc • E-377, O-314 Hoof Trimmers Association • W-314 Horizon Organic • W-329 Horning Mfg, LLC • 501 Hubner Seed • H-302, H-303 Hunter Insurance Associates • 411 IBA, Inc • E-327, E-328 Independent Ag Equipment (formerly GVM) • 114 Iva Manufacturing • E-318, E-319, E-320, E-320A J&J Silo Co., LLC • 291, 292 J.L. Gossert & Co. Forestry • E-347 J.S. Woodhouse Co., Inc • 440 Jamesway Farm Equipment • 135 Jaylor Fabricating • W-349 Kauffman’s Animal Health, Inc • E-331 Kel-Krop Enterprises LLC • W-306, W-307 Kent Nutrition Group • L-216 Keystone Concrete Products • 271, 272, 273 Keystone Group Ag Seeds • E-361, E-362 King Construction • 254, 255 King’s AgriSeeds, Inc • 403, 404 Kirby Agri Inc • w-326 Kubota Tractor Corp • 126A Kuhn North America, Inc • 100 Kuhns Mfg LLC • 448 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • E-376 Lancaster Ag Products • 612 Lancaster Dairy Farm Automation • 542, 543 Lancaster DHIA • W-332, E-333 Lancaster Farming • L-202 Lancaster Parts & Equipment • E-378 Lanco Manufacturing • W-347 Lanco/Pennland • 429 Land O’Lakes, Inc • H-306 Lauren Agri Systems • W-322 Lawn Care Distributors, Inc • 124 Lely USA, Inc • 111 Lester Building Systems LLC • E Lincoln Highway Cattle Eq • O-310C LR Gehm, LLC / CoPulsation • 416 Magic Massage Therapy • 716 Mahindra USA Inc • A, B

Mark Hershey Farms, Inc • 431 Martin Limestone Inc • 257 Martin Water Conditioning • 710 Martin’s Welding • W-335, W-336 Maryland Virginia Milk • E-323, E-324 McFarlane Manufacturing Co., Inc • U McLanahan Corporation • E-312 Mensch Manufacturing LLC • R, O-202 Messick Farm Equipment • 105, 106 Meyer Manufacturing Corporation • W-346A M.H. Eby Inc • W-355, O-317 Mid-Atlantic Dairy Assoc/PA Dairy Promotion Program • 235 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • E-364, E-365 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • CV Co-operative • 138 Miller Diesel Inc • E-308 Miraco • 129 MM Weaver • 103, O-106 Monsanto Co • W-352 Monty’s Plant Food Co • 269 Morton Buildings Inc • E-332, E-333 Mount Joy Farmers Co-op • 210 Mueller • 119 Multimin USA, JDJ Solutions, SyrVet/Prima-Tech • W-336, W-337, W-338 Muscle Products Corp • 412 Mycogen Seeds / Dow Agro Sciences • 213, 214 Nachurs Alpine Solutions • 244, 245 Nasco • E-345 NASF / Dr. Register • W-304, W-305 National Dairy Producers Organization, Inc • 707 National Farmers Org - NFO • 534 National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) • 241D National Penn Bank • 227A Nextire, Inc • E-380, E-381 New Holland Agriculture • 108, 109 North Brook Farms, Inc • 239 Northeast Agri Systems, Inc • 122 Northeast Feed • 214A Northeast Stihl • 511, 512 Nuform Building Technologies Inc • F NYCAMH • 241C O.A. Newton • W-302, W-303 Old Mill Troy • 417, 418 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 415 Outback Heating, Inc • W-318, W-319 Oxbo International • 104 P. L. Rohrer & Bro. Inc • 535 PA Farm Bureau • L-209, L-210, L-211, L-212 PA Farmers Union • 715 PA Office of Rural Health - Penn State University • 241B PACMA Inc • L-304, L-305 Patterson Farms Maple Products • 240 Patz Corporation • 131 PBZ LLC - Crop Care/Zimmerman Cattle Control • 113, 115 PDM Insurance Agency, Inc • E-326 Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-310 Penn Diesel Service Co • E-329, E-330 Penn Jersey Products, Inc • E-374 Penn State Agricultural Safety & Health • 241E Pennsylvania Certified Organic • 414 Pennsylvania Grain Processing, LLC • 536 Pennsylvania Service & Supply, Inc • 425 Perma-Column East, LLC • 438, 439 Petersheims Cow Mattress LLC • 137 Pik Rite, Inc • D PNC Bank • 277 PortaCheck Inc • E-335 Power Ag • 222A, 222B Power Systems Electric, Inc • E-382, E-383 Precise Concrete Walls, Inc • 256 Priority One • 432 Provita Animal Health • 205 Quality Craft Tools • H-301 Quality Seeds Limited • W-327 R&J Dairy Consulting • 402 Rain and Hail LLC • H-304 RCM International LLC • L-203 Red Barn Consulting, Inc • 207 Red Dale Ag Service, Inc • 400 Redmond Minerals • 261 Reed Equipment Sales • W-346 Reinecker Ag, LLC • 506, 507

Renaissance Nutrition, Inc • 290 Roto-Mix LLC • W-358 RSI Calf Systems • 267, 268 Ruhl Insurance • 407 Ryder Supply Company • E-372 S&I Pump Crete LLC • 278, 279 Salford Inc • W-350, W-350A Sanimax Marketing Ltd • 436 Schaeffer Mfg. Co. • L-201 Schulte Ind., Ltd • 541 Seed Consultants, Inc • W-341 Seedway, LLC • W-342, W-343 Select Sire Power, Inc • W-308 Show Ease Inc • 116 Shur-Co, LLC • E-307 SI Distributing Inc • 420, 421, 422, 423 Silo Stop • W-331 S.K. Construction, LLC • 533 Slaymaker Group • E-366 Smucker’s Meats • W-309A Snyder Equipment, Inc - Brite Span Buildings • 430 Sollenberger Silos, LLC • 140 Steiner • 508, 509 Steinway Eq • 500, 449 Stock and Leader, LLP • L-200 Stoltzfus Spreaders • 117 Stor-Loc • E-305, E-306 Straley Farm Supply • 221, 222 Stray Voltage Testing, LLC • E-325 SuKup Manufacturing • E-355 Sundance Vacations • 617 Sunova Worx, Inc • 539 Superior Attachments Inc • 288, 289 Superior Silo LLC • 118 Susquehanna Bank • 406 Susquehanna Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram • 525 Synagro • E-344 Syngenta • W-344, W-345 TA Seeds • W-315, W-316, W-317 Taurus Service, Inc • W-310 Team Ag, Inc • E-334 Tech Mix • 428 The Mill • 275, 276, 276A The Pennsylvania State University • 713, 714 TM Refrigeration LLC • 262, 263, O-103 Topstitch of New York • H-300 Triangle Communications, Inc • 241 Trioliet • E-353A Triple-M-Farms • 283 Trouble Free Lighting • P Twin Valley Farm Service / Dryhill • 505, 515, 449A Udder Comfort International Inc • 204 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - FSA • L-206 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NRCS • L-207 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NASS • L-208 Valmetal Inc • 136 Vermeer • 123 Vigortone Ag Products • 405 Vulcan Materials Company • 227 WA Johnson, Inc • L-302, L-303 Weaver Distributing • E-301, E-302, E-303, E-304 Weaver Insurance Agency • 249 Weaver’s Toasted Grains LLC • 408 Wenger Feeds • E-339 Wengers of Myerstown • W-351A Westfield Group • W-334 White Horse Construction, Inc • 215, 216 White Oak Mills, Inc • 434 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-310A Zartman Farms Cow Comfort • 107 Zeiset Equipment, LLC • 447 Zimmerman Farm Service • 504 Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 516, 517, 449B

Tuesday Mug Sponsor PA Farmers Union Men’s Room Sign Sponsor Bio-Zyme, Inc Building Sign Sponsor Triangle Communications, Inc

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586


Page 31 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013


Section A - Page 32 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Wet or dry conditions, we have the right combine for your harvest.

2004 Case IH 8010 1000 hrs deluxe cab, electronic sieve adj. U17986 $160,000

2008 Lexion 570 2300 hrs straw walker, Lexion field drive H000246 $135,000

2002 JD 9650 STS 4000 hrs yield monitoring, large single drive tires H000127 $75,000

2007 JD 9660 1917 hrs H000752 $243,063

2009 Case IH 6088 H000479 $214,812

2009 Case IH 8120 1000 hrs 4x4 track unit N17899 coming soon $294,000

2004 Case IH 8010 1500 hrs pro 600 monitor, field tracker CVT drive H000500 $156,250

1999 JD 9610 4520 hrs H000605 $56,250

1996 JD 9500 5084 hrs H000603 $41,250

2008 Case IH 3412 12 row hydr stripper plates U11560 $56,250

COMBINE HEADS

MOWER CONDITIONERS continued

Case IH 983 corn head (A)...................................................................................... $3,995 Gleaner 630 6RN corn hd off N-Series combine U19334 (A) ................................... $5,000 IH 963 6R head 1986 U12223 (B) ........................................................................... $5,384 Case IH 1063 corn head U12110 (B) ...................................................................... $5,384 Case IH 1063 corn head 1993 U12213 (B) ............................................................. $8,995 Case IH 1083 8R corn head 1991 U12202 (B) ...................................................... $18,995 Case IH 2212 12R corn head H001428 (B) ........................................................... $33,750 Case IH 2062 platform head H000496 (AC) .......................................................... $37,500 Case IH 1020 1993, 25ft 3”knives w/Crary air reel, 1 yr old U87319 (C) ............... $19,913 Case 1020 flex head H001706 (B) ........................................................................ $14,286 Case IH 2020 U17581 (B)..................................................................................... $20,634 Case IH 2212 corn head (B).................................................................................. $32,500 Geringhoff R12-30F 12 row fold w/roto disc (C)................................................. $111,113 Geringhoff Northstar 120 2008 (B)....................................................................... $56,250 Case IH 1020 flex head 20ft, 1.5” knives, 2007 (C)............................................... $18,313 Case IH 3020 flex head 25ft, 3” knives, 2011 (C).................................................. $27,700 JD 625 flex head 25’ H001505 (B).......................................................................... $9,995 RS70 header cart - fits 2062 platform head H000499 (AC).................................... $1,995 Claas 6R corn head 1996 H001543 (AC) ................................................................ $9,995

Krone EC9140 28ft triple disc mower, 2004, includes Easy Cut 32C and 9140 U08314 was $27,000 ..........................................................................................now only $24,000 Krone Big “M” 2002, 1460 eng hrs, 1052 cutter hrs, auto lube, 700/50R26 60%, 600/25R26.5 60% (C)................................................................................................... call NH 1495 SP mower 1985 H002453 (AC)..................................................................$6,995

MOWER CONDITIONERS NH 1441 2006, has shear hubs, rubber rolls (C).................................................... $24,888 Case IH DCX131 2004 2pt hitch, new cutterbar, rubber rolls U12232 (B) was $18,571 ......................................................................................... now only $14,900 Hesston 1365 2004 15’ U11555 (AL) ................................................................... $15,714 Taarup 4036C merger on rear 2000 U15363 (A)................................................... $12,900 Claas 3050C front mower U17567 (C) was $10,714................................ now only $8,462 NH 116 16ft sickle bar, hydra swing, good shape (C)............................................... $8,547 JD 4995 2006 H002316 (AC)................................................................................ $67,375 NH 492 9ft sickle bar mower 1994 H002627 (AC)....................................................$6,995 Case IH DC131 2pt hitch (A)..................................................................................$12,900 We reserve the right to change prices, or not sell an item, due to error in pricing.

BALERS NH 855 coming in....................................................................................................$5,833 JD 457 twine baler ..............................................................................................coming in JD 346 wire baler with 1/4 turn bale chute H000390 (B)..........................................$6,154 NH 74A 4x5 round, wide sweep pickup 2007, twine & netwrap (C) ........................$18,813

See our full used list on www.monroetractor.com

Stock up on combine parts! Available for any color equipment. - Bearings - Concaves - Knives - Straw choppers - Wear bars and more

Stop by or call our parts department today!

Call one of our agriculture locations: Adams Center, NY (AC) Jim Munroe II 866-314-3155

Albany, NY (AL) Danny Speach 585.236.7345

Auburn, NY (A) Clay VanNostrand 866-315-6311

Batavia, NY (B) James Kingston 866-320-2166

Binghamton, NY (BG) Jeremy Palmer 866-321-4277

Canandaigua, NY (C) John Poppoon 866-325-0388

Elmira, NY (E) Tom Sutter 800-866-8912

Hornell, NY (H) Kris Bower 800-866-8925


A View from Hickory Heights by Ann Swanson Table coverings and tables When I grew up at home we had a table with sort of a Formica top. Most of the time Grandma did not bother to cover it. When company came she put on one of her tablecloths. The tablecloths were made of a thick cotton material. When they got dirty they had to be washed and ironed. After the company left we used a tablecloth until it was dirty. After each meal we had to take everything off the table and shake out the crumbs. I loved Grandma’s tablecloths. They were

so colorful that they made the kitchen cheery. When the house was sold after both of my grandparents were gone I got several of the tablecloths. Most of them were square so I could only use them if my kitchen table was closed to its smallest size. The same was true for the dining room table. Mostly I used them for decoration. I need to say here that I am now on my third kitchen table and my second dining room set. I realized as I read through this that it was rather confusing. My mother-in-law cro-

cheted an oblong tablecloth for us as a wedding gift. I used that all the time on my feudal oak dining room set. When we traded the old set for a new oak set, I put that tablecloth away because it did not fit very well on the new table. That made me sort of sad because I knew my mother-in-law put a lot of work into her gift. The table we used in the trailer first was small. It was really made for two. We received it as a gift from my grandparents for our wedding. It was a perfect size for a trailer kitchen. It was sturdy and served many purposes. It was my painting surface, my sewing surface, and my baking surface. There are some home movies of the children climbing up on the chairs to “help” me make cookies. Mostly they liked to lick the

bowl when I had all the ingredients added in. Once the children were able to sit at the table I had to find a bigger one. I found an old set at a second-hand shop. It was all wood with four chairs.That was perfect for our family at that time. The top was not water proof so I bought some oil cloth to cover it. Do you remember when the stores had rolls of oil cloth? Now, it is very hard to find. Once in a while I see it in Amish country. When I put “oil cloth fabric” into the search engine I found a number of sources. I also found out it is still sold by the yard and you can actually order tablecloths. As usual, it does not have to be available locally to still be available. The internet is a convenient market place. I found fruit patterns,

The August Issue of

table. The table that I use now used to be my great-grandparents’ table from my grandfather’s side of the family. It has a history, but that is another story. Now, I seldom use a tablecloth — except for the holidays. I have made several of them to fit my new dining room set. The kitchen table now has a polyurethane finish so I no longer have to cover it. I do use place mats to set a festive table. I have received several sets as gifts. Today everything is convenience. It is easier than ever to wash clothes in our automatic washers and dryers, yet we use as little extra as we possibly can. We would never think of hauling out the old table linens that used to be the norm. Even at church we have gone to the plastic lace tablecloths. I must say I was

Hickory B2

HOSKING SALES

Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market w ww.cfmanestream.com

Will Focus On:

Alternative Therapies & Medicine Horse Farm & Stable Equipment This Issue will go to... Best of Gymkhana, Champlain Valley Fair, Essex Junction, VT, Empire Farm Days, Seneca Falls, NY • Ag Progress, University Park, PA th

DEADLINE: Friday, July 12

For advertising contact your sales representative today... or call 1-800-218-5586

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checkered patterns, camouflage, chalk friendly, stripes, polka dots, and even animal prints. One source told me their fabric was imported from Mexico. The Vermont Country Store had quite an assortment of fabrics and table cloths. The other thing I remember making with oil cloth was a “sit-upon”. We made those in Girl Scouts and filled them with crinkled up paper. As long as you sewed the seams well they did not leak so they worked well at camp. That wooden table I mentioned earlier moved to Hickory Heights with us. We used it until my grandfather had my present table refinished. When I put an ad for the table into the newspaper I got an offer from a restaurant that was revamping its dining room. They wanted only the table. That was alright with me since the chairs went well with my new

Weekly Sales Every Monday starting at 11:30 with Misc. & small animals, 1:00 Dairy. Call for more info and sale times. Our Volume is increasing weekly - join your neighbors & send your livestock this way! Monday, June 24th sale - cull ave. .65 Top cow $.83, bulls/steers $.70 $.98, bull calves top $1.23, heifer calves top $1.05, Dairy feeders $.50 - $.70. Slaughter hogs $.64. Monday, July 1st - Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. 3 Springing heifers from heifer grower. Monday, July 8th - Monthly Heifer Sale. Monday, July 15th - Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Sat., July 20th - In Wellsboro, NY - 9:00AM. J&C Wholesale Auction from Antique to Modern, check out website for pictures and full details. Monday, July 22nd - Normal Monday Sale. Monday, July 29th - Normal Monday Sale. Saturday, Aug. 31st - 2PM - Empire State Farms - Total Fullblood Wagyu Dispersal. 170 Head sell, for full details contact James Danekas 916837-1432, Mercedes Danekas 916-849-2725 or www.jdaonline.com. Saturday, Oct. 19th - sale held in Richfield Springs, OHM Holstein Club Sale Chairman Jason Pullis 315-794-6737. Call with your consignments. NOTE STARTING JULY 1ST WE WILL BE STARTING OUR MORNING MISC. & SMALL ANIMALS AT 11:30 AM DUE TO THE INCREASE VOLUME ALL OTHER SALE TIMES WILL REMAIN THE SAME. LOOKING TO HAVE A FARM SALE OR JUST SELL A FEW - GIVE US A CALL. ** Trucking Assistance - Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on our Web-Site. Call to advertise in any of these sales it makes a difference. Directions: Hosking Sales 6096 NYS Rt. 8, 30 miles South of Utica & 6 miles North of New Berlin, NY. www.hoskingsales.com Call today with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 6096 NYS Rt. 8 New Berlin, NY 13411

607-699-3637 or 607-847-8800 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771

Page 1 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Section B


Section B - Page 2 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

American Angus Auxiliary heifer purchased for $5,500 Proceeds benefit the Auxiliary’s scholarships and awards endowment. Promoting youth and the Angus breed is a main priority for the American Angus Auxiliary. Thanks to Tom McGinnis of Heritage Farm, who purchased the 2013 American Angus Auxiliary Heifer, the tradition continues. The heifer brought $5,500 during the All-American Angus Breeders’ Futurity on June 16 in Louisville, KY. Through her earnings, the elite female EXAR Rita 5681, donated from

Express Ranches of Yukon, OK, will provide for many Angus youth in the continuation of their education. The October 2011 daughter of Connealy Consensus 7229 offers a long line of topquality genetics including GAR EXT 614, a female whose progeny have broken several individual sale records in the Angus breed history. “We sincerely thank the donors, Express Ranches, and buyers, Heritage Farm, for help-

ing us in our commitment to the Angus breed and its junior members,” said Cortney Hill-Dukehart-Cates, Auxiliary President. “We’re thrilled about the opportunity that this will bring to others and continuing our mission.” McGinnis says the heifer comes from some of the best genetics in the business right now, and he’s excited to incorporate her into his herd. “Because of their commitment to Angus youth

store where I used to find them is long gone so I am not sure where you can get them at this point. That is the way life goes. You get used to using something, then, it is no longer available. Maybe it is time to rethink things. If I can get

my hands on some oil cloth I just might order a couple of cloths. It would give my kitchen the country flavor and brighten up my table. Ann Swanson writes from her home in Russell, PA. Contact at hickoryheights1@verizon.net

through scholarships and award endowments, I feel fortunate to be able to help the American Angus Auxiliary in its mission,” McGinnis said. “Purchasing the Auxiliary heifer is a worthwhile investment, and I am glad to see those dollars being passed on to the next generation of Angus leaders.” All proceeds from the auction benefit the Auxiliary’s scholarship and awards endowments,

which the Angus Foundation maintains. The scholarship and awards endowments benefit 10 Auxiliary scholarships; the Crystal, Grote and Spader Awards; the Silver Pitcher Award; the Miss American Angus contest; the All-American Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB) Cook-off contest; and the National Showmanship Awards. The awards and scholarships are presented annually during the Na-

tional Junior Angus Show, which is held this year in Kansas City, MO, July 5-11. For more information about the heifer auction or the American Angus Auxiliary, visit www.angusauxiliary.com. Find out more about the American Angus Auxiliary Scholarship Endowment Fund and other endowments maintained by the Angus Foundation at angusfoundation.org

Hickory from B1 happy yesterday after brunch to just be able to wash the thing off and not have to carry it home to wash and iron. When my son and his wife married we used lacy plastic cloths on the tables so we had quite a collection of them. The

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations. ur tO n u o Ab uctio g Ask rse A Listin Ho ndar e Cal

Having A Horse Auction? Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.

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August September October November/December

July 12th August 16th September 13th October 11th

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Search for all types of auctions at any time. New w updatess alll the e time!! Visit the All-New Accessibility Center at Empire Farm Days

August 6-8, 2013 Rodman Lott & Son Farm, Seneca Falls, NY

Featuring: • Disabled Motivational Speaker and Accessibility Product Design Consultant Ed Bell • Assistive Technology Product Exhibits • Modified Wheelchair Demos • Farm Safety Demos • Farm Safety and Accessibility Webinars • Health Screenings • Occupational Therapy Consulting • Counseling Services • Financial Planning Assistance • Accessibility Support and Referral Services Be sure to stop by and see us next to the Health & Safety Center. New this year, the Country Folks Accessibility Center focuses on the physical challenges faced by farmers with disabilities, and showcases the assistive technologies and resources available to help them maintain their quality of life and passion for farming.

For more information, call 877-697-7837 or visit www.empirefarmdays.com


Come join us to celebrate the 100th anniversary of historic Fishkill Farms and its recent protection from future development, insuring that it will remain as farmland in perpetuity. Our Hudson Valley orchard, started in 1913 by Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau Jr., is one of the few remaining farms in the area. Three generations of Morgenthaus have operated the farm against great economic odds and high development pressure to save the farmstead and preserve it for the community. Now, the family has found a failsafe way. The Morgenthaus have transferred the right to sell the land for development to the Dutchess Land Conservancy, which has designated

the property farmland in perpetuity. This is in keeping with Farm Founder Henry Morgenthau Jr.’s vision and wishes. He was FDR’s close advisor, and in 1933 became Chairman of the Farm Credit Administration, which saved thousands of farms across the country. He went on to become Secretary of the Treasury, but at heart he was a farmer. Such an important moment for the farm and the community calls for a smashing good party! Fishkill Farms Centennial Celebration and Gala: 100 Years of Farming, 1913-2013, Saturday July 6, 2013 Program: All Day: Cherry picking, Hayrides and Lunch (11 a.m.-3 p.m.)

4 p.m.: Ribbon Cutting and talk with 2nd and 3rd generation farmers Robert and Joshua Morgenthau 5 p.m: Screening of historic home videos, never publically released, filmed by Henry Morgenthau Jr, recording political events from 1930-1942 including a secret huddle at Fishkill Farms in 1942 of Henry Jr., FDR, and Winston Churchill. 6 p.m.-10 p.m.: Centennial Gala • A Magnificent Firework Display (bring picnic blankets) • Moonlit Orchard Hayride Tours • A Foot-stomping live Dixieland band • Barbecue dinner and drinks — chicken, roast pork, cornbread, grilled corn on the cob, baked beans, old fashioned root beer floats

• A historic ‘throwback’ special: a slice of homemade cherry or apple pie for the price of $1. There will be no admission charge but we ask for donations at 6 p.m. for our Gala, a suggested $10, to cover the cost of the fireworks and music for this event and to support the farm in our mission to grow fresh, wonderful food for the community. If one donates through our website, www.fishkillfarms.com, the donation comes with a limited-edition old-style Fishkill Farms Centennial poster. Farm History This uniquely beautiful farm with its cascading hills of pick-yourown apples, peaches, cherries and vegetables

Fishkill B10

Page 3 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Historic Fishkill Farms celebrates 100th year, placing farmland into permanent conservation program

The 12"x18" Centennial Poster advertising the upcoming Fishkill Farms Centennial Celebration and Gala 100 Years of Farming; 1913-2013 that will be held on Saturday July 6, 2013. Photo courtesy of Fishkill Farms


Section B - Page 4 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, July 1 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale starting with calves. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-420-9092 or Auction Barn at 518-392-3321. www.empirelivestock.com • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

• 10:00 AM: Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 840 Fords Bush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Produce Auction. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 or 518-568-2257 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-8682006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, July 3 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, July 4 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752

• 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800321-3211. Friday, July 5 • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Monday, July 8 • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 10

Tuesday, July 2

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 11167 Big Tree Rd., E. Aurora, NY 14052 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

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• 12:30 PM: 1175 Slater Creek Rd., off State Rte. 248 between Canisteo & Greenwood, NY. Township of Hartsville Real Estate Auction. 104 acre farm. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, July 11 • 3:00 PM: NY Steam Engine Assn. Show Grounds, 3349 Gehan Rd., off Rts. 5& 20, 5 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. NYS Two Cylinder Expo XI JD Consignment Auction. 1st day of Expo XI Show. For show info contact John & Cheryl Jensen 585-526-6607. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585-2339570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Friday, July 12 • 10:00 AM: Bath, NY (Steuben Co.) Haverling High School Auditorium. Steuben Co. Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp & James P. Pirrung licensed Real Estate Brokers. Pirrung Auctioneers, 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515

THESE

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY 13849 607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190 www.drchambersauction.com EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY • 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HILLTOP AUCTION CO. Specializing in Agricultural & Construction 863 Smith Rd., Clyde, NY 14433 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 www.hilltopauctioncompany.com HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 • www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

• 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com

Saturday, July 13 • 9:00 AM: 601 North Peterboro St., Canastota, NY. Annual Lyon’s Hay Camp & Large Rental Return Auction of Late Model Construction Equipment and more. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.alexlyon.com

Friday, July 19 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030

Monday, July 15 • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. .Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 17 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, July 20 • 9:00 AM: Wellsboro, NY. J&C Wholesale Auction. From antique to modern. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 11:00 AM: Tully, NY. Slice of Summer at Currie Holsteins & NY Holstein Summer Picnic. 100 of the finest Holstein in North America will sell. NY Picnic hosted by the Currie family & all are invited. Sale managed by The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Monday, July 22 • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY . Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, July 27 • 9:00 AM: Martins Country Market, Waterloo, NY. Annual Summer Equipment Auction. Selling complete farm lines, estates, selling eq. for farmers, dealers, construction, bank reposes, large & small trucks. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030. • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Horse sale. Tack at 9 am, horses at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: 2139 Ganaan-Southfield Rd., Southfield, MA. Gillette Welding & Fabrication Auction. Trucks, trailers & equip., welders, equip., shop equip., tools & other misc. equip. Jacquier Auctions, 413-5696421 auctioneer2@jacquierauctions.com www.jacquierauctions.com Sunday, July 28

Wednesday, July 24

• 10:00 AM: Washington Co. Fairgrounds, Rts. 29 & 392, Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY. Tri State Antique Tractor Club, Inc. 2nd Annual Consignment Auction of antique & modern equipment. 2nd day of Antique and Irwin Show. For info contact Bill Herrick, 518692-1106. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585-233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Monday, July 29 • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 31 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, August 2 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, August 7

Wednesday, July 17

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE 817 State Rt. 170 Little Falls, NY 13365 315-823-0089 • 315-868-6561 cell We buy or sell your cattle or equipment on commission or outright! In business since 1948

LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 MOHAWK VALLEY PRODUCE AUCTION Auctions every Tuesday at 10 am 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY 13339 518-568-3579 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. • Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774 NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

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AUC TION CALENDAR


Section B - Page 6 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Auction Calendar, Continued (cont. from prev. page) • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 2:00 PM: New York Steam Engine Assoc. 5th Annual Consignment Auction. 1st day of Pageant of Steam show. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585-233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Thursday, August 8 • Next to Empire Farm Days, Rt. 414, Seneca Falls, NY. Important 2 Day Auction. Aug. 8 & 9. Trucks, Farm Equipment, Large Construction Equipment, Landscape Supplies &Equipment, Recreational Equipment, Fleets, Complete Liquidations, Repo’s, Leas Returns & Consignments of all types! Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, August 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, August 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, August 24 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Produce Auction Inc., Penn Yan, NY (Yates Co.). Late Summer Farm Equipment, Light Construction, Equipment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com Wednesday, August 28 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, August 31 • Lancaster Co., PA. Androscoggin Holsteins Dispersal. One of the highest BAA herds in the country & the finest Red & Whites! Owner: John Nutting, Leeds, ME. Co-managed by Stonehurst Farm and The Cattle Exchange. Sale managed by The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

• 2:00 PM: Empire State Farms. Total Full blood Wagyu Dispersal. 170 head sell. For full details contact James Danekas at 916-8371432, or Mercedes Danekas at 916-8492725 or visit www.jdaonline.com. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, September 4 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • WNY Gas & Steam Engine Assoc. Inc. 3rd Annual Consignment Auction, 1st day of show Sept 5-8. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585-233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Saturday, September 7 • 9:00 AM: Town of Lansing Highway Department, Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing (Ithaca), NY. Lansing Municipal/Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 11 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, September 14 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY (Geneseo Area). Groveland Fall Consignment Auction. Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Landscape Machinery, Nursery Stock. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Horse sale. Tack at 9 am, horses at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Sunday, September 15 • 11:00 AM: H&L Auction, Malone, NY. 2nd Annual Franklin County Auction. Seized vehicles, cars, trucks, 4 wheelers, snowmobiles, heavy equip. H&L Auctions, Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787, cell 518-569-0460, Edward Legacy 518-483-7386, cell 518-832-0616 Wednesday, September 18 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, September 19

• 10:00 AM: Conestoga, PA. 2 Day Sale! Frey Farms Milking Herd & Bred Heifer Dispersal. Same starting time both days. Over 900 Head of sire ID, AI sired and served Holsteins! Owners: Frey Farms, Inc. Sale managed by The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, September 21 • 9:00 AM: Lamb & Webster, Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors, Machinery, Lawn & Garden Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 25 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, September 26 • 11:00 AM: Homer, NY. Bud Ranch Holsteins Complete Dispersal. 150 outstanding registered Holsteins. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, September 28 • Morrisville, NY. SUNY Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. 100 high caliber Holsteins. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, October 5 • 9:00 AM: CNY Farm Supply, Cortland, NY. Construction Equipment, Farm Machinery, Trucks, Recreational Vehicles & Trailers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 9:00 AM: Monroe Co. Fleet Center, 145 Paul Rd., Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal/Contractor Vehicle & Equipment Auction. Heavy Equipment, Tandem & Single Axle Trucks, Trailers, One Tons, Pickups, Vans, Cars & Landscape Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 12 • 9:00 AM: The Fairgrounds in Hamburg, NY, 5600 McKinley Pkwy (closest to Clark). Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Cochranville, PA. Ar-Joy Farm Select Sale. Owners: Duane & Marilyn Hershey. 100 of the finest Holsteins at Ar-Joy. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 16 • Fairfield, Maine. 300 Cow & Bred Heifer Dispersal for Dostie Farm. 200 Holsteins, 100 Jerseys and crosses. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-474, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 Thursday, October 17

• 11:00 AM: Chateaugay, NY. Rocklan Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Mike Garrow, owner. 175 Head sell! One of the greatest type and production herds in the world! The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, October 19 • Richfield Springs, Pullis Farm. OHM Club Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 26 • 9:00 AM: NYS Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, NY. Onondaga County Area Municipal Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Ithaca, NY. New York Holstein Harvest Sale. Hosted by Cornell University Dairy Society. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, November 2 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 2 • 11:00 AM: Sharon Springs, NY. Ridgedale Farm Sale. Wayne & Jen Conard & Family. 100 head of the deepest, highest type Holsteins in the world! The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Thursday, November 14 • TBA - Watch for details. Pedigree Power Sale II. Seagull Bay Dairy Inc., American Falls, ID & Triple Crown Genetics, Jerome, ID. Sale co-managed by the Cattle Exchange & Burton Consulting, LLC. One of the most significant Holstein offerings of all time. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, November 16 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, November 29 • Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 840 Fords Bush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Black Friday Consignment Auction. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 or 518-568-2257 Saturday, December 7 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY (Geneseo Area). Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Landscape Tools, Building Materials. Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Cattle Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 14 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Horse sale. Tack at 9 am, horses at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com


MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT June 24, 2013 Calves: 45-60# .42-.48; 6175# .54-.58; 76-90# .75-.80; 91-105# .8250-.85; 106# & up .9250-.95. Farm Calves: 1-1.05 Started Calves: .44-.52 Veal Calves: .95-2.60 Open Heifers: .80-1.10 Beef Heifers: .91-.99 Feeder Steers: .7250-.9250 Beef Steers: 1.17-1.20 Stock Bull: .75-1.2750 Beef Bull: 1.02-1.08 Sow: one at 19 Butcher Hogs: one at 90 Feeder Pigs (ea): 50-130 Sheep (ea): 45-75 Lambs (ea): 65-205 Goats (ea): 65-270; Kids 4592.50. Canners: up to 83.50 Cutters: 84-88 Utilty: 89.50-90.50 Rabbits: 5-26 Chickens: 4-17 Ducks: 6-23 *Middlesex Auction is pleased to announce we have an additional Beef Buyer “JBS USA” joining us every Monday! ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT June 17, 2013 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 75-82; Boners 80-85% lean 72-81; Lean 8590% lean over 1000# 63-74, under 1000# 40-60. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 55-140; 80-90# 55100. Vealers: 100-120# 50-58; 90-100# 50-62.50; 80-90# 45-60; 70-80# 35-50. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA No Report *Sale every Wednesday at 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA June 25, 2013 Beef Cattle: Canners 45-78; Cutters 78-82; Util 78-85; Bulls 90-105; Steers 100120; Hfrs 75-90. Calves: Growers 90-120; Veal 70-90. Hogs: Feeders 40-70; Roasters 70-140; Sows 3842; Boars 5-10. Sheep: 40-55 Lambs: 1.50-1.75 Goats: 100-140; Billies 125175; Kids 40-120 NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA June 25, 2013 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 12-30; 61-75# 17-38; 76-95# 34-50; 96-105# 40-50/cwt; 106# &

up 39. Farm Calves: 60-170/cwt Start Calves: 30-36/cwt Heifers: 60-92/cwt Steers: 70-96/cwt Bulls: 90-100/cwt Canners: 10-70/cwt Cutters: 71-87/cwt Utility: 88-95.50/cwt Lambs: 105-145/cwt Sheep: 45-95/cwt Goats: 47.50-280 ea. Rabbits: .50-10.50 ea. Poultry: .50-19.50 ea. Hay: 10 lots, .25-5/bale HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ June 25, 2013 Livestock Report (/#): 48 Calves .26-1; 33 Cows .42.85; 3 Easy Cows .22-.57; 12 Fat Steers 89-117 ea.; 14 Feeder Steers (/#) .90-1.65; 4 Feeder Hfrs .90-1 Easy Steer 47; 20 Sheep .40-1.20; 63 Lambs (/hd) 28-49.71, 52 (/#) .90-1.65; 23 Goats (/hd) 40-240; 7 Kids 42.50-90 ea. Poultry & Egg Report (/hd): Heavy Fowl 2.70; Silkies 5.50; Geese 19; Misc. 1; Pullets 5-8; Chicks 1.50-8; Bantam 7; Roosters 4-11 ea; Bunnies .75-3.50; Ducks 56.50; Rabbits (/#) 1-2.30, (ea) 7; Pigeons 3.25-4.25. Grade A Eggs: Brown XL 1.45-1.55; L 1.35-1.45. Hay/Straw/Grain Report (/bale: 75 Timothy 2.85-3; 541 Mixed .50-3.60; 309 Orchard .50-3.50; 245 Grass 3.20-3.60; 40 Mulch 85; 183 Rye Straw 1.50-2.10; 20 Posts 1.25. CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No Report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET Chatham, NY No Report VERNON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY June 17 & 20 2013 Calves: Hfrs. .40-1; Grower Bulls over 92# .80-1.50; 8092# .60-1.25; Bob Veal .10.55. Cull Cows: Gd .68-.86; Lean .40-.76; Hvy. Beef Bulls .70.98. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 800-1500; Handling Hfrs. 850-1350; Springing Hfrs. 900-1400; Bred Hfrs. 800-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 8501800; Open Hfrs. 450-850; Started Hfrs. 150-400; Service Bulls 500-1000. Beef: Feeders .60-1.20; Hols. Sel .85-1.01. Lambs: Market 1-1.80; Slgh. Sheep .20-.50. Goats: Billies .80-1.75; Nannies .70-1; Kids .10-.80. Swine: Sow .30-.55

CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No Report CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY June 17, 2013 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 1.10-1.45; 80-92# .65.80; Bob Veal .55-.57. Cull Cows: Gd .79-.8450; Lean .73-.7750; Hvy. Beef bulls .92-1.01. Beef: Feeders 300-750# 116-126; Veal 150-299# 110145; Hols. Steers 87-92. Lamb & Sheep: Feeder 180215; Market 55-70. Goats: Billies 230-265; Nannies 70; Kids 27-125; Bottle Babies 10. Swine: Hog 125-300# 40-90.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY No Report DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY June 19, 2013 Calves: Hfrs. 1-1.70; Grower Bull calves over 92# .851.55; 80-92# .55-.85; Bob Veal .35-.55. Cull Cows: Gd .75-.85; Lean .68-.84; Hvy. Beef Bulls .85.99. Beef: Ch .91-1.16 Lamb & Sheep: Feeder 1.25-1.55. Goats: Billies 130; Nannies 80-130; Kids 50. Swine: Feeder Pig (/hd) 40 GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY June 20, 2013 Calves: Hfrs. .70-.95; Grower Bulls over 92# .80-1.325; 8092# .575-.975; Bob Veal .20.49. Cull Cows: Gd .78-.85; Lean .60-.775; Hvy. Beef Bulls .65.895. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY June 17, 2013 Calves: Grower over 92# 1.175-1.425; 80-92# .70-.85; Bob Veal .10-.45. Cull Cows: Gd .76-.845; Lean .64-.765; Hvy. Beef Bulls .94. Beef: Ch 1.10-1.15; Hols. Ch .94-1.06. Lamb & Sheep: Market 1.225-1.30 Goats: Nannies 120 Swine: Sow .415-.45; Hog .665-.67. BATH MARKET Bath, NY June 20, 2013 Calves: Grower Bull calves over 92# 1.175-1.35; 80-92# .65-1.125; Bob Veal .25-.40. Cull Cows: Gd .765-.83; Lean .73-.77; Hvy. Beef Bulls .87-.95. Beef: Feeders 1-1.28

Goats: Billies 210; Nannies 62.50-82.50; Kids 12.5027.50. Swine: Feeder Pig /hd 45. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY June 19, 2013 Produce: Asparagus 3; Beans (1/2 bu) 29-43; Beets .55-1.70; Broccoli .75-1.30; Cucumbers (1/2 bu) 27; Eggs .70-1.80; Lettuce .10-1.10; Peas (1/2 bu) 17-33; Radishes .30-.55; Rhubarb 1.401.80; Salt Potatoes 24;Spinach (1/2 bu) 7-10.50; Spring Onions .20-1.30; Strawberries (qt) 2.60-4.10; Swiss Chard (1/2 bu) 4.50; Summer Squash (1/2 bu) 10.50-18.50; Tomatoes (25#) 31-45; Zucchini (1/2 bu) 7-17. *Produce Mon. at 10 am, Wed. & Fri. at 9 am sharp. * Hay auctions Fridays at 11:15 am. FINGER LAKES HAY REPORT Penn Yan, NY No Report * Produce Mon. at 10 am. Wed.-Fri. at 9 am sharp. * Hay auctions Fridays at 11:15 am. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE FEEDER SALE Canandaigua, NY June 19, 2013 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 68-82.50; Canners/Cutters 48-75. Dairy Bulls for Slaughter: HY Util 86-92.50. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95110# 25-40; 80-95# 20-35; 60-80# 15-35. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 55-140; 80-95# 50-137.50. Beef Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 75-140. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed

112-126.50; Sel 95-106. Holstein Steers: Ch grain fed 96-110; Sel 849. Hogs: Slgh. Hogs US 1-3 60-70; Sows US 1-3 50; Boars US 1-3 5. Feeder Lambs: Ch 50-80# 110-142. Slaughter Sheep: M 5562.50. Goats (/hd): L Billies 110# & up 97.50-167.50; M 80-110# 45-80.

