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The Public Library 2019

L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019

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“THIS PAGE IS LEFT INT

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TENTIONALLY BLANK”

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LEEL

ARCH30001 Melbourne School of Design The University of Melbourne, Masson Rd, Parkville VIC 3010

Leelee Chea Email: lchea@student.unimelb.edu.au https://www.linkedin.com/in/leelee-chea/ issuu.com/leeleechea Mob: +61 xxx xxx xxx

RE: Delta - Journal Task, Reflection

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he projects and research I've explored for Studio Delta are ones that I am deeply interested in and can see myself making a career from. I am in my third year of completing the Bachelor of Design with a major in Architecture and specialisation in Environmental System Designs at The University of Melbourne, and believe my skills and principles are well suited to that of a career architorture. Studio Delta had placed a large emphasis on studying from precedent and iterative design process, and I am unsure if that really benefitted my conceptual thinking. The first half of the semester focused primarily on form and reductive diagrammatic drawings. I hence often found myself post rationalising my decision making since there wasn’t a core reason I did a particular form or a particular circulation path. Many concepts explored were about dualities, and with a building typology as complex as a library, I found it difficult to just focus on elements regarding that. I therefore went down a winding path, trying to understand my approach to the Public Library and Society. I believed that the Library was a direct reflection of society, and I hence wanted to create a Library that can neutralise society's disastrous glorification of activities that instigate feelings of loneliness, depression and anxiety. My final project explores forms and materials by utilising bodily senses, such as sight, touch, smell and sound, engaging the architectural environment with physical sensations, promoting individual perceptions and invoking meanings. It proposes a Library for China Town, Melbourne, where the site is filled with complex layers of history and inundated with idiosyncratic lifestyles. The library typology, with characteristic contents, is meant to encourage people to slow down and re-experience life. Through moments of pause, retreat and exposure, the space becomes a celebration of community, information and passion in the Melbourne CBD. It forces people to create new perspectives of their relationships with the city and the details of mundane everyday life. This connection draws an extension line between architectural experiences and people. The Library, as an archive and community centre, connects an individual's mind and body with the extant world.

Yours Sincerely, Leelee Chea

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LEE WELCOME TO MY MIND

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Table of Contents 16 THE ABSTRACT & THE CONCRETE Capturing the essence of each project from the list in a single diagram. Creation of a schematic representation of the building’s plan or a section into abstract schemes characterized by spatial dualities such as open/close, transparent/opaque, solid/void,

34 THE CONCRETE & THE ABSTRACT Employ means of abstraction, a reduction to essential characteristics, in the process of architectural design. Produced a series of physical models based on abstract spatial ideas by developing an iterative workflow. This therefore formulates the Library project design proposal.

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66,106 THE PUBLIC LIBRARY INTERIM, THE PUBLIC LIBRARY FINAL Designed a public library in Melbourne’s CBD. It is a large civic building of up to 20 000m2. Developing an individual design brief in parallel with drawings and models,including three principal spaces: 1. Book Depository 2. Reading Room 3. Public Sphere They occupy approximately equal floor areas, which is one-third of the building each. Examined their nature and investigated possible relationships between them.

JOURNAL ENTRY: 08

Week 01

62

Week 07

10

Week 02

96

Week 08

12

Week 03

98

Week 09

30

Week 04

100

Week 10

58

Week 05

102

Week 11

60

Week 06

104

Week 12

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PARLIAMENT STATION AND THE SOUL-LESS BEINGS.

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WEEK 01 My Favourite Building - Parliament Station and the Dualities of Love and Hate. John Cacioppo: The lethalities of Loneliness and Johanne Hari: Lost Connections Date: 30 Aug 2019

W

hat interests me most about Parliament station is the interconnectivity of underground loops and the labyrinth-like experience when travelling through it. The loops disregard the grid of the city and leaves you confused, altering your sense of vertigo when passing through either 3 of the openings. The station is very dismissive in terms of its size and location when first perceiving it. I love it because of the many loops, tunnels and depth of the escalators; how it feels like a journey each time I visit, but also hate it when I approach it during the usual work/peak hours of 9am and 5pm. I am constantly reminded that I live in a machine, enslaved by the capitalist society. Throughout this subject I want to investigate loneliness, depression and anxiety in the world we live in today. In Johanne Hari’s book, “Lost Connections”, he discusses how humans evolved to be in a tribe, and for the first time in 2 million years we're disbanding the tribe through technology and architecture. He claims that we didn’t evolve to talk through screens and that we have an innate need to be seen and felt in presence. Additionally, John Cacioppo explores concepts of addiction and the lethality of loneliness in regards to junk values. These concepts were interweaved into Lost Connections, investigating society’s dependency on the chase for happiness. I

admit, I went through a phase where I was addicted to MMORPG games. Realising now that really it is a hollow version of the things we used get in society - sense of a tribe, movement, status and a sense that we're good at something. The internet actually parodies a lot of the things we've lost and there has been an increase in junk values. We live in a machine that is designed to get us to neglect what is important in life. A hurricane of messages that suggest that consumerism is the answer to our invented wants. The image is concerned with the effects of tunnel vision, and realisation that everyone, regardless of status, is a part of a continuously disbanding tribe. It explores the feeling of journey, but never reaching the end goal or, in fact, the end goal being a never ending journey in itself, with constant messages on either side of us about capitalist ideals, diverging our attention away from what really matters in life. Each escalator is so narrow, only comfortably accommodating one person at a time, much like how most of our lives are spent alone today. We move in parallel with one another other, but never intersect in a meaningful way. This spontaneous intersection and small gestures of interaction with one another are a reminder that we are not alone.

