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V ol . 1 2 5 • I s s . 2 6 0 • 1 8 Pa g e s

MONDAY NIGHT Liberal Band Festival PAGE 6A

SUNDAY

February 26, 2012

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I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History By JESSICA CRAWFORD • Leader & Times

Label Me Royalty is an organization which strives to provide positive examples of today’s African-American population. The I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History publications shed a very positive light on African Americans as individuals in an effort to bring confidence and pride to African American communities. I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History was given life through editor Emmanuel Brown. He founded the Label Me Royalty ideology in order to offer positive role models for African American people. “Label Me Royalty was established on Sept. 24, 2009, during a time when violent actions became the normal behavior for young people all over the country,” Brown noted in a summary of his purpose. “It was noticed that there was a need for solutions to the problem of negative behavior in black American communities instead of solutions to symptoms. “Label Me Royalty believed that the problem was the vision of younger generations, or the lack of it,” he explained. “The I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History anthology series started being published to provide alternative vision and to make young black Americans aware of options that they might not have known about in November of 2010. “I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History is not attempting to ignore the ills that plague our society,” he added. “We are simply putting emphasis on successful parts of it and the positive people that make up our communities.”

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K - S ta t e E x t e n s i o n A g e n t M i k e H a n s o n g e t s a h u g f r om R on n a S t u m p F r i d ay a ft e r n oo n at a r e c e p t io n f or hi m in t he Ex te nsi on o ff i ce. L&T photo/Robert Pierce

R I G H T : L a b e l M e R o y a l t y R e g i o n a l C o o r d i n a to r C h a n i t a M i t c h e l l i s f e a t u r e d i n th e f o u r t h v o l u m e o f I A m R oy a lt y : P r of il e s i n B la ck H i s t or y . A B O V E: D u r i n g t h e B l a c k H i s t o r y M o n t h T a s t e F e s t j u s t tw o w e e k s a g o , M i t c h e l l p r o v i d e d a b o o t h w i t h i n fo r m at i on a b ou t A f r i ca n A m e r i ca n h i s t or y a n d p e o p l e w h o a r e gi v i n g t h e A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n c o m m u n i te s a b r i g h t f u t u r e . “ I t i s u p t o u s i f i t w i l l b e p o s i t i v e o r n e g a ti v e , ” M i t ch e l l s h a r e d w i t h th e L e a d e r & T i me s . “ O u r h i s t o r y i s w o r t h l e a r n i n g , w e ca n ’ t h a v e a p r e s e n t a n d a f u t u r e w i th o u t a p a s t . Y o u h a v e to k n o w w h e r e y o u c o me f r o m t o k n o w w h e r e y o u a r e g oi ng . ” Courtesy photos

Mike Hanson says goodbye after 8 years By ROBERT PIERCE • Leader & Times Mike Hanson began working as an agent with the Seward County K-State Research and Extension office on Feb. 29, 2004, and on Wednesday – Feb. 29, 2012 – after eight years, he will say goodbye to the office on Stadium Avenue in Liberal. Hanson recently made the decision to go to work as the operations manager of four facilities for the Co-op

N See HANSON/Page 6A

Haskell Co. English students get history lesson on Olney’s Pancake race crash sends Liberal man to Wichita hospital By LARRY PHILLIPS • Leader & Times

• L&T staff report A Liberal man was severely injured Tuesday while on County Road 190 in Haskell County when he T-boned a vehicle five miles southwest of Copeland that had failed to stop. Mario Ortega, 32, of Liberal was driving a 2002 Chevrolet pickup eastbound on County Road 190 around 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, when a 1998 Ford F-700 driven by Elvis Emery Wilson, 67, of Montezuma, was southbound on County Road XX. Wilson failed to stop at the stop sign at the intersection, according to a Kansas Highway Patrol report. As Wilson drove into the roadway, Ortega broadsided the Ford on the driver’s side of the vehicle. Wilson was taken to Western Plains Regional Hospital in Dodge City for treatment of his injuries. Ortega was taken to Satanta District Hopital in Satanta but had to be airlifted to Via Christi Hospital in Wichita. The report noted both men were wearing safety restraints at the time of the incident.

Just a few miles south of Olney, England, sits the small village of Emberton. I’ve never met or known anyone from there, but it is the home of British Indy race car driver Dan Wheldon’s father and mother. That is also where his funeral services were conducted after his death a few months back in a racing crash in Las Vegas. Sunday morning in Olney had us walking about and with a visit to St. Peter and St. Paul Parish Church where Claire Wood is the Vicar. Unfortunately, the reverend was out of town with most of her 750-person flock on a retreat, according to organist John Witchell. Upon leaving the church and heading down Church Street, we ran across several adult women and eight children, the kids were all wearing aprons – boys and girls – and each had a skillet in their hand. When asked, one of the women said the children were students from Emberton and they were on a field trip learning about the Pancake Day Race. I told them who we were and where we were from. They were delighted, and one of the These students from Emberton, a small village south of Olney, are getting a hands-on lesson on the history of Olney’s Pancake Race on the Sunday prior teachers read them the part to Shrove Tuesday’s actual race. The “lit ’el” girl on the left and the “lit ’el” boy in the center are caught watching when the two other children take off about how Liberal, Kan., in the on the “Go” signal from the teacher, right. L&T photo/Larry Phillips U.S.A. had started racing the women of Olney in 1950.

N See KIDS/Page 3A

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S U N DAY Feb. 26 Page 1B

Sports HIGH PLAINS

ZONE

hollow loss

STAYIN’ ALIVE Hooker Bulldogs drop a heartbreaker by one point before rebounding to stay alive in area tournament. 3B

Win or loss at Dodge meant nothing in league, Sub-state standings

The Forgan Bulldogs dominated the competition on the road back to the state tournament. 2B DeVondre Livingston puts in a basket against Garden City earlier this week. Friday, the Redskins traveled to Dodge City and ended their five-game winning streak with a loss to the Red Demons in the regular seaosn finale, but the late-season surge moved Liberla into third place in the Sub-State pairings, and Liberal will host a first-round playoff game Wednesday. L&T photo/Earl Watt

Despite Redskin loss, Liberal earns third spot in Sub-State By EARL WATT • Leader &Times

The Lady Redskins had one last chance to get a WAC win Friday against Dodge City. 2B

BOYS

Dodge Garden Liberal Great Bend Hays

W 7 6 4 2 1

L 1 2 4 6 7

Hays Garden Dodge Great Bend Liberal

W 8 5 5 2 0

L 0 3 3 6 8

Eisenhower Salina Central Liberal Salina South Newton Hays Great Bend Valley Center

W 16 12 8 7 6 6 5 3

L 4 8 12 13 14 14 15 17

Salina Central Hays Newton Valley Center Salina South Liberal Great Bend Eisenhower

17 16 12 10 10 3 3 0

3 4 8 10 10 17 17 20

GIRLS

FINAL SUB-STATE STANDINGS BOYS

GIRLS

BACK TO STATE

WAC FINALE

FINAL WAC STANDINGS

The Redskins had their chances to pull off an upset win against Dodge City Friday, but a slow start and two empty possessions at a crucial time in the fourth quarter led to a 54-47 road loss. Dodge City jumped out to an 11-0 start to the game before the Redskins scored their first basket. The Red Demons wer able to keep the lead around double digits for most of the second and third quarters, but the Redskins cut the lead to five twice in the fourth quarter. Liberal had a chance to cut the lead to two or three,

but a missed shot and a Dodge City rebound ended the threat. Liberal had a second chance after holding the Red Demons on the next possession, but again the shot missed, and Liberal had to foul down the stretch to try to reduce the deficit. Despite the loss, Liberal retained possession of third place in the SubState pairings when Salina South also lost to Derby 71-57. Had the Redskins won, it wouldn’t have changed their seeding. The Redskins finished the regular season winning five of the final six, and the late surge pushed the Redskins up the standings in both the Western Athletic Conference and the Sub-State

pairings. Liberal finished third in both despite starting the WAC with three straight losses. The Redskins dramatic finish also improved their Sub-State position, moving them from a battle for the fifth and sixth positions into sole possession of third. The top four teams play at home the first round.. No. 3 Liberal (8-12) will host No. 6 Newton (6-14) at 6 p.m. Wednesday at The Big House. The winner will face the winner of the Salina Central (12-8) vs. Great Bend (5-15) game. The winner of the secondround game qualifies for the state tournament March 7-10.

Saints top Frank Phillips By ROY ALLEN • Seward assistant athletic director Six Seward County pitchers held the Frank Phillips Plainsmen to just one run in 14 innings Friday afternoon at Brent Gould Field as the Saints swept the double header in the teams first meeting in nearly 10 years. Seward took Gane 1 5-0 behind the work of Gavin Glanz. The sophomore righty allowed just one hit in five innings of work to earn the win before giving way to Cole Nicholson and Tyler Weidenfeld who preserved the shutout. Offensively the Saints were led by Willy Gustin who had a double, a triple, and 3 RBI’s while Brittain Ibbotson roped a pair of doubles in the win. The Saints picked up a 9-1 Game 2 win behind another good start from Keegan Hucul who went five shutout innings and struck out four while Kevin Domrzalski gave the Saints all the run support they needed, going 3 for 3 with 4 RBI’s and missing the cycle by just a home run.


2A

Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

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EARL WATT President and Publisher earl@hpleader.com

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MYRON REIMER Production Manager News Room E-mail: news@hpleader.com Classifieds E-mail: denasa@hpleader.com Advertising E-mail: ads@hpleader.com Sports E-mail: sports@hpleader.com Subscriptions rates for the City of Liberal in city limits are: 1 year at $70.56 6 months at $43.42 3 months at $27.14 1 month at $9.04 Outside of city limits and in town mailing 1 year at $130.26 6 months at $78.16 3 months at $39.08 1 month at $13.03 Outside of Kansas 1 year at $120 6 months at $72 3 months at $36 1 month at $12 Delivery areas include Kismet, Plains, Hooker, Okla., Tyrone, Okla., Turpin, Okla., and Forgan, Okla. Call for mail rates outside delivery areas.

