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What can we do to ensure our children are ready for school? The EDI Can Pave the Way

In our hands is their future...


Every child is born That’s right! Children are born with billions of neurons just waiting... for stimulation, experiences, love and support. Babies’ brains develop at a tremendously rapid pace, forming thousands of connections with each and every taste, touch, smell, sight, and sound they experience, even prenatally. Those connections build upon each other and strengthen through interactions with families and caregivers. Positive and supportive environments guide their development and provide the foundation for future learning and well-being. Children are born ready to learn. They are eager to learn, explore, and try new things. “Getting ready for kindergarten” is fostered throughout a child’s early development and can be monitored and supported through the many developmental milestones that children reach.

Long before stepping into a kindergarten classroom, children are getting ready for kindergarten. Just after birth, after fingers and toes are counted, noticing what those fingers and toes can do is the first observation of a child’s fine and gross motor skills. These are just some milestones in physical health and well-being, one of five developmental domains. 0-3 Months

4-6 Months

7-9 Months

moves hands to mouth, lifts head, starts to grasp

rolls, reaches hands to play with feed, reaches for toys

sits without support, picks up objects, crawling

10-12 Months

walks independently, holds a crayon, points, drops and picks up toys

13-18 Months

pulls to stand, stands alone, claps hands, builds small towers, self-feeds


n a billionaire.

Age 2

runs, climbs, turns pages in a book, throws a ball, holds a crayon

Age 3

climbs on playground equipment, draws circles and lines, puts on clothes

Age 4

catches a ball with whole arms, hops on one foot, cuts lines and circles with scissors

Age 5

catches ball in hands only, draws recognizable pictures, prints some letters


Physical Health and Well-Being

Social Competence

Emotional Maturity

For example: holds a pen, crayon or paintbrush, manipulates objects, is overdressed/underdressed for school activities, is too tired or sick to do school work, has independent bathroom habits most of the time

For example: respects property of others, listens attentively and follows directions, curious about the world and eager to play, plays and works cooperatively with others, and shows self-confidence

For example: volunteers to help, is able to concentrate appropriately, is not upset/ anxious when dropped off, and invites others to join in play


The EDI helps identify ways we can strengthen our community to support early childhood development. The Early Development Instrument (EDI) is a population measure of child development and school readiness, which means that it collects information about kindergarten age children in participating geographic areas and creates an overall snapshot of their developmental progress. The EDI does not label or identify individual children with specific problems. Instead, it looks at how experiences at home and in the community can help prepare children to succeed in school.

Language and Cognitive Development

Communication Skills and General Knowledge

For example: identifies at least 10 letters of the alphabet, experiments with writing tools, writes his/her name in English, reads simple words, is interested in games involving numbers, counts to 20, recognizes numbers 1-10 and geometric shapes

For example: listens in English, communicates his/her needs to adults and peers, tells a story, articulates clearly, understands what is being said


The EDI reveals... In Spartanburg County, 47% of children are ready for school, meaning they are “on track” in all five domains of readiness.

EDI results are reported as the percentage of children who are developmentally “vulnerable,” “at-risk,” or “on track.” Distribution Across All Developmental Domains SPARTANBURG COUNTY

29%

25%

47% * not 100% due to rounding

NATIONAL CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

26%

26%

48%

Vulnerable

At Risk

at or below the 10th percentile

at or below the 25th percentile and above the 10th

On Track

above the 25th percentile

EDI maps provide a visual snapshot of childr represents the range of developemental vuln with lighter shading have a lower percentage higher percentage of developmentally vulner data to address needs identified within neigh


Vulnerabilities: One or More Domains

0% - 19% 20% - 25%

Lowest Proportion

26% - 32%

33% - 38%

39% or more

Highest Proportion

too few data

ren’s developmental status in different census tracts. The shading on the map nerabilities, below the 10th perctile in relation to the nationally normed scale. Areas e of developmentally vulnerable children, while areas wtih darker shaing have a rable children. Maps provide a context for data reflection and plans to use the hborhoods and communities.