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WEEK 02 World of the Book - The Reading Room. Cj Lim: Inhabitable Infrastructures: Science Fiction Or Urban Future? Date: 06 Aug 2019

THE CITY OF OBLIVION BY BRADNER BUCKNER.

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he reading room is a private space, free from prying eyes and the needs of others. A space where concerns and obligations could melt away, and for once your imagination can be truly lost within the books. A hideout. The book that I selected from the World of the Book exhibition in the Melbourne State Library is a compilation of stories denoting a science fiction fantasy. These stories are: Wanted 7 fearless engineers, The deadly slime. The city that walked, The city of oblivion, World without death, The whistling death As one reads these stories, they are reduced to a state of phantasmal hallucinations, morphing one story to the next, and the reading room facilitates this. A reading room isn't necessarily a room, it is also

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a state of mind. In a sense, these lucid daydreams may overcome the form of the space. Gaston Blanchard mentions that “daydreams feeds on all kinds of sight, but through a sort of natural inclination, it contemplates grandeur”. It is inferred that the act of daydreaming transports the dreamer outside of the immediate world. To the world that bears the mark of the infinite. “Day-dreaming from the very first second is entirely constituted state. We do not see it start, yet it always starts the same way, that is, it flees the objects nearby and right away it is far off, elsewhere”. Blanchard expresses that we cannot enforce a day dream, however, a sense of immensity and a lack of visual and audio distractions can facilitate this state of imagination. I seek to create a space that induces these fleeting moments, but how?


I instinctively chose a science fiction book due to my unconditional curiosity to the genre. CJ Lim explores this subject through his book "Inhabitable Infrastructures: Science Fiction or Urban Future?". He asserts that science fiction is prophetic. Its utopian visions have often predicted the future, as much as representing a past that was never possible. Imaginative science fiction often predates modern technology and cities. It always holds a mirror to the present, taking the notion “if this goes on...” As its starting point. It questions how humanity adapts and the process of change threatens us more radically than what

we’re doing now to a natural environment we entirely depend on. It is often used to comment on the failings of the real world. In regards to daydreaming and science fiction, my collage of the photograph explores NOT the reading room, but the mind of who is experiencing this space. The reader is absorbed into the City of Oblivion. Words cover the scene; clues of characters are extracted from the chapter coverings and morphed into the characters described in the tale. The reader attempts to knit a still.

MIND OF OBLIVION.

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WEEK 03 This American Life: The Room of Requirement.

THE ROOM OF REQUIREMENT

Date: 13 Aug 2019

The room of requirement explores the notion that what we want, is not necessarily what we need, and what we need, may present itself when we stop thinking about what we want. But is what we want, actually what we need and we don’t really need anything so we actually don’t want anything but something to do. blah. blah. blah.

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T

he podcast chapter: The Room of Requirement, discussed in This American Life, explores the flexibility of the library typology. The podcast argues that the library facilitates all kinds of interactions, whether it be secret meets between separated families or an archive of unpublished books. In the third segment, it discusses the Library as sortv'e a second home for the less fortunate. Not discussed thoroughly enough in architecure is the program of people who play a vital role in the buildings, such as the librarian, rather than just the visitor in a library. TAKING WORDS FROM EXISTING TEXTS TO DESCRIBE THE LANDSCAPES

The Quiet Helper

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he collage explores the notion of The Room of Requirement, by sampling words to describe a story and compose a scene depicting the role of a librarian to every member of the public as an equal.

SILENT SANCTUARY

The Library thus becomes a sanctuary of knowledge and comfort. It connects people to the community and the extended world of information something that is unattainable by the internet itself. The collage represents a young girl escaping the troubles of her everyday life, away from the bustling noise and destruction of the city, into the arms of the librarian.

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ASSIGNMENT 01 Date: 12 Aug 2019

The Concrete and the Abstract

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252

Jewish Museum

The term diagram for this assignment has been fraudulently used for means of the post justification of a projects intellectual grounds - namely, the essence of a project. To diagram and explore the dualities of a library as its essence is merely preposterous as I think every building has a dualitiy if there is a geometry regardless of its intentions. The notion that a diagram should only be an abstracted floor plan or section is also fundementally fraud. Take for instance the KAIT. Why couldn’t I diagram a perspective if the intention of the building was to create ambiguous boundaries through personal perceptions? Anyway, [ REDACTED ] assignment, [ REDACTED ] diagrams

25. Jewish Museum, unfolded. The trace of the voids, highlighted in red, retains the zigzagging form of the actual plan.

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Jewish Museum

10 CANONICAL BUILDINGS, PETER EISENMAN

Jewish Museum, unfolded. The trace of the voids, highlighted in red, retains the zigzagging form of the actual plan. Rather than representing diagrams as just 2 dimensional plans and sections, I wanted to explore them in 3d.