ISN No. 262273494 The High Plains Daily Leader&Times is published every day except Saturday by Seward County Publishing Company at 16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal, KS 67901 and entered under Periodicals Postage Paid at Post Office in Liberal, Kan. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any contributed material. Postmaster: Send address changes to: High Plains Daily Leader&Times, 16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal KS 67901. Phone: (620) 626-0840 Fax: (620) 626-9854

Liberal Senior Center Friendship Meals Monday, Feb. 27 – Baked ham, baked beans, creamy coleslaw, whole wheat bread and frosted cake Tuesday, Feb. 28 – Roast beef with gravy, mashed potatoes, winter mixed vegetables, whole wheat bread and cookies Wednesday, Feb. 29 – Smothered chicken, garden rice, seasoned zucchini, whole wheat roll and mandarin oranges Thursday, March 1 – Honey mustard pork loin, cottage potatoes, brussel sprouts, whole wheat bread and baked apple slices Friday, March 2 – Marinated chicken breast, sweet potatoes, creamed spinach, whole wheat bread and ambrosia deluxe

Activities Monday, Feb. 27 8:30 a.m. – Aerobics 9 a.m. – Strong bodies 10 a.m. – Stretch N Flex 1:30 p.m. – Buck bingo 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Tuesday, Feb. 28 9 a.m. – Ladies snooker 9:30 a.m. – Bible study 11 a.m. – Gospelaires 12:45 p.m. – Dr. Duncan/audiologist program 7 p.m. – Bridge 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Wednesday, Feb. 29 8:30 a.m. – Aerobics 9 a.m. – Strong Bodies 10 a.m. – Stretch N Flex 1:30 p.m. – Pitch game 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Thursday, March 1 3 p.m. – Tea at Three 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Friday, March 2 8:30 a.m. – Aerobics 9 a.m. – Strong bodies 9 a.m. – Coffee N Rolls 10 a.m. – Stretch N Flex 1:30 p.m. – Buck bingo 8 p.m. – Happy Steppers dance 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Saturday, March 3 1 p.m. – Open for snooker

deaths EVELYN I. BEATY DANVILLE, Ind. – Evelyn I. Beaty, 77, died Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012, at Avon Health & Rehabilitation, Avon, Ind. ❏ Funeral services are pending and will be announced by Miller Mortuary.

obituaries JASON R. HITCHCOCK Jason Reed Hitchcock, 39, died Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012, in Greensburg. He was born Jan. 22, 1973, to Ralph L. and Mary (Reed) Hitchcock in Liberal. He attended Liberal High School. He was employed as roughnecker in the oilfields and had worked as a machinist at Myriad Machines. Survivors include his father; his brother, Coachise John James Tanner and wife, Jennifer, Kismet; his sister, Rhonda Wiens and husband, Spencer, Meade; his companion, Diana Ebersole, Liberal; two nieces, Kendall Wiens, Garden City, and Mersadez Tanner, Manhattan; three nephews, Brady Wiens, Meade, and Brendan and Trever Tanner, Kismet; and several cousins. He was preceded in death by his mother. ❏ Memorial service will be at 10

Sunny, with a high near 54. North northeast wind 7 to 16 mph becoming east southeast. Tonight: Partly cloudy, with a low around 31. East southeast wind around 11 mph. A 30 percent chance of rain or drizzle. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 49. Southeast wind between 8 and 16 mph. Monday night: A 30 percent chance of rain or drizzle. Mostly cloudy and windy, with a low around 44.

a.m. Monday at Brenneman Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Rex Petty presiding. Burial of cremains will follow at Liberal Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to the Angels for Animals in care of Brenneman Funeral Home, 1212 W. Second, Liberal, KS 67901. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.brennemanfuneral home.com.

Aug. 20, 1952. She then married Jimmie Doud June 11, 1983. He survives. She is also survived by one daughter, Debra Ehlers, Park City; three step children, Kevin (Wendy) Doud, Kris (John) Holst and Kerry (Mike) Less; two brothers, Franklin and Cecil Hitchcock; two sisters, Carolyn Sue (Dave) Falke, Liberal, and Sharon Lou (Henry) Mussman, Hooker; one grandson; eight step grandchildren; and nine step great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, one son, Larry Munkres; eight brothers; and two sisters. ❏ Funeral services were at 2:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, at Concordia Lutheran Church in Waterloo, Iowa. Condolences may be left at www.DahlFuneralHome.com.

hospital TOMMY E. MAUPIN Tommy E. Maupin, 80, died Thursday, Feb. 23, 2011, at his residence in Liberal. He was born Jan. 11, 1932, to George D. and Margaret (Fillbeck) Maupin in Hutchinson. He married Margie Byer Oct. 28, 1955, in Raton, N.M. He attended Hugoton High School. He was a truck driver for Schlumberger, R.C. Williams and Ideal Foods. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1951-1954, during the Korean conflict. He was a member of St. Andrews Episcopal Church, since 1960, serving as Sunday school teacher and director. He was the union steward for Teamsters Union No. 795 for 15½ years. He enjoyed construction work. Survivors include one son, Gregory Maupin, Blue Springs, Mo.; one daughter, Linda Sistrunk and husband, Harvey, Liberal; five grandchildren, Brian Maupin, Jenifer Maupin, Stephen Green, Jeffery Green and Kristina Landis; and four great-grandchildren, Jeremy Green, Addison Landis, Garret Landis, Jr. and Ellie Landis. He was preceded in death by his parents, one daughter, Julie Maupin, four brothers, Bob Maupin, Harold Maupin, Douglas Maupin and Vernon Maupin, and one sister, Reva Hadsell. ❏ Funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Monday at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Liberal with the Rev. Canon Charles Schneider presiding. Burial will be at Restlawn Cemetery. Friends may call from 1 to 5 p.m. today at Brenneman Funeral Home. Memorials are suggested to the St. Andrews Episcopal Church in care of the Brenneman Funeral Home, 1212 W. Second, Liberal, KS 67901. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.brennemanfuneral home.com. DONITAY. DOUD WATERLOO, Iowa – Donita Y. Doud, 77, died Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012, at Sunrise Hill Care Center in Traer, Iowa. She was born Jan. 4, 1935, to Herman and Mattie (Jones) Hitchcock in Hooker, Okla. She married James Munkres

SOUTHWEST MEDICAL CENTER FRIDAY ADMISSIONS: Christina Golubski, Liberal Jessica Juarez, Liberal Galynn Smith, Liberal BIRTHS: None reported DISMISSALS: Daniel J. Hightower, Turpin, Okla. Clarence Ray Combs, Turpin, Okla. Total admissions: 14 Total dismissals: 7

jail log The Seward County Jail Calendar will now be published daily only in the Leader & Times. The information is provided by the Seward County Sheriff’s office at L&T’s request and only lists when and why a person was incarcerated. Those reasons do not mean the individual was charged with those crimes, or if any charges were incurred. That decision is determined separately by the Seward County Attorney’s office.

Jail Log from Feb. 13, 2012 Name – Age – Date in – Address – Charges Christopher Perez, 21 – 2/13 – 710 S. Pershing, Liberal – Probation violation Carlos Ibarra-Lora, 21 – 2/13 – 1501 N. Kansas, Liberal – Day server Stormy Stanley, 26 – 2/13 – 315 N. Grant, Liberal – FTA Samuel Goch, 31 – 2/13 – 219 W. Eighth, Liberal – Disorderly conduct Estaban Diaz, 32 – 2/13 – 213 N. Court, Ulysses – Day server Mariana Valenzuela-Mendoza, 22 – 2/13 – 310 S. Webster, Liberal – DWS and unlawful window tint Ga Far, 25 – 2/13 – 1317 S. Maddox, Dumas, Texas – DWS and illegal display Manuel Erives, 27 – 2/13 – 1500 E. Bluebell, Liberal – Day server Travin Moore, 21 – 2/13 – 520 N. Pershing, Liberal – DWS, no

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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING

insurance and failure to yield Charge codes: DL – Driver’s License DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWS – Driving While Suspended FTA – Failure to appear FTC – Failure to comply LEO – Law Enforcement Officer MIP – Minor In Possession PBT – Preliminary Breathalizer Test PFA – Protection From Abuse TOC – Transporting an Open Container WWI – Walking While Intoxicated

agenda LIBERAL CITY COMMISSION The next meeting of the Liberal City Commission will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the city commission chambers at 325 N. Washington. ❏ Call to order ❏ Roll call ❏ Pledge of Allegiance ❏ Invocation ❏ Awards, proclamations and presentations a. Swearing in of new commissioner Dave Harrison b. National Nutrition Month ❏ Approval of agenda ❏ Minutes – Approve the minutes of the Feb. 14 regular meeting and Feb. 23 special meeting ❏ Items from citizens ❏ Items from groups ❏ Consent agenda a. Acknowledge receipt of minutes b. Airport lease renewals ❏ First reading of Ordinance No. 4403 – Authorize lease purchase financing – water meter project ❏ LPD organizational structure ❏ City of Liberal employee survey presentation ❏ City manager’s report ❏ Items from commissioners ❏ Vouchers ❏ Adjournment

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calendar TUESDAY ■ New Community Missionary Baptist Church hosts a food cupboard beginning at 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Residents in need should bring identification to receive services. The cupboard is located at the Community Missionary Baptist Educational Center. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Women’s Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. at 909 N. Clay. WEDNESDAY ■ Overeaters Anonymous of Guymon, Okla., will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the AA Club on Main Street across from Homeland in Guymon. All who have a problem with food are welcome to attend. ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays through the Liberal Senior Center. Transportation is also offered from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. THURSDAY ■ The Western Avenue Church of Christ has a benevolent room which is open to the public from 9 to 10 a.m. every Thursday. For those in need of clothing, come by 215 S. Western Ave.

If you miss your paper, call (620) 626-0840 or (620) 624-2541 between 5 and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday.

Leader

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Sunday, February 26, 2012

Leader&Times

sports@hpleader.com

Defending state champs knock out Lady Bulldogs

Balko’s Clay Casper (0) and Forgan’s Tanner Jones (33) fight for the ball during the Class B Regional Championship game last week at Guymon High School. Forgan advanced to the state tournament with a win over No. 5 Fort Supply, 80-37, Friday in Woodward. Guymon Daily Herald photo/Shawn Yorks

By JASON EPP Leader &Times It was another defensive struggle for the Forgan Lady Bulldogs facing the defending Class B girls state champion, Corn Bible Lady Crusaders in the first round of the Area Tournament in Woodward, Okla. Forgan struggled to hit shots all night, and were knocked out of the playoffs with a 36-29 loss. “I knew it was going to be a fairly low-scoring game, because I knew they were going to play some defenses to try to keep the ball away from Kenzi (Taylor) or Lindsey’s (Trippet) hands,” Lady Bulldogs coach Brett Trippet said. “I knew we were going to have to make some shots, but I knew we could keep them from scoring a lot of points. We just struggled all night long to score at all; it was a grind.” Compounding the offensive issues for the Lady Bulldogs was the fact that leading scorer, and conference MVP, Kenzi Taylor was called for three fouls in the first quarter, and had to sit out the majority of the first half. Forgan fell behind 9-3 in the first quarter, and trailed by ten at half, 2212. “We were going to have a hard time scoring with her (Taylor) in there, but it really got tough with our leading sitting on the bench most of the first half,” Trippet said. “She was not on their best player, but did help out against her, and because of that got in early foul trouble.” Corn Bible pushed their lead to a dozen by the end of the third quarter (30-18). Forgan frantically tried to used full-court pressure to try and get back in the game, and even though they outscored the Lady Crusaders 11-6 in the fourth, it was too little too late.

Forgan was just 3 of 25 from three-point range, and only made 9 of 24 inside the arc. The Lady Bulldogs even struggled both getting to the free throw line and when they were there, making them (2 of 8). “They packed it in, and didn’t let us get in the paint,” Trippet said. “We got a ton of shots, just didn’t make very many of them all night long. We’ve been shooting well from the free throw line lately, but not to night and not very many either.” Kenzi Taylor led the Lady Bulldogs in scoring with 16 even though her time on the court was limited. Seniors Lindsey Trippet and Allison Watson scored 4 and 3, respectively in the final game of their high school careers. KaDawn McReynolds also scored 4. “This team, from the start of the year, probably improved more than any team I’ve ever coached,” Trippet said. “We weren’t very good at the beginning of the year, but during the year got a lot better and played some good basketball.” Forgan finished the season 18-10, and only loses two seniors, of which Trippet spoke about. “Most kids get their names mentioned when they score a lot of points, but she was just an unbelievable defensive player. Lindsey (Trippet) sold out for her team to play defense. Allison (Watson) had knee surgery didn’t have to try to get back. Her favorite sport was softball, and she was good at it too. She played basketball mainly for the other girls and her school. I’m really proud of both of them.”