Calves: Bull calves 96-120# .90-1.23; up to 95# .10-1; Hols. Hfrs. under 100# 1.05.

FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE Canandaigua, NY June 12, 2013 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 66-84.50; Canners/Cutters 46-76. Dairy Bulls for Slaughter: HY Util 85-98. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95110# 40-67.50; 80-95# 3565; 60-80# 30-62.50; Vealers (grassers) 250# & up 75-95. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 80-160; 80-95# 75-157.50; 70-80# 70-100. Beef Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 75-100. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 113-126; Sel 93-108; Hols. Ch grain fed 98-111; Sel 84.50-92. Hogs: Slgh. US 1-3 60-71; Sows US 1-3 49-50. Feeder Lambs: Ch 50-80# 105-129. Market Lambs: Ch 80-100# 78-110. Slaughter Sheep: M 35-65 Rams: Ch 130# & up 37-51 Goats (/hd): L Billies 110# & up 125-217.50; L Nannies 85-107.50

CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA June 25, 2013 Slaughter: Steers cpl lo Ch 1220-1275# 120.50-121.50; Hols. 1370-1645# 104106.50; one Sel 1645# 103; Hfrs. Ch Hols. 1350# 106.50. Cows: Breakers/Boners 7583; Lean 73-80.50; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 67-74.50; Shelly 66 & dn. Bulls: Char 2425# 91.50 Feeder Cattle: Hols. w/horns 570# 75; Hfrs. dairy types 475-705# 78-98; Bulls dairy types 370-725# 88-100. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 125-128; No. 2 90-120# 120-125; 8090# 92-110; No. 3 75-135# 75-110. Swine: Hogs 225-295# 6069; Sows 395-475# 40-46. Goats (/hd): Fleshy kids 130-145; small 77-112; small/thin/bottle 20-70. Sheep: Rams 130# 70 * Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for rabbits, poultry & eggs. * 6 pm for livestock, starting with calves. * Fed Cattle Sale July 9 & 23 * Graded Pig Sale July 13 at 1 pm.

HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY June 24, 2013 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util .65-.83; Canners/Cutters .58-.70; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls/Steers: .70-.98 Feeders: Dairy .50-.70

BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No Report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA No Report

CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Small Animal Sale June 25, 2013 Rabbits: 8

Page 7 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT


Section B - Page 8 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Bunnies: .50-7 Roosters: 4-8.50 Hens: 3.50-6.25 Pullets: 1.50-5 Chicks: .50-4 Pheasant Peeps: 5 Turkey Peeps: 3.50-4.50 Muscovy Hens: 5.75 Muscovy Peeps: 1.50-3.50 Pot Belly Pigs: 1-20 Eggs (/dz): Jum Brown 1.451.55; XL Brown 1.45; L Brown 1.50; L Green .90; S Banty .20; Fertile Duck Eggs 1.25. * Animals sold by piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Graded Feeder Pig Sale June 21, 2013 US 1-2: 35# 181; 48# 151; 50-9# 106-126; 62-69# 125137; 70-79# 119-129; 75# 100; 83# 103; 92-99# 90100; 100-115# 96-99; 120122# 90-95; 131-134# 90-93; 168# 80. US 2: 24# 172; 30# 162; 45# 122; 54-59# 112-121; 77A# 138; 95# 94. As Is: 20-40# 15-80; 50-83# 56-98; 105-113# 70-84. No Grades: 80# 50. * Next sale July 12 aat 1 pm. Receiving 7:30-10:30 am. DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC June 24, 2013 Cattle: Sel 1-3 1264-1284# 107-112; Hols. Steers Sel 1-3 1282# 93. Cows: Prem. White 83-86; Breakers 77-82; Boners 7882; Lean 69-78. Bulls: G 1 1030# 93, lo dress 1266-1516# 83-89. Feeder Steers: M 1 486# 112; Hols. L 3 324# 88. Feeder Heifers: M 1 542# 107.50; M 2 574-600# 80-90. Calves: 230. Bull calves No. 1 94-126# 130-142.50; 8492# 105-120; No. 2 94-124# 117.50-135; 80-92# 82.50105; No. 3 94-120# 100117.50; 80-92# 57.50-90; Util 70-106# 25-45; 60-68# 1017.50; Hfr. calves No. 1 94116# 105-125; 84-88# 80100; No. 2 82-102# 60-95; Util/non-tubing 60-90# 2540. Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 272318# 61-66. Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 6070# 115-122.50; Ewes Gd 12 150-175# 50-57.50; 195200# 40-45. Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 2 under 20# 17.50-22.50; 2030# 25-37.50. Hay (/ton): Grass 95; Mixed 90. Straw (/ton): 85-155 EarCorn (/ton): 130-180 Oats (/bu): 5.75 GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA June 17, 2013

Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1386-1538# 126-128; Ch 2-3 1206-1564# 121.50125.50; Hi Sel & Lo Ch 2-3 1374-1664# 116-119.50; Sel 2-3 1024-1358# 113-116; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 11081608# 104-108.50; Ch 2-3 1126-1698# 96-102; Sel 1-3 1254-1498# 88-92.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1212-1276# 122125.50; Ch -3 1074-1370# 118-120.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 88.2594.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 74-79.50, hi dress 81-86, lo dress 70-72; Boners 80-85% lean 72-76.50, hi dress 7879, lo dress 66-70; Lean 8590% lean 66-71, lo dress 5862.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 11201902# 92-98, hi dress 14341656# 102.50-107.50, lo ress 1156-1892# 82-89. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 400-500# 136; 500-600# 125; M&L 2 500-700# 102.50; M&L 3 300-500# 90105; Hfrs. M&L 1 300-500# 134-139; 500-600# 132.50; M&L 2 400-600# 117.50130; M&L 3 700-900# 81100; Bulls M&L 3 300-500# 125-130; 500-700# 122.50130; M&L 2 300-500# 119128. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 96-126# 140-162.50;80-94# 105-122.50; No. 2 80-128# 120-152.50; No. 3 80-118# 60-100; Util 60-124# 30-60. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 86-108# 105-110; No. 2 8092# 85-90. Barrows & Gilts: 45-49% lean 200# 55. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 2-3 40-60# 105-110; 60-80# 100117.50; 80-100# 115-125; 100-120# 117-127.50; Ewes Gd 1-3 127-262# 30-44. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 60-70; Sel 2 40-60# 40-60; Sel 3 20-40# 20-32; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 100122.50; Sel 2 80-130# 72.50110; Billies Sel 2 100-150# 147.50-175. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA No Report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA June 21 2013 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 340 Mixed Hay: 7 lds, 55-190 Timothy: 4 lds, 175-260 Grass: 4 lds, 100-180 Straw: 2 lds, 120-165 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA June 21, 2013 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1250-1625# 122-126; Ch 2-3 1300-1600# 119-

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four

123.50; Sel 2-3 1250-1650# 115-119.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1450-1625# 109-112.50; Ch 2-3 1550-1650# 105-108; Sel 1-3 1400-1650# 101.50104.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1150-1300# 122.50125.50; Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 115.50-119; Sel 1-3 10501400# 102-110. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 79-86, hi dress 90-96, lo dress 75-78; Breakers 75-80% lean 77-83, hi dress 84.50-91, lo dress 74-77; Boners 80-85% 7681, hi dress 82-84, lo dress 68-76, Lean 85-90% lean 7278.50, hi dress 78.50-82, lo dress 65-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9201685# 93-103, hi dress 103107.50, lo dress 87-93. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 94-128# 121-141; 90-92# 90; No. 2 98-128# 115-120; 8894# 82-87; 80-86# 65; No. 3 72-130# 44-62; Util. 60-110# 30-35; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 85100# 90-115; No. 2 75-110# 50-80; Jersey Xbred 60-100# 70100; Util non-tubing 5585# 15-30. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION No Report LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA No Report MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA June 18, 2013 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1330-14685# 125129.50; Ch 2-3 1195-1540# 119-124.50; Sel 2-3 11001660# 109-119; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1330-1490# 107.50111.50; Ch 2-3 1380-1660# 100-105; Sel 2-3 1070-1720# 80-99. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1225-1445# 118124.50; Ch 2-3 1075-1385# 109-116.50; Sel 2-3 1145-

1555# 90-108. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 75.50-77, hi dress 81, lo dress 72-74; Boners 80-85% lean 7274.50, hi dress 74-74.50, lo dress 68-70; Lean 85-90% lean 62-69, hi dress 7273.50, lo dress 41-60. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 12501600# 90-96, hi dress 11251735# 101-106; lo dress 9151390# 84-91. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 300-500# 135-150; 500700# 120-135; 700-900# 120-127; M&L 2 500-700# 112-117; 700-900# 102-112; M&L 3 300-500# 78-92; 500700# 70-97; 700-900# 80-88; Hfrs. M&L 1 300-500# 120147; M&L 2 400-500# 115; 500-700# 107-117; M&L 3 400-500# 62-100; 500-700# 75-100; 700-900# 72-82; Bulls M&L 1 300-500# 137150; 500-700# 117-140; M&L 2 400-500# 117-125; 500700# 112-117; 700-900# 107-110; M&L 3 300-500# 51-61; 500-700# 77-92. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 132-142; No. 2 95120# 115-125; No. 3 94-115# 100-112; Util 65-95# 60-95. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 90-95# 75-87; No. 2 70-95# 35-55. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 245-335# 66-69.50; 45-49% lean 220303# 61.50-65.50. Sows: 300-500# 34-55; 500700# 58.50. Boars: 470-505# 13.50-20 Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 20-30# 30-60. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 40-60# 110-137; 6080# 110; 80-100# 100-125; 100-120# 75-80; Ewes Gd 23 140-170# 40-60. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 20-30# 45-50; 30-40# 62-65; 40-60# 77-87; 60-70# 95; Sel 2 20-30# 25; 30-40# 2735; 40-50# 55; Nannies Sel 1 50-80# 100-117; 80-130# 117-132; Sel 2 80-130# 92102; Sel 3 50-80# 57-60; 80130# 80-87; Billies Sel 1 50-

100# 145; 150-250# 185; Sel 2 50-100# 125; 100-150# 120; Sel 3 50-100# 52. MORRISON COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA June 24, 2013 Steers: Ch 108-113; Gd 100107. Heifers: Ch 105-112; Gd 100-105 Cows: Util & Comm. 74-80; Canner & Lo Cutter 73 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 85-95 Feeder Cattle: Steers 90110; Bulls 80-105; Hfrs. 75110. Calves: 117. Ch 100-120; Gd 80-100; Std. 20-55; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 80-130; Hols. Hfrs. 90-130# 90-130. Hogs: 27. US 1-2 70-72; US 1-3 65-70; Sows US 1-3 4348. Sheep: 44. Ch Lambs 115130; Gd Lambs 100-115; Slgh. Ewes 35-50. Goats: 15-140 MORRISON COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA June 24, 2013 Roosters: 4 Heavy Hens: 1.50-4 Banty Hens: 1-2.25 Guineas: 15.50 Ducks: 4.50 Bunnies: 2.50-4.75 Rabbits: 5-10.25 MORRISON COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA June 24, 2013 Grass: 150-225 Timothy: 75-125 Rd. Bales: 75-105 Lg. Sq. Bales: 90 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA June 20, 2013 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1250-1625# 122-125, few to 126.50; Ch 2-3 1300-

1600# 119-122.50; Sel 1-3 1250-1650# 115-119.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 14501625# 109-112.50; Ch 2-3 1550-1650# 105-108; Sel 1-3 1400-1650# 101.50-104.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1150-1300# 122.50125.50; Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 115.50-119; Sel 1-3 10501400# 102-110. Slaughter Cows: Prem. whites 65-75% lean 79-82, lo dress 75-78; Breakers 7580% lean 80-83, hi dress 84.50-86.50, lo dress 7479.50; Boners 80-85% lean 78-81, hi dress 82-83, lo dress 73.50-77.50; Lean 8590% lean 74-78.50, hi dress 79-82, lo dress 65-73.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9451625# 93-97.50, 1175-2125# hi dress 99-107.50, very hi dress 124-131; 1200-1785# lo dress 89.50-91.50. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 94-128# 121-141; 90-92# 90; No. 2 98-128# 115-120; 8894# 82-87; 80-86# 65; No. 3 72-130# 44-62; Util 60-110# 30-35. Holstein Heifer Calves: 85100# 90-115; No. 2 75-110# 50-80; Jersey Xbred 60-100# 70-100; Util non-tubing 5585# 15-30. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA No Report NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA No Report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Report Compared to last week Corn sold mostly .05 to .15 lower, Wheat sold mostly .05-.10 lower, Barley sold mostly .10 to .20 lower, Oats sold mostly steady & Soybeans sold mostly .10-.20 lower. EarCorn sold 2-3 lower. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 6.96-7.66, Avg 7.27, Contracts 5.51-5.60; Wheat No. 2 6.48-7.30, Avg 6.71, Contracts 6.61; Barley No. 44.10, Avg 4.03, Contract 4.05; Oats No. 2 4-4.70, Avg 4.35; Soybeans No. 2 14.7114.99, Avg 14.77, Contracts 12-12.23; EarCorn 207. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 6.75-7.26, Avg 6.96; Wheat No. 2 7.15; Barley No. 3 4.24; Oats No. 2 4; Soybeans No. 2 14.50-14.54 Avg 14.52; EarCorn 197. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 6.60-7.66, Avg 7.12, Month Ago 6.84, Year Ago 6.80; Wheat No. 2 6.487.30, Avg 6.61, Month Ago 7.28, Year Ago 6.54; Barley No. 3 4-5.15, Avg 4.12, Month Ago 4.49, Year Ago 5.03; Oats No. 2 3.75-4.70,


Avg 4.05, Month Ago 4.08, Year Ago 4.31; Soybeans No. 2 13.50-15.54, Avg 14.57, Month Ago 13.80, Year Ago 13.34; EarCorn 197-2074, Avg 193, Month Ago 198, Year Ago 194. Western PA: Corn No. 2 6.30-7.50, Avg 6.63; Wheat No. 2 6.35-6.75, Avg 6.85; Oats No. 2 4-5.25, Avg 4.41; Soybeans No. 2 14.59. Central PA: Corn No. 2 6.60-7.50, Avg 7; Barley No. 2 4-5.15, Avg 4.57; Oats No. 2 3.75-4.50, Avg 4.12; Soybeans No. 2 14-14.56, Avg 14.35. Lehigh Valley: Corn No. 2 7.05-7.32, Avg 7.15; Wheat No. 2 7.15; Barley No. 3 4.24; Oats No. 2 4.30; Soybeans No. 2 14.50-15.54, Avg 14.52. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary June 21, 2013 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 124.25-127.50; Ch 1-3 119.75-124; Sel 1-2 112.25118; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 107.50-110; Ch 2-3 101104.75; Sel 1-2 92-99.25. Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 120.75-125; Ch 1-3 114118.50; Sel 1-2 96-109. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 81.25-85; Bon-

ers 80-85% lean 77-81.25; Lean 85-90% lean 74.75-78. Bulls: 91-96; hi dress 99.75104, lo dress 86.75-90. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 135.50-143; 500-700# 122.50-130; M&L 2 500-700# 107.25-109.75; M&L 3 300500# 84-98.50; 500-700# 7097. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 120-147; 500-700# 123.75-139.750; M&L 2 300500# 116.25-122.50; 500700# 107-117; M&L 2 300500# 62-100; 500-700# 75100. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 137-150; 500-700# 117-140; M&L 2 300-500# 117-125; 500-700# 112-117; M&L 3 300-500# 51-61; 500700# 77-92. Vealers: Util. 60-120# 32.2558.75. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 95-120# 130.50-149; 80-90# 101-119; No. 2 95120# 113-130.50; 80-90# 79.25-91.75; No. 3 bulls 80120# 68.50-94.75; No. 1 Hols. hfrs. 84-105# 92.50111; No. 2 80-105# 54-79.50. Hogs: 49-54% lean 220300# 71-73; 300-400# 57-61; 45-49% lean 220-300# 6670.50; 300-400# 54-56; Sows US 1-3 300-500# 56.50-58; 500-700# 59.5063; Boars 300-700# 18-20. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 15-25# 200-210; 25-30#

160-180; 30-40# 140-180; 40-50# 120-140; 60-65# 100105. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs non-traditional markets, Wooled & Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 50-80# 155-166; 80-100# 158-160; Wooled & Shorn Gd & Ch 1-3 40-60# 130150, hair sheep 127-132; 6080# 135-152; 70-80# hair sheep 127-150; 80-100# 126-146, 120-125# 140-144; Wooled & Shorn Util & Gd 12 40-60# 100-125, hair sheep 112-124; 60-80# 100128, hair sheep 100-122; 80110# 100-132, hair sheep 94-126. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 82# hair sheep 80; 80-110# 62-70, 110-160# 54-70; 110-190# hair sheep 56-68; 160-200# 44-60; 183# hair sheep 46; Util 1-2 thin flesh 90-160# 40-54; 100130# hair sheep 44-54; 160180# 38-44. Slaughter Bucks: 100-160# hair sheep 64-85; 140-160# 47-72; 160-200# 40-76; 200250# 48-70. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 140-160; 60-80# 135172; 80-90# 165-185; Sel 2 40-60# 112-135; 60-80# 112130 80-110# 140-157; Sel 3 40-60# 45-96; 60-80# 96110. Slaughter Nannies/Does: Sel 1 100-125# 145-190; Sel 2 80-125# 107-145; 130-

Center for Beef Excellence News for June 26, 2013 USDA released its monthly updates on U.S. cattle on feed inventories as of June 1 as well as cold storage ending stocks as of May 31. Below are some of the highlights from the latest reports and some of the implications for markets going forward: Cattle on Feed: Feedlots placed more cattle on feed than expected in May. May placements were 2.049 million head, 1.7 percent less than a year ago but more than pre-report which were looking for a 3.1 percent decline. We started the year with a larger supply of feeders outside of feedlots than the year prior and this has showed up in the number of cattle placed on feed this past spring. For the period Jan - May, U.S. feedlots placed a total of 9.056 million head of cattle on feed, 98,000 head more than a year ago. High feed costs and poor feeding margins

slowed down the flow of cattle into feedlots late last year and earlier this year. The cattle placed on feed have also been heavier than a year ago. The May survey showed that placements of feeders over 800 pounds were up 20 percent compared to a year ago while placements of calves under 600 pounds declined 25 percent from last year. Marketings in May were down 3.4 percent, compared to pre-report estimates for a 2.1 percent decline. The June 1 cattle on feed inventory was 10.736 million head was 2.1 percent lower than a year ago but 0.4 percentage points higher than pre-report estimates. The report implies that there will be a few more cattle coming to market in the last four months of the year than previously expected. Placements of heavier cattle imply the additional pounds will be skewed

more towards the front of the holiday season (late Sept – Oct). However, the market has been buoyed recently on speculation that high pork and chicken prices could push retailers and foodservice operators to feature more beef during the year end holiday season. When it’s all said and done, demand remains THE critical factor for beef prices. Cold Storage: Inventories of beef cuts in cold storage were down 41 percent vs year ago while boneless beef stocks were up 2.3 percent vs. year ago. We think the increase in boneless beef stocks reflects more imported beef and also more lean beef supplies than a year ago but this is just speculation as unfortunately the USDA data is a complete black box with regard to beef freezer stocks. Total beef supplies in cold storage were down 3.9 percent vs. year ago but above

150# 125-137; Sel 3 60-80# 70-92; 80-110# 77-100. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 130-150# 210-240; 150-200# 200-280; Sel 2 100-150# 150-200; 150-160# 162-167; Wethers Sel 1 70100# 232-295; 100-150# 262-312; Sel 2 70-100# 180225; 100-150# 140-250. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and/ton. Compared to last week Hay sold .20-.50 lower & Straw sold .25-.65 higher. All hay & straw reported sold/ton. Alfalfa 120-250; Mixed Hay 75-220; Timothy 75-200; Straw 80-160; Mulch 50-60. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 87 lds of Hay, 29 Straw; Alfalfa 90-205; Mixed Hay 60472.50; Timothy 125-310; Grass 50-340; Straw 80-250. Diffenbach Auction: June 10, 36 lds of Hay, 10 Straw. Alfalfa 390-410; Mixed Hay 135-380; Timothy 135-225; Grass 142-240; Straw 125270. Wolgemuth Auction: June 17, 52 lds of Hay & 16 Straw. Alfalfa 90-205; Mixed Hay 60472.50; Timothy 140-310; Grass 50-340; Straw 80-250.

the five year average. Pork inventories were up 4.1 percent from a year ago and also 18.4 percent higher than the five year average. Inventories of hams remain quite high and this may limit the upside in the ham market this fall. Ham stocks as of May 31 were 156.6 million pounds, 21 percent higher than a year ago. Boneless beef hams are up 43 percent from a year ago. Belly stocks are down 17 percent from last year, reflecting the tight supplies and record high prices for pork bellies. Supplies of chicken breasts are down 3 percent from last year while wing supplies remain burdensome, up 121 percent from a year ago. Total broiler inventories at 679.3 million pounds were 6 percent higher than a year ago. Total turkey inventories were 519.6 million pounds, up 4 percent. Ham stocks are burdensome at this point. While prices have advanced recently on higher prices

Green Dragon Auction: June 21, 14 lds Hay & 6 Straw. Alfalfa 175; Mixed Hay 115-200; Timothy 125; Grass 100-195; Straw 125-187. Central Pennsylvania: 34 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 87.50-340; Mixed Hay 50190; Timothy 80-260; Grass 62.50-175; Straw 82.50-180. Dewart Auction: June 17, 3 lds Hay, 4 Straw; Mixed Hay 170; Timothy 120; Grass 62.50; Straw 110-160. Greencastle Auction: June 13 & 17, 2 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Mixed Hay 50-102.50; Straw 150. Kutztown Auction: June 21, 17 lds Hay, 2 Straw; Alfalfa 150-340; Mixed Hay 55-190; Timothy 175-260; Grass 100175; Straw 120-180. Middleburg Auction: June 18, 4 Hay, 3 Straw; Mixed Hay 155; Timothy 120-150; Grass 110; Straw 120-150. Shippensburg Auction: June 8 & 11; 65 lds Hay, 9 Straw. Alfalfa 120; Mixed Hay 88-180; Timothy 55-210; Straw 100-165. VINTAGE SALES STABLES June 18, 2013 Slaughter Holsteins: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1400-1600# 111.50112.50; Ch 2-3 1350-1650# 106-109; Sel 1-3 1400-1650# 100.50-105. Slaughter Cows: Prem.

for pork trim, once hot dog and sausage demand wanes, hams could find it more difficult to continue to climb in the fall. Turkey breast supplies are declining. Sharp cutbacks in turkey poult placements and the seasonal improvement in demand

White 65-75% lean 77-79.50, hi dress 83.50; Breakers 7580% lean 79-83.50, hi dress 841-86.50, lo dress 72.5078.50; Boners 80-85% lean 78-81.5, hi dress 82-83.50, lo dress 71.50-77.50; Lean 8590% lean 71-75.50, hi dress 76-79.50, lo dress 65-70.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 10652475# 89-92, hi dress 94, lo dress 82-84.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 90-120# 140-160; No. 2 80113# 125-140; No. 3 95-109# 75-110; 70-90# Util 70-105# 50-55; 73# 25. Graded Holstein Heifers: No. 1 93-115# 100-120; No. 2 84-93# 70-90; Util/non-tubing 65-93# 20-40. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA June 20, 2013 Orchard Grass: 2 lds, 180320 Mixed Hay: 7 lds, 120-285, 1 new 110. Grass: 2 lds, 100-120 Straw: 3 lds, 110-220 WOLGEMUTH AUCTION June 19, 2013 Alfalfa: 2 lds, 175-185 Mixed: 16 lds, 160-180 Timothy: 2 lds, 160-180 Grass: 5 lds, 162-255 Straw: 7 lds, 151-205 Fodder: 3 lds, 83-135

normally support turkey breast prices in the second half of the year. PA Center for Beef Excellence Inc. with information from the CME Report, Cattle Buyers Weekly and other resources. For more information call 717-705-1689.

Page 9 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT


Section B - Page 10 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

State agencies encourage horse owners to vaccinate their horses against diseases New York State Agriculture Commissioner Darrel J. Aubertine, State Health Commissioner Nirav R. Shah and State Gaming Commission Acting Director Robert Williams on June 17 urged horse owners across New York State to vaccinate their horses against Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and West Nile Virus (WNV). In 2012, two cases of EEE were reported in horses in New York State, as well as seven WNV cases. No confirmed cases of either disease have been reported thus far in 2013. “Every year in New York, cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile Virus pop up in horses across the state — diseases which are largely preventable,” said Commissioner Aubertine. “Good prevention programs are a key component to any animal health plan and I encourage horse owners across New York to take the necessary precautions and vaccinate their horses against these diseases today.” While it is preferable to vaccinate horses against these diseases in the spring before the mosquitoes that transmit

them are active, early summer is not too late, since New York often has mosquito activity into the month of November. Vaccines for EEE and WNV can be effective for six to 12 months, and horses should be re-vaccinated at least annually. In an area where the diseases occur year round, many veterinarians recommend vaccinations every six months. For the vaccine to be effective, it must be handled and administered properly, prior to an anticipated increase in mosquito activity in a local area. For these reasons, state veterinarian David Smith recommends that the vaccines be administered by a veterinarian. Other prevention methods include eliminating standing water breeding sites for mosquitoes, using insect repellents and removing animals from mosquitoinfested areas during peak biting times, usually from dusk to dawn. In addition, water in water troughs should be changed at least twice a week to discourage mosquito breeding. There is no human vaccine for EEE or WNV. The best way to protect your-

Fishkill from B3 has been an oasis for people as near as the immediate neighborhood and as far away as New York City. Henry Jr’s son, Robert Morgenthau, District Attorney of New York County for 35 years, took over the farm after his father’s death in 1963, and now Robert’s son, Joshua Morgenthau, has expanded Fishkill Farms, putting 100 acres of fallow land back into production, and transforming the farm with sustainable and organic agricultural methods. Chickens which lay delicious free range eggs can now be seen pecking amid the trees; fields of organically grown tomatoes, potatoes, greens and a cornucopia of fruits — strawberries, cherries, black currants, peaches, apples and more — ripen consecutively throughout the season. These offerings are available through pick-your-own, the farm’s recently founded CSA program,

and farmers markets in New York City. Fishkill Farms is located at 9 Fishkill Farm Road, Hopewell JCT, NY 12533. Please contact: Josh Morgenthau with inquiries at Cell: 347-8344835. Email: Joshua.Morgenthau@gmail.com

self is to keep mosquitoes from biting you. EEE is rare but serious and can affect both people and horses. Five cases have been diagnosed in humans in New York State since 1971 and all have been fatal. Prior to 2009, there had not been a human case detected in the State in more than 25 years. WNV is more common than EEE and can also cause serious illness or, in some cases, death. Not all mosquitoes carry WNV, but human cases have been reported in counties across the State. In 2012, there were 107 reported human cases of WNV statewide, nine of which were fatal. To greatly minimize exposure to WNV and EEE, the New York State Department of Health (DOH) recommends that people take precautionary measures, such as wearing shoes, socks, long pants and a longsleeved shirt when outdoors for a long period of time. People are also ad-

ADVANCED NOTICE

Farm Dispersal Auction July 13 • 10AM Sharp 40 Hawkins Rd., Binghamton, NY

Selling: Tractors, Field Eq., Shop Tools, Misc. and 30 Head of Beef Cattle bred to Angus Bull. Personal property of Ken Hawkins. Sale due to health reasons.

607-316-8811 Fred 607-343-0183

Call Danny

FRED R. BELL AUCTION SERVICE CONSIGNMENTS WANTED!

LLAND SALES STABLES, IN W HO E N Located 12 Miles East of Lancaster, PA Just Off Rt. 23, New Holland C.