Vulnerabilities: Physical Health and Well-being Domain

0% - 6% 7% - 11%

Lowest Proportion

12% -15%

16% - 20%

21% or more

Highest Proportion

too few data

SPARTANBURG COUNTY 11% 13%

76%

10% 13%

77%

NATIONAL CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

Vulnerable at or below the 10th percentile

At Risk

at or below the 25th percentile and above the 10th

On Track

above the 25th percentile


Vulnerabilities: Social Competence Domain

0% - 4% 5% - 8%

Lowest Proportion

9% - 12%

12% - 16%

17% or more

Highest Proportion

too few data

SPARTANBURG COUNTY

12% 16%

72%

NATIONAL CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

10% 15%

75%

Vulnerable at or below the 10th percentile

At Risk

at or below the 25th percentile and above the 10th

On Track

above the 25th percentile


Vulnerabilities: Emotional Maturity Domain

0% - 5% 6% - 9%

Lowest Proportion

10% -14%

15% - 18%

19% or more

Highest Proportion

too few data

SPARTANBURG COUNTY 11% 16% NATIONAL CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

9% 13%

Vulnerable at or below the 10th percentile

At Risk

at or below the 25th percentile and above the 10th

73% 78% On Track

above the 25th percentile


Vulnerabilities: Language and Cognitive Development Domain

0% - 4% 5% - 8%

Lowest Proportion

9% - 13%

14% - 17%

18% or more

Highest Proportion

too few data

SPARTANBURG COUNTY NATIONAL CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

14% 11%

Vulnerable at or below the 10th percentile

17% 18% At Risk

at or below the 25th percentile and above the 10th

68% 71% On Track

above the 25th percentile

* not 100% due to rounding


Vulnerabilities: Communication Skills and General Knowledge Domain

0% - 4% 5% - 8%

Lowest Proportion

9% - 12%

13% - 16%

17% or more

Highest Proportion

too few data

SPARTANBURG COUNTY NATIONAL CONVENIENCE SAMPLE

11% 17%

72%

11% 16%

73%

Vulnerable at or below the 10th percentile

At Risk

at or below the 25th percentile and above the 10th

On Track

above the 25th percentile


Physical Health and Well-being The EDI provides additional information about readiness by sub-domains.

31%

31% Physcial Health and Well-being

al Competence 16%22% 31% al Competence Physical independence

Readiness to explore new things Gross and fine motor skills 4%

Readiness to explore new things

54%

15% 15%

54% 84% 74% 54%

16%22% 4%

Physical readiness for al Competence 16% work 5% ReadinessApproaches to explore new things toschool learning

Social Competence

15%

Physical Health and Well-being

4% 15%22%

5%

al Competence Approaches learning Readiness totoexplore new 0% 15% Readiness to explore new things 4% 22%20% things 4 5%

33%

84% 74% 84% 95% 95%

74% 52%

33% 40% 60% 52%80% Emotional Maturity 95% 74% 0% 20% Emotional Maturity Not Ready40% Somewhat 60% Ready Ready80% Respect and responsibility 68%52% Approaches learning 10% Approaches to to learning 15% 22% 33% 0% 20% Not Ready 40% Somewhat60% Ready Ready80% Emotional Maturity Respect responsivility tive and inattentive behavior Respect and and responsibility 24% 15% 62% 68% Not Ready Somewhat Ready Ready Approaches to learning 10% 15% 22% 33% 52% Emotional Maturity tive and inattentive behavior 24% 15% 62% Overall socialwith competence all social competence peers 12% 43% 45% with peers 10% Respect and responsibility

22%

ctiveEmotional and inattentive behavior 7% 24% 15% Aggressive behavior 7% Maturity all social competence with peers 12% 43% Hyperactive and Respect and responsibility 10% 22% 15% ctive and inattentive behavior 40% 24% Aggressive behavior 7% 7%20% inattentive behavior0%

68% 85% 62% 45% 68% 60% 62% 80% 85%

Language and Cognitive Development 43%40% 85% 87% 60% Language and Cognitive Development Aggressive Anxiousbehavior and fearful 7% 7% 85% Anxious and fearful with behavior 87% all social competence peers 3% 12%11% Development 43% behavior Language and Cognitive Not Ready Ready Basic numeracy skills 76% 9% Ready 16%Somewhat 0% 20% 40%25%87% 60% Anxious and fearful behavior 3% 11% rosocial and helping 36% Prosocial and helping Language andskills Cognitive Development Basic numeracy 76% 16% 9%