Forgan headed back to state tourney By JASON EPP Leader &Times The top-ranked and defending state champion Forgan Bulldogs had blown threw their first three opponents in the playoffs by an average margin of 56 points, but Friday night’s area championship game was to be different with 24-3, No.5 Fort Supply providing the challenge. The challenge never happened as Forgan ran through Fort Supply like napalm through a field of daisies. And when the smoke cleared, and the charred remains were exposed, the Bulldogs had won by 43, 80-37. “I thought we started out a little sluggish on offense,” Bulldogs coach Todd Kerr said, “but as the game wore on, our defensive pressure finally got to them. We were able to put some points together, and really get going.” And Forgan did struggle to hit open shots the first quarter, leading only 13-6 at the end of it, and they missed 7 of their first 8 attempts from beyond the arc. But while Forgan struggled to hit deep shots, Fort

Supply struggled to get any shots attempted. Fort Supply was only able to attempt 30 shots the entire game compared to 59 for Forgan. Forgan’s pressure defense forced 31 turnovers, most leading to layups at the offensive end. “I thought we did a great job neutralizing their big man,” Kerr said. “And Drew Wolfolk, who I thought was their best player, got a couple of threes early; but from that point on, we just did not help off of him at all. He struggled to even get touches. I thought defensively we were really good. I thought we committed a couple of silly fouls in the traps, but when you are being that aggressive it’s going to happen.” Rhett Radcliff was on his game, scoring 28 points on 9 of 10 shooting (including 5 threes) from the field in just three quarters of play. He really heated up in the second and third quarters where he scored 11 and 12, respectively. Rhett also ended the third quarter with a final barrage, scoring Forgan’s last nine points of the quarter on three straight threes which pushed the lead to 36. As a team Forgan outscored Fort Supply 49-20 in the middle quarters.

By EARL WATT • Leader &Times Liberal had one last shot at a Western Athletic Conference victory Friday night on the road, but winning a road game at Dodge City proved to be too much of a challenge. The Lady Redskins dropped the final game of the regular season 55-22. The loss left Liberal in a tie with Great Bend in the Sub-State pairings, but two previous losses to the Lady Panthers pushed the Lady Redskins into seventh and set up a first round game at 6 p.m. Thursday at Hays.

KANSAS PREP BASKETBALL SCORES

Andover 52, Goddard 36 Atchison County 52, KC Christian 39 Basehor-Linwood 63, Bonner Springs 50 Burlingame 55, Northern Heights 54 BV North 67, St. Thomas Aquinas 55 BV Northwest 56, Blue Valley Southwest 44 BV West 56, Blue Valley Stilwell 40 Deerfield 54, Rolla 39 Derby 71, Salina South 57 Dodge City 54, Liberal 47 Gardner-Edgerton 44, Bishop Miege 34 Goddard-Eisenhower 58, Hutchinson 51 Highland Park 75, Topeka West 31 Johnson-Stanton County 50, Sublette 42 KC Sumner 64, KC Schlagle 36 KC Washington 61, KC Harmon 57 Lakin 43, Hugoton 40 Lansing 56, KC Piper 47 Lawrence 38, Lawrence Free State 36 Leavenworth 63, SM West 51 Lebo 53, Wichita Defenders 36 Lincoln 44, Victoria 43 Maize 42, Newton 41 McPherson 52, Arkansas City 33 Meade 68, Syracuse 48 Mill Valley 59, KC Bishop Ward 47 Minneola 53, Satanta 22 Northern Valley 60, Golden Plains 38 Olathe Northwest 66, Olathe North 39 Olathe South 44, Olathe East 43 Olpe 51, Southern Coffey 28 Pleasant Ridge 68, Doniphan West 52 Quinter 68, St. Francis 66, OT SM Northwest 50, SM North 45 SM South 68, SM East 63 Southern Cloud 48, Rock Hills 34 St. Johnʼs Beloit 47, Palco 39 Tonganoxie 57, KC Turner 52 Topeka 37, Manhattan 26 Topeka Hayden 54, Shawnee Heights 32 Topeka Seaman 64, Emporia 58 Valley Falls 41, McLouth 31

Jake Regier and Tanner Jones each scored 10; Trevin Lopez had seven, and Ryan Radcliff 5. Dalton Lemieux scored seven off the bench. As a team, Forgan was 19-28 (68 percent) from inside the arc, 10-31 (32 percent) outside of it, and 12-23 (52 percent) at the line. Fort Supply was 7-19 (37 percent) from 2-point, 5-11 (45 percent) from 3-point, and 8-18 (44 percent) from the charity stripe. With the win Forgan (26-1) now heads to the state tournament with a first-round matchup against a yet-to-be-determined opponent Thursday. But whoever the opponent is-that is where the Bulldogs focus will be, not on the championship. “I think we just keep doing what we keep doing,” Kerr said. “We’ve been through this, and I have great leaders. We are just going to keep preparing to win the next game. That’s what we say all the time. We are going to practice to prepare to win our next game; that’s the only one that matters. That’s how we’ve looked at it for the last two years, and we’re not going to change one thing that we’ve done.”

Shaquill Bond, center, makes her way through the middle of the lane earlier this week against Garden City. Bond and the Lady Redskins suffered their eighth Western Athletic Conference loss Friday to Dodge City. L&T photo/Earl Watt

No upset in finale against Dodge City

BOYS

2B

Washburn Rural 73, Junction City 50 Weskan 43, Triplains-Brewster 17 Wichita County 50, Elkhart 49, OT Wilson 82, Logan 36

GIRLS

Andover 59, Goddard 33 Atchison County 44, KC Christian 19 Blue Valley Stilwell 63, BV West 44 Bonner Springs 44, Basehor-Linwood 24 BV Northwest 40, Blue Valley Southwest 37 Deerfield 51, Rolla 31 Dodge City 55, Liberal 23 Doniphan West 37, Pleasant Ridge 35 Elkhart 55, Wichita County 42 Gardner-Edgerton 41, Bishop Miege 13 Highland Park 61, Topeka West 58 Hugoton 49, Lakin 30 Hutchinson 82, Goddard-Eisenhower 29 Johnson-Stanton County 42, Sublette 34 KC Piper 43, Lansing 26 Lawrence Free State 79, Lawrence 45

Lebo 51, Wichita Defenders 21 Maize 36, Newton 28 Manhattan 42, Topeka 32 Marais des Cygnes Valley 53, AltoonaMidway 27 McPherson 63, Arkansas City 33 Meade 52, Syracuse 25 Mill Valley 45, KC Bishop Ward 13 Minneola 44, Satanta 25 Northern Heights 61, Burlingame 25 Northern Valley 60, Golden Plains 38 Olathe Northwest 65, Olathe North 36 Olathe South 45, Olathe East 27 Olpe 52, Southern Coffey 28 Otis-Bison 51, Sylvan-Lucas 26 Quinter 66, St. Francis 43 Rock Hills 41, Southern Cloud 34 Salina South 55, Derby 36 Silver Lake 75, Wabaunsee 51 SM South 48, SM East 45 SM West 43, Leavenworth 36 St. Johnʼs Beloit 55, Palco 24 St. Thomas Aquinas 49, BV North 27 Tonganoxie 66, KC Turner 42 Topeka Hayden 33, Shawnee Heights 30 Topeka Seaman 36, Emporia 34

Troy 45, Oskaloosa 33 Valley Falls 46, McLouth 40 Washburn Rural 40, Junction City 31 Waverly 48, East (Kansas City), Mo. 36 Weskan 53, Triplains-Brewster 36 Wilson 65, Logan 44


news@hpleader.com

NEWS

Sunday, February 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

3A

on the

HAPPENINGS high plains

American Red Cross announces certified aquatics classes

J Lifeguarding Instructor class (LGT) March 21-24, 21-23 6 to 10 p.m.; 24 – 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Class is limited. Deadline for signing-up – March 7. Call Daniel Minde- 202-299-7402 J Lifeguarding classes April 2 to 5 – 5pm-10 daily April 13 to 15; 13 – 5 to 10 p.m., 14 and 15 – 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. April 16 to 19; 5 to 10 p.m. daily April 27 to 29; 27 from 5 to 10 p.m.; 28 to 29 – 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. April 30 to May 3; 5 to 10 p.m. daily All classes will be at the Liberal Recreation Center 1709 W. 7th St. in Liberal. Call 626-0133 to sign-up. J WSI class May 18 to 20 and 24 to 25; 18 – 5 to 10 p.m., 19-20 and 24 to 25 – 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The instructor is Daniel Minde, certified Red Cross LGIT and WSIT. For those interested in setting up aquatics classes in their area, call Daniel at 202-299-7402.

SIGN UP BY MARCH 7

Seward County seeking interested citizens to serve on boards

Seward County currently has some positions available with the Southwest Medical Center Hospital Board. Appointed Boards: Seward County has several boards appointed by the county commission.The boards are staffed by volunteer members from the community – those who volunteer their time and efforts help to make Seward County a better place to live. Anyone interested in volunteering to be a member of any of the appointed boards, please contact your county commissioner or the administration office. Current openings: 3 – two-year positions with Southwest Medical Center Hospital Board.Those interested in applying for this board may do so online at sewardcountyks.org.Applications are also available at the Seward County Administration Office. For more information call 626-3212.

Children from an Emberton, England school practice the art of pancake flipping a few days before the Olney Pancake Race.The students were on a field trip to see where the race is ran, and they got to participate in a short run themselves during the history lesson. L&T photo/Larry Phillips

Kids ... O Continued from Page 1A

I mentioned the competition started the year I was born, and I assured them it was only 62 years ago. They seemed relieved it wasn’t as many years as I looked. The children were taken to the finish line and learned more history of the race from prepared

remarks the teacher had scribbled down. As one of the teachers led the students down Church Street about 40 yards, the history teacher said she had ran in the Olney Pancake Race many years ago. “I assure you it was a terribly long time ago,” she said with a chuckle. The children were stopped near a light pole to start a practice race. The teacher handed out a pancake to each and encouraged them to try flipping them as the race requires flipping. She split them into two groups of four and prepared them to run to the official finish line. “Do be careful to look out for the lit ’el ones,”

she admonished. Off they dashed except the two lit ’el ones were somewhat tardy on the start. The second group did the same, and, of course, there were pancakes dropped here and there along the route. But, they all were quite happy to have ran a pancake race. One of the boys said he wanted to run the race when he was grown up. He was reminded by a teacher that one has to live in Olney to race. She said nothing that one also had to be a woman. “Well, I want to move to Olney then,” he said, resolutely.

APPLY NOW

Baker Arts presenting 23rd annual Area High School Exhibit

The Baker Arts Center is pleased to host the 23rd annual Area High School Art Exhibit.The 10 area high schools participating this year are Liberal, Elkhart, Garden City, Hugoton, Stanton County – Johnson, Sublette, South Gray at Montezuma, Guymon, Okla., Fowler and Satanta. Everyone is invited to come by the center to view the wonderful works that have been created by area art students during the school year.This year’s sponsor, Community Bank of Liberal, will be presenting eight students with Distinguished Merit Awards in recognition of their talents. The student’s artwork will be on display beginning March 4 and running through March 27 for everyone to enjoy. The reception for this exhibit will be from 2 to 4 p.m. March 4. Drop by Baker Arts Center from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. The Center is also open from 2 to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and closed on Sundays and Mondays.