Dairy Cow & Heifer Sale Wed., July 3RD • 10:30 AM

All Consignments Welcome Cows - Heifers - Bulls

ing facility conditions and working with track management to reduce mosquito-infested areas. “An additional ounce of prevention goes a long way to protecting equine athletes,” said Robert Williams, Acting Executive Director of the New York State Gaming Commission. “We will continue to partner with our colleagues at the Department of Agriculture and Markets and track operators to make sure that horses are kept in the safest environment possible.” Humans cannot become infected by handling or being exposed to an infected horse. Horses cannot spread either virus to or from other horses, people or pets. From a veterinary perspective, mosquitoes transmit both diseases from birds to horses. Typical symptoms of EEE in equines include staggering, circling, depression, loss of appetite and sometimes fever and blindness. Clinical signs

of WNV in horses include lethargy, weakness in the hind quarters, stumbling, lack of awareness, head tilt and head twitching, convulsions, circling, partial paralysis and coma. Horses exhibiting neurologic signs like those listed above need to be promptly reported by veterinarians to the State Department of Agriculture and Markets’ Division of Animal Industry at 518-457-3502, in addition to the local health department. Horses suffering from neurologic problems must always be handled with extreme caution, since they may be unpredictable and there is also the possibility that Rabies may be the cause. Vaccines are available to drastically reduce the incidence of EEE and WNV in horses. For more information on EEE and West Nile Virus in horses, please visit: www.agriculture.ny.gov/A I/equine/equine.html#3

FEEDER CATTLE SALE Friday, July 12 • 6 PM For info call: 585-394-1515 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK EX. 3 Miles East Of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20 Visit Our Web Site www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Next Feeder Cattle Sale Friday, August 2 @ 6 PM

PUBLIC AUCTION

FARM MACHINERY AND LAWN & GARDEN EQUIPMENT

SATURDAY, JULY 6TH, 10:00 AM 51792 STATE HWY 10, BLOOMVILLE, NEW YORK

CONSIGNMENT #1: AC 7045 tractor, AC XT190 tractor, AC 185 tractor, AC 6080 tractor w/loader, Kasten self-unloading wagon, Badger self-unloading wagon, NH 316 square baler, Gehl 1470 round baler, hay elevator, (2) round bale wagons, (2) hay wagons, AC plow, NH 306 slinger spreader, AC 4-row corn planter, NH 1412 disc bine, NH 256 hay rake, double-rake hitch, NH 469 haybine, Kuhn 5001 tedder, NH 890 chopper w/2-row corn & hay head, 1990 Mack road tractor, Low Boy trailer CONSIGNMENT #2: Oliver 770 tractor, Farmall H tractor, 8 ft land roller, 2 btm 3pt plow, 3 pt bale spear, 3 pt forks, tow-behind sickle bar mower, steel-wheel hay wagon, steel-wheel lime spreader, NH double-rake hitch, 3 btm 3 pt plow, (2) NI conditioners, post hole digger, dump wagon, 4 ft lime spreader, 3 pt drag, fertilizer spreader, (2) running gears, IH sickle bar mower, (2) 3 pt back blades

Consignors:: pleasee sendd alll infoo w/truckerss forr catalog Thank You

SALE MANAGED BY: New Holland Sales Stables, Inc. David Kolb 61-L

vised to apply appropriate mosquito repellent according to the label’s instructions and to remove all standing water from their property. “In addition to the health risks posed to the general public, West Nile virus and EEE can cause serious problems for horses and their owners and handlers in New York State,” said State Health Commissioner, Nirav R. Shah M.D., M.P.H. “Thankfully there is an inexpensive vaccine to protect horses, but their handlers should also take appropriate precautions to protect themselves from mosquito bites.” Horsepersons working at New York racetracks, where large concentrations of horses are stabled, should especially heed the recommendation to have horses vaccinated and take necessary precautions to reduce the risk of EEE or WNV. The New York State Gaming Commission’s on-track staff is monitor-

717-354-4341 (Barn) 717-355-0706 (FAX)

UPCOMING SALES:

1. Annual Driving Horse Sale - Fri., July 5th, 9AM. Free Ice Cream All Day. 2. Riding Horse & Pony Sale - Mon., July 8th, 10AM 3. Special Dairy Heifer Sale - Wed., July 10th, After Cow Sale 4. Fri., Eve. Horse Sale (Drafts & Drivers) - July 19th, 6PM

CONSIGNMENT #3: NH 477 haybine, NH 630 round baler, NH 55 rake, Deutz-Fahr 17 ft tedder, 3 pt post pounder, 7 ft 3 pt disc mower, JD MX6 3 pt rotary mower OTHER CONSIGNMENTS: (2) diesel road signs (Lombardini engines), tri-axle deck over trailer w/G&I hitch (dove tail ramps & winch), IH 826 tractor, several riding lawn mowers Early Listing - Much More by Sale Day - Not Responsible for No-Show Items For updated listing visit www.auctionzip.com ID 19065 To consign call Bill McIntosh (607) 538-1654, Consignments Accepted Until Friday, July 5th, 6 PM Loader On Site • Port-a-John • Food Available Terms: Cash or good check. Positive ID required. 10% Buyer’s Premium on all items selling for $1,000 and under. Nothing removed until paid in full. All sales as is where is. Payment must be made during or immediately following auction.

Directions: From Delhi, take State Rte 10 east to auction. From Stamford, Take State Rte 10 west to auction. Watch for auction signs. Auction by: Frank Walker, Inc., Franklin, New York (607) 829-5172 or (607) 434-0042 cell


Cornell Cooperative Extension and Cornell University, in partnership with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program and New York State Water Resources Institute, are

launching a new educational initiative to help municipal officials and stream-side landowners prepare for floods and climate change in the Hudson Valley. During 2013, staff from the Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) associations

in Columbia, Greene, Dutchess, Orange and Putnam counties will be training municipal personnel and landowners in target areas about flood preparedness. The goal of the Hudson Estuary Watershed Resiliency Project is to pro-

Eklund Farm Machinery & Massey Ferguson

“HAY DAYS”

Thursday, July 11th, 2013 9:00AM to 4:00PM

Come meet our Factory Representatives who will be offering the Best Deals of the Season! Enjoy Lunch, See Our Demonstrations Or, Better Yet, Drive Them Yourself!!!

27696 ST. HWY. 23, Stamford, NY 12167 607-652-2151

"HAYMAKER SPECIAL" AUCTION

SATURDAY, JULY 6TH @ 9:30 AM

At Visscher Farm, 1400 S Main St (NYS Rte. 282 south) Nichols, NY 13812 use Exit 62 off I-86 Expressway - 1 1/2 miles to farm or 20 miles north of Towanda/Wysox, PA area via PA Rte. 187 north - 1/2 mile north of the state line

CONSTRUCTION: JD 350C dozer w/winch & limb rackers "nice"; Yanmar Mini Excavator; JD 544 C wheel ldr. w/4in1 bucket; (2) JCB 8027 Mini Excavator; Cat 963 crawler loader; Case 621 BXR wheel loader; Komatsu PC27 Mini Excavator TRACTORS: JD 2750 4X4 Hi-Crop; Same 80 Saturno 4x4; Massey Ferg. 2615 4x4; Massey 205 compact tractor; Allis Chalmers 185 w/ldr.; Ford 8N 3pt, new rubber, back blade, dirt scoop; Ford 4000 SKID STEERS: NH LS 160; NH L885; Case 430 Skid Steer loader; Gehl 7810 Skid Steer loader Skid Steer Attachments: buckets; snow pushers; grapples; pallet forks; bale spears; rotary mower FARM EQUIPMENT: Baling: Krone Combi Pack 1250 baler wrap combo; Gehl 1875 TDG w/net wrap; Claas Variant 280, Rollant 46, Case/IH RBX 451; Hesston 530; JD 566; JD 466; Vermeer 5400 Rebel; Deutz Fahr 2.31; NH 282 w/thrower; NH 273 w/thrower; like new Diamond Wrapper w/loading arm; Mowing: NH 1432 discbine w/fingers; Kuhn FC 350C disc w/fingers; JD 720 M/C; JD 926 disc; IH 1160; NI 5209 disc; Landpride 6' rotary mower; Ford 535; Gehl 2240 M/C; Hesston P-7 M/C; JD 1360 disc; IH, NH & Ford sickle bar mowers; selection of 3pt rotary mowers plus Bush Hog 15' batwing; JD 1518 batwing; Chopping: NH 782; NH 38 flail; Gehl 72 flail; Gehl 3 row corn head; NH #8 tandem wagon; Grove wagon; Vermeer bale chopper; Tedders & Rakes: NI; rotary rake; Claas 6 star tedder; NI wheel rake; NH double hitch rake; NH 55; 3pt wheel rake; Kuhn 3 pt rotary rake; NH 256 rake; Kuhn THA 500L hydr vert fold tedder; Manure Spreaders: NI 245 box; NI box tandem; NH side slinger; NH 519; new Kuhn 1250 box E2 spread; Hagadorn 275 hydra push Tillage: JD 2500 7 BTM.; JD 2600 5 BTM.; other 3&4 btm. plows; Glencoe Consertil 7 shank chisel; sub soiler; Bush Hog transport disc; Taylorway Rockflex 15' disc; Misc: Century tandem sprayer; JD 400 Grinder/Mixer; Papec grinder mixer; Bukton hydra feed wagon; Anderson Rock Picker; TMR wagon; plastic layer; transplanter; Badger blower; 3pt cultivators; NH 40 blowers; 3pt spin spreader; pair 18.4x34 tractor tires; IH 510 grain drill; GT no-till drill; elevators hay/grain & skeleton; out door furnace; boat and motor; 275 gallon totes; trailers; corn planters; loaders; Lawn & Garden: Toro "Z" turn mower; Cub Cadet "Z" turn mower; Wheel horse Commodore 8; Ford 125 mower; JD 316 LGT; Wheel horse 516H; "new" 8x8 garden shed, out house, chicken coop; calf hutches; Vehicles: 2012 Pequea 10-18' trailer w/fold-up ramps; 1988 Ford F-350 rollback; 1995 Ford F-250 4x4 crew cab pick up; 1981 Ford pick up box; Kenworth truck tractor - Something for Everyone!

NOTE: Check auctionzip #7884 for updates as we get closer to sale date. TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK - NO CREDIT CARDS OR BUYERS PREMIUM LUNCH AVAILABLE

HOWARD W. VISSCHER & SON SALES MANAGERS AND AUCTIONEER NICHOLS, NY • 607-699-7250

vide assistance to communities in developing effective flood readiness and flood response plans. After a severe storm and flooding event, landowners and municipal officials have many decisions to make. There are immediate responses to protect human safety and to repair infrastructure. Once the initial crisis period has passed, there is the opportunity to develop strategies to minimize future flooding impacts. The Hudson Estuary Watershed Resiliency Project will provide communities with information that can enhance flood planning and preparedness in advance of the next big storm. “This Cornell Cooperative Extension project will provide communities with tools to increase their understanding of how streams and floodplains work, and how local officials can plan to reduce their communities’ vulnerability to floods in an era of increasing heavy precipitation events,” said Cornell Cooperative Extension educator Liz LoGiudice. “The goals of the project are to help communities reduce future risk to infrastructure and human life, to minimize harmful stream practices that

can actually lead to increased flooding, and to keep people out of harm’s way.” Staff members from the regional Cornell Cooperative Extension offices will be training municipal officials and landowners in several watersheds across the Hudson Valley. CCE staff will first be interviewing local officials across the region through a process led by Cornell University to identify local knowledge of how streams work, and needs for further information and training. Results from these interviews will help guide the development of the program so that it meets the needs of municipal officials and stream-side landowners. CCE staff will also be utilizing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping and analysis to determine critical target areas for the program. CCE has also been collaborating with the Lower Hudson Coalition of Conservation Districts to deliver trainings to highway personnel and contractors on the topic of post-flood stream repair. “We are very excited to partner with county Soil and Water Conservation Districts to provide training on how to effectively stabilize streams

after storms in a way that protects both infrastructure, such as bridges and culverts, and maintains stream function,” LoGiudice said. “As a result of this training, highway personnel will learn how to effectively work in and around streams immediately after a large flood so that the connections between the stream and floodplain are maintained and projects are more successful in the long-term.” CCE will also be providing educational presentations and seminars for municipal officials; workshops and hands-on trainings for landowners; resource materials including fact sheets identifying which agencies to contact during and after flood events, and planning tools to assist municipalities with reducing vulnerability to flooding. CCE is developing a project website that will house all of these resources in an easy-to-access format for municipal officials and landowners. For more information on the CCE Hudson Estuary Watershed Resiliency Project, contact Rosemarie Baglia, Extension Educator at 845344-1234 or rsb22@cornell.edu.

Page 11 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

New project aims at reducing future flood risk to people and infrastructure


Section B - Page 12 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

T RU C K S New technology clean diesel trucks with near zero emissions make up 28 percent of all trucks on U.S. highways 2007 and later year diesel truck technology a success — reducing NOx and PM emissions by more than 95 percent WASHINGTON, D.C. — More than 28 percent of all trucks registered in the United States — 2.5 million of 8.6 million trucks — are now equipped with advanced new technology clean diesel engines, according to new data compiled by R.L. Polk and Company for the Diesel Technology Forum (DTF). The Polk data includes registration information on Class 3-8 trucks from

2007 through 2012 in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Beginning in 2007, all heavy duty diesel trucks sold had to meet particulate emissions levels of 0.01 grams per brake horsepower hour (g/HP-hr) — a level near zero. “The fact that more than 28 percent of all trucks on U.S. roads today are new technology diesel engines with near zero emissions is significant for the environment and the trucking industry,” said Allen Schaeffer, the Executive Director of the Diesel Technology

Forum. “More than 95 percent of all heavy-duty trucks are diesel-powered, as are a majority of medium-duty trucks. Diesel power is the driving force today of goods movement by truck in our economy and they are continuing to play a central role of the United States’ new effort to reduce fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in the coming years. “These increasing penetration rates are a reflection of the confidence that truckers have in the new technology diesel

engines, particularly during the last few years which have been a recessionary period with lower demand for trucking services,” Schaeffer said. Regionally, the Midwest (31 percent) has the highest percent of new diesel trucks, followed by the South (29.8 percent), the Northeast (29.1 percent), and the West (26.0 percent). New technology diesel engines & fuel have reduced NOx by 99 percent and PM by 98 percent “Emissions from today’s diesel trucks and

buses are near zero thanks to more efficient engines, more effective emissions control technology and the nationwide availability of ultralow sulfur diesel fuel. The new clean diesel technology has reduced emissions from heavyduty diesel trucks and buses by 99 percent for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and 98 percent for particulate emissions. “What makes the new diesel technology even more remarkable is model year 2010 and later trucks are experiencing an average of three to five percent improve-

ment in fuel economy. Additional fuel-saving strategies are being developed to improve engine efficiency, vehicle aerodynamics and expanded application of hybrid technology. “In addition, new diesel technology and ultra-low sulfur diesel are benefitting many of the older diesel trucks built before 2007. Through the use of retrofit upgrades, older diesel engines can improve their performance and reduce key emissions by up to 90 percent,” Schaeffer said.

Pennsylvania needs transportation funding now Op-Ed by George Greig, Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary We’re on the edge of a transportation crisis. More than 9,200 miles of Pennsylvania roads are in poor condition, and that number will nearly double in four years. About 4,000 bridges are structurally deficient, and many can’t hold trucks, tractors and farm equipment.

The condition of our transportation system affects the way farmers do business and how consumers enjoy the state’s agriculture bounty. Governor Corbett has a long-term solution to fix our transportation network. Transportation drives our number one industry — agriculture — and we need good roads to get food to Pennsylvani-

ans. Each day, thousands of dollars of agriculture products move on our state’s roadways. We expect pick up, travel and delivery of our farm products to be efficient. Products are loaded onto a truck shortly after they are harvested from our fields or pumped from our milk tanks. They should arrive to our consumers safe, fresh and undamaged. But too of-

ten, that’s not the case. Rough roads damage freight and add travel time, meaning consumers may get lower quality products. Many bridges can’t hold the trucks that carry our food, and they’re forced to take detours that add time to trips. Vehicles that travel these deteriorating roads burn more fuel and need costly repairs more of-

ATA names HELP Inc.’s PrePass its latest featured product American Trucking Associations announced it has added HELP Inc.’s PrePass weigh station preclearance service to its group of featured products for the trucking industry. “Over the past 20 years, PrePass has been a valuable service to many trucking companies,” said ATA President and CEO Bill Graves. “It is innovators like HELP that are making our industry more efficient

movers of America’s freight and for that reason we’re happy to add them to our roster of featured products.” PrePass’ inspection preclearance services are available at more than 300 facilities in 31 states, allowing prequalified trucks to bypass inspection at highway speed while demonstrating compliance with state and federal safety, weight and cre-

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dential requirements. In addition, HELP offers automated toll payment service on 78 toll facilities in 15 states. HELP prepays all tolls for its subscribers, handles all reconciliations and disputes and passes discounts back to motor carriers. “With nearly 450,000 interstate trucks now enrolled in PrePass, HELP is proud to offer North America’s largest, most secure truck preclearance system,” said

Karen Rasmussen, president and CEO of HELP. “We value our 20-year partnership with American Trucking Associations’ safest carriers, its conferences and its state trucking association affiliates and share ATA’s commitment to safety and efficiency.” For more about PrePass or ATA’s other featured products, visit www.atabusinesssolutions.com or call 866821-3468.

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ten. Our aging roads are cutting into farmers’ profits, resulting in higher prices for consumers. Pennsylvania can’t afford bad roads. Governor Corbett’s proposal adds $1.8 billion to Pennsylvania’s transportation system. That money will allow the state to restore our bridges, repave our roads and improve public transportation, while adding as many as 50,000 good-paying jobs. Pennsylvania’s transportation funding crisis has been decades in the making and while quick money has come and gone, the state has not received a significant funding increase since 1997. The lack of funding is starting to take its toll.

We cannot continue to ignore the problem and increase the burden on future generations. We must fund Pennsylvania’s transportation system now. Under the governor’s proposal, the state would raise additional dollars by removing an artificial cap on the Oil Company Franchise Tax. The governor is also proposing a 17percent reduction in the “flat” motor fuels tax paid directly at the pump by motorists. Our transportation system needs to be fixed now. Farmers can’t wait and neither can Pennsylvanians. Putting it off costs our economy, our safety and worst of all, it increases the cost for future generations.

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1947), offered by Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA) and Kurt Schrader (DOR). The amendment preserves the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) 37 years of success regulating forest roads as nonpoint sources under the Clean

The National Alliance of Forest Owners (NAFO) applauded leaders in the U.S. House of Representatives for adopting by voice vote an amendment to the Farm Bill, the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act (H.R.

their hard work in securing this common sense amendment to the Farm Bill,” said Dave Tenny, NAFO President and CEO. “This amendment restores legal certainty for forest owners and operators and protects thousands of jobs

Water Act (CWA) and mirrors the Silviculture Regulatory Consistency Act (H.R. 2026) introduced on May 16. “We thank the sponsors, the committee leadership and a long list of members on both sides of the aisle for

throughout rural America by reaffirming that forest roads are nonpoint sources most effectively regulated under state-adopted Best Management Practices.” The Supreme Court reversed last May a 2011 decision from the U.S

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Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (NEDC v. Brown) that forest roads used for timber harvest require mandatory CWA industrial stormwater discharge permits typically applied to factories and other facilities. The Court did not, however, address the more fundamental question of whether forest roads are point sources under the CWA. Under a previous and separate Ninth Circuit order, EPA is reviewing whether to regulate forest roads as point sources. Plaintiffs have told the Supreme Court and the media they intend to use this process and further litigation to require permits. “House members in both parties know that as the housing market begins to recover it is important to avoid an unnecessary and costly permit requirement that would threaten the recovery and jeopardize rural jobs while not improving water quality,” Tenny said. “I think we can all agree on the common-sense economic and environmental merits of this amendment. We encourage our supporters in the House and Senate to keep this amendment in place as they finish their work on the Farm Bill.” The bipartisan legislation enjoyed the support of nearly 150 forestry associations, companies and organizations from across the country.

Page 13 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Forest owners applaud House passage of forest roads amendment to Farm Bill


Section B - Page 14 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

DFA leader lends perspective on immigration reform Recognizing the dairy industry’s critical need for immigration reform, Jackie Klippenstein represented Dairy Farmers of America at the National Council of Farmer Cooperative’s (NCFC) immigration reform panel during their Washington Conference recently. The panel, Our Nation’s Immigration System Needs Work: Co-op

Perspectives on the Need for Reform, gave attendees an understanding of what immigration reform means for a diverse range of agricultural producers across the country. Joining Klippenstein on the panel were Rich Hudgins of California Canning Peach Association and Bob Smith of Farm Credit East. The session was moderated

by Chuck Conner, president and chief executive officer of NCFC. The NCFC panel was especially timely, as the Senate voted on cloture this week, signaling their commitment to moving forward S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. As a panelist, Klippen-

stein spoke in support of the Senate’s comprehensive immigration reform proposal, which includes compromise language for the agriculture sector. S. 744 includes agricultural provisions that address current undocumented workers while creating two new types of farm worker visas — one for seasonal workers, and one that meets the

needs of dairy producers for year-round help. Klippenstein has served as vice president of industry and legislative affairs since joining DFA during 2008. In that capacity, she focuses on federal legislative and regulatory issues and plays an active role in member and Farm Services. She also serves on the boards of Nation-

al Milk Producers Federation, the Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship program and the American Royal. Prior to joining DFA, Klippenstein spent nearly 15 years in Washington, D.C., as a lobbyist for agricultural interests and as a congressional aide, having worked for members of both the U.S. House and Senate.

Farm Aid announces star-studded lineup for its 2013 Music and Food Festival Tickets for Farm Aid 2013 go on sale June 28 SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY — Farm Aid has announced a stellar lineup for its 2013 music and food festival, scheduled for Sept. 21 at Saratoga Performing Arts Center (SPAC) in Saratoga Springs, NY. Jack Johnson, Amos Lee, Kacey Musgraves, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Bahamas, JD & The Straight Shot, and Pegi Young & The Survivors will join Farm Aid board members Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, Neil Young and Dave Matthews at Farm Aid 2013. In addition, Dave Matthews will be joined by guitarist Tim

Reynolds. “The Farm Aid benefit concert takes place each year thanks to the generosity of artists who donate their talent to raise awareness about the crucial need we have for family farmers on the land,” said Carolyn Mugar, executive director of Farm Aid. “We are thrilled to have an eclectic lineup this year that includes returning artists, as well as artists new to the Farm Aid stage. Together, Farm Aid concertgoers and artists are changing our food system!” In addition to the allstar lineup, Farm Aid’s all-day music and food

festival will spotlight family farm food and hands-on activities that will engage concertgoers in activities that give them a true understanding of why family farm agriculture is so important. Farm Aid’s HOMEGROWN Concessions® brings family farm food center-stage, showcasing local, organic, sustainable, humanely-raised family farm ingredients. In Farm Aid’s HOMEGROWN Village, concertgoers will have the chance to meet farmers, engage in hands-on food and farm activities, and learn about the ways family farmers are enriching our soil, protect-

ing our water and growing our economy, in addition to bringing us good food for good health. Tickets for Farm Aid 2013 went on sale starting June 28. Tickets will be available at www.ticketmaster.com, at the SPAC Box Office or by phone at 800-745-3000. Tickets range from $45 to $150, while a limited number of premium VIP seats range from $300 to $1,500. Additional ticket information can be found at www.farmaid.org. To learn more about the Farm Aid 2013 lineup, visit www.farmaid.org/lineup. Farm Aid welcomes the participation of the local business communi-

NYS TWO CYLINDER EXPO XI CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013, 3 PM, SHOW DATES JULY 11-13

NY Steam Engine Assn. Show Grounds, 3349 Gehan Rd., off Rts. 5&20, 5 mi E. of Canandaigua, NY. From I-90 NYS Thruway use Exits 42 - 44. Early Consignments - 4020D hi-crop, restored; 730 LP hi-crop restored, no sn; 530, wfe; 820 restored; '58 820, original paint; 70D standard; '37 AOS, original full steel and paint, sn 1180; AO restored; '36 AO; '46 &'49 B's; '38 B w/ fenders; '38 BO; '46D; '52 G, original paint, 801 hitch; '41 H, restored ; '39 L w/ sickle mower, plow, cultivators; '40 L w/ cultivators, original paint; 730 gas, nfe, 3pt.; Dale Pedersen Collection: '51 A rebuilt, ex. restoration sn 678883; '47 B, restored, sn 199885; '49 M, ex. condition, sn M-28927; M 7' sickle mower, 2R cultivator & 2- M 1168T front wheel weights; 2-14 trailer plow w/ coulters & jointers; 953 flatbed wagon, restored; other consignments: '57 420 w/ original orchard exhaust, repaint, new tires; 60; 620 w/ 227 mounted picker, repaint; '53 60 low seat standard, 1 of first 6 built, complete restorations new tires, sn 6025011; H, restored; '36 A on steel, original paint, sn 428127; '52A, sn 7000138; pallets of A& B parts; some unstyled, most '39-52; B transmission; power-trols; 40 plow; #4 Big Mower, restored; open grill pedal tractor, repro; 4020 pedal, older collectable toys; NIB toys; L&G tractors; 57 riding mower; construction manuals; Turnbull Tractor & Imp tape rule; tire pump; electric clocks NIB; quantity equip, parts, toys, signs, literature and memorabilia. All items subject to consignor delivery. Consignments accepted at auction site Tues- Wed- Thurs July 9-11. Terms: ID for bidder number, cash, check. Payment with Visa, MC, Disc, 3% fee.

DANN AUCTIONEERS, DELOS DANN, 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424, 585-396-1676 or 585-233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm

ty and offers corporate sponsorship opportunities. For more information, email Glenda Yoder at glenda@farmaid.org. For concert updates, follow Farm Aid on Twitter (@farmaid) and on Facebook (www.facebook. com/farmaid), as well as by visiting www.farmaid. org/concert. Farm Aid’s mission is to build a vibrant, family farm-centered system of agriculture in America. Farm Aid artists and board members Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, Neil Young and Dave Matthews host an

annual concert to raise funds to support Farm Aid’s work with family farmers and to inspire people to choose family farm food. Since 1985, Farm Aid, with the support of the artists who contribute their performances each year, has raised more than $43 million to support programs that help farmers thrive, expand the reach of the Good Food Movement, take action to change the dominant system of industrial agriculture and promote food from family farms.

Senate passes Farm Bill with alfalfa crop insurance amendment On June 10, the Senate passed its version of the 2013 Farm Bill which included an important amendment for alfalfa and forage producers. The amendment, introduced by Senator Jerry Moran (RKS), directs the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) to conduct research and development regarding a policy to insure alfalfa, and issue a report describing the results of the study. Senator Moran’s amendment passed by a margin of 72-18. “As the nation’s 4th most valuable crop, alfalfa is critical to our nation’s food supply,” said Beth Nelson, NAFA President. “We are very grateful for Senator Moran’s recognition of the importance of alfalfa and the need its producers have for a bona fide risk management tool.” Although alfalfa is one of America’s most valuable crops — be-

hind only corn, soybean and wheat — it is not a Title I or ‘program crop’ and does not enjoy the type of safety net that is generally afforded to other program crops. Due in part to this fact, alfalfa acreage has declined 25 percent since 2002 and 10 percent in 2012 alone. “Senator Moran has been a real champion for the U.S. alfalfa industry,” added Robin Newell, NAFA Chairman. “Working with RMA to develop a crop insurance program producers find valuable and are eager to utilize will be a huge benefit to both producers and consumers. It’s clear Senator Moran understands the critical role alfalfa plays in beef and dairy production, as well as the myriad environmental benefits it provides. It is essential that alfalfa achieve parity with the risk management tools available to other major crops.”


NYAAC strives to enhance the public’s understanding of and appreciation for animal agriculture and modern farm practices. Industry comes together to educate consumers about dairy farms The New York Animal Agriculture Coalition (NYAAC) recently announced a new project that will share in realtime one of the miracles of modern agriculture. A Dairy Cow Birthing Center, debuting at the 2013

New York State Fair, will provide a unique opportunity for the public to witness a cow giving birth and to learn more about New York’s dairy farms. The new exhibit will be located between Gates 6 & 10, adjacent to the FFA and Beef Barn, at the New York State Fair, Aug. 22–Sept. 2. “By providing an opportunity to witness the miracle of life, we expect the new Dairy Cow Birthing Center to be one of the most popular

TRACTORS CIH JX1070C 560 Hrs., 2WD, ROPS, (Like New). $15,000 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke NH Workmaster 45 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,250 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 450H Dozer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4440. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 5101E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 6200 w/620 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 750 B Crawler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville (2) JD 6330 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 6715 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville COMPACT TRACTORS Ford 1925 w/Loader 450 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 46 Backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 110 TLB, Loader/Backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,900 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 790 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 790 w/Loader & Hoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,700 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4110 w/Loader & Deck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 900 HC Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD JD 950 w/Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 2305 TLB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4100 w/Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 2210 w/Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 3320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 3720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 3720 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4400 w/60” Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 4720 w/400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota BX2200 loader, blower/mower . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 1030 TLB, Mower/Bagger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonvile NH TC45D cab/loader/front blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TC48DA TLB, cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH TZ25DA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MF 205. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH TC29DA w/Loader, Hydro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,400 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION Bobcat 435 Excavator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 35D Excavator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 96’ pwr rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH LS180 cab/heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MOWERS CONDITIONERS JD 530 MoCo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 920 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 926 MoCo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,950 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 956 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 411 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville HAY AND FORAGE JD 7450 (900 Hrs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $219,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 640B Pickup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Claas 860 w/Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville HS 420 Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,250 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 74 Rake w/dolly, rubber teeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 670 Rake w/dolly, rubber teeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,300 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 3950 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 74 rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 751 Tedder-Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $800 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke (2) JD 2 Row Corn HD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 751 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 1475 Forage Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,950 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville

free exhibits at the State Fair this year, attracting tens of thousands of urban and suburban families,” said Jessica Ziehm, Executive Director of NYAAC. “The State Fair may be the only time these families ever see a cow and will hopefully take home not only a unique experience, but a greater understanding and appreciation for dairy farms in New York State by visiting this exhibit.” To fulfill this initiative

and to ensure a professional presence, NYAAC is partnering with Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine that will oversee the birthing process and animal care. “Milk is New York’s leading agricultural product, and it all begins with the dairy cow,” said Dr. Michael I. Kotlikoff, Austin O. Hooey Dean of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine. “Veterinarians and dairy

HAY AND FORAGE NH 166 inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,450 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 256. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro 1416 Twin Merger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro 1416 Twin Merger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Amco 27’ disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville AC 3 bottom 3 pt. plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $975 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 750 15’ No-till drill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 1750 6 Row Liquid/Dry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7200 6 Row Liquid Zone Till . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,800 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8250 DRILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2500 5 bottom (nice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2800 6 bottom trip plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS JD 328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 330 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 335 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 336 w/30. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 338 w/42. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 338 w/40. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,800 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 348 w/40. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 348 w/40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 457 round baler Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville SOLD JD 535 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Gehl 1475 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,950 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 566 w/Mesh Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS Freeman 14’ 2 Beater, F&R Unload F. Box on Gear $2,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Howard 4’ Roto Tiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Woods 6’ Grooming mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Hardt 150 gal 3pt Sprayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville MX 10R Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Meteor 3 Pt Snowblower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham HARDI 500 Gal Sprayer 45’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,250 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 40’ Hay Elevator on Running Gear w/ elec. motor . $3,800 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Knight 3030 Mixer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,850 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kubota RTV Diesel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,900 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 620 Gator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 620i Gator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 265 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4x2 Gator/Cab/Dump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,250 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 300 HUSKER w/243 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 850D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 918 Flex Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 25A Flail mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 7720 Combine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Vermeer TS30 Tree Spade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham Snow Push Blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Schaghticoke Sweepster 6’ 3pt broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Sweepster S32C 6’ front broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 8N/9N loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 40 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods 7’ Rotary Cuter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods 72” Blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,995 . . . . . . . . . . Clifton Park Woods 3100 loader (fits IH 66/86 series) . . . . . . . . . $4,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 12’ Brillion Seeder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville H&S 235 w/End Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . Chatham York Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen

HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR COMPANY LLC FULTONVILLE 518-853-3405

GOSHEN 845-294-2500

CHATHAM 518-392-2505

SCHAGHTICOKE 518-692-2676

CLIFTON PARK 518-877-5059

farmers are partners in advancing the health and welfare of cows, and in improving the productivity of our farms. Together with our Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory, the College of Veterinary Medicine provides the infrastructure that helps make our farmers the most productive in the world. We are pleased to participate with the New York Animal Agriculture Coalition at the New York State Fair to raise awareness of the critical infrastructure that ensures the health and welfare of cattle and supports the production of safe and affordable dairy products in a sustainable manner.” The Birthing Center will showcase four closeup cows from local dairy farms daily, which will be kept in a large box stall and moved into a calving pen when labor commences. Veterinarians and veterinary students will be on hand around the clock to assist with the births and to explain the process to the public, as well as to answer any questions. Bleachers, along with a large video screen and live web cast, will help accommodate the anticipated large crowds. Surrounding the box stall and calving pen will be professionally crafted and interactive exhibits that will explain the role New York’s dairy farms play in the State’s economy as well as the connections dairy farms have to the lives and livelihoods of every New Yorker. The educational exhibits will provide details on how cows are cared for, the recycling efforts on dairy farms, and the impact and contributions dairy farms make to the state and local communities. There

will be free activities daily for families, as well as farm equipment on display and other exhibits to be announced. The New York Corn and Soybean Growers graciously provided the seed money through the soybean checkoff to initiate the Dairy Cow Birthing Center. Julia Robbins, Executive Director of the New York Corn and Soybean Growers said, “Our organization supports this exhibit, knowing that as an industry we need to work together and support the development of high-quality educational displays and materials that are critical to generating a positive and lasting impression on the nearly one million fairgoers who attend the State Fair annually.” In order to ensure the success of this complex exhibit, NYAAC is currently seeking additional funding from industry organizations and agri-businesses. If you care to support this initiative and contribute to its success, or wish to volunteer your time at the State Fair, please contact Jessica Ziehm with NYAAC at jaz67@cornell.edu or at 518-527-3949. Please check NYAAC’s website at www.nyanimalag.org for regular updates about the Dairy Cow Birthing Center, along with other dairy farm advocacy efforts taking place around the state. NYAAC is a farmer founded and funded organization that strives to enhance the public’s understanding of and appreciation for animal agriculture and modern farm practices by engaging the public in conversations about animal agriculture and empowering farmers to tell their story firsthand.

Page 15 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

New dairy cow birthing center to debut at 2013 NYS Fair


Section B - Page 16 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Pennsylvania Grange Royalty visit capital city The 2012-2013 PA State Grange Royalty is made up of the Junior Prince and Princess Joshua Mengel and Hannah Leibensperger from Berks County, and Ashley Mohn from Berks County and Benjamin Wadsworth from Chester County; Youth Ambassadors, and the Young Couple of the Year, Matt and Miranda Irons of Warren County. The Grange Royalty trip has traditionally been a day of education and fun for our representatives of the Grange Juniors, Youth and Young Adults. This year was no exception, after a day of tours and visits at the Capital. At 9 a.m. the royalty met with the PA State Grange President Carl Meiss at the Grange headquarters building in Lemoyne, PA. From the office they went to the Capital for a tour provided by Senator Judy Schwank. The Pa State Grange Royalty was invited to the Senate proceedings where they were introduced to government body. At the Capitol, the young Grangers were given an official tour of the center of government in the Commonwealth.

MeeCee Baker and Galen Weibley of Versant Strategies scheduled them to attend a meeting and tour with Senator Judith Schwank, (D-11). Representative Jim Cox, (R-129) arranged for the Royalty Court to be guests at the Senate proceedings where they were introduced to the government body by Representative Sam Smith (R-66). The day was capped off with a visit to Hershey Park for the evening. The PA State Grange Royalty is chosen by a panel of judges at Young Adult Weekend, Youth Camp and Junior Camp, all held in the spring and early summer of the year. The individuals competing for the positions are required to take a “Grange Knowledge Test,” answer an “Impromptu” question and are evaluated in various categories by the judges. The highlight of each of the three events is the “coronation” of the Royalty. The Grange Royalty represents the PA State Grange throughout the year at various functions such as the PA Farm Show, Ag Progress Days, State Grange Session and other local and county events.

Left — Front Row (LR): Hannah Leibensperger and Joshua Mengel, Junior Grange Princess and Prince; Senator Judith Schwank (D-11), Ashley Mohn, Youth Ambassador; and Matt and Miranda Irons, PA Grange Young Couple. Back Row (L-R): Anna May Nauss, Youth Grange Director; Carl Meiss, PA State Grange President; and Karen Mohn, Junior Grange Director. Photo courtesy of PA State Grange

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Kuhn FC302 – 9’9” Cutting Width, Finger Comb Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,975

Kuhn FC353GC – 11’6” Cutting Width, Center Pull, Finger Comb Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,975

New Holland FP230 Forage Harvester – Processor, New Holland 258 Rollabar Rake – 9’6” Width . .$3,275 Metal Alert, Tandem Axle, Base Unit Only . . . .$23,975

Demo Kuhn MM900 – 29’10” Pickup Width, Field Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call for Pricing

New Holland 451 – 7’ Width, Sickle Bar Mower, 3 Pt. Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,575

New Holland F62B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,275

Richardton 700 Dump Wagon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,975

New Farm King 1410 Applicator – 1,000 Gallon Tank, 12 Rows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,580

Page 17 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

2012 New Holland T5050 – 80 PTO HP, 4WD, Cab, Great John Deere 5410 – 65 PTO HP, 4WD, Loader, Approx. Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$49,995 2,350 Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26,775


Section B - Page 18 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Online registration now open for the 2013 Summer Crop Tour Online registration is now open for the 2013 NYCSGA Summer Crop Tour! Visit the following link to register: http://2013nycsgacroptour.eventbrite.com . Check out the event brochure at: www.nycornsoy.org/images/2013_bro chure-_final-_no_registration_form.pdf This year’s event, titled “Breaking the Yield

Barrier” features Bill & Missy Bauer and Ken & Issac Ferrie. Workshops include: • General Session: Fundamenntals of Soils, with Ken Ferrie Breakouts: 1. Identifying Growth Stages in Soybeans, with Bill Bauer 2. Understanding Yield Components in Soybeans, with Ken Ferrie

3. Root Growth & Soil Density, with Missy Bauer 4. Precision Ag & Dairy Farming, with Issac Ferrie The Summer Crop Tour will again be hosted by Du Mond Ag, 5083 White Rd., Union Springs, and runs from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Lunch by Northern Oaks BBQ of Batavia. Register now.