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63

90 29°

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80 40 67°


STUDIO DELTA 12.08.2019

• Columns used as a method to define boundaries of space as a field. The zones work together to form a synthetic totality as the columns relate to each other by comparison with length, width and rotations. • An ambiguous, landscape-like architecture dissolves the structural grid - concealed from users so that users can discover new modes of usage. • Impact of high dense columns is mitigated through making them extremely thin like abstract lines.

80 30 40°

28 140 270°

KANAGAWA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY WORKSHOP / JUNYA ISHIGAMI STUDIO

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ETFE

NITROGEN FOG

14.5m

BIOLUMINISCENT PAINT

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STUDIO DELTA 12.08.2019

• Ultra-pragmatic design - basic form that responds effectively to the climate of Barcelona through facade systems as well as allows for flexible usage through structural systems. • Parameterised modular building where everything is interrelated and linked with maximum flexibility. • Stripping architecture back to its basic needs; the shelter.

44m

38m

MEDIA-TIC / ENRIC RUIZ GELI STUDIO

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800-000 600-000 400-000 200-000 000-000

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STUDIO DELTA 12.08.2019

• Programmatic clusters arranged into spatial compartments dedicated to specific duties as a stack from whos evolution could be predicted (at the bottom) and those that cannot be predicted (at the top). • Very large in the city - floor plates are transposed leaving an implied position, causing tension between the new explicit position and the old implicit position in which new spaces are created. • Simple but encompasses the current library’s needs and future changes.

999-999 700-000 500-000 300-000 100-000

SEATTLE CENTRAL LIBRARY / OMA + LMN STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA 12.08.2019

• Continuous spiralling bookshelf insinuates constant growth of human knowledge. Breaks away edges and proportions through inherent quality of organisation. • Searchability - rational premeditated positions of the bookshelves allows fast access to search. • Strollability - spontaneous self-initiated routes induced by the maze-like interiors. • Ambient closure increases awareness of position by multiple use of reference through the frames. Builds up completeness from interlocked units by transparency of relationships with the thresholds.

USASHINO ART UNIVERSITY MUSEUM & LIBRARY / SOU FUJIMOTO ARCHITECT STUDIO

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ɒv ˈlæŋgwɪʤɪ tɪks z ɛ θ iːsˈ

22°16'40.1"N 34°55'06.9"E

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STUDIO DELTA 12.08.2019

• Circular form “recall the cyclical nature of knowledge, fluid throughout time” and to reflect the circular layout of the alexandrian harbor. • The tilting disk descends into the earth where the past metaphorically resides and ascends towards the future where the future lies. Tie together history and the future in which does not exists as the present. • Responds to context such as history, materiality and the urban surrounding.

BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA / SNØHETTA STUDIO

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WEEK 04 Abstract to Concrete - Gaston Blanchard: The Poetics of Space Date: 20 Aug 2019

THE DIALECTS OF INSIDE AND OUTSIDE, THE INFINITE

M

y exploration of the Musashino Library by Sou Fujimoto explores the infinite and framing. However, I wanted to further investigate the dualities of outside and inside, as Fujimoto describes the building as a forest. Gaston Blanchard’s “The Poetics of Space” explores this duality in one chapter. He claims that “outside and inside form a dialect of division, the obvious geometry of which binds us as soon as we bring it into play in metaphorical domains”, in which was discussed in my analysis of

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the precedent studies. The dialects of here and there has been promoted to the rank of absolutism, according to which these unfortunate adverts of place are endowed with unsupervised powers of ontological determination. The Musashino Library is comparable to Blanchard’s explanation of a spiral - circuitous, roundabout, recurrent; a chaplet of sojourning’s a refraine with endless verses. Experiencing a building like a book, rather than just the organizational system bestowed by the Dewey numbers is


PUSH ME TO THE EDGE, ALL MY FRIENDS ARE DEAD.

investigated in this week’s journal. Inside and outside, as experienced by the imagination investigated in week 02 can no longer be taken in their simple reciprocity, consequently, by omitting geometrical references. By choosing to be more concrete, I realise that the dialects of inside and outside multiply countless diversified nuances. Blanchard writes that outside and inside are both intimate - they are always ready to be reversed to exchange their hostility. The centre of being there wavers and trembles, intimate space loses its clarity while exterior space loses its void, void being the raw material of possibility of being. Using a void as a means of flexibility and immensity becomes incredibly lazy. The last collage taken from The City of Oblivion is a composition of a square. The corner is a

haven that ensures us one of the things we prize most highly - immobility. It is a half box, part walls, part doors, serving as a dialect of inside and outside. Blanchard insinuates that Consciousness of being at peace in one's corner produces a sense of immobility, and this, in turn, radiates immobility. An imaginary room rises around our bodies, which think that they are well hidden when we take refuge in a corner. Already, the shadows are walls, a piece of furniture constitutes a barrier, hangings are a roof. But all these images are over-imagined. So we have to designate the space of our immobility by making it in the space of our being. It is said that people are more comfortable being beside an edge or a wall. My composition depicts these corners and edges, harboring programs inside and outside the library

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ASSIGNMENT 02 Date: 02 Sep 2019

The Concrete and the Abstract

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This assignment explores the iterative process of design. I was mainly inspired by the Musashino Library due to its ambiguous space and its suggestive transparency. It implies a spatial order concurrently with its effects on awareness of position via multiple use of references to the frames and portals. I wanted to explore framing and a notion of the journey by first setting some rules such as perforation, levels and enclosure. I later realised that I wanted to further explore the spiral system as a means of programme and circulation. I investigated the system’s effects on spatial awareness: Increasing/decreasing awareness of position by multiple use of reference to the bookshelves.