ABOVE:An Emberton teacher, right, tells her students the history of Pancake Day and how the women of Olney race the women of Liberal just prior to letting the children experience racing a short distance themselves. RIGHT:This youngster was last out of the gate when trying his hand at racing with a skillet and pancake. L&T photos/Larry Phillips

RECEPTION MARCH 4

Turpin Baptist Church to show ‘Courageous,’ public welcome to attend

Have you seen the movie ‘Couragous?’ If not here is your chance. Today is Family Movie Night at Turpin Baptist Church,W. Hill St., Turpin, Okla., and ‘Courageous’ will be shown. The movie starts at 6 p.m. If you have any question please call 580778-3314.

TODAY

Liberal’s VA Clinic now has Tele Health

Liberal’s VA Clinic now has Tele Health available. Call 626-5574 to make an appointment. Also, a VA doctor will soon be available at the clinic.

CALL FOR APPT.

OK Kids Day Committee selling Blue & Gold Sausage Co. meats to raise funds

Organizers of Outdoor Kansas (OK Kids) are raising funds to help provide the numerous activities at the OK Kids Day, which is scheduled for May 12 this spring at Meade Lake State Park. Committee members are selling Blue & Gold Sausage Co. bacon in 3.5-pound packages, 2.5-pound orders of sausage and 5-pound chicken packs to raise funds.Those wishing to purchase some can call Zach Wester at 629-0498 or 624-9500. About 800 kids and 600 adults attended OK Kids Day last year.The focus of the event is to get kids in the great outdoors.Any businesses wishing to host a booth can also call Zach or the park office at 620873-2572.

SUPPORT OK KIDS DAY

Vision ... O Continued from Page 1A

Liberal resident and Label Me Royalty Regional Coordinator Chanita Mitchell said the four volumes of I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History focus on individuals making a difference in the African American communities across the country today. “These are people from modern times,” Mitchell said. “I know we know the past individuals that are dead and gone, but now we have people that have left a good example. We have different profiles of people to overshadow the

negative images that people put on blacks as a whole.” Mitchell would like to take the idea one step further – by gathering stories and memoirs of Liberal’s African American citizens in an effort to bring about a more positive influence on Liberal’s African American population, and more importantly, she said, Liberal’s African American children. “What I am wanting to do is start putting in stories about different experiences people have had and how they have overcome,” she said. “Here in Liberal, most of our black children are in a negative environment – and a lot of them are my family. Whatever you are influenced by, that is what you do. You

do what you know. If the parent is in and out of prison, the child is likely in and out of prison. “We want to encourage people in a positive way, that is the purpose of this,” she added. Mitchell encourages AfricanAmerican individuals throughout the City of Liberal and surrounding area to provide her with stories and positive profiles. Stories and profiles, she said, can be sent to her email – uniquelymade7@gmail.com or chanitamitchell@gmail.com. “I encourage everyone to please take time to support I Am Royalty: Profiles in Black History,” she said. “We only strive toward being a positive alternative for negative behaviors.

“Our ultimate purpose is to share the stories of people that add strength to our Black American communities,” she continued. “In doing so, we hope to bring change by replacing the labels that Black Americans have. In order to do so, we must be the prime examples of common unity in spiritual beliefs, dedication, preservation and variations of success. “The end result will be expanded perspectives that can see beyond the barriers of a distorted vision,” she added. “We make history everyday. It is up to us if it will be positive or negative. Our history is worth learning – we can’t have a present and a future without a past. You have to know where you come from to know where you are going.”


Sunday, February 26, 2012

sports@hpleader.com

Leader&Times

3B

DOWN BUT NOT OUT Hooker drops first game of post-season before rebounding for win to stay alive at the area tournament Bulldogs bounce back to win, now one game from Area Tournament

Dogs done in by Goldbugs By KJESTINE STEINBRING Guymon Daily Herald MOORELAND — Hooker’s boys basketball team has been in more than one close game this season; three of their last four games have been decided by ten points or fewer. Last night’s playoff game against Alva was decided by just one basket in the final minutes. Unlike their last 12 games this one did not end in their favor, as the Goldbugs defeated them 41-40. In a game that was anticipated to be entertaining and exciting, Alva vs. Hooker did not disappoint. Early on in the game it was apparent just how close the game would be between these opponents. Teams traded baskets in the first quarter and defensively were not giving up any easy baskets. Near the end of the first, Hooker started to gain some momentum with their defensive pressure causing Alva problems. That momentum carried over into the second quarter and by halftime Hooker had worked up a sevenpoint lead. “I thought defensively in the first half we played really great. We rebounded and blocked out and didn’t give them any second chance shot opportunities,” said Hooker coach Bud Valerius. In the first three minutes of the second half Alva got back in the game making it a one basket game. “The first three minutes after halftime are the most important in the whole game. We came out and didn’t match their intensity, and they got back in the game,” said Valerius. While both teams had traded leads throughout the whole game, Hooker seemed to have control of the game and was looking like the rankings should have been reversed. Hooker was keeping Alva’s shooters to one shot, but in the third the Goldbugs shots were falling. At the end of the third quarter the Bulldogs were down 28-29 and it was looking to be a close one. Neither team had gotten themselves into much foul trouble all night, both team’s defensively were disciplined and effective in their efforts. In the fourth quarter there was a bit of a battle for momentum. Alva was trying to work their way into a lead and to get the win, while Hooker was trying to hang onto their control of the game. With just over a minute left in the game Alva’s coach got a technical foul, and Alex Sancehz made both to give Hooker a four point lead, 3832. Alva would not go down without a fight and had gotten the game back within one point with 1:08 left in the game. With 40 seconds left in the game Goldbugs took the 41-40 lead. Hooker had the ball looking for the last shot. Alex Sanchez who has handled the ball well for the Bulldogs all season had the ball in his hands with the seconds winding down. Sanchez drove down the right side wing and passed the ball around to Marcos Mendoza who passed it off with five seconds on the clock. Joe Bean ended up with the ball in his hands for the final shot. He just missed off the rim and in the

By KJESTINE STEINBRING Guymon Daily Herald

Joe Bean hit a couple big shots for the Dogs in their game against Alva Friday night. He had a chance to hit the game winning shot, but just missed.Alva won 41-40. Hooker played late Saturday. Photo courtesy Guymon Daily Herald chaos of the rebound a foul was called. An over the back call against Alva put Hooker on the free throw line with .1 seconds left on the clock to shoot a one-and-one to win the game. Chad Kennedy would miss the first and the game would end at 41-40. “This loss is very disappointing. We had a

chance to win the game and we played well in the first half, we just didn’t match their intensity in the second,” said Valerius. “We played very hard and still had a chance to win at the end, but it just shows how important free throws are to a game.”

TCU moving ahead with spring after drug arrests BY STEPHEN HAWKINS AP SportsWriter FORT WORTH, Texas — TCU coach Gary Patterson already had a hoarse voice after only one day of spring practice. The message to this team was the same as each spring, work toward the goal of winning a conference championship — now in the Big 12

instead of the Mountain West, where the Horned Frogs won the last three — and the chance to one day play for a national championship. “We’ll move straight forward,” Patterson said after practice ended early Friday night. Unfortunately for the Frogs, the expanded crowd of nearly two dozen reporters and cameras wasn’t because of the pending move to

the Big 12. TCU, coming off its fourth consecutive season with at least 11 wins, started spring practice only nine days after four players were among 15 current and four former TCU students were arrested on drug charges. Those players, including three past starters on defense, are no longer on the team.

SEILING — After suffering a heartbreaking loss the night before it was a challenge for Hooker to see if they could come back and win in the consolation bracket against Depew Friday night. While things did not start out as smoothly as they might have hoped, the Bulldogs were able to come away with a solid 55-42 win. In a game that started out slowly for Hooker they started out by only scoring nine points in the first quarter. “It’s tough coming off a big emotional loss from the night before. I thought we were kind of in quicksand a little bit early on,” said Hooker coach Bud Valerius. In the second quarter Depew took advantage of that and scored 15 points on the Dogs to put them ahead 2419 at halftime. Turnovers were an issue early on, which has not been typical of them this season, but once the second half started things started to move in the right direction for the Dogs. “We dug down deep in the second half and came out with a lot more energy to respond in the third quarter,” said Valerius. “We had some leaders on our team that really picked us up in that quarter and we got some sense of urgency. We just got playing like we can play.” In the third quarter Hooker’s full court pressure defense really took over against Depew who couldn’t seem to set up their offense early on. A major defensive key for the Bulldogs against Depew was Chad Kennedy, who created numerous turnovers on the press. Despite the turnovers and an increased level of energy from Hooker Depew mananged to stay in the game, and at the end of three quarters it was 35-32 in the Bulldogs favor. Neither team wanted to concede their season on Friday night in the game, and as the seconds ticked by the effort given by the players was increased. Joe Bean for the Bulldogs really lit the offensive fire near the end of the second quarter and beginning of the third. He led the team in scoring, but his baskets helped get some of the other Bulldogs open in the second half and everyone started getting better shooting opportunities. With a comfortable ten-point lead near the midway point of the fourth quarter it seemed as though things were firmly in Hooker’s control. Both teams survived a few nicks and bruises from the hard physical play on the inside, and the Bulldogs Guerro Garcia and Payson Slater did a good job of getting Hooker second chance shot opportunities all night. Those second chance opportunities and free throws helped to seal the 55-42 win for the Bulldogs. That win extends their season another day, and gets them one game closer to the state tournament.


4A

Sunday, February 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

EDITORIAL Opinion LEADER &T IMES

“For most of history, Anonymous was a woman.”

VIRGINIA WOOLF (1882 – 1941)

EARL WATT President and Publisher

LARRY PHILLIPS

JASON EPP

Managing Editor

General Manager

MEMBER The Associated Press and Kansas Press Association

FOUNDED 1886

Cold brings clarity, simplicity My husband had swept a brisk hand across the family’s overbooked schedule, but a few events remained on the calendar. Black History Month Taste Fest was one of them.