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Page 19 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You.


Section B - Page 20 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560 580 585 590 595 610 620 630 640 645 650 655 670 675 680 700 705 730 735 740 760 780 790 805 810 815 860 885 900 910 915 950 955 960 1035 1040 1050 1060 1075 1080 1085 1100 1115 1120 1130 1135 1140 1160 1170 1180 1190 1195 1200 1205 1210 1220 1225

CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Ag Bags

Ag Bags

CUSTOM FORAGE BAGGING Serving Western NY & Surrounding Areas

9’ & 10’ Ag Bag Machines w/Truck Table Reasonable Rates ~ Responsible Service Brett 585-689-1857 William 585-689-1816

Leray Sealed Storage Agricultural Plastics - est. 1985 28787 Martin Rd., Evans Mills, NY 13637

“Made In USA”

315-783-1856

• Up North Silage Bags - 6 ft. diameter - 14 ft. • Up North Bunker Covers - 60-80-100’ wide x 1000’ long • Silage Shield Oxygen Barrier Film - 50’x200’ - 50’x1000’

• Net Wrap • Bale Wrap • Bale Tubes • Bale Twine Ag Chemicals

BE WISE Check Our Prices

Atrazine to Ziram

From

in Crop Chemicals

315-823-1656 Announcements GOT GAS: 315-729-3710 35¢ above spot. No contracts, membership or tank fees. www.propane4farms.com NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101 or bsnyder@leepub.com

Announcements # # # # #

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Bale Covers

Bedding

Bale Covers

MAX TECH BALE WRAP 20”x6000’ or 30”x5000’ - Call for Truckload Also Net Wrap 48”x9840’ & 51”x9840’ Now Carrying - Stretch-O-Matic Fully Automatic

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

Tubular Wrappers - All At Competitive Prices (1) Available in Stock Also Selling - Bale Thrower Racks 8-1/2’x20’, Creek Bank Bale Wagons & Barn Feeder NEW - CREEK BANK 25’ BALE WAGON w/12 Ton Tandem Running Gear & Tires 9000’ Brazilian Green • 20,000’ Poly Twine 9,600’ Poly Twine (same as 7200’Twine) • Others Available

315-823-1656 Bedding

Barn Repair

Bedding

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Bedding GREEN SAWDUST, 35 yard load, $400.00. Delivered free 30 miles. Fingerlakes Firewood 607-659-7718

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Seward Valley 518-234-4052 Bedding

Syracuse Fiber Recycling, LLC “Bedding For Dairy Cows”

Florida Osceola Turkey • Alligator • Hog Hunts

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863-443-0519 twister@embargmail.com PLAN AHEAD JULY 4th ADVERTISING DEADLINE!

Tuesday, July 2nd • 5 PM For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111 or email classified@leepub.com

~ Presently Servicing Over 100 Dairy Farms Throughout New York State Including “Super Milk” Producers ~ Year Round Supply, Lime In Every Load, pH Always 11.5+ ~ Loads Delivered in 72-80 Yard Quantities; Smaller Amounts Can Be Picked Up At Our Syracuse Site ~ Producing Quality Bedding for over 15 years

Roger W. Elston Joseph E. Elston

P.O. Box 8, Syracuse, NY 13209 (315) 487-4346


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Bedding

Bedding

BEDDING SAND for COW STALLS

• Stones • Gravel • AgLime Mark J. DuPont, Owner Cell 315-796-5084 Home 315-845-8471

PEANUT HULL BEDDING New York Prices Quoted • Call for Prices Elsewhere

Load Size

110 Cu. Yd. Trailer Loads

Ground Unground

$125.00 $115.00/Ton

Beef Cattle

Building Materials/Supplies

REGISTERED ANGUS BULL “All-Around” is sire, 4yr old, great disposition, $2,000. Grade Angus bull, 1yr, $1,000. 315-831-5132, 315368-8286.

INSULATION 1/2” to 4” 4x8 sheets foam insulation. 1x6, 2x6 knotty pine tongue & groove, white pine siding. Large quantities available!! Beachy’s Lumber & Insulation. 585-765-2215

STRICTLY GRASS-FED feeder calves for sale. Grassfed/closed herd Black Angus/ Baldies. Approx. 70 feeder calves, 500-650lbs +/-. For more information please call 845-629-1000, 845-361-4997

Buildings For Sale

Building Materials/Supplies

FA R M R A I S E D H O M E BUILDER, featuring Bill Lake Homes. Your plans or ours. Also featuring Redman Homes doublewides & singlewides. w w w. k d h o m e s n y. c o m kdhomes@frontier net.net Dave, KD HOMES, 379 Stafford Ave., Route 12, Waterville,NY 315-841-8700

Buildings For Sale

Buildings For Sale

Double O Builders LLC

518-673-1073 or 518-774-7288 • Dairy Facilities • Machinery Sheds • Pole Barns • Free Stall Barns • Tie Stall Barns • Garages • Gravity Flow Manure Systems • Horse Barns • Riding Arenas Call today and join our family of satisfied customers!!

GO WITH THE LEADER IN POST FRAME CONSTRUCTION FOR OVER 40 YEARS!!!!

#1-40YR painted steel, galvanized & galvalume, also #2 available w/all trim & accessories. Complete Building Packages. Before you buy call Mohawk Metal Sales, 315-853-ROOF(7663)

Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies Garages * Shops * Free-Stall Barns * Equestrian Riding Arenas * Variety of Agricultural Plans & Usage

$165.00/Ton

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Beef Cattle

Beef Cattle

5 BLACK ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE

HEREFORD & Red Angus Bulls, docile, vaccinated, delivery possible; 6 feeders also available. 585-624-2983

Registration #s: 17499237 17499238 17499239 17501015 17499575 All High Quality Genetics & AI Sired

EMPIRE ANGUS FARM

SAVE ENERGY - GO FOAM • FREE ESTIMATES

NELSON ZIMMERMAN Union Springs, NY

Adirondack Metal Sales Metal Roofing and Siding in Many Colors 24 ga., 26 ga., 28 ga., 29 ga., Plus Aluminum

(Direct Shipments - Wholesale, Retail) Installation Available ~ Quick Turn-Around, We Ship Anywhere ~ (315) 429-3627 302 Bacon Brook Rd., Dolgeville, NY 13329

MURRAY GRAY HEIFERS For Sale, Ancramdale NY. For more information, please contact Herondale Farm at 518329-3769 or via email at info@herondalefarm.com

BLACK ANGUS BULLS: 14 months old. 315-790-3711 FOR SALE: Reg. yearling Black Angus bulls. NBAR Primetime, 878, Leachman Right Time & New Day breeding. NYSCHAP certified herd. Hauman Angus, 315-5368154 GRASS FED Cow Calf Pairs, Hereford Angus cross cows bred back, $1,500. 315-6537897

REG. ANGUS Heifers & Bulls from top Quality Embryos. 518-436-1050, 802-376-6729 REG. BLACK ANGUS Bulls & Heifers, $900 to $1,300. 845758-3332 or 845-876-4111

Business Opportunities

www.wineandgrapegrower.com

Midlakes Metal Sales • Metal Roofing and Siding in Many Colors 24 ga, 26 ga, 28 ga, 29 ga, Plus Aluminum

• Gluelam Poles, Lumber, Trusses REG. BRAUNVIEH BEEF CATTLE: Bred cows due June & July. Young bull for summer breeding. First calf heifers with calves. Very gentle, handled daily, stanchion trained & excellent bloodlines. Call 315225-5181

Business Opportunities

Do You Grow Grapes? Do You Make Wine? CHECK OUT

JOSEPH SHIVERS

607-829-3451

Steel or Wood Frame

“Visit us at the Central New York Farm Progress Show and see all the new and innovative ways Fingerlakes Construction can solve your agricultural building needs!”

315-720-5573

(Direct Shipments - Wholesale, Retail)

• Polebarn Packages - Any Size up to 80x600 ~ Quick Turn-Around, We Ship Anywhere ~ Located in the Heart of the Fingerlakes

607-869-9483

Or Call For a Sample Copy

800-218-5586

Concrete Products THE SCABBLER MAN:2” & 1” wide scabbling. Alleys, feedlots, holding pens. Dan Martin 434-454-7018.

Page 21 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 22 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Custom Butchering

• • • • •

USDA FACILITY ORGANIC CERTIFIED HALAL PROCESSING 5A – POULTRY, BISON NO NITRATE SMOKING STAMFORD, NY

Custom Services

Custom Services

COLOR GLOSSY PHOTO CALENDARS: Only $12.00 includes tax. Send us your digital prints and we will make a beautiful keepsake calendar for you. You may also bring in your photos on a disc or thumb drive. If you would like us to mail it is a $5.00 extra fee. Only 3 day turnaround time. Contact Lee Publications bsnyder@leepub.com or 518673-0101

FOR ALL YOUR EXCAVATING NEEDS. Ponds dug, land cleared, drainage ditches. CHEAP! 315-360-6789

607-435-9375 Custom Butchering

To Save Up

$70 ON WITH COUP

New York Custom Processing, LLC Rt. 8, Bridgewater, NY All Cuts Vacuum Packed and Bar-Coded for Tracking and a Complete Printed Inventory of Your Product Call For Appointment

315-204-4089 or 315-204-4084 Now USDA Certified Organic Custom Services

Custom Services

FRESH COWS NEEDED

USED COWS WANTED

5324 County Rd 14 Odessa, NY 14869

Herd Expansions

DEAD - DOWN - DISABLED CATTLE

All Size Heifers

1-800-777-2088

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

AMERICAN RENDERING CO. BINGHAMTON, NY

Local 607.703.0052

• Competitive Pricing • Trucking Available

Cell 607.227.5282 Working With You, The Farmer

Monday 9am - 4pm Thursday 9am - 3pm

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

110 WELL-GROWN freestall trained Holstein heifers due August & September. Had all shots. 315-269-6600

BOSS LIVESTOCK: WANTED Holstein Jersey or Mixed Dairy Herds, immediate payment and removal. Also Dairy Cows For Sale: One or 100your choice, quality replacements. Call Chris Boss 315219-0590(cell), 315-8581651(home).

1 to 4 Weeks - Large Assortment to Pick From Had All Shots Freestall & Parlor Trained

315-269-6600

CATTLE TRUCKING

5-MIXED BREED Organic dairy heifers to breed this Summer/Fall; also 7-Organic yearling mixed dairy heifers. 570-833-2080, 570-499-6757

Monday’s to Hoskins & Vernon Tuesday’s to Central Bridge

BAGGING HEIFERS 50 ON HAND At All Times

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

• Accepting All Types of Livestock

FRESH HEIFERS

Contact Us With Your Information jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

B.K. Transfer

Toll Free 1.877.208.0123

Custom Butchering

256 Co. Rte. 20, Downtown South Edmeston, NY 13411 607-847-8234 • www.joesfarmersplace.com

Custom Services

“A Farmer Friendly Direct Marketing Service” Owner/Operator Licensed & Bonded

FARMER’S PLACE

Dairy Cattle

Groups of 1st & 2nd Lactation

Custom Services

Barb Kelley

Meat Processing Special! Choose FARMER’S PLACE for your Meat Processing Needs and Get FREE SLAUGHTERING!

Dairy Cattle

518-231-1622

518-762-8772 518-705-1668

FOR SALE: 20 certified organic cows, $2,200 each; also young stock available. Best time to call 8:00am-8:15 am 315-823-1525

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ATTENTION FARMERS

WA N T E D

Down - Disabled & Fresh Dead Cows For Rendering - Courteous Service FREE PICKUP!

315-793-0043 CLIP & SAVE

FREE REMOVAL

Down - Disabled - Dead Cattle Servicing: Delaware, Otsego, Schoharie, Chenango and Montgomery Counties NOW SERVING: Broome & Cortland Counties CALL ANYTIME Call by 8am for Guaranteed Same Day Removal

1-855-3CATTLE 1-855-322-8853 EMPIRE RENDERING SERVICES

WANTED 315-269-6600

Call 607-722-5728 Anytime

 WANTED 

Lower your SCC & improve conception. Low cost, effective, easy use. Our 39th year. If over 50,000 SCC call today. 1-800876-2500 1-920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com Resellers Wanted QUALITY HOLSTEIN Open Heifers: 300lb to breeding size for sale. Please call 518-7963148. SPRINGING HEIFERS for sale. Call 315-376-3215, 315523-2558

Dairy Cattle

HEIFERS

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds (ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

HEIFERS orr HERDS Buying or Selling, give us a chance. Reputable dealers since 1937. Joe Distelburger 845-344-7170

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. buycows@warwick.net A MESSAGE TO ALL DAIRY FARMERS We’re not the largest Livestock Dealers, we don’t have the largest advertisements, but we can promise to be honest, fair, and caring when it comes to purchasing and selling your complete dairy herd. You and your cows deserve that much. We also have a quality selection of Reg. and Grade cows at all times for you to choose from. So if you are thinking of buying or selling, from one cow to an entire herd, give us a call. You will be glad you did.

Bose Quality Dairy Sales

Tom 845-482-4380 • Sonny 845-482-4166

ATTENTION FARMERS

Operating 6 Days~Monday thru Saturday

WANTED

DOWN, DISABLED & FRESH DEAD COWS FOR RENDERING FREE PICKUP!

PINE TREE RENDERING Route 37, Brier Hill, NY

315-375-8459


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Dairy Equipment

Farm Equipment

BLUE DIAMOND all stainless, contour milking parlor, double 8 herringbone, air operated, complete w/bulk tank to floor mats. 585-739-9335

EXCESS EQUIPMENT: JD 260 Self-leveling loader, joystick valve, 2 sets of brackets, $2,800. JD 9300 backhoe attachment for track-loader or dozer, parts or repair, $1,000. 1954 Ford NAA tractor, original Tin, runs excellent, $3,000. 315-855-7897

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159 Dogs REGISTERED ENGLISH SHEPHERD PUPS. e-mail TandD_Kaschak@msn.com www.kaschak-kennels.tripod.com Serious inquiries only. 814796-4070

Farm Equipment

IH CULTIVATORS, 4 row, 3pt. hitch, like new, $750.00. WANTED: 2-18.4-38 tires 60% or more tread. 518-6956180

Bale Chute 3/4hp Motor

28' $3,100 32' $3,300 36' $3,500

Dairy Equipment

Sunnyhill Farm

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS

We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us SOLD OH M • 6000 Gal. Storage Mueller • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 500 Gal. • 3000 Gal. Storage • 850 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller OH • 2500 Gal. Mueller OH • 800 Gal. Mojonnier • 400 Gal. Sunset • 735 Gal. Sunset • 2000 Gal. DeLaval • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 400 Gal. Mojonnier • 2000 Gal. Surge (99) • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 300 Gal. Mojonnier • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 1500 Gal. Mueller O • 300 Gal Mueller M • 625 Gal. Sunset • 1500 Gal. DeLaval • 300 Gal. Sunset • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal. Jamesway • 1250SOLD Gal.PA • 600 Gal. Mueller M Surge • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 200 Gal. Mueller RS OH • 545SOLD Gal. Sunset • 545 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller MW

• 200 Gal. Mojonnier • 100 Gal. Milkeeper Self-Cont.

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER 300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

We e Do o Tank k Repair

SHENK’S

Drainage & Tiling

Building & Rebuilding of Self-Unloading FLAT BED and HAY WAGONS

FEEDER WAGONS Also SILAGE CONVEYORS For Estimates Call

518-673-8536 or 518-461-8933

website: cjwagons.webs.com

email cjwagons@yahoo.com

PACK YOUR SILAGE TIGHT

Lititz, PA 17543

Drainage & Tiling

Dry Up Those Wet Fields Numerous studies show that field drainage installed correctly results in:

 30-50% yield increases  Reduced soil erosion  1-2 year payback in most cases

Farm Machinery For Sale

HAY WAGONS/ BALE CARRIERS The best in "Farmer to Farmer" deals! Insist! Ball joint steering for safety/quality!

18' w/8 ton gear . . . .$3,600 20' w/8 ton gear . . . .$3,750 18' body only . . . . . .$2,400 20' body only . . . . . .$2,550

20' bale carrier . . . . .$3,200 25' tandem carrier . .$4,200 Low pro bale carrier. $3,200

STOLTZFUS & FARMCO www.blissfarm.com

Now with Changeable Hookups

MARTIN’S MACHINING & WELDING 717-892-2717 Concrete Weights setup for quick hitch & 3pt CAT. 2, 3, 3N, 4’ & 4N, 3500 lb, 5000 lb, 6000 lb, 7000 lb & 8000 lb.

SUMMER

IS

HERE!!

Farm Machinery For Sale 4 ROW LILLISTON cultivator w/fertilizer attachment, 10hp rollermill w/barley rolls, Baker potato packer 10 head unit plus fishbine sewer & L-table, 30’ Haines flat bottom produce conveyor. Vincent Farms 518-483-7990

(bodies assembled & mounted free on your gear)

WE BEAT ALL OTHER DEALERS!

Elevator on Wheels

Dairy Equipment

Sales 717-626-1151

CJ WAGONS

SALE ON H.D. Skeleton Elevators

518-885-5106

505 E. Woods Drive,

Farm Equipment

MANY IH 1066’S, 1466’S, fender and cab tractors, $7000 - $12,000. IH Tractor Parts. 518-677-2854, 518222-6291.

3ph. SITREC CEMENT MIXER w/hydraulic tilt, excellent condition, $700.00. 315896-6144

• 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 1000 Gal. DeLaval • 1000 Gal. Mueller M

Farm Equipment

BLISS FARM 802-875-2031 3950 JOHN DEERE CHOPPER w/heads, excellent condition. 607-237-4574, 607222-9409

Farm Machinery For Sale

4250 HOULE manure tank on 1984 White 350HP Big Cam, 8LL $18,000; JD 4030 80HP with Canopy $15,000; 14’ Degelman Blade with 2 sub frames, one mid mount, one axle mount $8,000. Call 585245-8581 9’ KELLY RYAN Silage Bagger, excellent shape. 315-7251720 9FT NH 479 HAYBINE, fair condition, $1,200 O.B.O. 315668-3780

Farm Machinery For Sale

BATWING MOWERS, COMBINES & HEADS NH 8770 MFD . . . . . . . . . .$36,500 JD 7610 MFD, NICE . . . . .$39,900 JD 4050 MFD PS . . . . . . . .$26,900 CIH 8910 MFD . . . . . . . . . . .$36,000 CIH 7130 MFD . . . . . . . . . . .$34,000 CIH 5140 MFD NICE . . . . . .$26,500 CIH 5130 LDR, MFD, HI HRS $13,500 IH 1486 NEW TA . . . . . . . . .$13,900 IH 1086 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,900 IH 1086 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL IH 856 FENDER . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 IH 856 NEW TA . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 IH 806 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 IH 656 WEAK HYDRO . . . . . .$3,500 FD 4100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 BOBCAT CT 225 W/LDR, NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,900 JD 9510 CM, 4WD . . . . . . . .$65,000

JD 9500 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . .$46,000 JD 9500 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . .$30,000 JD 653A BEAN HEADS .$3,000 & UP JD FLEX HEADS . . . . . . . . . . .CALL JD CORN HEADS . . . . . . . . . .CALL JD CX15 BATMOWER . . . . .$11,500 JD 7000 6 ROW, DRY . . . . . . . .$6,500 LANDPRIDE COMMANDER 5020 MOWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000 TOP AIR 500 G SPRAYER . . .CALL GRAVITY BOXES . . . . . . . . . .CALL 2100 GAL. PLASTIC TANKS, NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL IH & WHITE PLOWS 4X-10X . .CALL FRONT END LOADERS NEW & USED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL BRILLION 9 SHANK . . . . . . . .$6,500 LOTS OF DUALS . . . . . . . . . .CALL TRACTOR WEIGHTS . . . . . . .CALL

Alternative Parts Source Inc. Chittenango, NY •

315-687-0074

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

05-06 John Deere 310G 4x4 Backhoe, Cab. $36,999.00. 1-800-548-2558

1992 CASE-IH 1680 4WD combine, contour header adjustment, 3,500 engine hours, $48,500/OBO. 315420-8328, 315-382-6334

Learn more at estoltzfusexcavating.net/tilingfaqs and grab your FREE Tiling Guide

05-06 N.H. LB90 4x4 Backhoe, 4-In-1, Cab. $28,999.00. 1-800-548-2558

Or call: (518) 568-7882 to discuss your project E Stoltzfus Excavating, LLC “We Do The Dirty Work”

1840 CASE Skid steer, good motor, needs work, $4,300. 518-812-1428

2007 NEW HOLLAND 1431 mower, drawbar swivel hitch, very good condition, $17,500. 315-794-1969

JD 6410 P/Q . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 NH TS100 16 Spd P/S . .$29,900 JD 7130 24 Spd, P/Q w/JD JD 6715 P/Q LH Rev . . .$34,500 Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . .$62,500 All used on our farm, sharp strong tractors

570-833-2365

MABIE BROS., INC. See the Krone Difference for size, strength, and unmatched durability

New Krone EC3210CV 10ft. disc mower, flail conditioner . . . . . . . . . . .$26,500 $398/mo.* *2.25% For 60 Mo, 15% Down Krone offer subject to change at any time.

Used Equipment Kuhn 5001TH 4 basket tedder . . . . . .$4,500 Miller Pro 1100 rotary rake . . . . . . .$4,400 Hesston 530 round baler . . . . . . . . . .$5,975

8571 1 Kinderhook k Rd.. Kirkville,, NY Y 13082

315-687-7891 1 • 315-510-2400

MabieBros.com

Page 23 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 24 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale 9x18 E-Z TRAIL bale wagon w/8-ton Kory gear, used 2 seasons, $3,000; NH 1034 auto bale wagon, bought used but never used, $6,000. 315482-5215. Located 30 miles north of Watertown,NY AKERMAN EXCAVATOR 14B very good condition, $15,000. 518-642-9437. B&E MANUFACTURING: Kicker racks, slant bar feeders, headlock feeders, round bale carriers, low profile bale carriers. 315-536-9513

Round Bale Grabber H.D. Schedule 80 Pipe 1 1/2” Hyd Cylinder

Sunnyhill Farm

518-885-5106

Case 5140 4x4 Cab Farm Tractor. $19,999.00. 1-800548-2558 CASE IH 8435 SILAGE SPECIAL round baler, VGC, New Firestone 800/65R32 tire and 800/70R38 tire both w/rims. 315-536-3807

CASE RB454 silage round baler, 921 bales through, self oiler, rotocutter, reverser, electronic controls for inside tractor . . . . . . . . .$30,500/OBO GEHL CTL85 turbo skid steer, 2 speed, hi-flow, air, heat, quick attach, 250 hrs. . . . . .$45,500/OBO CASE MAXXUM 140 full cab, 4WD, w/Case L755 ldr., 60 hrs. . .$115,000/OBO

518-872-1386

COMBINE: CASE IH 1688 with corn & grain head. 315521-2552 COMBINES: Many recent arrivals. Huge selection JD & Case IH. Some only 2 years old. zeisloftequip.com 800919-3322 Bloomsburg, PA

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale DION SELF UNLOADING WAGON 3 Beater w/Roof, Works Excellent, Needs Some Work

1,000.00 518-461-8933 $

FARGO DUMP WAGON, always stored inside, excellent condition, $7,500. 585-7399335 FOR SALE: Jay-Lor mixer model 3650 twin screw, works great with round bales of hay, used very little, cows are gone, $22,000; Valmetal hay grinder, great for round bales of silage, like new, $16,000; Husky 4,500 gallon manure spreader, like new, $18,000; Sold John Deere baler model #530, works great, $4,500; John Deere grain drill 18 hole, old but works good, $3,500; International 110 with bucket, low hours, like new, $56,000; 3,000 gallon milk tank, works good, will consider all offers. Call 607-336-5151

HAY EQUIPMENT

JD 336 #30 . . . . . . . . .$3,900 JD 337 w/chute . . . . . .$4,200 JD 48 Loader . . . . . .$1,550 Vicon 1210 Rnd Baler $3,500 Kuhn 23’ Tedder . . . . .$3,800 Miller Pro 1100 Rotary Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,950 NH 256 Rake . . . . . . .$1,450 New Diamond 3pt. Wrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900 New EHE 18’ Tedder .$6,500 Kidd 610 Round Bale Chopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800 Used & New JD Baler Parts

NEW Field Master 11’ Rotary Rake Model 250, Tandem Axle, Hyd. Lift $7,250

Farm Machinery For Sale

TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE 570-833-5214

MESHOPPEN, PA 18630

2012 Case IH 290 Magnum C/A, 4x4, Duals All Around, Red Leather, Warranty, 1,400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$165,000 Case IH MX200 C/A 4x4, Duals, Wts, “3 PTO’s”, 3400 Hrs . .$68,500 Great Price Here! 2010 Case IH 6088 Combine, 558/431 Hrs, 480/80Rx42 Duals, S/N Y9G003035, Compare Price Anywhere! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$175,500

ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. 814-587-2450

KUHN KNIGHT VERTICAL mixer, like new, all options, $22,000. 607-234-4029, 607226-2596. LARGEST SELECTION of late model grain heads & corn heads in East. $1000 off most heads this month only. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

PleasantCreekHay.Com

IH DISGUSTED???

LLC/Partnership pattern Tile as a secondary or Primary business! Welsarth@Msn.com

585-526-6705

706, 806, 1206, 756, 856, 1256, 1456, 766, 966, 1066, 1466, 1566, 886, 986, 1086, 1486, 1586, 3288, 3388, 3488, 3588, 3788 & Other Models CUT THIS AD OUT NOW! Put in Your Operators Manual

800-808-7885

JD 7720 COMBINE 4x4, great looking & condition, $18,500; JD 924 flex head, $3,800; JD 220 flex head, $3,400; JD 825 cultivator, 6x30 rolling shields, nice, $1,000; White 378 cultivator, 6x30 tunnel shields, $9,050; 4 other 4 & 6 row cultivators, $800; Century 500 gallon sprayer, $1,500. Mike Franklin 607-749-3424

GEHL Flail mower chopper, model 72, $350; flat rack hay wagon, $125. 315-677-3440

JOHN DEERE FM6 cultivator, $1,200; 2011 Kuhn SR108 wheel rake. 716-664-3757, 716-450-7062

Nelson Horning

FORD 8N, 9N, Ferguson, TO-20, miscellaneous parts, fenders, etc. Call 315-4392685 East Syracuse,NY

Gehl 860 chopper w/H.H., 1000RPM, metalert, hydraulic tongue, $4,000. Little Falls,NY. 315-868-3505.

John Deere 4040S 4x4 Cab Tractor. $21,999.00. 1-800548-2558

Maine to N Carolina

JD 603 ROTARY CUTTER Catagory 2 3PT hitch w/ slipclutch, $800. Sub-soiler, Category 2 3PT hitch $100. 518376-1960, 7am-7pm.

GEHL 1475 silage round baler, $8,500; Buffalo Valley 36’ elevator, electric motor, $2,400; Vermeer 5041 Silage baler, $8,500; Gehl 125 grinder mixer, hammers turned once, $6,900; Gehl 100 grinder mixer, hammers never turned, scales, $5,900. Garry Ulmer 570-323-0987

Farm Machinery For Sale

Finger Lakes Equipment

FORD 7700 tractor w/cab, 2400 hrs., $14,500; New Holland 27 whirl-a-feed blower, $1,000. 607-965-8151

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery PH:570-869-1551 Cell:607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

Farm Machinery For Sale

Kennedy Tractor of Williamstown, NY (315) 964-1161 Farmall Super MTA barn fresh, 2Pt PS, SN 72927, wfe, exc. runner, good tin & rubber, needs some cosmetics $4,850; Case VAC 14 Eagle Hitch (good) $2,450; Farmall C WFE nice shape $1,850; Farmall AV $1,850; 4x4 JD 4200 w/JD Ldr, Hydro 25-30HP Dsl, 900 hrs, industrial rubber, exc. runner $9,750; 4x4 Agco ST25 w/Ldr 20HP Dsl, 1100 hrs, ind. rubber, hydro, clean $8,950; 4x4 Kubota BX2200 Cab & 60” Belly Mower 20HP Hydro, Dsl, well maintained $5,750; 4x4 Kubota M8950, Full Cab/Heat/Air 85-90HP Dsl, all new tires, lots of weights, dual outlets, all ready for summer work! $10,900; 4x4 Case 580 Super L, Fully Heated Cab & E-Hoe very clean $24,500; Trailer Type Int 100 SB Mower $1,275; 3Pt NH 451 3Pt SB Mower $1,750; Landpride RCR2510 Demo 10’ Rotary Mower (3) gearboxes, 540 PTO, chainguard kit $5,250; JD M w/Front Blade, Quick Hitch, Rear Tire Chains, Land Plow (1) Btm, Good Runner all original $2,500; Bush Hog Brand RDTH 72 Finish Mower 6’ Width, 3Pt, excellent $1,650; 3Pt Kioti & Delmorino 6’ Finish Mowers 3Pt, new $1,750 & $1,850; Woods 3Pt Landscape Rake 6’ w/wheels, new $850; York 3Pt Landscape Rake 8’ $495; 4x4 Kubota B2100 w/60” Belly Mower & Fr. Snowblower 20HP Dsl, low hrs, hydro, very clean! $8,950; Lots More Tractors & Equip In Stock

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

2-2012 JD 7200 R’s C/A, 4x4, 20 Spd, P.Q. w/LH Rev, Only 4 S/N’s apart, 700 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$129,500!!! JD 6415 C/A, 4x4, Ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call! JD 5525 C/A 4x4, Ldr & 5325 C/A, 4x4, Ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call! Lots of Other Tractors & Equipment at www.AndrewsFarm.com

ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. 814-587-2450 JD 100 Large Square Baler . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500.00 NH 644 Round Baler, Net Wrap, Knives . . .$8,500.00 Jaylor 2425 Vertical Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500.00 1150 Miller Pro Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,800.00 NH 144 Hay Inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800.00 JD 327 Baler w/out Kicker . . . . . . . . .$1,400.00 OBO IH Disc Harrows 16’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,200.00 JD 640 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,800.00

MARTIN’S

Closed Sundays

518-529-7470

Got wet fields? Use YOUR

MF540 SOYBEAN SPECIAL combine diesel 13ft flex head & 13ft grain head, $5,900. 716-549-7359 after 9pm. MOTORHOME 33 ft. class A, with central air, generator, propane heat, full bath, queen bed, underside storage, 17K miles. Immaculate condition, $16,500. 315-853-2006 NEW STEEL BALE WAGONS, 9x8x18 2”pressure treated floor, w/wide track 8T gear, $3,999. 10 bale round bale carrier, 6x12”main box beam, $3,550. Feeder wagons. 10’Brillion seeder; NH LS190 skid-steer. 570-446-3170

New Holland FP 230 & 240 Choppers, Field Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call For Details New Holland BR7060 Round Baler, Silage Special w/Net Wrap & Applicator, Only 2600 Bales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,900 Firm!

ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. 814-587-2450 OVER 20 HAY & FEEDER WAGONS IN STOCK

E-Z TRAIL, FARMCO, STOLTZFUS & GAP HILL STEEL KICKER BALE WAGONS E-Z TRAIL: 9’x18’ w/gear w/11Lx15 Tires $3,950 OR w/265x75r-16 used Truck Tires $3,750 ALL E-Z TRAIL WAGONS are on E-Z TRAIL 890W WIDE TRACK GEARS w/tongue spring. STOLTZFUS: 9’x18’ w/gear $3,650 - 9’x 20’ w/gear $3,800 All Wagons have 8 ton Wide Track Gears w/265x75r-16, 10 ply Truck Tires on 8” wide rims, Spring Kits & 32” Extendable Tongues (Martin), Red or Green & Choice of Gears: Stoltzfus, Martin. FARMCO & STOLTZFUS: Slantbar-Headlock-Haysaver Feeders, Round Bale Carriers, Elevators, Grabber $1,900 & Wrapper $9,400

SUNNYHILL FARM - JIM ROGNER 518-885-5106

JD 4755 4x4 42,000 Hrs. Dual/Weights/Runs Excellent, Field Ready $42,000 OBO

NH 1049 bale wagon, 160 bale capacity, good condition, $11,000. 315-729-2281 NH 258 hay rake, 9’, field ready, $2,200; E.Z.Trail 9x18 hay rack w/gear, like new, $2,850. 315-374-2788 NH 310 w/thrower, $4,000; NH 575 w/thrower, low wear, $12,000; 256 & 258 hay rakes; new Pequea 11’ rotary rake, $6,500; 2 star Kuhn tedder, like new; IH 986, $8,500; JD 4520, $8,500; NH 492 haybine; NH 595 tandem axle manure spreader, $8,000; IH & JD front & rear weights; PTO generators. 203-5304953.

NH 575 BALER

JD 24T Square Baler with Kicker, Good Shape $2,200 OBO

CALL DAN 716-499-0611 You can’t afford downtime! Use

With 1/4 Turn & Kicker, VG, Have Gone to Big Square Bales

$14,500

NH BALE WAGON Holds 160 Bales, VG

Dual-Cut Rolls For Peak Performance

Y QUALIT EED T N A GUAR

15,000

$

Both Always Stored Inside Sharon Springs, NY

518-284-2710

ONE ROW NEW IDEA corn picker, always under cover, good condition, $1,600. 315896-6144

Questions? Call us. PH#


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

PARTING OUT: Ford 4500 diesel loader backhoe; loader off 800 M-H 333, whole or parts. 585-437-2796

SAVE UP TO 50% on new combine parts. Any make. We stock & ship. 800-919-3322. zeisloftequip.com

Do you have a digital subscription?

www.countryfolks.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale WE WILL BEAT ANY Internet deal on combines, plus give 1 year motor & trans. warranty. That’s a fact. 2.7% financing. Zeisloft Eq., Bloomsburg, PA 800-919-3322

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

703943

704056

JD 5525 4WD TRACTOR, 80 HP

MF 1652 4WD TRACTOR, 50 HP

$49,500

CALL

702833

704051

GT 500

GRAIN DRYER, 650 BU W/EXT

$25,000

HATFIELD MFG 308 BOTTLE WAGON

Farm Machinery For Sale

SMILEY’S EQUIPMENT Tedders, discbines, haybines, balers, hay rakes, cultipackers, disks, harrows, cultivators, seeders, corn planters, rototillers, York rakes, brush hogs, 1 to 6 bottom plows, 3pt. backhoes, bale spears, bale wrappers, square bale choppers, manure spreaders, fertilizer spreaders, hay elevators, corn choppers, corn pickers, flail mowers, hay wagons. Dozers, $3,500; tractors, 2 wheels and 4 wheel drives, cheap, $1,000 up; pickups, $1,000 up; backhoes, $3,000 up; excavators, $9,000 up; pavers, $1,500 up; rollers, $850 up; skid steers, $2,500 up; tractors with loaders, $1,800 up; equipment trailers & landscape trailers, $300 up; new 5 ton dump trailers, $5,000; dump trucks, $1,500 up. All types of parts for haying equipment and all makes of tractors and much more! Buying machines dead or alive!