“A spiral is a curve which emenates from a point, moving farther away as it revolves around that point”

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02.09.19

• EACH ITERATION WILL INVESTIGATE THE SPIRAL ORGANISATIONAL SYSTEM’S EFFECTS ON SPATIAL AWARENESS: INCREASING/DECREASING AWARENESS OF POSITION BY MULTIPLE USE OF REFERENCE TO THE BOOKSHELVES.

• THE SPIRALS WILL BEGIN WITH LESS PERFORATION AND EXPAND IN GAP AND DECREASE IN “TREES/BOOKSHELF” SIZE AS IT MOVES OUTWARDS. FRAME MAKING IS USED AS AN IDENTIFICATION OF PLACE IN REGARDS TO SPATIAL AWARENESS REFERENCES. • THE SPIRAL PLANE WILL START AT GROUND FLOOR AND MOVE UPWARDS IN A CONTINUOUS FLOOR PLATE, ACTING AS A SORT OF “TREE TRUNK” FOR THE CATWALKS (BRANCHES) THAT ARE HENCE CREATED FROM BOTH THE EFFECTS OF THE PERFORRATION AND THE SPIRAL TYPE. • THE GRADATION OF LAYERS CREATED DUE THE NATURE OF THE GROWING SPIRAL WILL GENERALLY HAVE A TALLER OUTER SHELL ENCOMPASSING THE INTERNALS. THIS CREATES DIFFUSED LIGHTING AS WELL AS A TERRACING/VALLEY EFFECT.

THE RULES STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA 02.09.19

“ONE WAY SPIRAL” STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA

• Continuing with a regular spiral with variable notches in angles, this iteration follows all the rules set. • This creates a single circulation flow towards the top that can be interrupted with various catwalks creating a seamless landscape-like architecture of the forest and valley. I imagine these catwalks to be moveable, and hence not modeled. • At ground level, it is unobstructed by walls, rather, it would be a free space for the public to make programs with, entering at one inferred entry area, or can be absorbed by the large gaps created by the perforations on the outer layer much like how you would enter a forest.

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STUDIO DELTA 02.09.19

“INTERSECTING SPIRAL” STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA

• This iteration also investigates the single spiral, however it is self intersecting, creating more “stable” bookshelves covering (bookshelves that do not require catwalks to access them). • It hence creates views at multiple levels as the users can peer up and around, as if in a jungle of tree houses and experience unexpected encounters due to the mazelike route. • This iteration breaks away from the “shell” rule as some areas are terraced outside of the main structure, creating a layering effect that can be seen from the outside, rather than needing to be felt when finally inside. This hence creates optimal views outside of the library.

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STUDIO DELTA 02.09.19

“TWO-WAY SPIRAL” STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA

• The two-way spiral infers a simultaneous conception from 2 directions. • The focal point is located at the central bottom as the two spiral arms lead away from it. this creates a sense of an amphitheatre. • Unlike the single spiral in which is different on all levels, the two-way spiral has duplicate levels, thus creating more efficient catwalks in that they could potentially be parallel to each direction of the spiral. • This iteration has the most obstructing views due to its levels, thus can potentially interrupt the ambience of the enclosure given the intensity of bookshelf organisation. These obstructions create a tightness which may induce a feeling of claustrophobia.

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STUDIO DELTA 02.09.19

“ROTATIONS AS THE SPIRAL” STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA

• Rectangles are turned around the centre at 10 degrees and compressed so that the corners align to form 4 spiral arms. • Unlike the conventional spiral types, this iteration does not have a singular circulation route. One is not lead through the library by the direction of the bookshelves induced by the spiral, instead it can only be perceived at birds eye. • This iteration hence has defined boundaries, and literal “layers” that implies a spatial order and hierarchy within the spatial organisation. Visitors are lead away from the centre rather than towards the centre, creating a language that does not conform to the organisation of the spiral. • When experiencing these spaces, there is a sense of openness and tightness on each layer due to the rotation of the rectangles. This accommodates both intimate and open programmes.

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STUDIO DELTA 02.09.19

“DOUBLE SPIRAL” STUDIO

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STUDIO DELTA

• The double spiral decentralises the library and creates two separate focal areas, connected by the experience of the ground and the roof level. • This hence creates two potential programmed areas such as public vs private, unlike much of the iterations that remain as shared ambiguous space. • The immediate frame when entering either entry points at ground work together to form a synthetic totality as the pairs relate to each other due to its connection at the centre of the form and the angle of the immediate internal spiral.