Taste Fest, the center of soul food in Liberal. Though I had no desire to sample barbecued pig’s feet, I did plan to taste Dirty Rice, gumbo, a magnificent array of cakes and pies, ribs and fried chicken and greens and brown beans. When we entered the building, the warmth offered just as comfort as the food. It was, as always, a fine time. A couple hours later, as we took our leave, we “Why can’t we keep doing everything?” various stepped into a different, ice-glazed world. The stiff wind had intensified, added frozen pellets to children asked, in various ways, with various its sting, and transformed the parking area levels of dismay. They liked their out-of-control lives, though it was clear to us parents they could outside the armory into an obstacle course. I babystepped across the gravel-studded asphalt to not get anywhere if things didn’t change. the car, where my son started the engine and “You guys have gotten too busy, and you don’t turned on the vent. Then I remembered the realize how much it’s hurting you,” he said. heating system in my husband’s vehicle is slow to “You’re neglecting important things.” warm up, even when the air outdoors is not subI knew what those were: everyday basics, like zero. adequate sleep, regular exercise, good nutrition. “Where’s the ice scraper?” I asked. And long-range life-changers, like daily Bible “Umm,” my son replied. study, steady attention to “We don’t have one in school work, and margin to G R AV I T Y here, do we?” cultivate stable family Silent head-shake. relationships. You just can’t & S TA R S I squelched my balance all that when life burgeoning irritation. This has no margin, when you wasn’t actually my vehicle; stop in the house only to my legs are too short to change clothes, grab a properly control the pedals, banana, and hurry to the and my son was doing me a next event. Their father had favor by taking on the taken a long look at the driving duties. It wasn’t dark-rimmed eyes, waning actually his call to keep the energy and too-tightlyice scraper in his father’s car. wound tempers and And none of that really declared a need for radical mattered, because we were resimplification. both shivering with cold as This particular Sunday, he more ice slugged down to reasoned, people had to eat layer the rear-view mirror no matter what, and my and the front window. modest baking project of Sister Carr’s Lemon In the parking slot next to us, friends had Cake was a small investment of time and energy encountered the same problem. I watched my to balance an opportunity for the family to partake of fellowship and soul food. We could go son’s buddy dig a plastic card from his wallet to to the Taste Fest. That didn’t mean we could line scrape at the stippled windshield with rapidly reddening fingers. It looked like a great idea, if a up four other activities for the remainder of the bit on the frigid side. day. “Try the library card,” I told my son. The clouds weren’t even visible when we The stiff rectangle of plastic, combined with parked and hurried into the armory, though the his numb fingers, served to scrape a clear view wind cut bitterly through my light jacket. through the frozen precipitation. By the time Winter’s been brief and merciful this year, unlike the early ‘90s when I moved to Liberal, when my A.J. slammed the door shut again, the air inside little Toyota struggled to climb over the ridges of was no warmer than when he had started clearing the windshield, but “it feels better in plowed snow that sliced through most here,” he said with an expression of stoic resolve intersections in town. That year — 1992 — I recognized. Compared to the weather, I blizzards closed the highways more than once, suppose the vehicle’s interior was an and starting with Thanksgiving, all the way improvement. That didn’t mean he had enjoyed through the beginning of Lent. In Liberal, the finger-numbing experience, any more than members of the Pancake Day committee broke out blow torches to de-ice the course on Lincoln he was savoring the fresh air of his newly cleared schedule. No doubt it still felt a bit barren. Avenue the morning of the race. Even so, the blank spaces were better than Winter in the 21st-century has been child’s continued overbooking. I was glad their father play compared to all that, and my own offspring had recognized the problem, ignored the squint dubiously when I reminisce about how discomfort of its solution, and continued to chip the weather was decades ago. At worst, they away at the excess with kind resolve. We couldn’t suspect me of embellishment; at best, they marvel at my faintheartedness when I declare the drive home with the view too obscured to navigate. Nor could we steer through life highway too icy to venture out, and cancel plans without room to breathe or clarity of vision. as I did one day earlier this month. I fell into my Sunday afternoon nap, grateful On the first Sunday of our newly simplified schedule, though, they tasted the fickle power of to have reached the real warmth of my house, thankful for the time to rest. Southwest Kansas weather. We’d hurried to the

Rachel Coleman

People have right to know how commissioners ranked candidates City Manager Mark Hall and city staff created a very good process on filling the vacancy to fill Bob Carlile’s position, but one question remains that has yet to be answered. How did the four commissioners rank the candidates? Many of you have posed that question to us, and we requested the forms the commissioners filled out during the process so we could share those results with you. Hall told us that they were not an open record and that he didn’t know where they were. Hall did a good job of explaining why he believed they were not an open record, but after consulting with Kansas Press Association attorney Mike Merriam, the state’s most formative expert on open meetings and open records, they are. Not only do you have a right to know how the candidates were ranked from “most qualified to least qualified,” as they were instructed to do, it is the best way to keep faith in our leadership on a decision that was considered to be predetermined. Hall said that commissioners can keep notes on their process, and that the public part of the process was when the commissioners made a motion and had a 4-0 vote in favor of Dave Harrison after the process was complete. He is right that commissioners can keep notes, and that those notes are not open records. However, what they cannot do is be given a sheet with specific instructions by city staff, turn those sheets back in, and then try to prevent those sheets from being made public. Hall’s defense for not releasing the results was that they were not

OUR OPINION giving points to the candidates, rather, they were ranking them. “It is called a ranking method,” Hall said. “They were not going in to a closed meeting, determining a winner and then never taking a vote. They did this all in the open.” Again, Hall is right, and the commission improved the process in keeping it in front of the people as they are required to do by law. But it still falls one step short of transparency by not revealing how the candidates were ranked by the four commissioners. “If these sheets are part of the formal process, then surely when they were distributed to the commissioners they were given instructions on what to do with them,” Merriam said. “An elected official can make his or her own notes for their own purposes, that would not be open, but marking up pieces of paper with instructions and then turning them in — they are open.” More importantly that they are open records and should be released to the public is simply that it is the right thing to do. Since Hall would not release them because he believed them to be protected, the Leader&Times asked each commissioner to do the right thing and reveal their list publicly. Commissioner Larry Koochel had no problem at all sharing his list with the public. “I haven’t said or done anything that I wouldn’t say or do in public,” he said. Thank you, Mr. Koochel, for your effort to keep the public informed. Koochel ranked the candidates as 1. Steve Leete, 2. Alaina Sill and 3. Dave Harrison. Janet Willimon recalled that she had selected Dave Harrison first but couldn’t remember the order of the final two.

Tim Long never returned repeated phone calls to ask him his order, and Joe Denoyer flat out refused to tell you how he ranked them. The commission should be commended on not making this a three-year appointment and allowing you to choose your own replacement in a year. And even though a year ago you removed Harrison from office only to have the commission put him back, he has a year to try to prove why he should remain a commissioner, even though he went from receiving 50 percent of the vote in 2007 to only 30 percent in 2011. And you should be able to evaluate your commissioners based on how they ranked their choices. If they refuse to reveal that to you, then you should evaluate them based on that as well. Monday morning, we will fill out a written request for the documents, not because we believe there was anything underhanded in the process, but because we believe the decision-making process of our elected officials is the only basis the voters have for evaluating the commissioners’ performance. If they are allowed to create a process that does not have transparency, then we should all be concerned about any concensus reached without accountability for how the determination was made. It is obvious that Harrison was the top choice of a majority of the commissioners, but they have the responsibility to reveal that to you. There will be no shocking revelation, but it is about accountability to the voters. You can applaud or criticize, but you will know. You have that right. If they refuse, if they try to hide behind the process rather than provide you the most information possible, not the least, how can you ever trust anything they do on your behalf?

ONLINE POLL Do you believe the public should have access to the ranking system in filling the commission vacancy? Vote at www.hpleader.com

Getting in Touch

The Leader & Times strives to represent the political views of the community by reflecting its political make-up in the selection of columnists. Have a view you’d like to share? Call us at 626-0840, or e-mail us at news@hpleader.com Business hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Liberal City Commission: City Hall; 324 N. Kansas Ave.; 626-2202. Seward County Commission: County Administration Building 515 N. Washington 626-3300. Kansas Senator Garrett Love, P.O. Box 1, Montezuma, KS 67867.Topeka office contact Info: (785) 296-7359. E-mail: garrett.love@senate.ks.gov. Kansas Senator Steve Morris, District 39: 600 Trindle, Hugoton, KS, 67951; Phone: 620-544-2084; E-mail: morris@senate.state.ks.us. Kansas House Rep. Carl Dean Holmes, District 125: P.O. Box 2288, Liberal, KS, 67905; Phone: (620) 624-7361. Topeka Office: 174-W Capitol Building, Topeka, KS 66612-1504. Phone: (785) 2967670. Fax: (785) 368-7074. Kansas House Rep. Steve Alford, District 124: 4179 East Road 19 Ulysses, Kansas 67880 Phone: (620) 356-1361. Email:j.stephen.alford@house.ks.go

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U.S. Representative Tim Huelskamp: 126 Cannon HOB Washington, DC 20515 Phone: (202) 225-2715 Fax: (202) 225-5124. Salina Office (785) 309-0572. E-mail: http://huelskamp.house.gov. U.S. Senator Jerry Moran: 4 Russell Courtyard (Temp), District of Columbia 20510-1604 Phone: (202) 2246521. Fax: (202) 228-6966; E-mail: MoranNews@moran.senate.gov U.S. Senator Pat Roberts: 100 Military Plaza, Suite 203, P.O. Box 550, Dodge City, KS 67801. Fax: (620) 227-

2264; Phone: (620) 227-2244; E-mail: pat_roberts@senate.gov. Tips on contacting elected officials: I Identify who you are and where you live — make it clear you are a constituent. Include phone and address so your official can contact you. I Keep to one topic per letter or call. If appropriate, refer to the specific ordinance, bill or date pertaining to the subject. I Be clear about what you hope your elected official will do. I Remain polite, even when disagreeing.


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© 2012 by King Features Syndicate

Chloe — EPIC PCS

Hi & Lois

Dear Dr. Brothers: I know you can’t be too careful these days, but I wonder if I am being paranoid. I met a guy through Internet dating, and he was very friendly and open. Before I started dating him, I checked him out as best I could, and found nothing suspicious. But he seems really interested in children, and he keeps asking if he can meet my granddaughter. I don’t want to have a dirty mind, but do you think I should be concerned because he loves children? He used to be a teacher. — C.W. Dear C.W.: I don’t suppose you have enough information to go on to have a very concrete concern about your new friend. When you say you checked him out, was it through anyone who has known him, or from sources on the Internet? The fact that he used to be a teacher is interesting: Most teachers like kids, or they wouldn’t be in the profession. But others choose careers that place them in the midst of youngsters so that they have an opportunity to behave in predatory ways. If you can discover why he “used to be” a teacher, that might be informative. Did he choose another career that brings him into the world of children? What I would pay attention to, though, is your gut feeling that the guy might be a little off. Although you have no evidence that anything is wrong, you are a mother and a grandmother with good instincts about what is right for you and your family. I certainly would not introduce this man to your granddaughter anytime soon, until and unless you are perfectly comfortable that your initial suspicions are groundless. And there is no reason — if you do introduce them — to leave him alone with her or any other child. You are right, you can’t be too careful. Predators don’t look like the big, bad wolf; they look like the friendly guy from the Internet.

Retail

Dear Dr. Brothers: I am a college student who is trying to decide how I feel about abortion. I know that my religion doesn’t approve of it, but it seems that if I got pregnant, I couldn’t handle giving a baby up for adoption, much less raising a baby right now. I have a boyfriend, but we are nowhere near being a permanent couple. I am afraid that if I had an abortion, I might go crazy or become depressed later. Is this likely to happen? I am already anxious. We had a scare just last month. — L.G. Dear L.G.: Your mental health sounds a little precarious already, so I hope you wouldn’t add to the stress by putting yourself in the position of having to make a serious decision about what to do if you became pregnant. There are new options available, such as the so-called morning-after pill, which would avoid all the trauma of an abortion. But the best option is to make sure you do not get pregnant in the first place, and since you are so conflicted, you need to look at all methods open to you and make sure that contraception is a priority. As to whether you would “go crazy” or become emotionally or mentally ill following an abortion, it’s impossible to know in advance what would happen. Those with prior mental-health issues tend to have a more difficult time. A new study coming out of the U.K. reviewed studies from the past 20 years and observed that ending a pregnancy does not have worse consequences, from a mental-health standpoint, than going through with a pregnancy if it is unwanted. However, pressure from the would-be father or a negative attitude about abortion can make the outcome more difficult for the pregnant woman. Aftercare and support are important, and there is no guarantee that the mental and emotional health of the mother won’t be affected.