Trucking Available

518-634-2310

$4,500

STOLTZFUS & FARMCO FEEDERS ON SALE NOW! — UP TO $200 DISCOUNT ON ALL PRICES WITH EARLY ORDER!

K46972

REEVES 857

702170

H&S 12’ MERGER

BALE WRAPPER

$17,500

$30,000

Headlocks • Haysavers • Slant Bars on skids or wheels all sizes 8’ to 32’ 16’ Headlock Wagon . . .$3,350 24’ Headlock Wagon . . .$4,200 16’ Slant Bar Wagon . . .$2,150 28’ Slant Bar Wagon . . .$3,000 16’ Haysaver Wagon . . .$3,200 24’ Haysaver Wagon . . .$3,800

Farm Machinery Wanted

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

WANTED

Used Self-Propelled

CHOPPERS & DISCBINES

John Deere - Claas New Holland Burnt - Blown Up - Parts

YOUR SOURCE FOR:

• Livestock Feeds • Ration Balancing • SeedWay Seeds • Crystalyx Products Buying Corn, Feed Wheat & Oats

518-848-4669

(315)) 549-82266 Romulus, NY 14541

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Fencing

Custom Roasting and Cooling Your Soybeans,Corn, etc. At Your Farm or Mill Serving All of NY State

WEILER’S GRAIN ROASTING

(315) 549-7081

AT T E N T I O N FA R M E R S : Cedar Fence Posts, 6’,8’,10’ & 12’; 1000’s of Rustic Furniture pieces; rough cut cedar lumber. Fred, Copenhagen,NY 315-688-2807 ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180 LOCUST POSTS, POLES, Split Rails, 6x6’s, 4x4’s. Other hardwood & softwood boards and planks, custom cut. Also lots, land cleared, woodlots wanted. 518-883-8284

CORN SILAGE FOR SALE $65.00/ton. Call 585-7399335

www.blissfarm.com For pics of our feeders

WE BEAT ALL OTHER DEALERS!

703166

GEHL DC2345 704020 DISCBINE, KVERNELAND 9’ STRAIGHT 7515 HITCH, WRAPPER 540 RPM

$4,500

Ask about free delivery to the Albany or Hudson Valley area! The best in “Farmer to Farmer” sales

BLISS FARM 802-875-2031

$8,500

GRAIN SORGHUM $300/T sold in 1,000lb. bags. Call Tony 607-267-3412, 607-6527590.

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

TEDDERS 703333

703700

JD 348

TANCO 400

BALER W/KICKER, 200 BALES

BALE WRAPPER

$7,900

$19,500 ORDER YOUR PARTS ONLINE THRU OUR WEB SITE: www.whitesfarmsupply.com 4154 State Rt. 31, Canastota (315) 697-2214 (800) 633-4443 8207 State Rt. 26, Lowville (315) 376-0300

©2007 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com

962 State Rt. 12, Waterville (315) 841-4181 (800) 859-4483 387 Center St., Franklin (607) 829-2600

10’ TO 17’ PRICED TO MOVE

Call 570-888-5370

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights Farm Machinery Wanted WANTED TO BUY: Used farm & construction equipment, all makes and models, running or not, 1980’s & newer. Will 315777-2357

Pat O’Brien & Sons For all your feed needs! • Steam Flaked Corn • Protein Mixes

• Corn Meal • Minerals

• Energy Mixes • Nutritional Services

Pick-up or Delivery from our Geneva Feed Mill

We Buy All Grains! Call Pat @ 716-992-1111

Grain Roasting On Your Far m

Soybeans • Corn Barley • Wheat

Waterville Grain Roasting Oneida Co., NY

315-534-8948

Page 25 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 26 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Fencing

Fencing

Empire Farm Fence & Supply

“Miles of Quality Start Here”

• High Tensile • Split Rail • Misc. Types of Fence • Energizers • Fencing Supplies 4097 Rt. 34B, Union Springs, NY 13160 RUSTIN WILSON (315) 364-5240

2033 Brothertown Road Deansboro, NY 13328 Phone: (315) 841-4910 Fax: (314) 841-4649 Hrs: Mon-Fri 8am-4pm Sat. 8am-Noon Spring/Summer

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

~ Available Now ~ ~ reels ~ poliwire ~ step in posts etc. ~ hi tensile ~ wire mesh ~ gates ~ split rail fencing ~ hay feeders ~ posts of all sizes ~ tools ~ cattle handling equipment ~ water tubs & valves ~ mineral feeders

Hay - Straw For Sale

Heating

HAY & STRAW

GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266

CENTRAL BOILER E-Classic OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. EPA Qualified. Call today Halloran Farm 845-482-5208.

ALFALFA - Delivered Cell

717-222-2304 FARMERS

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

2012 BALEAGE. Albany,NY area. James Frueh, 518-4361050

Goats

STANTON BROTHERS 10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

REG. NUBIAN Doelings/Does It started all in 2006 w/CapriDot’s Does & Bucks. Sired by Joyofthejourneyfarm Achilles & Mountaindale Jasmine Javlon CAE free. Doelings $200, Does $250. 518-260-5215 www.joyofthejourneyfarm.com

4x4 ROUND BALES, Grass Hay, not wet. Organic Certified. $35.00 each. 607-8493798

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

FOR SALE: Baling Twine, Net Wrap & Bale Wrap. Call Bonita @ 717-380-9571.

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

FOR SALE: Horse quality first & second cut grassy hay, big & small square bales. Delivered.-315-264-3900

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

www.williamsfarmfence.com

williamsfence@gmail.com

Hay - Straw For Sale

518-768-2344

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118 Clyde, NY WE SPECIALIZE IN

• Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

HAY & STRAW: Large or small square bales. Wood Shaving Bags and Grain. René Normandin,Québec, Canada 450-347-7714 HAY SAVER Plus Hay Preservative, 68% Propionic Acid. Product available in Waterloo, NY. Delivery Available. Conoy Ag, Elizabethtown, PA 717367-5078

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

Ag Service Tech

MIXED GRASS HAY, small square & 4x4 round. 100+ acres of feed corn. Orange County,NY 201-602-5034 NOFA CERTIFIED Organic Hay, 3x3x8 square bales, 1st cutting, 2nd cutting & straw. 518-234-2188

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

519-529-1141

PLEASANT VIEW FARMS HAY & STRAW Lg. Round, Lg. Sq., Sm. Sq.

1st & 2nd Cut Wrapped Round Bales Delivery Available Call Louis 860-803-0675

Hay - Straw Wanted

WE’VE GOT LIME HI-MAG

3 0 To n M i n i mu m Spreader & Spreading Available Large Quantity Discount ALSO BEDDING SAND & CHICKEN MANURE

HI-MAG LIME

Delivered by the Truckload Also EQUINE & BEDDING SAND

Call T J Allen 315-845-6777 315-868-2438

ALWAYS WANTED Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

The Best Method For Covering Hay Stacks

ROCKY MEADOW FARM

Delivery Available

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727

888-339-2900 ext. 10

810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

The job requires computer knowledge and good communication skills. John Deere equipment repair knowledge and experience is a plus. Technicians have access to state-of-the-art computer diagnostic information, John Deere education programs, as well as performance incentive programs. Cazenovia Equipment offers competitive compensation package, 401K retirement program, employee discount, personal leave days many group employee benefits.

Apply now...

TIMOTHY MIXED HAY ALFALFA MIXED HAY 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cuttings Also Small Square Mulch

www.cazenoviaequipment.com

Call 4M FARMS 315-684-7570 • 315-559-3378

Heating

FOB McConnellsville, NY

The right candidate has strong mechanical skills, understands the performance of farm equipment and implements applications.

Fax Resume to (315) 655-8433 Email Resume: jobs@cazequip.com

WANTED: 1st & 2nd cut big & small squares. 315-363-9105

PROTECT YOUR FEED FROM THE WEATHER Save money in prevented feed losses & up to 5 seasons of use Large Inventory • Next Day Shipping

ohartes@aol.com or 508-520-2321

Cazenovia Equipment Company, a premier John Deere Dealer is looking for experienced service technicians to join our team in any of our eleven locations in New York.

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

HAVE WET FIELDS? Have compaction issues? Low yields? Call D&D Farm Service/Agri-SC 1-888-401-4680

For a new mixed livestock farm in Central New York near Cooperstown. Accomodation provided. Drivers licensed required. Experience preferred. Please reply to:

CALL STEVE

519-482-5365

Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

ASSISTANT FARM MANAGER WANTED

STRAW WANTED:

Call for Competitive Prices

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

Help Wanted

CENTRAL BOILER EClassic OUTDOOR FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. 97% Efficient. EPA Qualified. Call North Creek Heat 315-8663698

FEED MANAGER 800 cow dairy in WNY dairy is seeking a feed manager. Primary responsibilities will include daily feeding, bunk management, inventory management and quality control. For a more detailed job description and application Please call 585-245-8581 or e-mail: kimballkeith@aol.com


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Help Wanted

Hogs

HERDSMAN

TAKING ORDERS for Spring piglets, feeders and slaughter hogs, all corn & milk fed. Also freezer ready pork cuts & sausage. Hull-O Farms 518239-6950, Durham,NY

High producing 400 cow dairy seeks caring, experienced person to assist with daily health & reproductive programs of cows & heifers. May also include parlor staff supervision & administration of mastitis program. Experience or 2 year dairy science degree required. Competitive salary with housing available. 50 to 55 hours per week. Wonderful location in Western New York with excellent school district.

BLUMER DAIRY

585-356-3572

Hoof Trimming J&S LEONARD HOOF TRIMMING. 20 Years of Experience. Sore Feet - My Specialty. 607-264-8004 SHAMANSKY’S HOOF TRIMMING, references available. 518-231-3162

Large Dairy in Cayuga County, NY

BAILLIE LUMBER CO. buys all species of hardwood veneer logs, sawlogs and standing timber year round. IMMEDIATE LOCAL PAYMENT AND TRUCKING AVAILABLE. Please call for an updated price and spec sheet today! Smyrna Sawmill 607-627-6547. Mark Mowrey 315-796-6644; Phil Day 315436-2766; Jonathan DeSantis 315-882-8174; Sean Karn 315-436-3588. Boonville Sawmill 315-942-5284. Dave Prezyna 315-436-5329; Paul Snider 315-827-4062 (home) or 315-436-0949 (cell); Tom King 315-436-0936; Lukas Myers 315-263-6909. LOCUST 4x4’s, fence posts, split rails, lumber. Natural, chemical free non poisonous alternative to pressure treated that has strength and lasts a lifetime. 518-883-8284

Looking for Experienced

HERDMAN

e-mail swhite3273@aol.com MILKER WANTED: 3PM-midnight, housing provided. Gansevoort, NY. 518-744-4052 or lksmiles1@msn.com Weller & Associates has been providing comprehensive crop insurance solutions for over thirty years. We use John Deere APEX/AMS technology to provide accurate timely service. We are looking for an individual with strong educational skills to represent us in Central New York. See the web site http://tinyurl.com/nq4nve7

Lumber & Wood Products

Miscellaneous BUSINESS CARD MAGNETS only $75.00 for 250. Free Shipping. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or bsnyder@leepub.com Please allow 7-10 business days for delivery

Horses

Miscellaneous YARD SIGNS: Full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Starting at $15.00 each. Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or bsnyder@leepub.com. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

Parts

Parts & Repair

COMBINE PARTS

New, Used & Rebuilt Combine, Corn Head & Grain Head Parts!

BRYANT COMBINE PARTS U.S. 27, Bryant, IN 47326 • 800-255-1071 www.bryantcombineparts.com

ORDER NEW AFTERMARKET COMBINE & TRACTOR PARTS ONLINE 24/7

WE SHIP UPS & TRUCK FREIGHT DAILY

TRACTOR WEIGHTS

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

AC, IHC, MF, JD, CASE & OTHERS Wheel weights and suitcase weight brackets. Free freight 1,000 lbs or more. Also skid steer weights and brackets.

CERTIFIED ORGANIC 420 acres, 265 tillable; 100 rotational pastures, freestall parlor centrally located to pastures with 2,000,000 gallon manure storage and two bunks for feed storage. 2½ miles road frontage on quiet road. Retirement sale - full line of machinery, 180 head of cattle available. Larchar Farms, Columbus, NY. 607847-8393.

LAND FOR SALE: Little Falls area, 59.9 acres, field & woods, $65,000; 17.9 acres field & woods, $35,000; owner financing. Fort Plain area, 60 acres, fields, 2797’ road frontage, $119,000; also 5.3 acres, great view, $16,000, owner financing. 518-861-6541 www.helderbergrealty.com

100 lb. IHC Style Suitcase Weights 85 ea. 10 or more 75 lb. available

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

Parts & Repair

ZERO - PATZ NuPULSE Bulk Tank Repair Parts

PAIR REG. HAFLINGERS, full brothers, 2yr. gelding, one 1yr. stud, good size, make ex. team, good for vet, farrier, UTD. 518-766-4621

Parts & Repair

For All Makes & Models

MARSHALL ELECTRIC Venice Center, NY

315-364-8452

Call 800-836-2888 to place your classified ad.

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

MORTGAGES AVAILABLE Financing for Farmland, Timberland, Commercial and Waterfront Properties. Fast Approvals & Closings

Call Thompson Island LLC 518-796-4828

Livestock Wanted CASH FOR DAY OLD BULL CALVES Eastern Wayne, Northern Seneca & Cayuga Counties. 315-521-0309

Help Wanted

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

Help Wanted

SEED COMPANY DEALERSHIPS

(607)) 334-97277

DOEBLER’S is searching for professional seed sales men and women in all of its Eastern regions from New York State into Ohio and as far south as North Carolina. Ideal candidates must demonstrate an ability to quickly learn new seed product information, a desire to not only grow Doebler’s business but also the businesses of his or her customers, and a thorough understanding of and ability to communicate Doebler’s reputation in agribusiness as “Your Regional Advantage”.

Celll 607-316-3758

If you would like to be considered for a dealership position with a company nearly eight decades in the industry, please call 1-800-853-2676. Thank you.

Hoof Trimming

Hoof Trimming

M.D.’ S HOOF TRIMMING • Corrective and MaintenanceTrimming • Sore Problem Feet Repaired and Wrapped

MIKE DVORAK 315-725-1720 Serving g Alll off New w York

www.possonrealtyfarmsandland.com possonrealtyllc@stny.twcbc.com David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

NEW! Montgomeryy Countyy Farm - Clean and Neat. Exceptional home. 100 acres, 60 tillable, good well drained soils. 10 acres of pasture balance in woods. 2 Virginia style barns for beef with concrete barn yards. Big machinery building and 2 shops. Very nice remodeled 2 story 4 bedroom Victorian home. Exceptionally well maintained. 2 baths and 2 full kitchens. Home could easily be a 2 family house or use all as one. Nice location. Overlooking the beautiful Mohawk Valley. Easy to get to from Rt 90. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Askingg $310,000 7 - Western n NY Y 86 6 acre Greatt Buy!! - 2297 Gentleman'ss Farm. Within 15 mins to beautiful Lake Erie. 30 acres tillable, good soils, partially

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

fenced in new high tensile. Balance woods, some timber. Excellent hunting. Nice remodeled 2 story 3 bdrm home. New roof, windows, deck, and much more. 36x100 2 story barn for hay storage and cattle. Nice 40x100 machinery building with 2 box stalls for horses. All buildings have power and water. Quiet road, very nice setting. Mins to shopping hospitals and airports. Askingg $250,000. This is a very well maintained farm in a beautiful area of New York. 2354 4 - Northern n New w York k Farm. Clean and Neat. Well Maintained. 140 m/l acre dairy farm. 120+acres tillable right behind the barn. 50 stall 2 story dairy barn. Good size stalls, nice wide mangers. 2 story 2 bay garage. Remodeled 2 story 4 bdrm home in nice shape. This is a good all round little dairy farm w/lots of room for expansion and growth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Onlyy Askingg $235,000 Good buy on a nice sized farm. 2314 4 - 35 5 acress closee to Cortland d and d I81. Mostly wooded with some timber. Excellent hunting. Would make a nice place to have a home or cabin for weekend getaway. Close to Syracuse, Finger Lakes, Cornell College. everything you need is close by and is easy to get to from I81. . . . . . . Askingg $59,900

Page 27 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 28

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Real Estate For Sale

PUTNAM, NY, 475 acres wooded, crop & pasture. House, barns & brook running through property. Recreation/beef farm, asking $625,000. 518-585-7907

140 ACRES LARGE 3BR, 2½ bath log home. Large out building contains 4 box stalls, tack room, 2 stall+ garage. Property on Indian River. Asking $360,000. 315-629-6666.

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #685 - Very neat outstanding 330 acre dairy farm, nice 2 story barn for 85 cows on 2” pipeline - 20 stalls for dry cows & bred heifers. Freestall heifer barn - large bunk silo for corn & haylage. Heated shop - building for bedding and other storage - another storage building. Nice two story home with 8 rooms - nice new kitchen - includes double-wide trailer for hired help. . . . . . . .Priced at $825,000 More land for rent. #35-A - Lg. dairy/crop farm w/832 acres - .530 tillable plus pasture & woods. This organic farm has 100 cow free stall w/double eight parlor & holding area for 100 cows - very nice milk house w/two 1500 gal. bulk tanks, also lg. area for dry cows/heifers - 3 car garage w/4 bdrm. apmt. above and 30x40 shop at end - 216x16’ bunk silo, also 42x228’ bldg. w/high doors on end for tractor trailers to drive thru - large 38x200’ storage bldg. also a nice 2 story 8 room home. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $1,652,000 MORE LAND AVAILABLE. 5 MILES OF ROAD FRONTAGE.

Real Estate Wanted

Sawmills

WANTED TO RENT

TIMBER WANTED PAYING TOP PRICES FOR

Young couple currently farming looking to rent a Dairy Farm in good working condition to milk 60 cows plus raise young stock. Must have land and pasture. Madison County NY or surrounding counties.

315-430-8628 Rentals

FOR RENT 9’ Silage Bagger Call for Price & Availability

Timberland, Saw Logs, & Veneer Delivered, Standing or Roadside.

Call General Timber 518-796-4828

315-725-1720

C-88 - Cottage style camp located in the Caroga Lake area of the Adirondack Park. This four room camp is in need of remodeling. Features electric, phone, septic and good water system. The cottage located on a .96 acre lots sits with a backdrop of a green of The Nick Stoner Golf Course. Ideal area for hunting, snowmobiling, golf, or just relaxing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $25,000

Van Billings Real Estate, LLC 315-429-0300

Offering the Best in Farms, Land, Homes www.vanbillingsrealestate.com 14 S. Main St., Dolgeville, NY 13329 Licensed Real Estate Broker

Van Billings

Argyle - 100 Acres $550,000 Dairy of Distinction Perfect Dairy of Distinction - High milk producing Organic farm, ideal for rotational grazing. 68 tie stalls, new milking equipment, 100 acres, mostly tillable. 21,000 lb. herd average. Excellent buildings, silo, shop and ranch home. Cattle and machinery also available. Additional beautifully remodeled farmhouse on 7 acres may be available. Call for milk production.

Georgetown - 135 Acres - $589,900 - Dairy of Distinction Picture perfect Dairy of Distinction. First time offered outside the family. Fully functioning dairy farm with excellent barn, milks 53 cows, 3 silos, 6 ton grain bin, holds 10,000 small bales, 135 acres with 65 acres tillable, good woods and pasture. An excellent grazing farm. Other outbuildings include equipment shop and garages for equipment storage. Additional 46 acres available for lease with 36 acres tillable. Two fine homes in excellent condition. Beautiful 4 bedroom ranch with inground pool and decks with beautiful views plus an older 4 bedroom farmhouse also in fine condition with sparkling hardwood floors. This farm is a real gem.

Columbus - 77 Acres $299,900 Old Dairy Farm now used for beef with extensive farm buildings & renovated two family farm house. Beautiful setting. Double twelve milking parlor but no milking equipment left. Feed barn, heifer barn, metal machine barn, ponds, great potential.

www.countryfolks.com

New Stave Silos

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

For All Your Automation and Filling Needs Call:

Center State Ag. Service Morrisville, New York

315-684-7807

JAMESWAY & VAN DALE

Equipment, Parts & Service Authorized Harvestore & Laidig Dealer Sales, Service-Repair

PATZ DEALER Parts-Sales-Service

VALMETAL DEALER Sales-Service-Parts

DAIRYMASTER DEALER

# # # # # # # # # #Sales-Service-Parts # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #Mixers, # # Stationary # # # & #Trailer # # #

Rentals

Rentals

of # # # # # VENTILATION # # # # # # #We # carry # #a full # line # #

# # All # Types # # of#Systems # # # milking # # # # # #for#tie# # equipment # # # # # # # # # # #stalls # #& parlor # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

FORESTRY CUTTER FOR RENT

SILO REPAIRS - Blower Pipe, Vinyl & Steel, Distributors, Silo Hoppers, Poly Chute Hoppers, Chute Replacements, Chute Liner, Klean Chute Tubing, Wood Doors # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # WOOD CONVEYORS - Single & Double Chain, # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Taper Board Feeders

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

# #

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

NOW AVAILABLE: SILO UNLOADER REPLACEMENT PARTS FROM 10 MFGS.

#74 - Very neat dairy/hobby farm w/252 acres - 100 tillable - 38x96’ 2 story barn w/56 stalls, 22x34’ 4 stall garage / 50x50’ mach. shed / 30x40’ heifer barn - very good home built in ‘60 w/fireplace, sun rm. Great buy at $550,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED TO $499,000 #B-107 - This property is 338 acres of solitude. It is all wooded and just on the edge of the Adirondack Park. It is ideal for hunting, fishing and year round recreation.There is a 12’x20’ log cabin that is located along side a small pond. He also constructed a road for access so you can drive to this cabin by the pond. There are a few streams that flow through the land, one of which is piped to the cabin for a water source. Although it is remote it has over 600 feet of frontage on a paved road with power. This is priced to sell at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$220,000

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ## # # # # ## ## # #

Real Estate For Sale

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ## # # # # # # #

July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Will ship to entire country. ALSO

REPLACEMENT T SILO O DOORS S & HARDWARE E AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd., Myerstown, PA 17067

• Blaze Wildlife Trails • Trim Tree Lines • Clean Up Old Orchards • Reclaim Grown Up Meadows (For Rent or Custom Hire)

Call Lamar 315-246-1154 Roofing

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING

Toll-free 1-877-484-4104 Fax 717-949-3232

www.agmap.psu.edu/businesses/5996

MID-STATE TECH INC. 6024 Greene Rd. Munnsville, NY

315-495-6506 315-404-6721 David Stanek

Pre-Owned Tanks & Silos NRCS Approved Slurry Storage Systems

New Conventional Silos Silo Unloaders Van Dale Jamesway Patz (Used) FULL LINES N-TECH NORBCO RISSLER Conveyors & Carts GRAETZ LAIDIG All Silo Repairs Conveyors & Mixers Utility Augers

Hammer Mills

FARMERS - SPRING IS AROUND THE CORNER! Does that Wood or Concrete Silo Need Help?

ALL TYPE OF REPAIR Cabling of Barn & All Types of Barn Roof Repair

Call MAC HYNEY

518-993-4613

NORTHEAST SILO DEMO: Need a cheap, quick & easy way to get your silo down? Will travel, give us a call. 518568-3560

Silo Repair Specializing In: e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

• New Silos Available • Stave Replacement • Plaster • Chutes • Pipes • Distributors • Roofs • Takedowns & Rebuilds • Retightening Older Silos

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Services Offered RED BARN MEATS now offers USDA inspected & custom processing of beef, pork, sheep, poultry & venison. Call Jordan at 315-346-1254. WEDDING INVITATIONS printed and designed by Lee Publications: 100 (4.5x6) Invitations including envelopes with 100 RSVP postcards. Only $150.00 +tax. We can also do smaller and larger amounts. Call for pricing and designs 518-673-0101, or bsnyder@leepub.com Also Save the Dates • Shower Invitations • Baby Announcements and more.

Over 40 Years Experience Ed Rocker

1-800-836-2888 To place a Classified Ad

607-334-5194 Norwich, NY SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17202. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Tires & Tire Repair Service

Trailers

Trucks

Trucks

Radial 240-R4TM Truck Tire 22.5 Available

B&G Trailer Sales

1984 INTERNATIONAL V8 diesel, w/16’ aluminum Agway box, dump w/cross auger in back, $9,600. 315-794-2859, 315-841-8411

2000 F-250 4X4 POWERSTROKE, quad cab, 8ft box, automatic, 122,000 miles, many new parts, $10,000. 315-855-7897

Trucks

Trucks

TRACTION & FLOTATION

Hill Top Tire

402 State Hwy 163 Fort Plain, NY

(518)) 993-2235 www.hilltoptire.net

Dryden, NY 13053

COMPLETE LINE OF ADAM LIVESTOCK TRAILERS 12’ TO 24’ ADAM & COTNER HORSE TRAILERS

$15,900 2002 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD DURAMAX 4x4, Longbed, Extended Cab, 173K, With New Injectors at 100K. Good honest truck.

Also 1992 Fruehauf 5000 Gallon Stainless Steel Tanker, 11-20 Rubber, S Cam Brakes, Pump and Hose Included. $8,900

Hainsworth Farms Call Chuck 585-734-3264

2001 Dodge 3500 Ext. Cab Pickup 6 Spd. Man Trans/Eby Alum Bed, 5th Wheel & Bumper Hitches, Runs .............................................$12,000 OBO

Trailers

1974 Heil 9200 gallon tanker. Nice trailer from the south with aluminum subchassis. New HD springs. Tires 40%.

Call Chuck at 585-734-3264

Horse • Livestock • Dump • Cargo Equipment • Landscape • Motorcycle Snowmobile • ATV • Car and More

Trailer Parts & Towing Accessories

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK

Fontaine Stainless Sander. 10’ with controls. Very good shape. $7,000

1988 Peterbilt 379 Roll-off 350 Big Cam Cummins, 13 Spd., Galbreath 60,000 lbs roll-off, Aluminum Wheels. $10,000

1992 Int 8100 C+C, 3208 Cat diesel, Eaton 10 speed, engine brake. Priced to Sell

New Silage Bodies. Call for Size and Pricing

1995 Mack CL753 3406B Cat, 18 speed, full locking 46k rears. $25,000

“We’ll hook you up” 1595 Yale Farm Rd., Romulus, NY 14541

Toll Free 888-585-3580 ~ 315-585-6411

1986 Mack DM686S 300 Mack with Jake, Mack 6 Spd Low Hole Trans., 18,000 Front, Mack 44,000 Rears, Mack Camelback, Double Frame, Southern Truck, No Rust. Priced To Sell Or Trade

2007 Peterbilt 335 ISC Cummins, 280HP, Fuller 6 Spd Low Hole Trans., 35,000 GVW, AC, Southern Truck, 25’ Virgin Frame. Priced To Sell Or Trade

2004 International 7600 Southern Truck, C-10 Cat, 305 HP, 9 Spd Trans., 35,000 GVW, No Rust. Priced To Sell Or Trade

ADVANTAGE TRUCKS (716) 685-6757 www.advantagetrucks.com

Calendar of Events

102”x28’ (23’ flat deck + 5’ dovetail), with 3 spring assist flip over/stand up ramps, 21,000lb. GVW, LED lights, locking toolbox, side steps, spare tire.

Midlakes Trailer Sales

1987 Mack DM688 300 Mack, Mack Air To Air 6 Speed Low Hole Transmission, 26’ Roll Back With 20,000# Winch, Stabilizer, Low Miles, No Rust. Priced To Sell Or Trade

1983 Autocar DC64B, Cummins, Automatic with Auxiliary Transmission, Double Frame. Good Feeder Truck. $5,000

2013 PJ Tri-Axle Gooseneck Prices valid till 7/8/13 Cash Only

White GMC Grapple Truck Excellent Storm Truck, Road Ready/Inspected/ Prentice ............................................................................................$28,500

CALL DAN 716-499-0611

Route 12, North Norwich, NY

7,500

$9,900

1978 Fruehauf 9200 gallon aluminum tanker. Rear fill with doors and flip to spread option. 22.5 tires at 90%, brakes at 90% and 4 new HD springs.

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

$

24.5 rubber, new brakes, drums, and springs. Rollover tarp in good condition. Full frame, Good trailer.

Flatbed Trailers TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: 400 different trailers, in stock, ready to haul. Dumps, tilttops, landscape trailers and goosenecks. Financing always available. Call 585243-1563.

Trucks 1977 MONOTONE 30’ DUMP TRAILER

607-898-9558

Tractor Parts

Trailers

Trucks

1984 Fruehauf 9200 gal tanker, 4 compartment. $15,000

(3) 1999 Int 4700 flatbed dumps DT466E. 2 are 6+ standards and 1 Allison automatic. Selling Choice $8,500

Many New and Used Feed and Gravel Bodies

Call Us With Your Used Parts Needs - Many Hydraulic Parts in Stock

DERBY Y TRUCK K PARTS 802-673-8525 Days • 802-895-2961 Eves www.derbytruckparts.com

EAST NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

MAY 6 - OCT 26 Groundswell Center Offers Scholarships

WE DELIVER

“Exporters Welcome” for Sustainable Farming Trainees The Groundswell Center for Local Food & Farming is offering scholarships for limited resource trainees in its 2013 Sustainable Farming courses. These courses provide training in small scale, commercial organic farming systems and are geared for beginning and aspiring farmers. Programs begin May 6. Apply now. Groundswell’s 100 hour Sustainable Farming Certificate Program runs from May 6 to Oct. 26. Finger Lakes CRAFT: Monthly farm tours and social gather-

Page 29 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 30 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com ings. Organic Farming Fundamentals: Six sessions, May 8-June 26. Commercial Organic Vegetable Production Basics: Eight sessions, May 22 - Aug. 28. Organic Livestock Production Basics: Six sessions, July 3 - Aug. 7. Pastured Poultry Intensive: Full day workshop, Aug 12. Sheep Dairy Intensive: Full day workshop, Aug 18. Hog Breeding and Farrowing Intensive: Full day workshop, Sept. 16. Draft Horse Intensive: Two day workshop, TBA. Poultry Process-

ing Practicum: Full day workshops, TBA. Tuition for each program is on a sliding scale. Program details and an online application form can be found at www.groundswellcenter.org Call 607-319-5095 or e-mail info@groundswellcenter.org JUL 1 - AUG 16 Summer Youth Lessons Each 45 to 60 minute, hands-on lesson is geared for youth ages 5 to 12. There needs to be a minimum of 5 youth participants to schedule a lesson and a maximum

Trucks

Trucks

of 25 youth can be accommodated for each lesson. Summer youth program coordinators may schedule one or both of the lessons for the period of July 1 through Aug. 16, by contacting Extension educator Linda Wegner no later than June 27 at 518-673-5525 ext. 114 or lew9@cornell.edu JUL 3 Grazing Basics Northland Sheep Dairy, Marathon, NY. 5-8 pm. Basic principles and practices of intensive rotational grazing systems including forage biology, grazing behavior, stocking rates, paddock and lane design, moving animals, fencing and watering systems. Cost: $45-$60 voluntary sliding scale. To register e-mail info@groundswellcenter.org JUL 5-7 Northeast Reining Horse Show Eastern States Exposition Coliseum, 1305 Memorial Ave., West Springfield, MA. Contact The Big E, 413-7372443, 413-205-5115. On Internet at www.TheBigE.com JUL 6 Historic Fishkill Farms Celebrates 100th Year Fishkill Farms, 9 Fishkill

Martin’s Farm Trucks, LLC

Trucks for All Your Needs - Specializing in Agri-Business Vehicles

2006 F/L FLD120 Classic Dump, 14L Det 515hp, Jake, 18spd, 20/20/46 Axles, HMX Susp, Quad Lock, 19.5’ Alum Dump, Double Frame, 569k mi. $59,500

1974 Pennco 9000 Gal Alum Fuel Tanker, 4 Compartments, TA, Springs Susp, Very Nice Cond, Tires & Brakes Old. $11,900

Both of these units at the NY Store

888-497-0310

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CALEDONIA DIESEL, LLC TRUCK & EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE “The Diesel People!”