Aggressive behavior Aggressive behavior 7% 7% 20% allAnxious social competence with peers 0% and fearful behavior 12%11% 3%

45% 80% 45%

80% 40%

100% 100% 100%

100%

100%

100%

behavior Anxious and fearful behavior 3% 11% 87% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Not Ready Somewhat Ready Ready osocial and helping behavior 36% 25% 40% 100% Language and Cognitive Skills Basic numeracy skills 76% 16% 5% 9% Advanced literacy skills 15% 80% 0% 20% 40% 80% 100% rosocial andnumeracy helping behavior 25% 60% 40% Basic numeracy skills 16% 36% Basic 76% 9% Advanced literacy skills skills 80% 15% 5% rosocial and helping behavior Not Ready Somewhat Ready Ready 36% 40% 20% Ready 40%25% 60% 80% 100% Not Ready Ready Advanced literacy skills0% Somewhat Advanced literacy skills 15% 80% 5% cy/numeracy and memory 70% 80% 12% 18% ommunication and Not Ready Somewhat Ready Ready 0%Skills 20% 40%General 60% 100% Interest in literacy/ Ready Somewhat Advanced literacy skills 80% 5% cy/numeracy andNot memory 70% 80% 12%Ready 18% 20% 40% Ready 60% 100% numeracy and memory0%15% Knowledge Not Ready Somewhat Ready Ready70% cy/numeracy 12% 18% 18% Basicmemory literacy skills 10% Basic and literacy skills Not Ready Somewhat Ready Ready73% cy/numeracy memory 70% Basic and literacy skills 12% 18% Communication and General 18% Knowledge 73% 10% on skills and general Communication skills and 20% 40% 80% 100% 39% 21% 60% Basic literacy skills 0% 73% 40% general knowledge 10% 18% owledge * may not add to 100% due to rounding 0% 20% 40%Ready 60% 80% 100% Not Readyskills Somewhat Ready Basic literacy 18% 73% 10% Ready Somewhat Not Ready 0% 20% 40%Ready 60% 80% 100% Ready 40% 0% 20% 60% 80% 100% Not Ready Somewhat Ready


Using the EDI... With this first ever comprehensive look into kindergarten readiness across our county, we see there is work to be done. The great news is that our community is ready, willing, and able to collectively and collaboratively drive action toward our ultimate goal: all children, ready for success in school. Now organizations, community leaders, and individuals have information key to answering vital questions and taking action:

Who can help spread awareness to build community interest for investing in young children from birth to kindergarten?

How can we strengthen coordination and alignment of services?

Where do we see strengths and needs among neighborhoods?

How can this information inform program and curriculum development?

Where can public and private funding be leveraged for the greatest impact?

How can this be used to create professional development opportuntities for those caring for young children... or in-home caregivers?

In our hands is their future...


for positive change

In their hands is ours.


About SAM: The Spartanburg Academic Movement is a collective impact initiative working across Spartanburg County to improve educational outcomes for all children, cradle-to-career.

About TECCS:

This local effort is part of a national initiative called Transforming Early Childhood Community Systems (TECCS). TECCS is a partnership with the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities and United Way Worldwide. TECCS uses EDI data to improve school readiness by providing accurate information about young children’s developmental progress that guides state, regional and local efforts to make effective improvements in early childhood systems. Since 2008, TECCS has spread to over seventy communities nationwide. Special thanks to the Mary Black Foundation and the South Carolina Block Grant for Education for providing significant funding for this project. Special thanks to the kindergarten teachers of Spartanburg County who completed the EDI surveys. This information about kindergarten readiness is available on SAM’s website, www.learnwithsam.org/kindergartensuccess Your organization can arrange for presentations regarding the EDI report and other areas of SAM’s work by contacting SAM at:

349 E. Main Street, Suite 101 Spartanburg, SC 29302 864.573.5804 learnwithsam.org

Profile for Spartanburg Academic Movement

2018 Spartanburg County EDI Results  

A first look at kindergarten readiness across Spartanburg County, SC.

2018 Spartanburg County EDI Results  

A first look at kindergarten readiness across Spartanburg County, SC.

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