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ForSt pieuse, forit bris^e oil Von n’enlive pas les morts Infiniment fermie, serrie de vieilles tiges droites roses Infiniment resserrie en plus vieux et gris fardes Sur la couche de mousse inorme et profonde en cri de velours

(Pious forest, shattered forest, where the dead are left lying Infinitely closed, dense with pinkish straight old stems Infinitely serried, older and grayed On the vast, deep, mossy bed, a velvet cry.) - Pierre-Jean Jouve

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WEEK 05 A Tale of Two Thoughts - As Far as the Eye can See, Gordon Bennett, 1993 Date: 27 Aug 2019

T

ERRA NULLIUS /ˌtɛrə ˈnʌlɪəs/ noun

Land that is legally deemed to be unoccupied or uninhabited. In Australia the question of whether British colonizers had regarded the continent as terra nullius at the time of the original settlement, and, if so, whether this was a proper designation, was at the centre of several important legal cases in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Terra Nullius (Teaching Aid) As Far As The Eye Can See by Gordon Bennett explores the topic of Terra Nullius for the Indigenous Australians. Gordon Bennett rejected racial stereotypes and freed himself from being categorised as an Indigenous artist by creating an ongoing pop art inspired alter ego, John Citizen, who he considered to be ‘an abstraction of the Australian Mr Average, the Australian Everyman’. The artwork depicts the calm and orderly task of ‘looking’. However, represented in the painting masked more violent and protracted encounter between Indigenous Australians and colonists that resulted in profound acts of dispossession, juxtaposed by the more colourful left side. Bennet says,

“The dominant myth of Australia was the history of exploration and colonisation,”. “The spirit of the explorer, the pioneer, and the settler was a spirit all Australians could share in. Such was the unproblematic sense of national identity I was taught to believe in. This Australian identity that so effectively colonised my mind and body was presumed to be a white experience; informed as it was by the colonial diaspora of an essentially western culture. Aborigines caught in this system of representation remain ‘frozen’ as objects within the mapped territory of a European perceptual grid.” This is hence represented in his painting of grid lines and viewlines, juxtaposed by eratic paint dripping naturally over the settler. Bennet's styalised painting highlights multiple elements by connecting them with lines, providing the impression of first person perspective. My design would be a place of retreat, given the porosity of the form. In my collage, I highlighted depth through the model and the sight lines to multiple cues. There are hidden areas where people can find santuary, and lit areas where they become exposed to one another.

STUDIO

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PERPETUAL MOTION

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WEEK 06 A Tale of Two Thoughts - Perpetual Motion Machine Date: 3 Sep 2019

MIRROR

Forests, especially with the mystery of their space prolonged indefinitely beyond the veil of tree trunks and leaves, space that is veiled for our eyes but transparent to actions are veritable psychological transcendents. - Marcault & Therese Brosse

F

ollowing the analysis of Bennet's "As Far as the Eye Can See", I chose another of his artwork - Perpetual Motion Machine. This highly political painting follows the latter artwork in that it villainises a particular demographic of people. I attempted to merge the two

paintings together into my model. I highlighted hidden areas and shown areas of the model using motifs from the painting. By simply overlaying and cropping, I hope to portray an image that reflects Bennett's depiction of society.

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WEEK 07 Context Models, China Town is a Palimpsest - Radical Reconstruction Lebbeus Woods Date: 10 Sep 2019

THE SITE CONTEXT

T

he unique architecture of China Town attempts to preserve chinese culture as well as mid century western architecture. This culture is maintained at the expense of creativity, whereby chinese culture morphes in order to suit the western needs. Lebbeus Woods wrote "Through the predictable entertainment of movies by which the world's growing number of consumers feel the are in touch with themselves and one another, and by the fashions in everything from clothing to buildings, which give a reassuring inclusion of cultural unity and vitality, consumers are encouraged

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to supress their inherent differences and conform." He insists that the complexity of buildings and streets built up over time can never be replaced. The attempt at replacement serves, in the end, only the interest of the decreipt hierarchies, struggling to legitimise themselves finally through sentimentality and nostalgia, a demagoguery that is all too conforming and appealing to people struggling to recover from the tradegy of profound personal and cultural causes. Much like a palimpsest of cultural identities, China Town holds a very unique position in the Melbourne CBD.


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FRAGMENTATION OF EXISTING BUILDINGS

In this weeks exercise I've remodelled China Town and fragmented the existing building in the site. In the spaces voided by this fragmentation, new structures can be injected. They create more voids, but do not fit exactly in the voids, but exists as spaces within spaces, making no attempt to reconcile the gap between two radically different systems of spatial order and thought. These gaps can only be filled in time. The new structures contain free spaces, the forms of which do not invite occupation with the old paraphernalia of giving. they are difficult to occupy nd require inventiveness, in order to become habitable.


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STUDIO

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ASSIGNMENT 03A Date: 23 Sep 2019

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The Public Library


STUDIO

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We avoid walking in the middle of the street, even if it causes discomfort

118-140 Lt Bou 68 | L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019

Who would go to smelly, tight Chinatown to find peaceful reading, if the state library ex


ways, fastests routes or safe checkpoints. It seems as though everything is about efficiency and independence.

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urke Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

xists in an easily navigatable location, large, with a historical presence?