Zits

Joyce Brothers

Hagar

Dustin

CRYPTOQUOTE

Blondie

Beetle Bailey

Baby Blues

Sunday, February 26, 2012 Page 4B


news@hpleader.com

u

WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE

8,151.96 +37.45

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

u

AMEX

2,469.62 +28.36

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

u

NASDAQ

2,963.75

+11.97

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg NoahHldgs 8.00 +1.83 Prestige 16.63 +3.13 WhitingP pf298.00+54.30 CmtyHlt 25.11 +4.38 CS VS3xSlv55.32 +9.44 KenCole 15.49 +2.64 MetroPCS 12.01 +1.67 CSVLgCrde66.19 +9.15 DBCmdDL 12.14 +1.64 GramrcyC 2.89 +.39

%Chg +29.7 +23.2 +22.3 +21.1 +20.6 +20.5 +16.2 +16.0 +15.6 +15.6

Name Last GreenHntr 2.84 NewConcEn3.70 MexcoEn 11.25 EllieMae n 8.98 PyramidOil 6.23 SamsO&G 3.01 Banro g 5.65 Bacterin 3.07 LucasEngy 3.03 Metalico 4.93

Chg +1.05 +1.25 +2.93 +2.23 +1.48 +.62 +.94 +.48 +.46 +.70

%Chg +58.7 +51.0 +35.2 +33.0 +31.2 +25.9 +20.0 +18.5 +17.9 +16.5

Name Last Vivus 22.13 ThrshdPhm 6.08 PlumasBc 3.90 Corcept 4.35 Onvia Inc 4.13 TOP Ship rs 3.03 DehaierMd 2.69 Burcon g 7.35 DiscovLab 3.40 LeGaga 5.25

Chg +10.14 +2.55 +1.60 +1.32 +1.10 +.78 +.69 +1.85 +.77 +1.13

%Chg +84.6 +72.2 +69.3 +43.5 +36.3 +34.6 +34.4 +33.6 +29.3 +27.4

Name Last Chg US Airwy 6.99 -1.91 GencoShip 7.00 -1.78 PennVa 4.88 -1.22 YingliGrn 3.82 -.92 TrinaSolar 7.80 -1.84 CSVS3xInSlv26.57 -6.16 GrafTech 12.80 -2.67 CSVInvCrd36.01 -7.44 Suntech 3.06 -.59 Flagstone 7.80 -1.44

%Chg -21.5 -20.3 -20.0 -19.4 -19.1 -18.8 -17.3 -17.1 -16.2 -15.6

Name Last Chg SynthBiol 2.32 -.48 eMagin 3.56 -.55 Medgenic n 4.91 -.75 ProlorBio 5.44 -.76 YM Bio g 2.00 -.26 PernixTh 8.70 -.97 AvalonHld 3.67 -.38 ElephTalk 2.28 -.22 HstnAEn 11.82 -1.02 Lannett 4.32 -.35

%Chg -17.1 -13.4 -13.3 -12.3 -11.5 -10.0 -9.4 -8.8 -7.9 -7.5

Name Last GTx Inc 3.43 CarverB rs 6.10 CelldexTh 3.85 RubiconTc 9.84 CUI Gbl rs 5.05 TesseraTch16.37 Daktronics 9.25 Sky-mobi 4.35 JetBlue 4.81 Micrvisn rs 3.92

Chg -2.37 -2.13 -1.02 -2.35 -1.20 -3.59 -2.02 -.94 -1.01 -.80

%Chg -40.9 -25.9 -20.9 -19.3 -19.2 -18.0 -17.9 -17.8 -17.3 -16.9

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 8544666 7.88 -.14 S&P500ETF4591282136.93 +.52 SPDR Fncl2303954 14.67 -.12 SprintNex2196481 2.47 +.17 iShR2K 1622511 82.64 -.15 AlcatelLuc1601728 2.59 +.14 iShEMkts1531163 44.19 +.26 GenElec 1512897 19.24 +.13 FordM 1489411 12.23 -.52 Citigrp rs 1428919 32.35 -.57 Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

1,811 1,317 340 12 3,191 63 14,266,209,686

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) CheniereEn180580 NovaGld g155733 YM Bio g 143079 SamsO&G137623 DenisnM g 95733 NA Pall g 89929 GoldStr g 80066 NwGold g 79698 Rentech 62176 TrnsatlPet 62078

Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

Last 14.05 8.69 2.00 3.01 1.94 2.83 2.10 11.84 1.83 1.57

DIARY

Chg +.05 +.26 -.26 +.62 +.09 +.18 +.10 +.36 +.01 +.20

290 219 32 2 530 21 399,770,982

Name Vol (00) Last Chg SiriusXM 2421296 2.20 +.06 PwShs QQQ170167663.96 +.53 Microsoft 1660738 31.48 +.23 Intel 1588720 26.70 -.67 Cisco 1337687 20.14 -.15 Dell Inc 1248000 17.43 -.73 FrontierCm1118525 4.64 -.14 Oracle 953973 29.25 +.46 Vivus 900530 22.13 +10.14 MicronT 869398 7.95 -.48

Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

1,173 1,496 230 41 2,730 61 6,887,083,085

on the

HAPPENINGS high plains

American Legion Auxiliary seeking applicants to Sunflower Girls State

The American Legion Auxiliary is inviting high school junior girls interested in participating in Sunflower Girls State during the week of June 3 to 8 at the University of Kansas in Lawrence to apply now. Application deadline is March 31. The Sunflower Girls State program develops leadership and pride in American citizenship; it educates delegates about our system of government, instills a greater understanding of American traditions and stimulates a desire to actively participate in the government process. For more information, go to www.ksgirlsstate.org or call 624-2964 or contact the high school counselor.

APPLY NOW

Sign up for Beta Sigma Phi’s 8th annual Scholarship Golf Tournament

Beta Sigma Phi is hosting its 8th annual Scholarship Golf Tournament on Saturday,April 28, at Willow Tree Golf Course. It will be a four-person scramble (two men and two women) with a 9 a.m. shotgun start.The entry fee is $50 per person, and lunch will be provided. It does not include golf cart. There will be a 90 percent cash pay back, with other cash drawings and beverages following the round.The field will be limited to the first 30 teams, so call Willow Tree at 626-0175 to sign up.

SIGN UP NOW

Seward County Relay For Life 2012 kicks off Monday evening at Hampton Inn

American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life of Seward County 2012 kickoff will be from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday at the Hampton Inn on East Pancake Boulevard in Liberal. Everyone is invited to come join us for free food (barbecue donated by Billy’s), fun, door prizes and excitement.

MONDAY

Fire department is testing fire hydrants throughout city The Liberal Fire Department is testing all fire hydrants within the city from now throughout the summer until completed. Residences may encounter rusty water during the testing procedure.To remedy this problem, it is recommended running water through a garden hose or a faucet.The water should clear up within a short amount of time. For more information, call the fire department at 626-0128 or the water department at 626-0138.

TESTING HAS STARTED

THE WEEK IN REVIEW Name

AT&T Inc AirProd AlcatelLuc Alcoa Anadarko BP PLC BakrHu BkofAm Bar iPVix Boeing Caterpillar Cemex ChesEng Chevron Cisco Citigrp rs CocaCola CSVS2xVxS Deere Dell Inc DirSCBear DukeEngy ElPasoCp ExxonMbl FordM FrontierCm GenElec Hallibrtn HarleyD Hastings HewlettP HomeDp iShSilver iShEMkts

Div

Last

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

1.76 30.34 +.33 +1.1 +.3 2.32 91.94 -.12 -0.1 +7.9 ... 2.59 +.14 +5.7 +66.0 .12 10.43 +.28 +2.8 +20.6 .36 87.30 -.75 -0.9 +14.4 1.92 46.99 -.63 -1.3 +9.9 .60 51.96 +1.90 +3.8 +6.8 .04 7.88 -.14 -1.7 +41.7 ... 25.05 -1.55 -5.8 -29.5 1.76 76.06 +.71 +0.9 +3.7 1.84 116.00 +2.05 +1.8 +28.0 ... 7.36 -1.16 -13.6 +36.5 .35 25.45 +.74 +3.0 +14.2 3.24 109.08 +2.42 +2.3 +2.5 .32 20.14 -.15 -0.7 +11.8 .04 32.35 -.57 -1.7 +23.0 2.04 69.00 -.05 -0.1 -1.4 ... 16.66 -.39 -2.3 -47.9 1.64 83.27 -.60 -0.7 +7.7 ... 17.43 -.73 -4.0 +19.1 ... 18.39 +.05 +0.3 -30.6 1.00 21.10 +.20 +1.0 -4.1 .04 27.16 ... ... +2.2 1.88 87.34 +1.72 +2.0 +3.0 .20 12.23 -.52 -4.1 +13.7 .40 4.64 -.14 -2.9 -9.9 .68 19.24 +.13 +0.7 +7.4 .36 38.51 +2.22 +6.1 +11.6 .62 47.04 +.99 +2.1 +21.0 ... 1.85 ... ... +15.6 .48 26.64 -2.95 -10.0 +3.4 1.16 46.98 +.27 +0.6 +11.8 ... 34.37 +2.09 +6.5 +27.6 .81 44.19 +.26 +0.6 +16.5

Name

Div

iShR2K 1.02 Intel .84 IBM 3.00 JPMorgCh 1.00 JohnJn 2.28 Kroger .46 MGM Rsts ... McDnlds 2.80 Merck 1.68 MicronT ... Microsoft .80 NokiaCp 1.26 OcciPet 2.16 ONEOK 2.44 Oracle .24 Penney .80 PepsiCo 2.06 Pfizer .88 PwShs QQQ .46 S&P500ETF 2.58 Schlmbrg 1.10 SiriusXM ... SonicCorp ... SprintNex ... SPDR Fncl .22 TimeWarn 1.04 VangEmg .91 Vivus ... WalMart 1.46 WeathfIntl ... WellsFargo .48 Wendys Co .08 WmsCos 1.04 Yahoo ...