2905 Simpson Rd., Caledonia, NY

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Just 1 mile south of Route 20 on 36 south

2007 Mack CX613 Flat Top Sleeper Truck, 380hp, 10 speed, air ride, 12k front axle, 40k rears, aluminum wheels, 212” wheelbase, very good rubber, stock #4302 $28,900

2008 Cat D5K XL Dozer 3400 Hours, Canopy w/heater, System One U/C in very good condition, With 20” pads, 6 way PAT blade, GPS ready $68,900

2002 Freightliner FLD120 HD Dump Truck 12.7L Detroit 470hp, Allison 5 speed auto., 20,000 lbs. front axle, 65,000 lbs. rears, 18” steel body, double frame, rubber block suspension, ONLY 50,000 MILES!!! stock #4360 $47,900

2004 Cat 312C EROPS with heat and AC, 5574 hours, new chains and sprockets, mechanical thumb, 38” bucket $67,500

2005 Volvo VHD64 Dump Truck ONLY 147,000 MILES! Volvo 435hp, 8LL transmission, 17 1/2’ J&J steel body, 18k front axle, 18k lift axle, 44k rears, double frame, stock #4343 $55,900

2009 Laymor SM250 Sweepmaster Broom 722 HOURS! Enclosed cab w/AC, 180 gallon water tank $27,900

Please check our Web site @ www.caledoniadiesel.com

1993 Kawasaki 90ZIII Wheel Loader 4.5 CY Bucket with teeth, cab with heat & A/C, Cummins 290hp, only 7348 hours $38,900

1996 Cat 938F Wheel Loader 13,442 hours, Cab with heat and AC, 20.5x25 tires at 80%, 3CY bucket with BOE, ride control and 4 speed powershift $45,900

2005 Western Star 4900 Flat Top Sleeper Heavy spec truck with 545k miles, Cat C15-475hp, 18 speed, 14k front axle, 46k full locking rears, 36” bunk, double frame, haul-max suspension, stock #3636 $46,000

2010 Ammann Double Drum Roller Only 7 Hours!! 32” drums, spray system & vibratory. Save $$$$$. Only $19,900!

COMING NEXT WEEK!!!! 1998 DEERE 624H WHEEL LOADER 10,950 Hours, EROPS with heat and AC Call for more information

2006 Freightliner Columbia Daycab, Detroit 14L 515hp, 13 speed, 471K miles, 14k front axle, 46k full locking rears, air ride, 205” wheelbase, stock #4267 $49,900

Farm Rd., Hopewell JCT, NY. All Day: Cherry picking, Hayrides and Lunch (11am 3 pm) 4 pm: Ribbon Cutting and talk with 2nd & 3rd generation farmers Robert and Joshua Morgenthau. 5 pm: Screening of historic home videos, never publically released, filmed by Henry Morgenthau Jr, recording political events from 19301942 including a secret huddle at Fishkill Farms in 1942 of Henry Jr., FDR and Winston Churchill. 6-10 pm: Centennial Gala. There will be no admission charge but we ask for donations at 6 pm. for our Gala, a suggested $10, to cover the cost of the fireworks and music for this event and to support the farm in our mission to grow fresh, wonderful food for the community. If one donates through our website www.fishkillfarms.com , the donation comes with a limited edition old style Fishkill Farms Centennial poster. Please contact Josh Morgenthau with inquiries at cell 347-834-4835. E-mail: joshua.morgenthau@gmail.com JUL 7 Grass Fed Sheep Farming Basics Northland Sheep Dairy, Marathon, NY. 1-4 pm. Fundamentals of sheep biology and behavior; opportunities and challenges for profitable organic sheep farming; basics of care, feeding, housing, parasite control, breeding, lambing, processing and marketing. Cost: $45-$60 voluntary sliding scale. To register e-mail info@groundswellcenter.org JUL 8 Farmer Training Meetings Heather Ridge Farm, Preston Hollow. 3-5 pm. Other 2013 schedule date include: • Aug. 12: Majestic Farm, Mountain Dale • Sept. 9: Dirty Girl Farm, Andes • Oct. 14: Rondout Valley Organics, Ellenville • November 2013: Contradance TBD A full schedule and host farm background can be found at www.CatskillsCRAFT.org JUL 8-12 Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association & the American Society of Animal Science Indianapolis, IN. 35 symposia on topics such as animal genetics, food science and animal well being. On Internet at jtmtg.org JUL 10 4-H Shooting Sports Program CCE of Albany County, 24 Martin Rd., Voorheesville, NY. 6-8 pm. Participants must be between 11 & 18 years of age. There is a participation fee of $35 for each youth. The deadline to register for this session is July 1. Participants must pre-register and registration will be limited. To register a youth, or for more information, contact Eileen DePaula at 518765-3500 or e-mail oremd32@cornell.edu Annual Ice Cream Social American Maple Museumin Lawn, 9756 Main St., Croghan, NY. 6-8 pm. A delicious evening of ice cream and music. Other items available are maple cotton candy, hot dogs, and popcorn. for refreshemts we

small business owner will find the information useful. Both workshops run from 4:30-8 pm. Registration is $20 and includes dinner. Those interested in attending can register online before June 28, by visiting www. financing-your-businessoneonta.eventbrite.com Those with questions can contact Josh VanBrakle at 607-865-7790, ext. 112. JUL 10-13 Region 16 Arabian Championships Eastern States Exposition Coliseum, 1305 Memorial Ave., West Springfield, MA. Contact The Big E, 413-7372443, 413-205-5115. On Internet at www.TheBigE.com JUL 11, SEPT. 5 & 19, OCT. 3, NOV. 7 & DEC. 5 Maple Program Webinar You can join this webinar by going to https://cornell. webex.com or to cornellmaple.com and click on maple webinars. Password is the word maple. Seminar runs 7-8 pm. Past webinars can be viewed by going to www.cornellmaple.com. For more information contact Steve Childs at slc18@cornell.edu or call 607-255-1658.

offer ice tea, lemonade and coffee. Entertainment provided by 198th Army Reserve Band and Folk Band. Rain location: Croghan Ice Rink. Evaluating Alfalfa & Corn Crops in the Field A-Dale Farm, 3576 Pratts Rd., Bouckville, NY. 7-8:30 pm. The program has been approved for 1 pesticide recertification credit. Attendees must arrive on time and stay for the entire program to be awarded credit. Please register by calling CCE of Madison County at 315-6843001. Understanding & Managing Vegetable Pests & Diseases West Haven Farm, Ithaca, NY. 5-8 pm. Cost: $45-$60 voluntary sliding scale. To r e g i s t e r e - m a i l info@groundswellcenter.org JUL 10-11 Small Business Workshops Jul 10 - Sullivan County Soil & Water Conservation District Bldg, 64 Ferndale Loomis Rd., Liberty, NY Jul 11 - Brooks House of BBQ, Oneonta, NY. The workshops are geared toward farmers, food based businesses and forest products manufacturers, but any

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Page 31 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 1, 2013

• Since 1964 • Specializing in Trade Publications, Trade Shows, Commercial Printing & Mailing Services


Section B - Page 32 July 1, 2013 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

ROY TEITSWORTH INC.

SUCCESSFUL AUCTIONS FOR 43 YEARS TRUCKING COMPANY FLEET REDUCTION INTERNET ONLY AUCTION RUNNING ONLINE FROM JULY 2ND - 9TH

PH (585) 243-1563 FAX (585) 243-3311 6502 Barber Hill Road, Geneseo, New York 14454 WWW.TEITSWORTH.COM

Road Ready and Fleet Maintained Visit www.teitsworth.com for information and photos You won't want to miss this rare opportunity to buy quality, road ready units at auction. Selling: 1997 Strick dolly, Vin: 1S11CD080VD421672, S/A, tires 60%, 275/80x22.5, good brakes (930503) 1991 Monon Tow dolly, VIN: 1NNJ01010MM155179 (940717) 1989 Wabash Tow dolly, VIN: 1JJD09164KL130946 (940522) 1986 Wabash dolly, VIN: 1JJD09164GL104841, S/A. tires, 15-20%, 275/80x22.5, good brakes (930138) 2004 Great Dane 28' Van Trailer, VIN: 1GRAA56184K262962 fair conditions, some front damage, tires 11Rx22.5, 50-60%, spring suspension, 28'X102'' (284606) 2002 Strick 28' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S11E92802E480005 fair condition, roof damage, 28'x102'' front left corner damage, tires 11Rx 22.5,60%, Spring suspension, no rear door (282083) 2004 International 4300 truck with 24' van body, VIN: 1HTMMAANX4H650471, 286,098 miles, DT 466 Diesel engine, 6 speed Eaton Fuller transmission, AC, air brakes, air seat, lift gate, 33,000 GVW (10089) 1999 Great Dane 53' Van Trailer, VIN: 1PNV532B0XH220460, 75R22.5 tires, very good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door,

spring suspension, 53 ft, mixed tire tread and wear, (534472) 1998 Strick 53' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E8531WD429168, 75R22.5 tires, very good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door, spring suspension, 53 ft, front driver corner damage, mixed tire tread and wear (532915) 1995 Strick 53' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E8531SD387742, fair condition, right front side damage, tires 22.5, 40%, spring suspension, adjustable axle, no overhead door, 53'x102'', (530960) 1994 Strick 53' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E9533RD370294, Excellent condition, 22.5 tires, 50%, spring suspension, roll up door (530678) 1994 Strick 53' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E9538RD370310, 75R22.5 tires, very good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door, spring suspension, 53 ft, front driver corner damage, mixed tire tread and wear (530694) 1997 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN:1S12E8484VD20217, very good condition, tires 22.5, 40%, spring suspension, roll up door (480924) 1997 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E8483VD420273, very good condition, tires 22.5, 30%, spring suspension, roll up door (480980)

1997 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E8487VD420213, very good condition, tires poor, spring suspension, roll up door (480920) 1997 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E88489VD420214, 80R22.5 tires, Very good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door, translucent roof, spring suspension, 48 ft, mixed tire tread and wear (480921) 1996 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E8485TD402399, 75R22.5 tires, good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door, translucent roof, spring suspension, 48 ft, mixed tire tread and wear (480804) 1996 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1S12E8487TD406941, 75R22.5 tires, very good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door, translucent roof, spring suspension, 48 ft, mixed tire tread and wear (480872) 1996 Strick 48' Van Trailer, VIN:1S12E8483TD402353, 75R22.5 tires, very good ext. Good interior, 93x103 roll up door, translucent roof, spring suspension, 48 ft, mixed tire tread and wear (480758) 1992 Monon 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1NNVA4827NM159325, fair conditions, 22.5 tires 25-40%, spring suspension,48' x 102'', rear door slight damage, adjustable axle (481560) 1991 Fruehauf 48' Van Trailer, VIN: 1H2V04828MB041206, very good condition, tires 11Rx22.5, 10-15%, 45' x 102'', brakes fair, adjustable axle (480633) 1989 Fruehauf 45' Van Trailer, VIN: 1H2V04520KH003127, fair condition, front damage, tires 30-40%, spring suspension, rear door damage, good brakes, adjustable axle (451529) 1998 Wabash 40' Van Trailer, VIN: 1JJV452C8JL116827, good condition, tires, 295/75x22.5, 30%, spring suspension, brakes fair, adjustable axle, new latch on rear door, 40'x 96'' (400042)

KEN BOND SAND & GRAVEL

COMPLETE LIQUIDATION AUCTION

TUESDAY JULY 2, 2013 at 5:30 PM 4821 Rt 89 Wolcott, Wayne County, NY green conveyor & hopper powered by Kolman GenSetin building w/air Notice: The owner is retiring, the equipment is older but usable. See separate ad for the real estate description & details. Gravel pit with compressor residence sells at 5:30 followed by equipment. (3) loaders: Trojan 3000, Torjan 1900, Hough 80 Location: 4821 Rt. 89, 3 miles south of Rt. 104, approximately 15 miles Dozers: Case 1450 (8) Trucks: 1994 Ford L9000 tandem dump, 1990 White Volvo tandem north of Rt. 5 & 20 at Seneca Falls. dump, GMC single axle dump, Ford super duty 1 ton dump truck, IH 50' bucket truck, Ford 8000 rollback, 1989 Autocar rear unload mixer Selling: (5) Crusher & screens, Cedar Rapids 1024 portable jaw crusher truck w/new engine, 1985 Oshkosh front unload 4 axle mixer truck w/diesel power, S/N 5734, Kolman 202 portable screening plant 4x7, double deck, Wisconsin power, Kolberg portable screening model And other misc. items including: 5x5 digital scales, shop tools, torch set, and more 230-50 (no power), RVS Syntron 6x8 3 deck w/water on tower, (5) 30x80 conveyors, electric, Basset 4x52 sand screw, 6" diesel water Inspection: July 1, 2013 10am-4pm or appt. pump, 1996 Cat 140KVA diesel GenSet, 3304 Cat power, 1692 hrs., Concrete plant includes: Cement tank & water tank on tower w/Barber Terms: Full payment auction day, 5% buyer's fee on all items

ABSOLUTE GRAVEL PIT AUCTION! Bond's Gravel Pit, Rt 89 in Butler, NY 29.5 acre property with operational gravel pit and 7 bedroom, occupied, rental house. Pit produces Sand, #1, #2, #3 and Item 4. Over 400,000 tons of product left. This active pit is permitted and in use. Ready for a new owner to begin operations. Real estate sells then the equipment.

Full information packet can be found online at www.teitsworth.com, or call to request one. Pit will be sold to the highest bidder regardless of price! For more information call Jesse Teitsworth, Licensed Real Estate Salesperson at 585-738-2010. Carolyn Schwann, Licensed Real Estate Broker.

“WE SPECIALIZE IN LARGE AUCTIONS FOR DEALERS, FARMERS, MUNICIPALITIES AND CONTRACTORS”


SUMMER 2013

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY Good Living and Good Farming – Connecting People, Land, and Communities

Feature Articles Workplace CSAs - Get Your Veggies While You Work . .Page 4 The Case for Regional Seed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 14 Where the Buffalo Roam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 15 Sheep Barn Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 16 Supplement to Country Folks


Page 2

July 1, 2013

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY - SUMMER 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS SMALL FARM PROGRAM UPDATE Cornell Small Farms Program Update ........................................................Page 3

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY Good Farming and Good Living — Connecting People, Land, and Communities

Passing on the Farm, by Maureen Duffy ......................................................Page 7

Small Farm Quarterly is for farmers and farm families — including spouses and children - who value the quality of life that smaller farms provide.

FARM MEMOIR

OUR GOALS ARE TO: • Celebrate the Northeast region’s smaller farms; • Inspire and inform farm families and their supporters; • Help farmers share expertise and opinions with each other; • Increase awareness of the benefits that small farms contribute to society and the environment; • Share important research, extension, and other resources.

The Disappearing Hay, by Stewart Cheney ..................................................Page 13

GRAZING The Calves Come Home, by Eric Noel .........................................................Page 12

HORTICULTURE Uncommon Fruits With Commercial Potential, Part 2, by Lee Reich......Page 19

LIVESTOCK & POULTRY Where the Buffalo Roam, by Amy Weakley ...............................................Page 15 Sheep Barn Interior Design: Wooden Panels, by Ulf Kintzel....................Page 16

LOCAL FOODS & MARKETING Locally Grown Beans in the College Cafeteria, by Rachel Carter.............Page 3 Workplace CSAs - Get Your Veggies While You Work, by Laura McDermott.....Page 4 Diversified Portfolio: Not just for Wall Street, by Mason Donovan ............Page 5

NEW FARMERS Counting Our Blessings, by Emmaline Long and David Popielinski ...........Page 8

NORTHEAST SARE SPOTLIGHT Keeping Heifers Fit, by Rachel Whiteheart .....................................................Page 9

PHOTO FEATURE Horse Power, by Chandler Briggs .................................................................Page 10

RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT Growers Credit New York Berry Project, by Kara Lynn Dunn .........................Page 6

SEED STORIES

Small Farm Quarterly is produced by Lee Publications, Inc., and is distributed four times a year as a special section of Country Folks. Volume 10 publication dates: January 14th, April 1st, July 1st and October 7th, 2013. EDITORIAL TEAM: • Violet Stone, Cornell Small Farms Program Managing Editor • Anu Rangarajan, Cornell Small Farms Program Editor in Chief • Laura Biasillo, Broome County CCE New Farmers • Jamila Walida Simon, NYS 4-H Youth Development Program Youth Pages • Sam Anderson Livestock • Martha Herbert Izzi, Vermont Farmer New England Correspondent • Betsy Lamb, CCE Integrated Pest Management Program Horticulture • John Thurgood, USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service-Vermont Stewardship and Nature • Nancy Glazier, Northwest NY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team Grazing • Jill Swenson, Swenson Book Development Community and World • Jason Foscolo, Esq. Policy Corner • Valerie Walthert, Farmer Local Foods & Marketing

607-255-9227 607-255-1780 607-584-5007 607-255-0287 978-654-6745 802-492-3346 607-254-8800 802-865-7895 315-536-5123 607-539-3278 631-903-5055

FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION CONTACT Tracy Crouse, Lee Publications, Inc., PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 888-596-5329 subscriptions@leepub.com FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT: Jan Andrews, Lee Publications, Inc., 518-673-0110 or 800-218-5586, ext. 110 or jandrews@leepub.com SEND YOUR LETTERS AND STORIES TO: Cornell Small Farms Program 15A Plant Science Building, Cornell University , Ithaca, NY, 14853 607-255-9227 • vws7@cornell.edu SFQ is compiled by the Cornell Small Farms Program, based at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. The Cornell Small Farms Program fosters the sustainability of diverse, thriving small farms that contribute to food security, healthy rural communities, and the environment. We do this by encouraging small farms-focused research and extension programs. About copyright: The material published in Small Farm Quarterly is not copyrighted unless otherwise noted. However, we ask that you please be sure to credit both the author and Small Farm Quarterly.

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Cover photo: Gabriel Michaud and his calf Butterfly enjoying a Kingdom Creamery ice cream cone. Photo courtesy of Kingdom Creamery

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July 1, 2013

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Cornell Small Farms Program Update Heatwave? Watch Sustainable Farm Energy Webinars Online Anytime! Need a break from summer heat? If you missed any of the lunchtime webinars in the “New Generation Energy: Sustainable Power for Your Farm & Homestead” series this past MarchApril, you can stream them online anytime by visiting https://smallfarms.cornell.edu/ resources/farm-energy/. Learn more about passive solar, radiant heat, solar electric, wind power, compost heat, and services that installers provide in this 4-part series. You’ll also be able to get descriptions of each webinar and download PDF files of the slideshows. We’ve posted plenty of other sustainable farm energy resources at this page, too, awaiting you for a heat break, or an evening read! Enjoy! 2013 Online Farming Courses: Registration Opens Soon Registration opens Aug. 1 for 2013-14 online farming courses offered by our Northeast Beginning Farmers Project. These interactive 5- to 7-week courses are led by experienced educators and farmers and connect you to the information and people you need to start a successful farm business or diversify your farm. Courses help you establish clear goals, assess personal resources, plan marketing, create budgets, set up record-keeping, navigate regulations, choose the right equipment, improve soil, get organically certified, write a business plan, and learn how to raise veggies, berries and chickens. The classes are primarily targeted to those farming (or planning to farm) in the Northeastern U.S., though most of the courses are also appropriate for those outside this region. Visit the course calendar or course descriptions to see the offerings of all our courses organized by season http://nebeginningfarmers.org/online-courses/.

Message from the Managing Editor Happy Summer! Here on the agriculture quad, students have left for summer internships, faculty and technicians are in the fields doing research, and the campus gardens are the most lively place to be! This Spring we hosted a writing workshop for farmers and agriculture educators called “Telling Better Stories.” Over the years, I’ve noticed that there is a dearth of formal training opportunities for those that tell the stories of farming. While agriculture is chockfull of the ingredients good stories are made of – love, sweat, tears, birth, death, drought, harvest, to mention a few – weaving the details into a compelling narrative requires skill and practice. Fifty farmers and educators joined us on the Cornell campus to take the full-day workshop from professional journalists. As post-workshop homework, attendees were required to submit an article or photo to be featured in this magazine. While we don’t have room to feature everything, we hope you enjoy seeing participants work scattered throughout the next several issues. Other submissions are posted on our “Storyshare” pages. Visit www.smallfarms.cornell.edu and click on projects > Telling Better Stories > Storyshare.

LOCAL FOODS

Locally Grown Beans in the College Cafeteria

Vermont's Farm to Plate Network offers farmer and producer examples of navigating the regional supply food chain to serve ‘local’ at institutions by Rachel Carter sition happen.” Vermont Bean Crafters products are also distributed through Black River Produce. School, hospitals, colleges, government agencies, and corporations are demanding food grown and Supplying locally grown food within 150 miles from produced in New England. Farmers interested in their home base in Springfield, VT, Black River selling to hospitals, schools, and other organiza- Produce distributes to more than 2,000 wholesale tions are following the food supply chain by con- customers across Vermont, New Hampshire and necting first with local or nearby food hubs to bet- parts of New York and Massachusetts.“We distribter assess supply and demand. Food hubs and ute local farm products to stores, schools, restauprocessing centers have easier access to distribu- rants, clubs, camps, ski areas, hospitals, nursing tion channels and can help farmers and food pro- homes, and farm stands.Larger contract manageducers identify and build market opportunities. ment companies like Sodexo, the Vermont State Colleges food service provider, often require preVermont Bean Crafters makes bean burgers and approved vendor contracts that can be a major dips out of organically-grown Vermont beans, veg- hurdle for small producers and farmers. By selling gies, and grains. Dried bean varieties are pur- through a wholesale distributor, producers avoid chased directly from organic farmers in New the more stringent process of becoming an England and produced at the Mad River Food Hub approved vendor, which can really facilitate the in Waitsfield, VT. “The University of Vermont just ability to sell to institutions,” says Scott Sparks, vice swapped our black bean burger in place of president of sales at Black River Produce. Gardenburger and Devine burgers at all eight campus dining locations,” says Joe Bossen of Kingdom Creamery of Vermont is a family-owned Vermont Bean Crafters. “We’re also working with dairy farm and business, specializing in yogurt and Fletcher Allen Healthcare to have our bean burg- ice cream, experiencing recent growth in instituers more widely distributed throughout hospital tional markets-offering both a reliable cash flow food services.” source and brand identity.“The institutional marketplace provides a more stable and consistent cusBossen finds value-added food products as finan- tomer base than traditional retail markets.We have cially viable given the constraints of budgetary achieved moderate success within institutional challenges and publically traded ‘commodity’ mar- markets. By working with local schools and institukets. “On the whole, I’ve been impressed with tions we have been able to broaden our product chefs and purchasing agents willing to sit across portfolio, and build relationships within the state the table from us small producers and their gener- and tie it directly to our family farm,” shares Jeremy al willingness to make the local/regional food tran- Michaud of Kingdom Creamery. Small Vermont farmers committed to farm to school relationships are working with local food hubs to sell directly to local school and increase the number of young people in the farm community eating lunches made with healthy, fresh, local food.

If a refresher on writing tips sounds like something you could benefit from, you’ll be pleased to learn we posted handouts and videos from the workshop sessions at the address above. Do you chronicle seed selection, tool invention, animal husbandry, or other aspects of farm life? We hope you’ll consider sharing one of your stories with us! Instructions for submitting to the magazine are posted at our website. Click on “Quarterly.” Best wishes for a fruitful growing season! Violet

Violet Stone

Vermont Bean Crafters burger display at Black River Produce food show. Photo by Rachel Carter

How can I get Small Farm Quarterly? Country Folks subscribers automatically receive SFQ four times a

year at no extra cost. Country Folks is delivered weekly for $47 per year. SFQ-only subscribers receive just the 4 issues of Country Folks that contain the SFQ insert for only $5 a year. Cooperative Extension Associations and other organizations can offer their members a subscription to SFQ as a member benefit! Your organization collects the names, forwards them to Country Folks Subscriptions, and pays Country Folks just $2.50 for each subscriber. Country Folks mails out the copies.

Radical Roots Farm of Rutland, VT is finding success farm to institution efforts on a local scale. Photo by Radical Roots Farm

Bulk orders: You can order multiple copies of any issue for just 10¢ a copy! Minimum order is 50. Orders must be placed at least 4 weeks before the publication date To find out more, contact: Tracy Crouse Country Folks Subscriptions P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 1-888-596-5329 email: subscriptions@leepub.com

Page 3

Fletcher Allen Hospital partners with over 70 local food producers and serves more than two million meals a year, making it the largest restaurant in Vermont. Photo by Fletcher Allen Healthcare

Vermont’s Harlow Farm sells produce as the brand Westminster Organics for multiple Whole Foods accounts, yet wanted to see their produce served at local schools. “We started working with the Windham Farm and Food Network to distribute to area schools across the county.While it is a slightly lower price point than what we can get from Whole Foods, we are able to make it work for our business, and love the rewards of knowing we are providing local produce to children through school lunches,” comments Paul Harlow of Westminster Organics/Harlow Farm. Whether farmers choose to work with local processing units, regional distributors, or directly with schools in their community, building successful relationships is essential. Radical Roots Farm in Rutland, VT, grows vegetables for a 70-member CSA, two farmer’s markets, and the local school system.“Developing an open, honest, and mutually beneficial relationship with the school food service professionals is essential. We are lucky — the people who provide food for the schools in our area care deeply about the children in their community. We sit down together in the winter and plan out how our farm can grow some of the vegetables they will need during the school year. Honesty and dependability are key. As farmers, we need to be sure we don’t over-promise and that we can actually deliver what we agreed to in the winter,” offers Carol Tashie of Radical Roots Farm. Farmers interested in exploring farm to institution are also encouraged to look at industry trends. “Beans!” exclaims Joe Bossen of Vermont Bean Crafters. “And general staple food ingredients like

See Beans page 4


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Page 4

July 1, 2013

LOCAL FOODS

Workplace CSAs - Get Your Veggies While You Work Pilot Program Increases Farmer’s Business and Employee Wellness by Laura McDermott

help them meet the individual needs of the consumer.

Despite an abundance of farmers markets and farm stands, consumers still purchase produce at grocery stores. Let’s face it — people go to the grocery store because it’s easy. So how can we make purchasing locally grown produce easier?

This project sought to inform employers that are mindful of wellness initiatives about the feasibility of sponsoring a CSA. Ongoing health promotion efforts set the stage for increasing consumption of locally grown produce while also helping farmers develop nontraditional markets. Several informational meetings were held for farmers, businesses and consumers. Because the timing wasn’t perfect — the last training was held in mid-April — we were very pleased to have one farmer able to offer CSA shares to 50 subscribers at three different businesses. Deliveries were made on the same day, and the largest employer negotiated a farmers market to be held in their parking lot on the same day.

In early winter of 2012, Cornell Cooperative Extension and Adirondack Harvest worked together to attempt to answer this question.The goal of the project was to increase customer access through a convenient marketing plan for locally grown food. CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. CSAs have existed since the 1980s and are an important market channel for many vegetable farms. CSAs are not limited to vegetables however — fruit, flower, egg, meat, cheese and many value added items are also part of the CSA model. Historically, CSAs endeavored to include the consumer in the process and risk of farming — the pre-purchase of shares was described as more of an investment in farming than an investment in groceries. Customers were often required to participate in some of the farm labor — again as a way to assist the farmer, but also to help the consumer understand what took place on a farm. A CSA consumer — or subscriber — purchased a share that promised to provide a weekly mixture of produce for approximately 20 weeks. This weekly share could be picked up at the farm or another pre-determined location. Usually the subscriber would receive a mixture of produce that would be determined by the availability of the crop. Some CSAs still operate in this fashion, but over time the CSA model has morphed into less of a ‘share the risk’ model and more of a ‘share the wealth’ model. Farmers have worked hard to make CSAs into a convenience driven market option for consumers by offering ‘free choice’ shares and even customizable shares using software like Farmigo (www.farmigo.com) to

“There are a lot of businesses out there, and there are a lot of farmers. It’s a perfect match up,” said Adam Hainer, co-owner of Juniper Hill Farm in Westport, NY who also offered a Worksite CSA in Plattsburgh in 2012. “We wanted to increase the CSA component of our market, but because of our location we weren’t seeing much growth,” said Hainer. “We had to make it more convenient. We needed to make a decision to get more food to more people.” Adam decided that for the first few years he would allow companies that had a minimum of 10 subscribers to be a drop-off location IF there were other businesses contributing to at least 50 total subscribers for a single day delivery.The other requirement is that each business had to have an on-site coordinator to act as the liaison between the farmer and the consumer or the employer. This position proved to be critical — especially during the first season. “There were some problems,” said Hainer, “like what to do with a share if an employee was sick — or forgot that they were going on vacation. The coordinator really helped iron out those wrinkles.” During the fall, the subscribers were surveyed. None of the responders had ever been CSA subscribers before this project. The majority of the responses indicated that the value and the quality of the produce delivered to their worksite exceeded that of a grocery store. 100 percent of the respondents said that their consumption

For Businesses: Creating a Workplace CSA Getting Started • Get approval from the appropriate managers and facilities. • Spread the word! Inform your employees about the CSA model and determine employee interest. • Consider collaborating with a neighboring business to increase the number of participants. • Establish a point person to contact the farmer and answer employee questions. Finding a Farm • To create a list of potential farms, visit www.localharvest.org/csa/. Check out your local Farmers Market or contact your local Cooperative Extension office The Right CSA for You Each farm will run their CSA program differently.It is important to ask the right questions to find the farm that is best suited for your needs. • Logistics: Where and when do you want the shares delivered? Will this work with the farmer’s schedule? Does the farmer already deliver to a site near your workplace? If the CSA includes meat or dairy products, do you have refrigeration available? • Produce: What types of produce will each member receive? Most CSAs deliver a pre-packaged box with a variety of produce that is in season. Some, however offer a varying degree of choice for their members. • Shares: Ask the farmer about the quantity of produce each member will receive per week. Some farms offer full and half share options to meet the different needs of their members. • Payment: Determine who will be responsible for collecting payments and establish a deadline for subscribing. • Subscription Length: How long do you want the CSA to last? Some farms offer an extended season, providing produce into the fall and winter months.

Beans from page 3 corn meal and local grains — not to replace the bread basket, but to meet nutritional guidelines while incorporating locally grown and produced items.” Both Bossen and Black River Produce stress extended season greens and lightly processed vegetables, such as lacto-fermentation, core to strengthening market opportunities. “Extending seasonal accessibility to provide the volume needed to match price points in budgets are more than a trend-this is becoming the reality and it’s much easier now than ever to have that discussion,”comments Sean Buchanan, business development manager at Black River Produce. Rooted in the farm to school movement, Farm to Institution New England (FINE) is the leading Northeast resource connecting organizations, agencies, businesses, and funders with the regional food supply chain to strengthen food production and consumption. Peter Allison, coordinator for FINE, says there are many opportunities for food producers and processors to market to the institutional

food service system. “In Massachusetts, the Western Mass Food Processing Center shared use facility works closely with farmers to develop lightly processed foods that also meet the farmer’s bottomline. FINE is also beginning research that will further help elucidate the benefits farmers gain by working with institutions, such as the ability to scale up production through new contracts with larger institutional clients.” The Vermont Farm to Plate Network, legislatively directed to double local food access and production by 2020, is helping farmers develop relationships with distributors through matchmaking events and peer to peer collaborations. The newly launched Vermont Food System Atlas provides a searchable mapping tool to help farmers build relationships with distributors, processing centers, other farmers, and all entities representing the state’s food system. Food Solutions New England provides details on how all New England states are rebuilding local food systems and connects the work each state is conducting regionally.

Rachel Carter is a Vermont entrepreneur, homesteader, journalist,

Download detailed brochures with info on getting started for both farmers and businesses at the Cornell Small Farms Program website. Photo by Laura McDermott

of fresh vegetables increased as a result of being a CSA member. 77.8 percent indicated that they would definitely join a CSA in the future. Some of the comments included, “Very convenient, drop off at work. I loved the variety and being able to choose from veggies that I wouldn’t ordinarily purchase in the store” and “I was surprised at the high quality of the product and the abundance.”

Adirondack Harvest has continued to assist with promoting the Worksite CSA concept to local businesses. At an April 4, 2013 meeting in Ballston Spa, NY several more farmers were in attendance and at least one of them has a Worksite CSA in development.Cara Fraver of Quincy Farm in Easton, NY plans to offer CSA shares at a local YMCA, so that facility staff, members and general public could pick up their shares at a convenient time. Quincy Farm has also made sales pitches to other companies, but with no luck yet. “We seem to hit a block with liability and corporate rules prohibiting contracting with just one vendor,” reported Fraver. “We might be able to overcome that if we had the passionate employee that could act as our coordinator and advocate.”

At that same meeting Adam Hainer reported that he had finalized a contract with a firm in Plattsburgh and had sold over 100 shares through a payroll deduction format that was offered to him by the business owners. His Glens Falls locations are all participating in 2013 and subscriptions look to be up by 15 percent. He continues to stress the increased consumption of fresh vegetables as being the most important part of a corporate wellness plan.“If companies are offering free memberships to gyms, why not access to a Worksite CSA?” asks Hainer. Teresa Whalen of Adirondack Harvest is hopeful workplace CSAs will become a popular trend. “It’s all about education and awareness,” Whalen said. “The employees want this, and they understand the benefits. Now we need to convince the employers.” For more information on this project, and to download free informational brochures for employer and farmer training, please visit the Cornell Small Farms website at: http://smallfarms.cornell.edu/projects/grants/. Click on ‘Promoting Workplace CSA in the Southern Adirondacks’.

Laura McDermott is the Berry Extension Specialist for the Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program. She can be reached at 518791-5038 or email her at lgm4@cornell.edu. and business owner.

The Vermont Farm to Plate Network is weaving together all components of Vermont’s food system to strengthen the working landscape, build the resilience of farms, improve environmental quality, and increase local food access for all Vermonters. Explore the Vermont Food System Atlas at www.vtfoodatlas.com.

Connect with Article Sources! Farm to Institution New England - http://www.farmtoinstitution.org/ Food Solutions New England - http://www.foodsolutionsne.org/ Vermont Food System Atlas - http://www.vtfoodatlas.com Vermont Bean Crafters - http://vermontbeancrafters.com/ Black River Produce - http://www.blackriverproduce.com/ Kingdom Creamery of Vermont - http://kingdomcreameryofvermont.com/ Harlow Farm - http://harlowfarm.com/ Radical Roots Farm - http://www.radicalrootsvt.com/


July 1, 2013

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LOCAL FOODS

Diversified Portfolio: Not just for Wall Street by Mason Donovan Open any financial advice magazine over the past decade and the single most popular advice given will be to make sure you maintain a diversified portfolio; basically, spread your money over many different funds and investment vehicles. They even have widgets which will rebalance your accounts and suggest different investments based on your particular goals such as education, retirement, or home ownership. The same sage advice with a slightly different twist can be given to any small farmer. Unless you are a mega-industrial farmer, relying on one crop is not a good recipe for long term success. Long term success is something the Courser Farm in Warner, NH knows a little bit about. The Courser family has been managing over 1,500 acres of farmland for 100 years. The family farm has survived two world wars, the Great Depression and the great recession in addition to the constantly changing American diet. Originally focusing on timber and corn, the family has expanded its offerings along the way. They’ve added pumpkins, maple syrup and hay to the list. Timber is sold to saw mills while corn continues to be a road side stand crowd attractor. Maple syrup has its peak in March while pumpkins round out the year in the fall. Creating an array of products which not only target different audiences, but also different times of the year creates a healthier portfolio to maintain a continual revenue stream. Putting all of your eggs in one basket (pun intended) can create make-it or break-it financial moments.

Diversifying your product sales channels will also make a big difference. For example, the Coursers leverage their pumpkins as an entertainment venue by inviting carvers to a weekend jack-o-lantern festival. Their maple syrup gets visitors out to their sugar shack during New Hampshire maple weekends. The timber sales allow them to tap into the commercial market. This healthy diverse balance provides a more stable enterprise. However, like any long term family farm, the Coursers understand they must change with the times and be open to emerging trends. They don’t have one of those financial balancing and suggestion widgets, but they do have four generations of working experience. Emma Course Bates is a member of that fourth generation forging into new territories. Emma is the founder of Courser Farm Kitchen, a gluten free bakery. After several of her family members were diagnosed with Celiac disease (caused by adverse reaction to gluten), she started cooking up gluten free baked goods. It wasn’t long before she realized there was an entire group of people the farm was not currently catering to. The kitchen quickly started up and she was staking out a stand at farmers markets across the region. “Many buyers who were not gluten intolerant were reluctant to buy gluten free baked goods,” Emma noted, so she expanded once more into a long time favorite of hers, home-made granola. “Granola allowed me to reach a wider audience,” she said. When asked to define her target audience, Emma said she was working on getting a

Emma and her cooking assistant, Emily, cooking a batch of Maple Nut granola. more narrow definition. Celiac affects twice as many females than males, so she concedes the gluten free aspect is probably more luring to women. However, granola has given her access to both the gluten-free and the mainstream crowd. Courser Farm Kitchen has also given the Courser family their first step into the online world with www.CourserFarmKitchen.com. Although, the majority of buyers are currently local, there is a growing clientele of out-of-state buyers. Best of all, granola is a year round product. Business has picked up enough for Emma to move her operations to a nearby commercial kitchen where she will spend ten hours mixing, baking and packaging seven different flavors of granola. One of her flavors, Maple Nut, also allows this product extension to draw upon one of the popular farm products, maple syrup. Knowing when to divest is just as important as when to invest as well. One of the flavors which

went to the graveyard was Peanut Butter Banana because of all of the peanut allergies. New flavors take into concern other allergies such as sulfate, so some mixes have no dried fruit. The Courser Farm Kitchen concept has sparked conversation as to where the farm family business will be when the fifth generation is old enough to climb onto the tractor. Their overarching strategy is as sound as any financial manager could give. They maintain an inclusive approach which has allowed them to reach a much wider group of buyers. Their focus on diversifying their portfolio of products and sales channels provides a return in every season.After all diversity and inclusion is not just something reserved for Wall Street.

Mason Donovan is an author of The Inclusion Dividend: Why Investing in Diversity & Inclusion Pays Off and the founder of the agriculture based community program, The Yard Project.