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SOUTH-EAST ISOMETRIC 70 | L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


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Architecture, as art, makes us aware of our fundamental solitude. At the same time, architecture detaches us from the present and allows us to experience the slow, firm flow of time and tradition. - Juhani Pallasama

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PUBLIC SPHERE - ANONYMOUS GIVE/TAKE IN UNCONDITIONED SPACE 74 | L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


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FRAMES AND VIEWS - FORMING DESTINATION POINTS 76 | L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


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The importance of imagination is highlighted in this library. “Imaginative science fiction often holds a mirror to the present, taking the notion ‘if this goes on’ as its starting point. It questions how humanity adapts and how no process of change threatens us more radically than what we are doing now to a natural environment we entirely depend on. It is often used to comment on the failings of the real world.” -CJ Lim

NONSENSICAL MIRROR - EXPLORATION AND WONDER 78 | L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


STUDIO DELTA 23.09.19 The Paradox of Anonyminity The more people you put together, the more lonely and distant they feel. The paradox, along with the proliferation of social networks created a new quality of society - The Invisible. Everyone lives their own lives, and walks their own paths. Walls and corners provide sanctuary. Portals and frames provide connections.

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Abstracted facades creates a sense of familiarity through portals and frames. Mirrored at ground level, it also creates a sense of immensity when experienced from underground.

Existing buildings fragmented and displaced creates pockets of immediate private space such as for office or amenity.

Other private spaces can be discovered by users through exploration due to the rotating form. Relation to site creates a sense of familiarity. Having smaller buildings in a large building encourages comfortability.

Note: The walls and facades have built-in bookshelves, much like Sou Fujimoto’s Musashino Library. Each layer of walls coincides with the dewey decimal system for easy navigation. Areas that are too high or low for the public to reach act as the book depository (archival system) accessible only by librarians. 80 | L.CHEA 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


h

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Continuous levels encourage exploration in users, allowing them to experience most of the building just by moving from one space to the another.

Catwalks are utilised as “shortcuts�. It breaks away from the continuous floorplates and allows users to have freedom in their movement.

The design investigates complexity (circulation), cohesiveness (rotation of the rectangle), mystery (portals and frames) and legibility (continuous ramping level and organisation of books in relation to form) throughout the library. To balance exploration and understanding to retain visitors, in particular the introverted or the lonely, views become important. It creates a sense of destination. When one sees a void, they want to move up or down to experience it from different spaces.

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UP

VOID

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Ground Floor Plan 1:500

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• All bookshelves on this level are purely community run. Any member of the public can place or take books and artefacts. • It is completely unconditioned space, integrating the two laneways and creating an extra walkway to the north. This indoor-outdoor relationship reactivates the laneways currently designated to cars. The public can take back the lost space generally vacant for automobiles. • Each visitor can create their own routes through the library from the outside, creating a sense of anonymity due to the complexity of the potential circulation routes. • The layers and frames create an experience of the rather anxious impression of going deeper into a limitless world. There is a hidden grandeur of depth.

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700 600 300 200 999 800 500 400 VOID

VOID

First Floor Plan 1:500

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• Dewey decimal system begins from the internal walls and moves up and down the building, excluding the ground floor. • The library disregards the sense of “efficiency” that society desires. To retrieve a book, one must walk through the building, and may take solace in the movement when observing the library. We must remember to pause; breathe. Why rush? This library is secondary to the State Library, it cannot compete in the same way. • Unexpected encounters with people, artefacts and books become a regular occurrence for visitors. • The walls do not simply separate spaces, rather, it defines spaces within themselves: the “in between” zones. Visitors are urged to take initiative to occupy these spaces.

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Section 1:500

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Upright Non-Fiction

• Why should a library feel like a library? • The urbanscape of facades and fragments of existing buildings creates multiple views throughout the library. These areas do not necessarily invite occupation with the old paraphernalia of the reading room and public sphere. It is difficult to occupy and require inventiveness in order to become habitable. • Due to the mirrored nature of the basement levels, placing water at the bottom create an effect with light and atmosphere via reflection of the sky. The sense of immensity may induce day dreams and imaginations. The unexpected water pool may encourage users to visit the basement levels. • The mirrored basement is the location of the sciencefiction books, and its organisation in terms to the dewey decimal system. It is what is referred to as “The Upside Down”

Middle Ground Mixed/Unpublished Upside Down Science-Fiction

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Iteration 1: No Context - Assignment 2, cropped and stretched to site conditions. Note: Catwalks and the upside down are left unmodelled. The floor plates used in this iteration are inferred for the next two iterations.

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• The structure placed without context sticks out like a sore thumb, and may actually discourage timid people from entering through curiousity. • I wanted to continue my exploration with the forest, however it became too difficult to prescribe program due to it’s ambiguity. I wanted to avoid using the “void” as a means of flexibility.

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Iteration 2: Consideration of existing buildings as separated areas and facade extraction for wall permeability Note: Floor plates, Catwalks and the upside down are left unmodelled. Refer to Iteration 1 for floor plates.

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• Instead of taking directly from the Musashino Library, I used the existing facades as a means of portals and frames. In this way, there is more control of which frames can be moved through and which can’t. The familiarity of these facades may encourage people to visit the library. • The reason behind extracting the facades of the existing buildings is sort of a mockery against fetishization of heritage facades, particularly in the superficial culture hub - China town. • I had also placed the existing building as it is. This creates a clear division from ambiguous space and controlled space; however, its maintenance is at the expense of my creativity.

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Iteration 3: Existing buildings and facades fragmented and displaced to create unusual views and private soaces. Note: Floor plates, Catwalks and the upside down are left unmodelled. Refer to Iteration 1 for floor plates.

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• Fragmenting both the facades and the existing buildings enabled me to control private and public spaces. This iteration ended up being the one proposed due to its flexibility.