Last

82.64 26.70 197.76 38.28 64.46 23.54 14.00 100.32 38.20 7.95 31.48 5.80 103.86 83.87 29.25 41.72 63.31 21.18 63.96 136.93 79.85 2.20 7.69 2.47 14.67 37.69 44.51 22.13 58.79 16.50 30.18 5.07 29.31 14.89

NEWS

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

-.15 -0.2 +12.1 -.67 -2.4 +10.1 +4.34 +2.2 +7.5 -.19 -0.5 +15.1 +.04 +0.1 -1.7 -.38 -1.6 -2.8 -.66 -4.5 +34.2 +.33 +0.3 ... -.36 -0.9 +1.3 -.48 -5.7 +26.4 +.23 +0.7 +21.3 +.31 +5.6 +20.3 -.06 -0.1 +10.8 +1.78 +2.2 -3.3 +.46 +1.6 +14.0 -.96 -2.2 +18.7 +.63 +1.0 -4.6 -.01 ... -2.1 +.53 +0.8 +14.6 +.52 +0.4 +9.1 +2.11 +2.7 +16.9 +.06 +2.6 +20.9 -.29 -3.6 +14.3 +.17 +7.4 +5.6 -.12 -0.8 +12.8 -.01 ... +4.3 +.23 +0.5 +16.5 +10.14 +84.6 +127.0 -3.69 -5.9 -1.6 -1.29 -7.3 +12.7 -.91 -2.9 +9.5 -.13 -2.4 -5.5 +.20 +0.7 +8.7 -.12 -0.8 -7.7

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MONEY RATES

Prime Rate Discount Rate Federal Funds Rate Treasuries 3-month 6-month 5-year 10-year 30-year

Last 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

Pvs Week 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

0.09 0.14 0.89 1.98 3.10

0.077 0.12 0.86 2.00 3.15

CURRENCIES

Australia Britain Canada Euro Japan Mexico Switzerlnd

Last

Pvs Day

.9348 1.5889 1.0002 .7430 80.98 12.9083 .8950

.9360 1.5716 .9988 .7498 80.08 12.8481 .9041

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show dollar in foreign currency.

Sunday, February 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

5A

WEEKLY DOW JONES Dow Jones industrials Close: 12,982.95 1-week change: 33.08 (0.3%)

13,000

CLOSED 15.82 MON

TUES

-27.02

46.02

-1.74

WED

THUR

FRI

12,000 11,000 10,000

A

S

O

N

MUTUAL FUNDS

Total Assets Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV American Funds BalA m MA 31,812 19.40 American Funds CapIncBuA m IH 55,268 51.31 American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS 45,986 35.42 American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 30,278 39.63 American Funds FnInvA m LB 31,515 38.77 American Funds GrthAmA m LG 56,202 32.17 American Funds IncAmerA m MA 53,653 17.46 American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 44,121 29.45 American Funds NewPerspA m WS 29,106 29.22 American Funds WAMutInvA m LV 38,964 30.03 Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 37,981 33.20 Dodge & Cox Stock LV 38,384 112.56 Fidelity Contra LG 56,729 74.48 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 36,463 2.17 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv IB 26,871 13.21 PIMCO TotRetA m CI 26,725 11.10 PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI 31,617 11.10 PIMCO TotRetIs CI 149,075 11.10 Vanguard 500Adml LB 54,136 126.16 Vanguard InstIdxI LB 62,387 125.34 Vanguard InstPlus LB 36,777 125.35 Vanguard TotBdAdml CI 31,945 11.03 Vanguard TotIntl d FB 31,509 14.79 Vanguard TotStIAdm LB 52,167 34.36 Vanguard TotStIIns LB 32,382 34.36 Vanguard TotStIdx LB 65,094 34.34 Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 31,306 57.28

D

J

Total Return/Rank 4-wk 12-mo 5-year +3.1 +7.2/A +3.3/B +3.8 +6.4/A +1.3/C +5.6 +0.4/C +0.4/B +6.6 -3.4/B +0.2/A +4.4 +3.3/D +1.5/A +5.8 +3.1/D +1.1/D +2.6 +6.9/A +2.1/C +4.1 +3.6/D +0.4/C +6.1 +1.1/C +2.3/A +2.9 +9.3/A +0.7/B +6.5 -5.8/C -2.0/A +3.9 +1.3/D -2.8/D +6.5 +7.3/B +4.0/B +2.4 +3.0/E +3.1/D +3.1 +5.2/C +10.9/A +1.6 +6.0/D +8.0/A +1.6 +6.2/D +8.2/A +1.7 +6.5/D +8.5/A +4.1 +6.8/B +1.0/B +4.1 +6.8/B +1.0/B +4.1 +6.8/B +1.0/B +0.9 +8.4/A +6.4/B +6.6 -4.3/C -2.0/B +4.5 +6.6/B +1.5/A +4.5 +6.6/B +1.5/A +4.5 +6.5/B +1.4/B +2.5 +6.7/A +4.4/A

F Pct Min Init Load Invt 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 4.25 1,000 NL 50,000 3.75 1,000 NL 1,000,000 NL 1,000,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL200,000,000 NL 10,000 NL 3,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 50,000

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.

S&P 500 index hits highest point since June 2008 For the second day this week, the Dow Jones industrial average nudged above 13,000 then pulled back By MATTHEW CRAFT • AP BusinessWriter NEW YORK — A two-point gain was enough to push the Standard & Poor’s 500 index to its highest level since June 2008, three months before the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the darkest days of the financial crisis. The S&P 500 index closed at 1,365.74, beating its 2011 closing high by two points. For the second day this week, the Dow Jones industrial average nudged above 13,000 then pulled back. It rose 29 points in the morning but wavered in the afternoon. The Dow dropped 1.74 points to close at 12,982.95. American Express was the leading stock among the 30 that make up the average, gaining 1.2 percent. It was a similar story on Tuesday, when the Dow flitted above 13,000 three times but ended the day lower. The average hasn’t closed above 13,000 since May 19, 2008. What will it take for the Dow to close above 13,000 and stay there? Mark Lamkin, CEO of Lamkin Wealth Management in Louisville, Ky., said it would require a surprising news event, like a huge merger or an economic report that blows past expectations. “It needs some type of surprise, a bombshell,” Lamkin said. “We’ve had a pretty good run over the past four months. Now it’s going to take something great to keep it above 13,000.” The two economic reports out Friday didn’t make the cut. A consumer sentiment index taken by the University of Michigan and Reuters edged up in February to its highest level in a year. And the Commerce Department reported that sales of new homes dipped slightly in January, but the figure still topped economists’ estimates. It also said sales in the final three months of 2011 were higher than previously reported. “The numbers are just OK,” Lamkin said. “They weren’t bad, but they weren’t great, either.” In other trading, the Nasdaq composite index rose 6.77 points to 2,963.75. Oil prices hit a nine-month high of $109.77 a barrel. The price of oil has jumped 10 percent this month

amid rising concerns about a conflict with Iran. The euro added a penny against the dollar, hitting $1.346, its highest since Dec. 5. Greece made a formal offer to creditors to swap their Greek government bonds for new ones, another step toward knocking $142 billion off its debts. The swap is part of a deal to prevent Greece from defaulting on a debt payment due next month. Stock indexes have been climbing since November as European officials redoubled their efforts to contain the region’s debt crisis and the European Central Bank extended cheap loans to troubled banks. The S&P 500 index has gained 8.6 percent to start 2012, better than its long-term

annual average gain. In contrast to the volatile trading of late last year, the market’s gains have been small but steady. To Lamkin, the lack of large swings looks ominous. The world is still full of dangers, he said. Lamkin tells his clients that the top risks are another flare-up in the European debt crisis and a war between Israel and Iran. “When the next big thing happens, and it will, you’re going to see a pullback,” he said. “I think we’re due.” Among stocks making big moves: J Sprint Nextel Corp. lost 2 percent. The country’s largest cable company, Comcast, filed a suit against Sprint Nextel, alleging that it was violating Comcast’s patents.

J Gap fell 4 percent. The clothing retailer reported a 40 percent plunge in quarterly profit after the market closed Thursday. Gap said higher costs and deep discounts weighed on its revenue. J Deckers Outdoor Corp. sank 14 percent after the maker of Ugg boots and Teva footwear said higher costs will lead to lower profits for the quarter and full year. J Kenneth Cole Production Inc. soared 18 percent to $15.49 on news that Kenneth Cole is offering to buy the rest of the company. Cole currently holds about 47 percent of the company and has offered would give stockholders $15 per share, a 15 percent premium to the company’s Thursday closing price.


High Plains Leader&Times

626-0840 “You got the drive, We have the Direction” OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass Pets/passenger policy. Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. 1-800-5287825

Public Notice (First published in the High Plains Daily Leader & Times, Liberal, Kansas, on February 19,2012)t3

Kala McCrosky 220 W. Hoover

Reginald Porter 1420 E. College Way #14 Olathe Kansas Desiree Tedford 205 Aspen Street Gardner, Kansas Marietta Heck 230 S. Pershing

Adam Van Wyhe 1119 Western at Economy Storage, 1239 Larrabee Rd. must submit proof of claim on or before 03/10/2012 otherwise goods will be sold for non-payment of rent.

Economy Storage PO Box 2617 Liberal, Kansas 67901

Auctions

CONSIGN YOUR CAR TODAY! April 20 & 21, 2012. Branson Car Auction, Branson, Missouri. 300 ExpectedCall Today! 1-800-3553063. www.bransonauction.com AUCTION 2-Day March 10-11 Manhattan, KS New Construction Materials, Police Seizures, Kitchen Cabinets, Granite Countertops, Doors, Flooring, Vehicles, Jewelry; Cake store liquidation! For more info visit TotallyAuction.com

5

Classified

To place an ad call

Any person or firm having a legitimate claim against goods stored by

Section B

Structural Steel Erectors and Certified Structural Welders needed for commercial building construction projects throughout the state of Kansas and Southern Nebraska. You provide your own transportation to the job site. We pay mileage to the job and per diem pay. Jobs average 50 hours a week with some weekends. We offer Medical, Dental, Life and Disability insurance as well as paid vacations and holidays. Contact Leiser Construction, LLC for an application toll free (855) 437-2747

T N T HYDRAULIC is looking for a mechanic. Lathe experience helpful. Must have own hand tools & valid drivers licencepaid holiday- 40hrs a week. Apply in person TNT Hydraulic 720 W. Pine Liberal, KS,67901

CDL driver wanted to haul grain and hay. local runs. Nice equipment. Home every night. Must have 2 years exp. TRIPLE S ENTERPRISES 620-629-3603

10 Security Officers Needed Immediately in Hugoton Area. $8-$10 per hr. IMPERIAL SECURITY 866-840-2066 Ask for Sam

Office Clerical Positions available: Assistant bookkeeper and payroll clerk. Must have experience with spreadsheets. Accounting software a plus but not required. Office clerk: Good computer skills required with additional office duties and prior office experience. Bilingual skills a plus. Call Cyndi Kruse, Sunrise Staffing Services, 322 N. Lincoln, Liberal, Kansas. 620-626-5085 to schedule and interview or visit www.sunrisestaffingservices.com to complete an on line application.

626-9854 HOME WEEKLY. Regional & OTR Avail. Earn Top Pay & Great Benefits. Call Kevin 877325-4996 x 211. Owner Operators also needed. Central Transportation Services. www.ctsco.com

Casual Class A Drivers Wanted Drive OTR- 53ft Vans/Rfs. 40CMP$300.00 Orientation Pay. Can Pass a Physical/Drug Test. CORE CARRIER 888-454-2673 Apply @ corecarrier.com

Wheatridge Park Care Center is looking for the right people to join our dynamic team of caring individuals! DIETARY COOK PM shift to do food preparation, beverages, cleaning and other activities within the department. Experience preferred but will train the right individual.