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July 1, 2013

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

RESOURCE SPOTLIGHT

Growers Credit New York Berry Project for Successful Start-Up by Kara Lynn Dunn

eration methods, irrigation, and pest control.

If you’re thinking about starting a farm enterprise focused on growing berries, Elaine and Karl Guppy will tell you to go to back to school at Cornell University first.

“They are always just a call, email, or workshop away,” Elaine says.

“We have taken almost every production and business management workshop offered by the Cornell University New York Berry Project,” Elaine says. “The learning opportunities are packed with so much information, it is like taking an entire Cornell course in one day, and they are often free.” The New York Berry Project makes the expertise of Cornell’s Horticulture Department Chair Dr. Marvin Pritts and Cooperative Extension fruit specialists Cathy Heidenreich and Laura McDermott available to growers statewide. The project has funding from the New York Farm Viability Institute to offer workshops, webinars, on-farm demonstrations, and oneon-one interaction. Elaine and Karl operate Guppy’s Berry Farm, LLC in West Monroe, NY, and say learning all they could before they began preparing their land was a key to their startup success. “The Berry Project was invaluable to helping us get started with wonderful technical support. When we started, we only knew we wanted to plant berries,” Elaine says. The Guppys have attended workshops, taken field trips, and visited the Cornell berry plots. They avidly read the New York Berry News published 12 times a year with the latest research information from Cornell and the USDA, Berry Barometer month-bymonth tips for the best cultural practices and pest management solutions, policy and regulation news, and workshop and event notices. Growers can find it online at www.fruit.cornell.edu/nybn or request a monthly e-mail notification of the contents. “One of the biggest tips Dr. Pritts gave us early on was to test our soil and make sure we had the right nutrients for blueberries,” Karl says. “We learned everything we could about pH, soil testing, fertilizers, etc.” In 2008, they removed pinewoods from five acres and, a year later, they established their LLC. In 2010, they hand-planted 2,000 certified disease-free blueberry plants, painstakingly measuring spacing between plants and rows.

The Guppys dug a pond and added irrigation to their fields. Karl built a motion sensor tower that triggers a radio and light show that has successfully kept deer out of the berries. He constructed bat boxes that attract the night fliers to help control some pests. The project leaders helped the Guppys identify USDA grant funding to help pay for development of marketing materials, including product packaging, labels, and signage with a distinctive farm logo. A primary sales point is the Syracuse Regional Market, about a 35 minute drive from the farm. “There are a lot of farms selling blueberries at the market - three in my row alone - but people have taken the time to get to know us and our berries and now they search for our booth,” Elaine says. Their continuing education plan in 2013 has them completing their Good Agricultural Practices certification. “We are still learning and planning to enlarge our business as we approach retirement. It is great to work with the Cornell people who study berries and know what we should do and not do before we do it,” Karl says. “We wouldn’t be where we are today without the experience and knowledge the New York Berry Project shared to get us started,” Elaine adds. The Guppys see a future with more blueberry plants, a low tunnel for ever-bearing strawberry production, expanded blackberry production, and perhaps some juneberries (they attended a September 2012 workshop on juneberries, which like soil conditions similar to blueberries). A daughter-in-law has expressed interest in starting a commercial kitchen to make jams and other value-added products. For its part, the New York Farm Viability Institute (NYFVI) has also funded high tunnel season extension research and valueadded crop enhancement opportunities for berry growers. In 2013, with NYFVI funding, Dr. Pritts began recruiting commercial growers who have been in business at least three years and with sales, preferably of two types of

“Cathy’s advice helped us select the best varieties for fresh flavor, shelf life, and disease resistance, which was especially important for us as new growers to not have to deal with issues Cornish such as mummy berry,” Elaine Cross Broilers & says. In 2011, when an early frost destroyed nearly one-half of their crop and then Japanese beetles arrived, the Guppys turned to the berry team for training on temperature mod-

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Karl and Elaine Guppy with some New York Berry Project educational resources they used to begin and grow their farming enterprise. Photo by Brian P. Whattam

Other Resources for Northeast Berry Growers • Berry Crop Label Alerts - The latest registrations, updates, label changes, and more. • Pest Management Guidelines for Berry Crops: Critical pesticide information for managing diseases, insects, mites, weeds, wildlife, and nutrients. • Berry Diagnostic Tool - A pictorial aid to diagnosing physiological disorders and pest problems of berry crops. Includes direct links to Pest Management Guidelines for Berry Crops from pest description pages. • Nursery Guide for Berry and Small Fruit Crops - This two-part nursery guide for berry growers cross references scores of cultivars with the nurseries that sell them. • Berry Webinar Archive - View and listen to online berry web seminars on topics including weed control, varieties, insects, and nutrient needs. berries, in 2012 to evaluate the use of a berry farm-specific business summary. Horticultural marketing expert Dr. Bradley Rickard with the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell is part of the evaluation team.

return-on-investment for more than 10 years. No doubt the Guppys will make good use of that berry business training in the future.

Kara Lynn Dunn is a freelance writer, coordinator of the NYFVI series in American Agriculturist magazine, and publicist for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program. She can be reached at 315-465-7578 or karalynn@gisco.net.

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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Passing on the Farm

Loyalty to the land is deeply entrenched in the souls of most farm families. To keep the farm operating, there is no better time than now to talk about transfer. by Maureen Duffy Transferring the farm is a tough topic for many parents and children to discuss. However to keep the farm operating, there is no better time than now. Property ownership, business control and death are topics many people would rather avoid all together. Not talking about it only causes strain between family members, resulting in disagreements and farms being sold. If you don’t want these results, sit down and take the time to seriously look at the issues needed to address succession and estate planning. “Sometimes it’s difficult but you need to start talking,” said Mike Sciabarrasi, extension professor of Agricultural Business Management at the University of New Hampshire. While conducting a workshop titled “Transferring the Farm,” Sciabarrasi noted that there are many factors contributing to family discussions such as debt, health care, money for retirement, taxes and fair treatment of all children. It is all important and farm families need to strategically think and talk about it. For the Fabrizio family, the progress of the farm snowballed. After purchasing the farm in 1967, the Fabrizios began planting apple trees to create Windy Ridge Orchard. The five Fabrizio kids were always involved in the farm and still are today. However, it is Sheila who has decided to stay on the farm with the incredible mountain view in the distance. When Sheila returned to the farm ten years ago, she — along with the support of her parents — worked on finding a way to create an enterprise within the apple operation. She conducted a trial to see if she could make a living from the land. Sheila first tested the market with a donut wagon before investing in a café and found it to be profitable. “We knew we had to diversify from the wholesale apple market for the farm to continue,” noted Dick. “When Sheila decided to farm we added nature trails, farm animals and a playground. At the time, we didn’t

want to invest too much until we knew that Sheila was definitely going to stay. After ten years the test has held true.” The visitor season needed to be extended for Sheila’s livelihood. She has successfully accomplished this by planting a pick-yourown blueberry patch and building the Cider House Café where visitors can enjoy a snack or meal. “We open the end of June and close at Christmas,” said Sheila. “We have made it a family destination location with a good feel — a place where families can come and enjoy the day.” Windy Ridge continues to expand. The first expansion was the Christmas tree plantation in 1989. People can enjoy the holiday season with a wagon ride, cut their own tree and purchase presents at the gift shop. “New projects and products keep things interesting,” said Dick. “And customers come looking to see what is new and different.” The newest addition — Seven Birches Winery and an event center. Wines are now being crafted on the farm. It is another item that visitors are looking for, wines made with local fruits such as apples, blueberries and pumpkins from Windy Ridge as well as crafted grape wines. The event center offers an area for special gathering such as weddings and family reunions. “Time slips by quickly and estate planning is a subject that people often think we’ll do tomorrow,” noted Ann. “If it hadn’t been for Sheila’s energy and enthusiasm we probably would have called it quits by now. Her eagerness helped move the farm forward to what it is today. Plus she has brought the farm to the world through the internet with a Web page and Facebook. It’s what people are looking for these days.” Sheila’s four siblings all want to be part of the farm at some capacity so that it is always their family farm. “We aren’t the type of family to have an official meeting or plan but we talk over breakfast or at a coffee break,” mentioned Sheila. “Mom and Dad have planned well with life and long-term care insurance. They also have divided all assets equally between us kids. It’s not easy

Sheila Fabrizio holds son Max, and proudly stands with her parents, Dick and Ann. Photo by Maureen Duffy

to talk about — there are a lot of unknowns.” It is a blessing that all family members get along and are interested in the success of the farm. “We have all been involved in family discussions,” said Sheila. “It’s our mom’s and dad’s legacy and we don’t want that to fall apart. That would be the worst case scenario.” The other component that has worked for the family during the business transition is that they all have their own areas they are in charge of. Dick takes care of the apple orchard and wholesale, Ann manages the gift store and Sheila tends to the café and event center. Farm families often need a place to start and sometimes having a facilitator at a family meeting can help. “Savings accounts, IRAs can be liquidated but a farm is often dear to the hearts of farmers and something families usually want to hold together. Transferring farms can be complicated and challenging on family dynamics,” explains Matt Strassberg with the New Hampshire Mediation Program. “In most cases a desirable outcome is found but sometimes the math doesn’t work,” said Stassberg.

“Sometimes parents have to sell the farm because they need the money to deal with loans or for long-term care costs. It is an emotional issue for many people.”

Strassberg suggests that families contact an Agricultural Mediation Program sooner rather than later. “The kitchen table is also the board room table,” noted Strassberg. “The people you work with are also your family that you celebrate holidays with. Farm transitions can naturally impact other areas of the family which may magnify conflict. Our job is to facilitate a calm rational discussion with all of those involved.” No matter how your family decides to deal with transferring the farm, it is a subject that needs to be addressed. Perhaps it is as simple as talking about it while planting the garden or over coffee. Whatever the case, a conversation and plan of action will ease the process as much as possible.

Maureen Duffy works for the New Hampshire Farm Bureau as the Communications Director and Young Farmer Coordinator. She can be reached at 603-224-1934 or via e-mail editor@nhfarmbureau.org.

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July 1, 2013

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

NEW FARMERS

Counting Our Blessings Lessons Learned from Raising Heritage Lincoln Longwool Sheep by Emmaline Long and David Popielinski

Emmaline with a newborn Lincoln lamb.

get a sheep ready for show; how to wash it, condition it, trim it, and more importantly, how to breed our animals to improve our flocks. Neither of us claims to be an expert, but we’ve definitely come a long way. 3. Sometimes the people you meet along the way make all the difference: If there’s one thing that contributes more than the sheep themselves in making Lincolns a wonderful breed to raise, it’s the other people who raise them. The Lincoln breeders we show with from around the United States are some of the most encouraging and supportive people we have ever encountered. From the very first shows, when we were naïve rookies, to now as young adults striving to place better each year, they never fail to share their knowledge and help us become better herdsmen. Our Lincolns have taught us to always surround yourself with positive people who share their experiences and encourage you in yours. 4. Sheep will find every burdock in the field: If there’s one thing we have learned about raising a wool breed of sheep, it’s that no matter how much time you spend in the pasture digging up burdocks, thistles, and other troublesome weeds, your sheep will always manage to find the one you miss. And good luck getting that out later…

If you ask which life experiences have had the most profound impact on us, our answer may surprise you. “Sheep?” you would ask. “Why sheep?” Well, it all started with a Blessing in the form of a Lincoln Longwool sheep. Blessing came to Dave Popielinski of Rocky Knoll Acres while he was in middle school through the Youth Conservationist Program, which encourages youth to raise rare heritage breeds of sheep. Little did we know she would indeed be a blessing to both of us. Emmaline Long of Orchard View Farm met Dave and Blessing at an agricultural fair in the fifth grade. She was so inspired that two years later, she purchased a pair of Lincolns to call her own. Thirteen years after Blessing connected us, Dave has 15 and Emmaline has 35 registered Lincoln Longwools. Lincoln Longwools are a relatively large breed of sheep that was developed in the Lincolnshire region of England and was brought to the United States in the mid-1800s. While it is traditionally bred for its lustrous wool, the Lincoln is a multi-purpose breed that is large and heavily built. As with many larger breeds of animals, they are calm with a gentle disposition. Their fleece can either be white or natural colored (ranging from black to light charcoal) and is classified as coarse in texture. They have been a great breed for both of us and are the only breed that we raise. As we have grown up over the past decade, our Lincolns have taught us a great many lessons we feel are good guidance for young farmers looking to partake in the many blessings that come from raising heritage farm animals. 1. Educate, educate, educate: Education in agriculture happens on many levels. We do our part by attending fairs, festivals and other small community events with our Lincolns, both around our communities in Western NY and throughout the Northeast. While questions about our “goats” can be as frustrating as they are amusing, attending these events is a great way for us to not only educate people about agriculture and sheep in general, but also to teach people about the unique nature of our heritage breed. Also, because our breed is so rare we have often walked into the show ring at fairs to find judges’ faces clearly begging the question, “What on earth is that?!” We’re no longer surprised at being the odd ones out at our local county fairs, and celebrate our animals’ rarity as an opportunity to educate those around us. 2. If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again: Placing last in anything is never easy, but it is probably the most motivating place to be in the show ring. We have experienced placing last at shows large and small, but over years of showing we have steadily worked our way up the line. When we started, neither of us had any idea how to

7. Following the leader can get you into trouble: Sheep are flock animals. They strongly dislike being alone and will do anything - ANYTHING - to stay with their friends. There is no rhyme or reason to the decisions they make, but they always do the same thing. If one decides to go outside, they all go outside. If one decides to eat hay, they all get up and eat hay. Their game of “follow the leader” is quite humorous, actually, and blatantly evident in the one little path stretching from barn to pasture. While this is evolutionarily a defensive survival tactic for sheep, it often seems to get them into just as much trouble as it helps them. So, when one gets stuck in a fence, so do a few others. After spending enough time with the Lincolns, we realized it’s the same with us. During middle school, high school and throughout life, it is so easy to just follow everyone else without paying mind to the possible outcomes. As with sheep, this often gets you into trouble. We’ve learned this the hard way. The road to individuality is oftentimes much harder and less traveled, but we have found in the end it is infinitely more rewarding. Be a leader and make your own path into the pasture. 8. Don’t forget to count your blessings along the way: There is so much in life to be thankful for, yet so much is taken for granted. Blessing is the sheep that started it all for us: directly for Dave, and indirectly for Emmaline. Along the way we’ve had our share of trials - lost lambs, sick sheep, disappointment from placing last in a competitive show- but it has always been important to pay attention to the little things like an energetic lamb, the excitement of sheep when you walk into the barn (even if all they want from you is food) and placing higher at a show than you did last year. In this modern world of instant gratification, lightning fast technologies, and drivethrough everything, it is easy to lose focus of what is most important. We have learned to pause and take the time to appreciate the small, seemingly insignificant things in daily life. We now realize the littlest things are usually the biggest blessings. What started as one Blessing in the form of a sheep has since multiplied into many more that have shaped us into who we are today. Blessing has since passed away, but the gifts she passed onto us will last a lifetime. Even though we are still finishing college and trying to figure out our plans in the grand scheme of life, we both know, without a doubt, that Lincoln Longwool sheep will continue be a part of our future.

Lincoln Longwools out to pasture at Orchard View Farm. They’re a bit like we were growing up: always managing to get ourselves in a little bit of trouble that we would have to work ourselves out of later. Man or beast, it seems that we all have a burdock stuck to us at some point in our lives.

Emmaline Long has been developing Orchard View Farm in Bergen, NY since the age of 12. She is currently a graduate student in the Animal Science department at Cornell University. She can be reached at eal93@cornell.edu. David Popielinski has been raising his Lincolns at Rocky Knoll acres in Alden, NY since middle school. He can be reached at dlpopielinski@yahoo.com.

5. Responsibility: Our Lincoln sheep started out as 4-H projects for us, so right from the beginning our parents made sure that we were the ones feeding them, cleaning the pens, and assuming full responsibility for all sheeprelated tasks and disasters. At the age of 12, this was not an easy task. It’s also not easy doing midnight and three a.m. checks on school nights, helping a mother give birth, and nursing a cold lamb back to life at -10° F. But we have done all those things, and through them we have been instilled with a sense of responsibility. 6. Patience is a virtue: Raising animals can be trying, and sheep are as stubborn as they come. We’ve both had our share of sheep-related temper tantrums, but as with most situations in life, frustration doesn’t accomplish anything. We believe sheep can sense their shepherd’s negative emotions and will purposely encourage frustration when they detect it. When you say “go left,” they go right. When you repair the fence in one spot, they find the next convenient hole. Winning the battle is difficult, especially when you are contending with a 300 pound ram. We have learned that calm and patient work can mollify even the most exasperating of sheep, as well as most obstacles faced in raising animals.

A Lincoln ewe ready to be shorn.


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NORTHEAST SARE SPOTLIGHT Welcome to the Northeast SARE Spotlight! SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education) offers grants to farmers, educators, universities and communities that are working to make agriculture more sustainable — economically, environmentally, and socially. Learn about whether a SARE grant would be a good fit for you.

Keeping Heifers Fit Fay Benson Used Pedometers to Track Cow Health by Rachel Whiteheart Fay Benson’s Facebook page “Girls of Summer” isn’t what the innocent web surfer might think. Instead of featuring topless women, as the evocative name suggests, Benson’s page promotes another type of unclothed female: the dairy heifer. In 2011, Benson received a SARE ‘On Farm Research/Partnership’ Grant to thoroughly examine the effects of confinement vs. grazing on the health and productivity of dairy heifers. Benson noticed that some larger dairy farmers are reluctant to graze because they believe that grazing is “backwards,” inconvenient, and overly time-consuming; in an attempt to change these farmers’ perspectives, he decided to come up with some cold hard facts as to the benefits of grazing. And when searching for cold hard facts, what better place to start looking than a heifer’s leg? Benson conducted two simultaneous experiments under this SARE grant to determine both movement differences and health differ-

ences that arose between heifers raised in confinement and heifers raised on pasture. Prior to this point, no experiments had been conducted to quantify physical activity differences between heifers that are kept in confinement and those that are grazed. Seeing an opportunity for exploration, Benson decided to develop this area as one of his two projects. His search for the best way to quantify movement differences led him to an almost comically simple solution: pedometers, small devices typically used by people to track the number of steps they take. Benson decided that the era of humans monopolizing this technology was over and set to work attaching pedometers to the legs of 10 heifers during their last month out in the grazing pasture before they relocated to a confinement dairy for the late fall and winter. The pedometers recorded every movement that heifers made over the two month period (first month on pasture; second month confined). The pedometers revealed that the grazing heifers experienced a 60 percent drop in the number of steps taken when the animals transitioned from pasture into confinement. For Benson’s second project, he examined the health differences that arose between heifers raised in confinement and heifers raised on pasture. Both Benson and Hardie Farm (the dairy for which he raises heifers) use a computer program called DairyCOMP to chronicle the full health history of each heifer that passes through their farms. DairyCOMP keeps track of specific health markers including milk production levels, times bred, age at first calving, calving ease, and post-freshening health problems.

The pedometers attached to the leg of each heifer record the heifers’ movements, including the time they spend lying down, standing, and walking.

Benson doesn’t have enough land or time to allow all of the heifers that are raised on his farm to graze; each year some heifers are held in a confinement barn on his land and some are grazed, a fact that was key in the development of this experiment. He utilized past DairyCOMP health data for heifers that had grazed on his farm for a period of five months in 2009, 2010, and 2011 (he sampled 60 from each year). He then found past data for a “herd-mate” (a heifer of similar age and stature) that had been raised during each of those years in confinement on his farm. Hardie Farm, which housed each of

Upcoming SARE Grant Deadlines Professional Development Preproposals - Due July 29 The Professional Development program funds outcome-based projects that train Cooperative Extension educators and other agricultural service providers in sustainable techniques and concepts. Projects must be directed toward increasing the skill and understanding of these service providers and consistent with SARE’s larger goal of broad farmer adoption of sustainable practices. Awards range from $60,000 to $200,000. Research and Education Preproposals - Due July 29 Northeast SARE seeks proposals for research, education and on-farm demonstration projects, and the emphasis is on projects that lead directly to improved farming practices and an enhanced quality of life for farmers and rural communities. Projects must involve farmers and other stakeholders in planning, implementing, and evaluating a potential project; we also fund projects where research, Cooperative Extension, and education are closely linked. Learn more at http://www.nesare.org/ Grants/Get-a-Grant.

Benson’s heifers are rotationally grazed. the test heifers after their stay on Benson’s farm, provided Benson with their past and current DairyCOMP data following the health of each of the sampled heifers. This set of comprehensive health data for each of the sampled heifers allowed Benson to examine the full health histories of the grazed and confinement heifers during, and after, their stay on his farm. Benson then used health markers found in DairyCOMP to determine whether any significant health differences arose due to the environment in which the heifers were raised. Benson found no noticeable health differences across any major health markers between the dairy heifers that he had raised in confinement and those that had been grazed. He attributes this result to the fact that both the grazed heifers raised on his See Heifers page 16

One of Benson’s heifers sports a pedometer that will catalog her movements over the course of a two month period. Photos by Fay Benson


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I Love New York Agriculture Art & Writing Contest Each year, NYAITC and New York Farm Bureau sponsor an opportunity for Pre-K through middle school students across the state to discover where food comes from and why agriculture is important. The contest is divided by grade level, and each level has a specific topic to create a piece of art, poem, or narrative related to an aspect of agriculture. There were over 500 entries in this year’s contest.

July 1, 2013

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Small Farm Quarterly

Youth Pages New York Agriculture in the Classroom’s (NYAITC) mission is to foster an awareness, understanding, and appreciation of how New York State and the United States produce food and fiber. NYAITC assists educators in teaching about our agricultural food systems, what we eat, and how we live by offering opportunities for students and communities to engage with agriculture.

All awardees receive a Certificate of Recognition, and the first place winners are awarded $25 to invest in their education or an agricultural product or experience. Congratulations to the all the award winners! We wish we could feature all of them!

If you are interested in learning more about NYAITC, or volunteering for a variety of events, please visit www.agclassroom.org/ny.

PHOTO FEATURE

Horse Power Our summer photo feature comes to us all the way from Welcome Table Farm in Walla Walla, WA. Welcome Table Farm offers a full diet of foods including vegetables, grains, eggs, perennial fruits and nuts, and pasture raised meats and cut flowers. The farmers of Welcome Table Farm strive to make healthy, local food accessible through direct customer sales, work trade options and donations to hunger relief organizations. The farm is working to minimize non-renewable and polluting energy use by effectively employing the skill and draft power of people and animals. Learn more at http://welcometablefarm.com.

Joel Sokoloff cultivating fava beans with horses Avi & Dandy. Photo by Chandler Briggs

New York Agriculture Art and Slogan. Third grade students are asked to paint or color a drawing with a one sentence slogan about New York agriculture. The slogan can be general or specific to a particular agricultural process of commodity. Vegetables were the product of choice for Amelie Metzger, a 3rd grader at CattaraugusLittle Valley Elementary School. Her slogan states, “Eat Your Vegetables.”

“Cows, Milk, and Me” by Hunter Osgood of Franklinville Elementary School.

“Me and the Foods I Like” by Elena Gehrke of Cayuga Heights Elementary School.

“My Favorite New York Food and Where It Comes From” by Olivia Seiflein of Cattaragus-Little Valley School.


July 1, 2013

New York Agriculture Poem

New York Agriculture Narrative Grace Sayward, a homeschooled 5th grade student, received 1st place in his category for her original narrative she wrote. The students were asked to write an informative narrative, real or imagined, that utilized research and information from a variety of sources to develop their topic or stories. Grace’s winning story is entitled, “Advice From Gilly” and a section of her story reads: “I stomped the ground. I didn’t want the little farm girl coming any closer. Aspen was my son and I was going to protect him. Two more faces were at the door. I stomped again. Couldn’t they leave me alone? The nosy children wanted to pet and play with my little darling. I wanted them gone. I’m Gilly, a seven year old Icelandic ewe. Aspen is my seventh lamb and a second son. He was born this morning.”

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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

“My Favorite New York Farm Animal” by Evelyn Britt, a Pre-K student at Cattaraugus-Little Valley Central School.

Students in 4th grade are asked to compose a poem. The poem can be general or specific, and it can focus on one of the over 200 agricultural commodities produced in New York, a specific farm or farmer, or an aspect of the food system. Morganne Chapman of Ellicottville Central School won the division with her poem. A section of her poem reads:

“…In the fall the farmers Harvest the crops the Farmers can the food Then they go sell them In the winter we Buy what they canned And eat them all Winter. That is why I am thankful for FARMERS.”


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July 1, 2013

GRAZING

The Calves Come Home How to calm down, observe nature, and supercharge your results! by Eric Noel When I started grazing cattle nine years ago, I had no clue about what I was doing, how things would turn out, and how much nature takes care of things on her own. As the years went by I found that relaxing, observing and letting things happen was a better strategy than forcing change and making things that I wanted to happen come to pass.The latter is exhausting and not as fulfilling, but it took time, experience and careful thought to come to this realization. For me, nature was my best teacher, showing me how powerful animal instinct is and how well different species already work together. The Power of Instinct I used to always make sure all the calves for my cow-calf operation were with their mothers every time I went to move the herd. I’d make sure that with every herd move all the calves were found and trained on my time frame. This worked all right until the end of my first season of grazing my own herd. I moved the herd and noticed two calves not present. I proceeded to find them and attempted to get them with the herd. This didn’t work so well this time. In my attempt to get behind them and push them in the direction of the herd, these two calves kept going in the opposite direction. I ended up pushing them into the neighbor’s woods, up over two hills and through three barbed wire fences about a mile away. I gave up. They kept moving away from me. I couldn’t make a big enough circle to get behind them. I actually lost them in the woods. I thought I would never see those calves again.

The view from down here! Cattle still in the paddock.

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It was evening. I went home and ate. I was angry at the calves and myself, and I was stressed out about losing the potential income. I tried to put it out of my mind, and I went to bed. The next morning I went out to do my first move of the day, never expecting to see those two calves, but there they were — standing next to their mothers with full bellies looking at me like nothing ever happened. At first this got me cranked up again because I was thinking “these calves are playing me, not doing what I want them to do when I want them to do it.” Then after some thought (I don’t know why it didn’t come sooner) it dawned on me: Let them move when they want to at the pace they want. They already know what to do. Their instinct is so strong that they overcame all the obstacles. I pushed them through in the dark no less. I had forced my own time-wasting, stressful situation. I let my ego, my belief that things were supposed to be ‘just so’ get in the way. Life, and farming in particular, does NOT require struggle to be successful or to feel like you are doing your part. What I have found is that nature already has all the answers. The path of least resistance (which is also human nature) actually allows us to accomplish more in less time for an

increased quality of life, higher net profits and more time off. Cow Controlled Weaning Another natural concept you can use is to let the cow do the weaning. This totally eliminates stress for the calf, the cow and you. I

A Bobolink nest after 150 head grazed the paddock. Photos by Eric Noel See Calves page 14


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FARM MEMOIR

The Disappearing Hay by Stuart Cheney One year about 1944 or ‘45 it was time to cut the second cutting of hay, more commonly called rowen back then. The farmer who lived across the road from where I live now, whose name was Dan, mowed down seven or eight acres of beautiful rowen on a field between where I live now and where I lived then, which is about one-third of a mile. Dan and my dad had been talking and he told Dad to mow the whole east side, and Dan would take it to his barn where they had an ensilage cutter set up. The plan was to pick up all the hay when it was dry, bring it all to the ensilage blower, fork it into the blower, shoot it up the pipe about thirty feet into the window at the top of the barn, and it would land on a scaffold at the end of the barn under the blower pipe. Dad was to get his share for helping. The idear was that the barn was full of loose hay and by chopping it the hay wouldn’t take up much room and would all fit on the scaffold — maybe. They had an old big blue onelunger engine mounted on an old waygon frame to run the blower, and Dan had bought a wooden buck rake that fit right on the front of the John Deere tractor. The buck rake has wooden teeth about eight inches long and also about eight inches wide. You lower it down and let it slide along the ground right underneath the windrow of hay. When it gets full you pick it up and head for the barn. Sounds good, doesn’t it?

down the road he went. Well they soon found out that over near the woods where the hay was the heaviest, it was rough. A few stones stuck up, so Neil stayed outta there with the tractor and they sent down the truck and a couple of men to get that hay. Things were going pretty smooth so far, and they loaded the truck, brought it up, and were dropping it off onto the blower table the best they could. Of course before they started chipping the hay and blowing it into the barn, Dan told my dad to bring up his Doodle-Bug (hand-made tractor) and large hay trailer that went behind and back it into the barn right up to the scaffold at the end of the barn. That way when they got a big pile of chopped hay they could take their forks and push my father’s share right onto the trailer. Sounds good. Well the afternoon wore on and Neil was making trip after trip, coming up the hill with a rake so full of hay it slowed things down a bit, but he sure made up for it on the way back. The only problem was when he had the rake loaded he couldn’t see a thing straight ahead and if a car was coming and they didn’t pull over and get out of his way — I don’t even want to think about that. But if you think that bothered Neil, well then you didn’t know Neil! Not much traffic back in those days and nobody’s car ever got impaled. Came about six o’clock and all the hay was off the fields with a lot less work than usual and it was milking time again. We shut down the Old Blue putt-putt and everybody cleaned

Dan’s son Neil drove the tractor. He was six years older than me and when the day came, we all got out there and one way or another got all the hay raked up. It was a perfect day, and they had the old putt-putt running and that big long belt was just a-flopping in the breeze. Two men were stationed with blower forks as Neil brought the hay in with the buck rake. He didn’t waste time, and as soon as he dumped off the hay and got turned around he’d jam it into high gear, and

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themselves off and headed to the milk house where all sorts of good cold things awaited. There was some nice chocolate milk for me, which I loved. Oh boy! Now we’re headed into the barn floor to see the big pile of chopped hay-what a fun idear this has been. “Oh my God! Where’s the hay!”

Well I guess they had the Old Blue putt-putt stepped up a little too much and instead of making the hay into a pile it blew it all over hell. Now there was no more than eight inches to ten inches of hay on the scaffold and only three or four inches left on the haytrailer. Hay was all over the Doodle-Bug, even stuck up against rafters. It seemed the smallest cobwebs held a handful of dry hay. There is no way you can believe that all that hay should of made a small mountain just wasn’t there. Neil hitched onto Dad’s Doodle-Bug and towed it out of the barn before they dare start it up and start a fire. As Dad and I went on down the hill to our own barn what little hay was on the tractor blew off. He didn’t even bother to back it into the barn.

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Making hay with the tractor.

Hay-making before the putt-putt. Stuart Cheney riding the horse. 1937.

Moral of the story is don’t count your chicks before they hatch.

Stuart Cheney grew up on a 145 acre diversified farm near Brattleboro, VT. He resides on the farm in a small five room house built by his grandfather in 1940.


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

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July 1, 2013

SEED STORIES

The Case for Regional Seed by Petra Page-Mann

heavily on chemical applications, resulting in varieties adapted to these sprays.

There is so much in a seed. Each seed tells the story of its entire life history, millions of years in the making. A few seeds, in a single generation, may travel the globe. Most will stay within their watershed and most likely, their microclimate. In this way, seeds become profoundly adapted to place. The selection pressures of the environment (drought, lownutrient stress) are key in the evolution of every seed. Agricultural seed tells an additional story, one of human relationship. Historically they remained fairly static, slowly adapting to place and becoming spread wide first on our backs, then by camel, then by boat. Fast forward to 2013: most seed companies offer seed from all over the world. If ‘regional seed’ is seed becoming adapted to a bioregion, then all seed before World War I was regional. Farmers in both industrialized and developing nations saved their own seed. Integral to livelihood, maintaining good seedstock was equally important as keeping a good bull for livestock. Over time, each variety was selected to meet the environmental conditions and farmer’s needs on the farm. We share a blind faith that seed is produced by the companies selling them; this is most often not the case. Although a ‘widely adapted’ seed may grow in your soil, it may not flourish as one that has been ‘regionally adapted.’ Companies with international markets excel in the former, but not the latter. Most seed is grown where the climate favors commercial dry seed production, such as the Pacific Northwest and Israel. Much of this seed is adapted to modern agricultural techniques (mechanization, increased external inputs), allowing for wide adaptation and the high yields resulting from high inputs. Further, breeding for resistance to pests and disease is rarely prioritized, relying

The author with her selections of ‘Joan’ rutabega from the root cellar, ready to make seed adapted to the Finger Lakes in 2013.

Calves from page 12 know what you’re thinking, “A cow doesn’t know how to do that.” Well, let me tell you from experience that they do. In preparation for the new calf she will kick the yearling until it gets the hint and stops trying. Yes, you will have the occasional heifer or even a cow that doesn’t get it right. What do you do? Cull the animal. It’s all about getting the herd to take care of itself as much as possible. Birds and Grazing Cattle Another example of nature working within a farming system is grassland birds thriving in a planned grazing model. I have seen cattle graze around Bobolink nests perched up in the forage canopy of a paddock. Think about this: 150 head of 1000 pound cattle in a high density scenario grazing around a nest in the forage, the size of a coffee cup with eggs in it and leaving it unharmed! How does this happen? The only answer I can come up with is “It’s nature. It’s what is supposed to happen.” Last year I also started seeing birds on the back of my cattle.A couple of years before I built and installed about 30 tree swallow bird houses because they eat flying insects. I wanted to reduce the fly

Is Regional Seed a Thing of the Past? Following the rebirth of regional organic vegetable production, awareness of regional seed production is gaining momentum. Regional seed is the natural root of local food. The Pacific Northwest has a thriving network of small-scale seed growers and here in the Northeast we have our own burgeoning community of committed seed growers. Perhaps evidence of a shift in public awareness, many of these growers are experiencing significant sales growth each season. The Case for Regional Seed Each region has specific resources, growing challenges and market opportunities; regional seed is uniquely able to adapt all of these needs and conditions. Not all seeds are readily produced on a commercial scale in the Northeast (on account of our humid growing season), but many could be with proper techniques. Few seed companies sell seed grown in the Northeast and even then it is only a small percent of their offering. This means you may be buying good seed but not seed selected to excel in your specific climate and soils. Fruition Seeds offers a different perspective, providing varieties grown organically in and for the Northeast. Raised in the Northeast, co-founders Petra Page-Mann and Matthew Goldfarb have worked in agriculture for over thirty collective years. With knowledge of local production, local markets and operating on a relatively small scale, they offer seed grown on their farm in the Finger Lakes of Upstate New York as well as seed from other excellent organic growers throughout the Northeast. “Without a company to serve the market, how do we have access?” asks Dr. Michael Mazourek with Plant Breeding and Genetics at Cornell University. “Seed customized to our growing conditions gives us freedom from ‘making do’ with what serves major national markets. A region’s ability to have vibrant, productive seed is critical.” “Each farm is unique, especially each organic farm,” observes Michael Glos, also with Cornell Plant Breeding and Genetics. Conventional seed, produced with quick-release fertilizer and pesticide, may perform with little variation between farms. Organic systems, however, have a spectrum of variables for seed to respond to, increasing the significance of regional seed. “Regional seed is important,” continues Michael who, ten years ago, saved kale seed on his farm. Having only grown that seed since, “nothing can replace seed selected on the conditions of your specific farm.” Will Bonsall agrees: “We like to hire everything out: washing the car, fixing the deck. But some things are too compelling, too important to leave to the professionals, like tucking in our children at night. Everything related to food, and especially the seed, must be seen in this light.” Bonsall has been saving seed in Maine for decades, witnessing population in a natural way. Now when I go down my cattle lane, I get dive bombed and zoomed by all these birds. It’s very cool to see. Last year was the first year I had NO pink eye cases with the most cattle I’ve ever grazed (180 head). Relax and Let Nature Do Her Job Plants and animals did just fine before we got here and will continue when we are gone. We have the advantage of our intellect, our thinking mind. We can choose to let go of our ego, our competitive self.This allows us to align ourselves with nature, give her the support she can use which allows both to prosper. Feed the cycle and the cycle will provide abundant returns in all forms. It all starts with our thinking. Do less, make more and laugh all the way to the bank, while at the same time making a deposit in nature’s bank account. Following what nature already knows how to do and using our management skills to align with her is where the magic happens. You will know when you get there because you are in the zone and your farm and cattle are all at high performance and in step with nature.You will have more time for the things in life that are important to you, your family and your farm. Stress levels are low and

the impact of regional and on-farm selection in many crops. His work with grain is an excellent example. “Wheat bred for the prairie soils of the grain belt, rather than the forest soils of the Northeast, are notably different. Additional breeding for yield has neglected the flavor, nutrition and bread-making qualities of wheat.” Adapting grains to his soils has taught him much and he continues to learn more each season. How is Regional Seed Developed? Bonsall sources multitudes of wheat to ‘trial’ from germplasm banks around the world, Seed Savers Exchange, neighbors and seed companies. Variety trialing is central to the growth and vitality of regional seed. Grown side by side, varietal characteristics are evaluated from seed currently grown in a region as well as seed from around the world. In many ways, trialing is as important as seed production itself because it illuminates the spectrum of genetic diversity within a crop type, offering us the range of what is possible. Once a consistent, quality variety has been identified, it moves into production to be ‘customized’ to our growing conditions. Like growing seed, trialing is done by seed companies and universities. But perhaps most important, the active participation of farmers is key to the long-term vision and success of these efforts.