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Equal Separated Levels Floor Plate Iteration: Study of light effects and circulation routes.

Continuous Levels

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• Lighting conditions were explored when deciding the nature of the floor plates as well as to interrogate the basement experience. • Having the floors disconnected created “duplicate” floors. I wanted every floor to be a different experience. • Continuous floors created the individuality I wanted, however, comfort may be an issue as it is difficult to walk, stand, sit on slanted floors for too long. Perhaps integrated furniture is required. • Intersectiong floors created interesting spaces, however, much of the spaces become uninhabitable.

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WEEK 08

The entry asked us to document a journey from any location outside of the new academic street to the library. I

by the building. Peter Corrigan's style is rather POMO and maze-like, capturing interesting portals and fr

avoid the library at first, however this proved difficult. Highlighted in red are the visual cues directing the vi

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isitor to any particular direction. I found myself at dead ends and open spaces before landing into the library.

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Date: 23 Sep 2019

rames throughout the building. I was intrigued by the multiple circulation routes possible and attempted to

New Academic Street RMIT University

I decided to take a rather convoluted route towards the library, by utilising the wayfinding techniques employed

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WEEK 09

SECATIBE RUNTUM EARUM SINCILLA VELENIMUS AUTA NOBIT RAECUS DI OMNIET

New Academic Street RMIT University and My Library Date: 30 Sep 2019

Taking precedent by visiting another building is important in my conception of ideas. Analysing a building through 3rd person, mainly via internet research removes the sense of human scale. Some buildings look great in pictures but are not conceived well in person. A key example would be the KAIT, analysed earlier in the semester. Many people who use the space dislike it due to its detachment from human comfort, such as glare and temperature.

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Techniques

T

he building around and along the RMIT New Academic Street is like my library in that it frames many views but allows for private and public spaces. Study and programmed areas are interweaved by circulation paths that are curated to create these juxtaposition of spaces. The building is much like a labyrinth, in that you can take multiple circulation routes to reach the same destinations. My building however has a rather distinct circulation route that is punctured by catwalks. I hope to create these framed views in my library by taking precedent of Corrigan’s techniques.

SECATIBE RUNTUM EARUM SINCILLA VELENIMUS AUTA NOBIT RAECUS DI OMNIET

Additionally, Corrigan’s use of light, colour and materials separates rooms without the use of walls. I find this an interesting technique as it creates a sense of openness without impeding on one’s sense of personal space and awareness of position, mainly investigated in assignment 02. My collage of one of my model explores the possibility of separating spaces without the clear distinction of a wall. I wanted to create a sense of a “mini city” through a portal view so that the visitor can connect spaces through visual and tectonic cues inviting curiosity and exploration. This innate need to explore therefore reconnects the individual to the outside world, exposing them to people and program. In this way I hope to mitigate the feeling of loneliness and anxiety, by making the user feel comfortable being uncomfortable in an unknown space.

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WEEK 10 Questions of Perception: The Phenomenology of Architecture - Steven Holl, Juhani Pallasmaa, Alberto Perez-Gomez Date: 07 Oct 2019

P

henomenology provides the foundation of our perceptual experience to extend understanding and meanings. Our perception of the world focuses on quantities and surface characteristics, such as how many new things we can take in a day, how to do things more efficiently, how much more information can we skim through and how many new places we could go to entertain ourselves as thoroughly discussed by Johanne Hari and John Cacciopo. Architecture hence delivers a pure reflection of the development of society. People seek excitement from superficial surfaces, facades; thus, buildings are emotionless products of mass production. I want to draw attention to architecture that convey meaning in an unconscious manner through my reapproprition of the existing facades and book shelves.

"if architecture is to transcend its physical condition, its function as mere shelter, then its meaning, like interior space, must occupy equivalent space within language. Written language might, then, assume the silent intensities of architecture". Holl dissects the whole into partial perceptions, in order to understand it in a systematic and organised way. Perception in architecture is "the merging of object and field; the incomplete perception; colour, light and shadow; spatiality of night, time duration and perception, water; sound; detail; proportion, scale and perception; site circumstance and idea. These are hence revealed in the matter of experience. Understanding the phenomenon of a space requires external and internal engagements; in other words, feeling and thinking.

THROUGH THE CATWALKS

THE SHADOWS

Without explanations, I created these stills Steven Holl questioned the relationship of my library to convey these ideas. I hope to between architecture and perception "can invoke some sort of feeling, whatever it is. we see through the world into built form?".

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THE MIRROR

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WEEK 11 Date: 14 Oct 2019

Colours and Mood - Scenic_Simpsons

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he Simpsons Technicolour world represented in scenic_simpsons is analysed. The Springfield aficionado captures the esoteric colours, cropped stills of things and landscapes mirror the mundane and insignificant aspects of our own lives, those things that when we stop to notice are beautiful. Viewed together as a grid, these scenes reveal the pink and purple dreaminess and bold lined aesthetic that characterises the world of Springfield. I wanted to explore the aesthetics of banality in my representation of the library. I took the facades of the original buildings, in which are the opposite to

"THE PUBLIC DOMAIN"

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the banality we conceive from modern/ contemporary concrete forests and reduced the ornamentation. In doing so, I created a new function to the facade as oppose as to sitting there and being pretty, it contained books and spaces to occupy. Although the use of colour is very much ocular-centric, it helps those who can see to navigate the space and find a sense of awareness in position. I initially wanted to have the entire building constructed out of wood like a forest, however after thorough investigation, I realised it is beneficial to my concept to mix materials. What if I approached materiality like Wang Shu and collided recycled bricks together as a form of materiality and colour?