Several seed companies based in the Northeast trial extensively to find varieties with potential for growers in the Northeast. Also, Cornell Plant Breeding and Genetics is making exciting progress identifying varieties with resistance to diseases with national and international significance, such as downy mildew and late blight. This season they are growing 56 varieties of cucumber in their downy mildew trials, with over a thousand plants from the breeding program going to the field for selection. We are fortunate here in the Northeast (especially the Finger Lakes!) because diseases with international relevance studied here offer tremendous regional insight, as well.

Cornell also engages growers in our bioregion who participate in variety trial and breeding. “Come to a field day,” encourages Michael Mazourek, “meet us and get more involved!” The Cornell Organic Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, NY will hold a public field day in late summer (date to be determined) and can always be found at NOFA conferences and many NOFA-sponsored events. Regional seed, like local food, is too important to our lives to be fringe for long. The extraordinary elasticity of genetics offers ample opportunity to customize our seed to meet the specific conditions and needs of individual and regional farms. The seed we have now is good but truly excellent, well-adapted and regional seed is our privilege to cultivate. With the collaboration of seed companies, universities and individuals alike, building a regional seed supply in the Northeast is gaining momentum with each season. ‘Trial’ some regionally adapted seed in your garden this season and see how ‘local’ can go deeper!

Petra Page-Mann lives and farms in Naples, NY and founded Fruition Seeds in the Fall of 2012. She may be reached at fruitionseed@gmail.com. farming becomes profitable and fun again.

Eric Noel is an organic farmer, grazing and farm planning consultant, and coach. He lives and farms in the Champlain Islands of Vermont with his wife and two children. He can be reached at 802752-8731 or ericrnoel@hotmail.com.

You’re out. I’m in. Momma knows what to do.


July 1, 2013

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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

LIVESTOCK & POULTRY

Where the Buffalo Roam by Amy Weakley Our little family farm is tucked away in a remote corner of Tug Hill in the Adirondack region of Upstate New York. As a child I lived on a small family farm, where I learned to have a strong work ethic and an even stronger understanding of our family values. As I grew up, went to college, married and started a family of my own, I realized I wanted my children to have those same experiences and values. We started Barefoot Buffalo Farm in 2010 with five buffalo. Raising bison, the more accurate name for our animals, is no small chore and should not be entered into lightly. That being said, we couldn’t be happier. Bison are absolutely amazing creatures, each with their own personality. They are majestic wild animals. More than 60 million bison once roamed all across the North American Continent. Bison have thrived on wild and drought resistant grasses, native shrubs, flowers and other plants and were a huge part of the ecological system. Bison are considered ruminants, as they do chew a cud. To Native Americans, bison were the economic and spiritual sustenance, supplying them with food, clothing, shelter and a source of utensils and tools. Currently, there are approximately 500,000

bison in the U.S. Yellowstone National Park has a herd of about 3,500 wild bison, making it the largest wild herd in the world. Bison are not tame animals and must be handled with care and caution, each with their own personality. While they may seem quiet or docile, they should not be trusted. Respect them and give them their needed space. Proper handling equipment, fencing and patience are must haves. Our fence posts are telephone poles or 6X6’s — 12 feet long, buried 4 feet down and a woven wire fence 8 feet high. The bison pasture ratio is the same as that for cows. We will be moving to a rotational grazing system this year in an effort to adopt more sustainable practices. We currently have about 27 bison ranging in age from newborns to fully mature animals. Our plans are to continue to grow our farm as we can. Currently we sell our bison meat to family, friends and our local community. With just word-of-mouth advertising, we can’t meet the local demand. We plan to join some of the local Farmers Markets as our growth allows. Our customers come from diverse backgrounds. They range from people curious about the taste of an exotic meat, outdoorsmen, Buy Local folks, and those interested in a healthier red meat. After talking to a variety of people including our potential customers, we have opted to transport our bison alive more than three hours away to a plant capable of processing them with a USDA inspection process. This is not required but is viewed as a valuable quality control for our customers. We have also had people interested in purchasing live animals on the hoof for private processing.

George is Barefoot Buffalo Farm’s current productive bull.

We love all of our animals and take comfort in knowing they are raised in a healthy manner where they can run and play in a natural environment. We have also chosen not to use antibiotics or hormones with our bison. They are hearty animals with a strong resistance to many diseases and we feel that nature should not be tampered with.

Rt. 20, Sharon Springs, NY • (800) 887-1872 or (518) 284-2346 1175 Hoosick St. Troy, NY • (518) 279-9709

Bison mothers are nurturing and protective of their young. Photos by Amy Weakley A common belief is that ranchers breed bison with cattle. This is not true. “The National Bison Association is dedicated to maintaining the integrity species. In fact, our Code of Ethics specifically prohibits members from deliberately crossbreeding bison with another species.” We chose bison because of its wonderful meat. It is delicious and nutritious.

Service (FSIS) or from an accredited state inspection program which offers inspection “at least equal” to USDA.

There are a numbers of farms in the central New York area that sell live animals for those interested in raising bison. The Eastern Bison Association also hosts two conferences/shows and sales annually.

To learn more about raising bison, visit The According to the Nation Bison Association, National Bison Association website at bison are classified as an exotic, or “non- www.bisoncentral.com. amenable species,” under the Federal Meat Inspection Act. As such, they fall under some Amy Weakley owns Barefoot Buffalo Farm unique regulatory provisions. All bison mar- with her family in Taberg, NY. She can be keted into the commercial marketplace must reached at 315-942-6171, dave_amy_weakand be processed in an FDA-approved facility. ley@yahoo.com These facilities are required to comply with www.facebook.com/barefootbuffalofarm. all FDA regulations, as well as with the FSIS regulations regarding sanitation. Bison producers/processors may • Bison are faster and more agile than a horse, running at also request “voluntary inspec40 mph and jumping 6 feet high. tion” services from the U.S. • Bison are matriarchal, meaning a female will be the Department of Agriculture’s head of the herd. Food Safety and Inspections • One Bison bull can usually service 10-18 cows. • Bison live 20-25 years in the wild and up to 30 in quality captive conditions.

Fun Facts About Bison

The Agri-Mark dairy cooperative works year-round for higher farm milk prices, better markets and effective dairy legislation on behalf of our Northeast dairy farm families. For more information on working with other farm families for higher on-farm milk prices, contact our Membership Department toll-free at

1-800-225-0532.


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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 1, 2013

LIVESTOCK & POULTRY

Sheep Barn Interior Design: Wooden Panels

If you can handle a drill, a saw, and a few other simple tools, this article describes how to assemble panels for pens, lambing jugs, and a creep feeder by Ulf Kintzel Any boards I use are rough cut. Other than avoiding the occasional splinter, there is no additional benefit to a finWhile times change with incredible speed when it comes to ished board — rough-cut will do and is cheaper. The boards the development of technology, some things seem to stand I use are one inch thick and three inches wide. Some may the test of time. Sheep feeders and panels were made from prefer a wider board, perhaps four or five inches wide. wood for hundreds and thousands of years. Nowadays, However, having a board thicker than one inch does not there is a variety of metal panels, pens, and feeders on the seem to suit any additional purpose. As far as the length is market, yet wooden panels seem to be the far more eco- concerned, I go pretty much with what is available at the nomical option and are perhaps even more widespread. time in order to keep the cost low. I take anything between That is if you can handle a drill, a saw, and a few other sim- eight and about ten feet long. Shorter than eight feet would ple tools. In this article I will describe my preferences and be too short. Boards longer than 12 feet will not be handy for experiences when making panels for pens, lambing jugs, one person when they are used for a panel. and creep feeder. Feel free to copy or modify my ideas as In order to make my panels, I need the following tools: a ciryou see fit. cular saw, a drill, one and 5/8 inch long deck screws, a The wood of choice — recommended by my friend Mahlon, measuring tape, a woodworker’s pencil, a woodworker’s tria saw miller — is hemlock. Hemlock is light yet it stands A divider panel, low enough to step over without climbpressure very well without breaking. In fact, it bends under ing and also “lamb proof.” pressure rather than breaking. The drier it is, the better it bends. The downside to hemlock is the relative ease with groups of sheep with lambs of different ages. These are just which it splits when you drill screws into it. So it may be nec36 inches high and the spacing in between the lower boards essary to pre-drill holes when putting in screws close to the is tighter — three to four inches between lower boards and edge. In the past I have also tried white pine (which works) five to six inches between upper boards. The tighter spacing and red oak (which is too heavy). is because of the lambs; lambs escaping through the panel into another group is absolutely undesirable. The lower height is for me to be able to step over without the need to Heifers from Pgae 9 climb. This may sound silly but if during the course of a two farm and those heifers raised in confinement on Benson’s to three week lambing season, you climb dozens of times farm spent “9 months [after leaving Benson’s farm] in conper day over panels in order to get from one group to anothfinement on the Hardie farm, which homogenized the er and in and out of lambing jugs (which are of the same health differences between them.” Nevertheless, Benson lower height), you will be exhausted just because of that. says that the feed costs savings he retains through grazStepping over is far easier. Since ewes are even less flighty ing heifers are reason enough for him to continue (he during lambing and with young lambs, this height, which saved around $650 over the course of a 150 day grazing may be insufficient at other times, is no problem at all. period). Benson believes that many other farmers in the A creep feeder panel with spacing that allows lambs near future will be drawn towards grazing for the same My panels for my lambing jugs or pens are of the same only to access the fancy hay. reason since “the cost of grazing hasn’t changed but the height and spacing as the dividers because of the same reacost of feed has.” However, Benson plans to continue his angle, a couple of saw horses, and a make-shift work bench son. The length of these panels is five feet. Due to the shortresearch of the potential health benefits of grazing to give made from hemlock boards laid over a frame. er length only one diagonal board is necessary to provide dairies more reasons, besides just economic incentives, stability. These panels make a five by five jug/pen, which is to choose grazing. Length and height of the panels as well as spacing in sufficiently large for a ewe to bond with her lambs immedibetween boards depends on the future purpose of the pan- ately after lambing. I set up the jugs along the wall and side This grant was the most recent grant in a series of three els. “Normal” panels, used for making holding pens for groups by side. That reduces the need for panels per jug to two, with that Fay has been involved with, all relating to dairy cows of sheep, are 40 inches high and eight to ten feet long. They the need for three panels per jug on either end of this row of (he jokes that his grants are his very own Lord of the have five horizontal boards, the lower boards are spaced lambing pens. Rings trilogy, but dairy cow-style). His first grant examabout five inches apart, the upper ones about six inches ined health differences between grazed and confined apart. My sheep are of medium size and calm disposition and Lastly, I also built the panels for my creep feeder myself. The dairy heifers during their freshening period (the period the height is indeed sufficient. If your sheep are of large spacing between vertical boards is seven inches, the height right after a heifer gives birth). This project determined frame or are flighty, you may need to adjust the height 40 inches. This allows the lambs to access the best hay I that grazed heifers had both improved calving ease and accordingly. These panels have three vertical boards or have, which is provided in a hay feeder and is inaccessible a need for fewer antibiotic treatments than heifers raised “legs,” one on each end and one in the middle. Two diagonal to the ewes. in confinement. The second project focused on the use of boards create stability and keep the panel from flapping whole farm analysis for New York small dairy farms to around when handled. If you wish to make these panels lamb Ulf Kintzel is a native of Germany and has lived in the US improve nutrient cycling, carbon status and energy use, proof, just add a sixth board and adjust the spacing accord- since 1995. He farms Ulf owns and operates White Clover among other things. Benson keeps returning to SARE as ingly. Such panels will be suitable for the chute as well. Sheep Farm, located in the Finger Lakes area in upstate New a source of funding because he believes that “a lot of York. He breeds and raises grass-fed White Dorper Sheep information that farmers want to know is about applicaI use pen dividers during lambing season so that I can sep- without any grain feeding and offers breeding stock suitable tions, which purely scientific research doesn’t always purarate a large pen to accommodate different groups, i.e. for grazing. His website address is www.whitecloversheepsue, [but SARE does].” farm.com. He can be reached by e-mail at ulf@whitecloversheepfarm.com or by phone at 585-554-3313. Benson has already begun to see the impact that his research has had on the practices of Northeast dairies. Hardie Farm, the dairy farm that houses Benson’s heifers after their stint with grazing, had not previously grazed heifers; now they send their cows to custom graze at Benson’s home farm every summer. Benson hopes that, with data he collects from future research, he can continue convincing farms of all sizes that grazing is the way to go. This article discusses SARE Project Number ONE10113. Download the full final report at http://my-sare.sare.org/mySARE/ProjectReport.aspx?do=viewProj&pn=O NE10-113 (www.sare.org í Project Reports íSearch Database íproject number “ONE10-113”).

Rachel Whiteheart was a summer intern at the Cornell Small Farms Program during Summer 2012 and is now a junior Environmental Engineering major at Cornell University. She may be reached at rmw95@cornell.edu.

A “regular” panel for the purpose of making pens. Photos by Ulf Kintzel

Lambing jugs, five by five feet big.


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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

SMALL FARM SPOTLIGHT

Making it Work: Couple Transforms Fallow Plot into Viable Farm by Jaclyn Rose Bruntfield In 1979, Deb Barber and Tom Decker bought a small plot of land that was stripped of its topsoil when the Taconic Parkway was built. The land might not have been put to productive use had it not been for the couple, who brought extensive skills and knowledge to their farming enterprise. In 1990, the Barber and Decker, her husband, began farming their land in the bucolic Hudson River Valley while also working full-time and raising two young children. They initially sold flowers at the Great Barrington Farmers Market, which opened that year. Since then, the farm has expanded to include a variety of fruits, vegetables, and decorative plants. “We both were really drawn to farming,” she says.“I really think it’s a genetic disposition to farm. Either you’re into it or you’re not. A lot of people would kill themselves first.” Deb earned a degree in floriculture at SUNY Cobleskill and worked for 12 years at a garden center in Great Barrington, MA. Tom is self-taught in agriculture from planting fruit trees and tending greenhouses as a groundskeeper at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, also in Great Barrington. Deb says these experiences gave them a foundation upon which to build their own farm. “Sometimes I look back at our records and say, ‘How did we survive? How did we feed our children?’” she says. “But I’m very grateful that we did it. I’m glad that we had worked on something for many years and, when the time came, we were able to segue into that.”

for the season,” Deb explains. “After you’ve gotten a whole season of beautiful work out of it, it goes into the soil and feeds the worms and becomes organic matter. That’s what we call a ‘double decker.’” “I like it when Tom takes a handful of soil and there’s worms all in there,” she says.“Last year we had all of our tomatoes, herbs, and flowers hay mulched. It was so beautiful.” Working with the Seasons Aside from a vacation each fall, Deb says the farm keeps her and Tom busy year round. “In July and August, we’re up really early harvesting what we can and cultivating,” says Deb. “We’ll bring music and chairs and water into the shed when it’s killer hot and sit with piles of onions and cut their roots off. It all has to be done, so we just try to work it around the weather and the season.” “We work all winter,” she explains. “This year we’ve been cutting brush, cutting trees, cleaning up stuff that we would normally have to do in the spring.” The couple also uses time in the winter to order seeds, do paperwork, and repair their tractors. Outside Deb’s home, which sits atop a hill overlooking the farm, is a huge, intricate clock that she created using clay and tiles. She says she tries to make time for her art in the winter, though the farm takes priority.

explains. “Many people don’t know how to cook anymore.They’re eating burgers, Chinese food, and quesadillas, so they don’t know how to buy good stuff.”

“We’re going to work if we can,” she muses.

Deb says that shopping at markets and preparing fresh food serves as an opportunity for families to create memories. “If you took $10 and made a game of it with your family, everybody can go and try to put together a salad, a soup, or a dessert,” she says. “Then you go home, talk about the stuff you bought, make it into a meal, and then you eat it all together. How far would that go for people to be eating healthy, educating, and having fun together?”

The couple has been working Double Decker Farm full-time since 1997. They currently own nearly six acres, with two and a half acres farmed on rotation each season. Investing in the Farm “We have needed everything that has come our way when it has come our way to make this work,” Deb says.

Deb says that making a raspberry tart from scratch can be less expensive for a family than a night at the movies. “Some people don’t have a clue that they could go and buy fresh raspberries, make a pastry crust, and bake it with some honey or sugar. It was two pints of raspberries an hour ago, but now you’re sitting down together eating one of the best things you’ve ever eaten. It creates a memory and it was your entertainment for the day.”

When Tom’s parents, who lived next door, passed away, Deb says they used his inheritance to invest in the farm, buying a mulch layer, transplanter, and cargo van. “Without that, there were so many ways this tiny little farm could have failed,” Deb says.

The Future of Double Decker Farm Deb says the local food movement has provided an uptick in business for Double Decker Farm.

Deb also credits the Great Barrington Farmers Market, which is 20 miles from the farm, with supporting their business. “People in Great Barrington always have such great appreciation for what we’ve done,” she says. “We’re their family and they’re our family.” Double Deckers In order to restore the farm’s soil and improve its structure, Deb explains that manure, hay mulch, rock phosphate, and green sand are added each growing season. “It’s a tremendous amount of work to put it in, but then it’s good

A variety of decorative plants start out in the greenhouse at Double Decker Farm.

Potted plants and herbs get their start in a greenhouse in early spring.

Deb has been farming Double Decker Farm full-time since 1990. Photos by Jaclyn Rose Bruntfield A Boutique Farm Double Decker Farm is so small that Deb says it doesn’t qualify for agricultural tax write-offs. “People will call us a boutique farm, but that’s the only way we can afford to be a farm. If you piled up all the high-quality food we’ve produced in 20 years, you’d be amazed where it came from.” She dismisses criticism that the “boutique farm” caters to the wealthy elite. “Good food is expensive,” explains Deb. “If your food is really cheap, you’re getting crap. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with selling our product for the price we do. Not making a profit, for us, would be unsustainable.” Deb believes that more people should try growing their own vegetables to experience how difficult it is, and so they know “what good food tastes like.” “There’s nothing like someone trying to grow a tomato plant to understand why we charge $3.50 a pint,” she says. “[In 2011] we had 13 inches of rain over Labor Day and seven inches of rain in July. There are blights. So many things can happen to a tomato.” Eating Healthy Together “People have to be taught how to shop conscientiously,” Deb

“For us it’s good,” she says. “Things come and go in cycles, but as far as the buying local movement goes, I think it’s only going to get better.”

The couple’s two oldest children work at the Hawthorne Valley Farm Store in Harlemville. Their youngest daughter helps out on the farm, mixing different colored tomatoes into containers and creating flower bouquets. But Deb says that her children have no interest in staying on the farm. “They like good food and the idea of farming, but who wants to go pick 30 pints of cherry tomatoes when it’s 90 degrees?” she says.

Deb says that she and her husband have created a sustainable business model through expanding their business slowly over time. She believes that market organizers and potential new farmers could benefit by adopting similar strategies. “Sustainability is something where the inputs and costs - monetary, health, environmental - are less than what you’re getting,” she says. “We’ve always worked under the premise, ‘Don’t get any bigger ‘til you can’t get any better.’ And as little as this place is, we have so much stuff after 22 years that we can still do. The longer we work at it, the better our systems get.”

Jaclyn Rose Bruntfield is a writer living in New York’s Hudson River Valley. After completing her thesis, “Stewards of the Land: Representations of Agricultural Authenticity in Columbia County, NY,” she received a Master’s degree in English from SUNY Albany in December 2012. Double Decker Farm was one of the family farms featured in Ms. Bruntfield’s thesis. She can be reached at jaclynbruntfield@hotmail.com.


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July 1, 2013

STEWARDSHIP & NATURE

Elderberry and Beyond: New Options for River Lands in the Northeast Riparian buffer plantings can reap rewards for nature and business by Liz Brownlee and Connor Stedman

water movement, allowing sediments and nutrients to deposit into the soil and keeping pollutants out of waterways. The root systems of these riparian plants, adapted to frequent flooding, rapidly absorb excess nutrients and make use of what would otherwise be waste. Buffers are essential for swimming, migratory fish breeding, and other river functions that depend on water quality.

Stan Ward springs into his greenhouse full of excitement, eager to show off elderberry cuttings. He’s growing elderberry, Echinacea, and other perennial medicinals on his upland farm in central Vermont, but these elderberries are bound for lower ground. This year, he’s planting them into one of three riparian buffer plantings along the Mad River, continuing a project that began in 2012. The elderberry will absorb floodwaters, keep farm field runoff out of the river, and reduce erosion. And they will generate income as an agricultural enterprise. The river’s edge can be tense territory, where conservation and agriculture seem permanently in conflict. Farmers, working with razorthin profit margins, want the rich soils in production. Conservationists want floodplains to grow native ecosystems that absorb floodwaters, remediate pollution, and provide wildlife habitat. At the same time, the river’s edge can also be a place of great collaboration. Stan’s plantings are innovative, in part because he’s establishing them in partnership with his local watershed group and the local conservation district. Planting elderberry in the buffer creates what Stan calls a “win-win-win” for watershed health, wildlife conservation, and the local farm economy. Stan isn’t the only one interested. A small but growing number of farmers, conservationists, and land managers in Vermont are beginning to add productive buffers to their toolboxes. Farmers are planting on commercial and homestead scales across the state. By directly integrating agriculture and conservation, these working buffers could help farms and watersheds alike adapt to increased flooding and the new climate “normal” of the 21st century. Rivers, Flooding, and Tropical Storm Irene River channels support an extraordinary abundance of life. Water continually shifts and meanders, carving banks and revealing new land. On any summer evening turtles bask on gravel bars while swallows and kingfishers nest in steep exposed banks. These habitat features are found nowhere else in the wider landscape, and are constantly changing as the river moves. When rivers flood from snowmelt or storms, they deposit rich silt and sand in their floodplains, supporting riparian forests and riverbank meadows. These in turn provide food and shelter for countless wildlife species. For farmers, rivers are a blessing and curse. They provide extremely fertile and easily plowed agricultural soils, but the threat of damaging floods is ever-present and increas-

ing with climate change. In late August 2011, Tropical Storm Irene dumped 4-8 inches of rain throughout Vermont in less than 24 hours. Flooding eroded entire fields; carried away barns, livestock, and greenhouses; and buried crops in sand and gravel. Almost 15,000 acres of Vermont farmland sustained damage; farmers in the state lost at least $20 million in one day. Intact riparian landscapes can mitigate the impacts of flooding. Flooding along the Otter Creek from Irene impacted 92 farmers in the vicinity of Rutland, VT. Thirty miles downstream, in Middlebury, only 41 farmers reported damage. While crop damage was similar in both places, farmland impacts were not: the flood damaged only 60 acres of land in the Middlebury area, compared to over 4,000 acres surrounding Rutland. The difference lies, in part, in a large system of intact swamps, wetlands, and floodplain buffers along the Otter Creek between Rutland and Middlebury. These ecosystems slowed and absorbed the floodwaters, shielding many Middlebury farms from the worst of the storm’s effects. Riparian Buffers in the Working Landscape Riparian buffers retain strips of natural vegetation along riverbanks, generally 20 to 50 feet wide. They mimic larger riparian ecosystems, like the ones that protected Middlebury during Irene, and allow natural river processes and communities of life adapted to floodplains to continue within agricultural landscapes. Buffers improve water quality, in particular, by acting as giant filters. High levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in agricultural runoff can disrupt river food webs and cause algae blooms. The trees, shrubs, and perennial herbs and grasses in riparian buffers slow overland

Productive Buffers: Economics and Funding Sources APBs can be funded through multiple sources, including crop revenue and certain riparian buffer grant programs. However, it is important to note that riparian buffers funded through CREP (the FSA’s Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) cannot include any harvesting or sale of agricultural or forest products. Some state and local funding sources may offer more flexibility. Upcoming trials in Vermont will evaluate the economics of a range of APB plantings, at commercial and smaller scales. These trials will help small farmers make informed decisions about APBs. If you’d like to learn more about APBs or current trial plantings, contact Liz Brownlee at ejbrownl@uvm.edu.

A host of government and local programs encourage farmers to plant riparian buffers, but many farmers choose not to participate. Some farmers simply can’t afford to take any land out of production. Others don’t want to see productive land sit “idle.” Often, farmers simply don’t want to sign on the government’s dotted line; they want to manage their land independently, and state and federal buffer planting programs often require contracts and include usage restrictions. Local programs may only require a handshake agreement, but even in those cases planting the river’s edge with trees restricts farmers’ options. Some dislike the aesthetic of a brambly forest hiding the river from view. For these reasons and many others, farmers often avoid or flatly reject planting riparian buffers on their land. But a new idea is showing up on Vermont riverbanks, a system that brings farmers back to the table. Growing agriculturally productive buffers is a strategy that can make sense for both farmers and conservationists. Agriculturally Productive Buffers: An Emerging Option Agriculturally Productive Buffers (APBs) are a form of agroforestry, integrating forest management with agricultural production. They incorporate the essential elements of traditional riparian buffers, but also include perennial crop systems. Typically, the portion of the APB nearest to the riverbank, Zone 1 (see diagram), is restored as natural riparian forest. Zone 2 is an alley of flood tolerant shrub or small tree crops, such as elderberries, hazelnuts, or fencepost black locusts. Finally, the field-side Zone 3 grows late-cut hay, keeping perennial grass cover during the spring and late fall flooding season. Productive buffers provide flood-resistant agricultural enterprises while incorporating natural river processes into farmland: flood tolerance, deeply taprooted trees, year-round plant cover, and room for river meanders.

resilience, improve water quality, create wildlife habitat, and grow crops. Crops currently planted as components of productive buffers in Vermont include nuts (hazelnuts, black walnuts) fruit (pears, currants, highbush cranberries), fenceposts (black locust), forage (late cut hay), and, of course, Stan Ward’s elderberries.

The Friends of the Mad River, a local conservation organization, partnered with Stan to establish his elderberry buffers. Caitrin Noel, FMR’s executive director, is cautiously optimistic about the potential for productive riparian buffers to become more widely used on Vermont farms. “Working with Stan to create working buffers definitely requires more flexibility.” She says that APBs can help reconcile ecosystem health and community values. “It makes buffers more palatable to farmers who hesitate to take the land out of production entirely. If managed properly, I think the model could represent the best of both worlds.”

Liz Brownlee helps Vermont farmers and conservationists partner to care for their rivers. She can be reached at ejbrownl@uvm.edu. Connor Stedman is an agroforestry specialist based in Guilford, Vermont. He can be reached at connor.stedman@gmail.com.

The physical features of riverbeds continually change with cycles of flooding. Photo by Connor Stedman

Agriculturally productive buffers may overcome the obstacles preventing farmers from participating in the current buffer planting programs. These buffers keep farmland in production and help farmers take care of both their land and their bottom line. There are no government contracts and no paperwork, though some groups are working to establish local funding sources and best management practices. It’s also clear that many details of productive buffer systems will need to be learned over time. In a changing climate and economy, this flexibility and adaptation may well be critical. Collaborating is proving key to the success of productive buffer projects. Local nonprofits are helping Vermont farmers with logistics, and some are finding funding for planting strips of native floodplain trees within APBs. These collaborations are allowing farmers to grow much needed riparian buffers, increase flood

Elderberry cuttings at Stan Ward’s Vermont farm will soon grow on the banks of the Mad River. The riparian buffer planting is a collaborative project with local conservationists. Photo by Liz Brownlee


July 1, 2013

Page 19

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

HORTICULTURE

Uncommon Fruits With Commercial Potential, Part 2 by Lee Reich

effort on your part. But . . . the fruit is small (1/2-5/8” diameter) and harvesting leaves a tear in the fruit where the stem was attached. This fruit has much potential and a few varieties — now lost — with larger and tastier fruits were developed. Still, run of the mill seedlings, which are readily available, are very tasty and the plants bear quickly and are very pest resistant with little or no care. Cross-pollination is necessary.

In my previous article, the first part of this 2-part series, I made a case for growing uncommon fruits: The fruits relative freedom from pests and ease of growth, along with their delicious and unique flavors, make them ideally suited to local markets. I then went on to describe some uncommon fruits — specifically, “fruits with a history” — that I recommend planting.In this second, concluding part of my article, I go on to describe other uncommon fruits that I recommend planting, continuing, for interest, my grouping of them into various categories. Fruits a Little Finicky About Conditions Juneberry, also known as shadbush and serviceberry (Amelanchier spp., Zones 3-8), is native in every state.The fruits are a blueberry look-alike but have their own flavor that has the richness and sweetness of a sweet cherry along with a hint of almond. In fact, juneberry is related to apple and as such, suffers some similar pest problems. I can’t grow them, but just four miles away, a row of them bears good annual crops. A number of varieties have been selected for ornamental and fruiting characteristics. Where juneberries can be grown, they are worth planting;if pests are a problem, rip out the plants. But do give them a try. Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) thrives only in cooler regions (Zone 4-7). It’s a northern European favorite; merely utter the word “lingonberry” to a Scandinavian and watch their eyes mist up with longing.This evergreen shrub grows less than a foot high and spreads via underground runners to fill in an area. Lingonberry is finicky about soil conditions. What’s needed is a soil that is very acidic, rich in humus, well-drained, and low in fertility — just like blueberry, a relative.Before planting, check the soil pH and add granular sulfur to bring the pH into the desired range of 4 to 5.Mix some acidic peat moss into each planting hole and then, after planting 18”apart, mulch the ground with a couple of inches of wood shavings or leaves. Drip irrigation or regular watering is usually necessary, especially to get a planting established.

Author harvesting Nanking cherries, which bear prolifically with little or no care. A number of varieties are available.For best fruit production, plant at least two varieties. Fruits That Could Use Some Breeding American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana, Zones 6-9) is a wonderful fruit plant.The tree is pest-resistant; it hardly needs pruning; it rarely succumbs to spring freezes (never, for me, after 25 years in a frost pocket).And, the fruit is delicious, like a dried apricot that’s been soaked in water, dipped in honey, and given a dash of spice. From a commercial standpoint, the problem is that the fruit is very fragile, akin to jelly held in a thin skin. Handled very gingerly, American persimmon could have commercial potential for very local sales. The fruit tastes awful until dead ripe, so grow varieties that can ripen with your growing season.Here, near the northern limit for persimmon ripening, my favorites include Szukis and Mohler. Dooley and Yates are also good. Perhaps the future will bring new varieties that hold up better for marketing. For now, American persimmon is a very fragile, very delicious fruit. Nanking cherry (Prunus tomentosa, Zone 3-6) is a true cherry that bears prodigious crops for little or no

Uncommon Fruits for Almost Everywhere In contrast to American persimmon, Asian persimmon, also known as kaki (D. kaki, Zones 6-10), has been cultivated and bred for thousands of years — in Asia. Kakis are larger and firmer than American persimmons, and can be picked to ripen off the plant. Just a few varieties appear in American markets and those are mostly from California. My farmden is slightly too far north of the northern limit for the hardiest kakis; in Zone 6 and warmer, you can be the only one around with Eureka, Giboshi, Giombo, and Saijo fruits, all of which are delectably sweet. Hardy kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta, Zones 4-9, A. kolomikta, Zones 3-7), as its name implies, is a coldhardy relative of the fuzzy, market kiwifruit, which is not hardy. The best thing about hardy kiwifruit, and the way they differ most from market kiwifruits, is in the fruit itself. Hardy kiwifruits have similar flavor and emerald green flesh as their market cousins, but the hardy kiwifruits are grape-size and have smooth skins. Just pop them into your mouth, skin and all, like grapes. Hardy kiwifruit also are sweeter and more aromatic, with hints of additional flavors such as banana, passionfruit, or pineapple. The fruits ripen in autumn, and once they reach a certain stage of maturity, can be stored under refrigeration from which they can be removed and ripened as needed. Anna, Geneva, MSU, and Dumbarton are some good fruiting varieties. I grow hardy kiwifruit vines on wires strung down the length of a 5-foot-wide T-trellis.Plants are either male or female so you need to plant a separate, nonfruiting male vine to pollinate fruiting females — up to eight females per male. Kiwis are pest-free but do need to be pruned religiously and severely, once in winter and occasionally through summer.

Pawpaw (Asimina triloba, Zones 4-8) is an American native that, although hardy to below 25°F., has many tropical aspirations.The tree looks very tropical, with lush, large leaves.It’s the northernmost member of the mostly tropical custard apple family. And best of all, the fruit tastes and looks tropical. It’s flavor has been likened to banana with mango, pineapple, and avocado mixed in.I liken it to crème brûlée.

Success with pawpaw begins with a grafted tree of a named variety. In shorter season areas, I recommend the varieties Pennsylvania Golden 1, 2, 3, or 4. The trees grow fifteen to twenty feet high and should be given that same spacing, or a bit less, in full sun. Once a plant is in the ground and growing well, little further care is needed beyond harvesting the fruits — twenty-five to fifty pounds per plant — and occasional winter pruning.

Plants of these uncommon fruits are not as readily available as, say, apple trees, especially if you’re seeking special varieties. A number of nurseries specialize in one or more of these uncommon fruits, and it pays to seek out specialty nurseries for these special plants. More information on uncommon fruits can be found in the book Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden by Lee Reich (Timber Press, 2004) and by contacting Lee Reich, 845-255-0417 or garden@leereich.com.

Lee Reich, PhD is a farmdener and consultant in New Paltz, NY.

Szukis American persimmon is an early ripening variety for northern regions. Photos by Lee Reich

Although resembling blueberries, juneberries have their own unique, delicious flavor.

Pawpaw has tropical aspirations, with texture and taste of banana along with hints of mango, pineapple, and avocado.


Page 20

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 1, 2013

Country Folks East 7.1.13  

Country Folks East July 1, 2013

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