"THE OTHER PUBLIC DOMAIN"


SCENIC_SIMPSONS INSTAGRAM ACCOUNT

Zoom in, it reveals an otherworldly artistic side of the technicolour world we thought we knew so well.

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ALL MODELS

STACKNG THE MODELS

BLENDING LAYERS

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Vertical Accumulation Palimpsest is a concept that is used to understand chronologically the morphological composition of a city from its current layout. Initially the concept was used to understand a manuscript or piece of writing material on which later writing has been superimposed on effaced earlier writing. China Town is a palimpsest in that the culture that is superimposed in the laneway is stacked and overwrites the culture of mid to late 19th century architecture style. My projects explores this phenemonon through fragmentation and stacking as can be noted in the overall design and previous journal entries.

Overwriting Throughout the semester, multiple models were built for iterative purposes, each of them carrying qualities onto the succeeding models. Due to this, multiple models look very similar to one another, as with the phases of iteration. The references that made the usefulness of the concept for the Public Library harbour a series of components at the morphological level that defines its identity, in terms of portals and frames.

Interdependent Layers The final model itself is series of layers, interdependent of one another. It links each level from the basement to the sky as well as the partitions and boundaries. Each layer corresponding the to dewey decimal system for both science fiction and non fiction books.

WEEK 12 Dichotomy between the Stack and the Palimpsest Date: 21 Oct 2019

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ASSIGNMENT 03B Date: 21 Oct 2019

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The Public Library


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SCALE TO FIT

10째 20째 30째

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40째


CONCEPT DIAGRAM

180° 180°

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UP VOID

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118-140 LITTLE BOURKE STREET, VIC,3000 SITE PLAN

VOID

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Abstracted versions of the existing facades creates a sense of familiarity when considering the neighbouring buildings and it’s context in Chinatown. Its fragmentation and rotation provides clues of the internal conditions of the building. 112L.CHEA | 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


SOUTH EAST ISOMETRIC

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UP

B4

UP VOID

B3

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UP VOID

BELOW GROUND LEVELS 1:500

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UP VOID

L1

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VOID

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ABOVE GROUND LEVELS 1:500

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4

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LEGEND A

PUBLIC SPHERE 1

LANEWAY ACCESS

READING ROOM

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COWORKING SPACE

BOOK DEPOSITRY

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CAFE

PRIVATE SPACE

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TOILETS

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The more people you put together, the mor distant they feel. This paradox, along with social networks created a new quality of so ble. Everyone lives their own lives, and wa Walls and corners provide sanctuary. Port vide connections.


GROUND LEVEL 1:200 B 000

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re lonely and h the proliferation of ociety - The Invisialks their own paths. tals and frames pro-

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Continuous levels encourage exploration in users, allowing them to experience most of the building just by moving from one space to the another. Catwalks are utilised as “shortcuts�. It breaks away from the continuous floorplates and allows users to have freedom in their own movement as well as offering an alternative for the mobility impaired, to not need an elevator. Rather, a cart that facilitates the same benefits as the floor plates in regard to exploration. 120L.CHEA | 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


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UPRIGHT

NON-FICTION

MIDDLE GROUND MIXED/UNPUBLISHED

UPSIDE DOWN SCIENCE FICTION

SECTION A-A

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SECTIONS 1:500

SECTION B-B

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Existing buildings fragmented, rotated and displaced creates pockets of immediate private space. Other private spaces can be discovered by users through exploration due to the rotating form. 124L.CHEA | 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


SECTION PERSPECTIVE 1:200

SECTION C-C

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Approached at street level, the library invites people through its porosity of the facade and the activities that can be seen through these frames. The facade therefore acts as its own space for people to occupy when moving along Lt Bourke St. 126L.CHEA | 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


PERSPECTIVE A - STREET INTERFACE

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The layers and frames create an experience of the rather anxious impression of going deeper into a limitless world. There is a hidden grandeur of depth and a sense of immensity that encourages daydreaming. 128L.CHEA | 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


PERSPECTIVE B - PUBLIC SPHERE

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The urbanscape of facades and fragments of existing buildings creates multiple views throughout the library. These areas do not necessarily invite occupation with the old paraphernalia of the reading room and public sphere. It is difficult to occupy and require inventiveness in order to become habitable. 130L.CHEA | 913999, STUDIO 03, ASSIGNMENT 4, SM2, 2019


PERSPECTIVE C - EXPLORATIVE NATURE

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The map represents the expansion of the library, given the dewey system is constantly being added to. The organisational system the library promotes the dewey system to an architectural form, placing the science-fiction books underground as a metaphor of how imaginative science fiction holds a mirror to the present. Therefore, the axo represents its growth opportunities, stealing facades and fragmenting existing structures it swallows. In this alternate timeline, animals co-live on the rooftop of buildings and sterile lands.

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CONCEPT AXO - THE GROWTH OF THE LIBRARY IN A SCIENCE FICTION SPACE

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MODEL

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till next time, good bye.

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