Sunday February 26, 2012 FAX

Wheatridge Park Care Center is a premier provider of long-term care services who believes in “Dignity in Life”. Along with a great team of skilled professionals, Wheatridge Park offers excellent benefits, an exceptional work environment and the opportunity to learn and grow. Interested individuals should apply at: Wheatridge Park Care Center 1501 S. Holly Drive Liberal, KS, 67901 Ph 620-624-0130 Fax 620-624-0144 EOE

Part time Custodian needed! First Christian Church, 907 N. Clay, Liberal, KS Apply in Person MondayFriday 1-3pm.

www.hpleader.com

A Leader in Bulk C o m m o d i t y Transportation is seeking part-time end dump drivers for Saturday and Sunday in Garden City . Driving within a 150 Mile radius, home every night, paid by the hour and paid every Friday. Must have a class “A” CDL with at least 2 years experience and clean MVR. For recruiting call Debra @ 316-8319700 Ext 100.

A Leader in Bulk C o m m o d i t y Transportation is seeking experienced end dump drivers in the Garden City/Liberal areas. Day cab trucks available, driving within a 150 mile radius, home every night, paid every Friday along with quarterly

FULL time diesel mechanic wanted in Garden City area, pd by the hour, weekly pay, service truck provided, health ins after 90 days. Must be self starter, computer skills, valid class ‘A’ CDL license, available for on call nights and weekends. If interested please call Debra at 316-8319700.

bonuses, BCBS Ins. after 90 days, must have class “A” CDL with at least 2 years driving experience and clean MVR. For recruiting call Debra @ 316-831-9700 ext. 100

Milt’s Cell (620)629-1747 Email: milt@ptsi.net Connie’s Cell (620)629-0000 Email:cseigrist@hotmail.com

SERVICE MANAGER

Central Power is looking for an experienced Service Manager for our Liberal, KS facility. Ideal candidates need to be team players, organized and customer oriented. We offer a competitive wage based on your experience, and a full benefit package. Relo negotiated. Fax resume to 816-781-4518 or apply in person at 1150 E. Highway 54, Liberal, KS. EOE

(First published in High Plains Daily Leader & Times on February 23, 2012)t3

Employment Business Opportunities

PROFITABLE KANSAS BUSINESSES for sale by owners. Many types, sizes, locations, terms. $25K to $15M. Other states available www.BizSale.com or Call 1-800-617-4204

Help Wanted

Transportation Company is seeking full time diesel mechanic in the Liberal/ Garden city area. Must be a self starter, be able to work unsupervised, available for on call services on the weekends, must have a class “A” CDL. Paid by the hour , paid every Friday, BCBS insurance. available after 90 days. For recruiting call Debra @ 316-831-9700 Ext 100. Kids World Daycare is in need of part time help. Approx 10-12 hrs a week. CPR certification & Early Childhood background preferred. Call Cheryl @ 620-626-5066

Call: Denasa at

620-626-0840 Peek A Boo! 1501 N. Calhoun Avenue $160,000 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Call Cheryl – 629-1264

408 Cornell Avenue $126,500

1545 N. Bellaire Ave $258,900 5 BR, 3 BA, 3+ Car Garage Basement Call Connie – 629-0000

$399,000

860 Holly Ridge Court

6 BR, 4 BA, 3+ Car Garage, Basement Call Cheryl – 629-1264

2160 Rose Lane $155,000 5 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage Partial Basement Call Cheryl – 629-1264

604 N. Webster Avenue $162,000 4 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage Basement Call Cheryl – 629-1264

2431 Lilac Drive $439,500 5 BR, 4 BA, 3+ Car Gar. Basesment Call Office - 624-1212

2501 Arrowhead Lane $217,000 5 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage Full Basement Call Bill – 482-1114

2420 Lilac Drive $349,500 5 BR, 4 BA, 2 Car Gar. Basement Call Richard - 655-6981

Beautiful Condo!! 303 N. Kansas Ave., #301 $235,500 3 BR, 3 BA Call Don – 629-7422

1640 N. Roosevelt Avenue $239,000 4 BR, 4 BA, 3+ Car Garage Full Basement Call Richard – 655-6981

724 S. New York Ave. $85,000 3 BR, 1 BA, Single Carport Basement Call Milt – 629-1747

2110 Bellaire Court Reduced $128,500 5 BR, 2 BA, Basement Call Milt- 629-1747

321 Canna Lane $315,000 8 BR, 3 BA, 3+ Car Garage Basement Call Milt – 629-1747

5988 Road 16 $156,000 4 BR, 2 BA, 3+ Car Garage Basement Call Ron – 629-7405

1505 Tulane Court $299,000 5 BR, 4 BA, 2 Car Garage Basement Call Bill – 482-1114

311 Yale Ave. Price Reduced $85,000

901 N. Sherman $85,000 2 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Call Office - 624-1212

Land on Tucker Rd. $325,000 More or less 220 acres Call Milt – 629-1747

1002 S. Calhoun Ave. $75,000 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Call Maria – 391-3900

1140 S. Pershing Ave. $225,000 Church Property + Parsonage (house) 3 BR, 2BA, 1896 sq. ft. Call Milt- 629-1747

3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage,

Call Office - 624-1212

3BR, 1 BA, 1 Car Garage

Call Bill - 482-1114


6A

Sunday, February 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

Hanson ... O Continued from Page 1A

based in Elkhart. “I’ll be based out of Rolla and also be over Richfield, Dermot, Feterith,” he said. “It’s basic operations, grain condition, making sure people have what they need as far as fertilizer delivered to them or chemical delivered to them.” Prior to coming on board with KState, Hanson had worked with Co-op until 1999, and after getting a call from that company, and some time to consider, the choice was made. “I decided I’d be able to be home more and not travel so much,” he said. The Extension hosted a reception for Hanson Friday afternoon, and during that time, the agent reflected on his days working with K-State. “The main thing is the kids and working with them,” he said. “I saw a lot of good come out of this. I’ve got a lot of good relationships. I enjoyed my time here. I got to take trips and participate in things I never would have been able to such as a trip to Mexico to learn about their culture and their farming practices.” Hanson also took part in an FBI symposium on agro-terrorism, and he likewise was involved the Extension’s Change Agent State program, which helps people learn about the diverse culture of both Kansas and the Extension itself. “I helped put on some trainings for agro-terrorism and agricultural disaster preparation,” he said. Hanson said, though, he got the most out of his job through the relationships he had with the people he came into contact with in

NEWS

his time as an agent. “I’ll definitely miss it,” he said. “I’m not going to be a stranger. I’ll definitely show up here and see people and visit with them. It was a very difficult decision, probably the toughest decision I’ve ever made in my life.” Hanson added he will continue to help out with the Seward County Five State Fair. “As much as I can,” he said. “That’s not going to be during harvest, so hopefully, in the evening, I’ll be able to come over to help with some stuff. Definitely want to be there to help out with the ‘barnyard buddies.’ I think that’s a very neat program that we got started.” In addition to K-State, Hanson was a community supporter in other areas such as helping with the Local Emergency Planning Committee and giving talks to many different organizations around Liberal. Hanson is also a Master Gardener, and he said horticulture was the biggest part of his job “from the time that things started budding out until the fall.” “I learned a lot about horticulture and taught a lot of people about horticulture,” he said. “That’s a pretty neat part of the job.” In the Seward County Extension office, Hanson also helped out with projects for family and consumer science agent Kathy Bloom, something he said brought some variety to his job. “I really hope the person that gets K- S ta t e E xt ensi on A g ent Mi ke H an son s ha r es a l a ug h wi th A nab el C l ine sm it h, r ig ht , a t his r ece pt io n Fr ida y af te r noo n. Aft er wo r ki ng as a n hired is willing to work with Kathy a g ent f o r e ig ht y ea r s, H a nso n is lea v i ng t he E xt en si on o ff ic e. S t a r ti ng Ma r c h 5, he w il l be co me t he o per a t io ns m a nag er o f t he E lk har t C o as much as I’ve been willing,” he o p. L&T photo/Robert Pierce said. “It’s a fun part of the job. It’s something different to do. You don’t get stuck in a rut doing the same old thing day in day out. Definitely good relationships and good rapport with everybody here in the office, and that’s something I’ll definitely miss.”

Want the best news on the high plains at the touch of a finger?

USD No. 480 band program presents the Liberal Band Festival • Provided by USD No. 480 Three bands will be performing on Monday Night’s Band Festival. First on the program is the Combined 6th Grade Band, under the direction of Grant Mathews. These students are from Cottonwood and Sunflower Intermediate Schools. Their concert program, in order of performance, is the Rondo Marziale, Midnight Sky, Midnight Mission and Gettysburg. The next group onstage is the Combined West Middle School/South Middle School Band, under the direction of Ginger Zingara, from Dodge City Community College. These 7th

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and 8th graders have been prepared for this event by their directors, Zeb Tiedeman and Charla Lewis, respectively. Their program includes the The Center Ring, Abandoned Treasure Hunt, Barnyard Blues, and a medley of P. I. Tchaikovsky’s Greatest Hits. Finishing up the evening is “That” Liberal Band with their indoor version of the “Grease 2012 Musical.” Parents, friends and the general public are cordially invited to attend this very entertaining event and as usual there is no admission fee. The LHS Band Boosters will have a Fish Fry ticket booth set up in the Commons for folks who haven’t purchased their tickets yet.

There’s an app for that!

Who: Bands 6th through 12th grade What: Liberal Band Festival When: 7 p.m. Monday Where: James Maskus Auditorium

Hot tub installation on campus roof a mystery ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Officials are puzzled over a mysterious hot tub that was installed — and then removed — from the roof of a building on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor. But a group of “creative” students are believed to be the culprits, Computer Science and Engineering building spokesman Steven Crang told AnnArbor.com on Friday. Initially reported by the Michigan Daily campus newspaper, the hot tub first was noticed Saturday, had visitors and was gone by Monday night. “People were kind of flabbergasted,” Crang said. “It was obviously unexpected. It was pretty creative and now it’s gone. It left a

buzz in its wake.” Despite its short stay, students called the hot tub the Bob and Betty Beyster Bubbler after the couple who donated $15 million to the school. The building is named after them. The philanthropic couple “found it amusing,” Crang said. “It’s apparently people who are close to the department because they were able to gain access to the building and install the tub,” he said of whoever installed it. “The thing that intrigued everyone was that it was on the fourth-floor balcony. It’s a large hot tub and the doors that lead out to the balcony are not real big, so they had to do some work to get it out there.”

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6B

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 25,2012 LEADER&TIMES

news@hpleader.com

High Plains

Bobwhite & Blue Scale Quail eggs, chicks, & adults. NPIP & AI tested. Delivery & Shipping available. Call 580-528-1222 or 580-528-1422

ADOLESCENT SUPPORT WORKER

 Must be 21 years of age or older  4 year college degree in Human Services or 2 year Associate with 1 year experience in the field  Demonstrate ability to teach at risk youth between the ages of 10 17 years old, be a positive role model and be able wo work with others on the team  Possess a valid driver’s license and necessary insurance  Will be screened through KBI and Kansas Child Abuse and Neglect Central Registry  Be physically fit Send resume to P.O. Box 1961 Liberal, Kansas 67901 or call for interview 620-624-8544 E-mail: ilove@swko.net

Delivery driver needed at Beaver Express. Must have a CDL Class B & Hazmat. Apply at 501 Industrial Rd. No Phone Calls.

Good Samaritan - Liberal is looking for quality RN’s, LPN’s and CMA’s. Apply at 2160 Zinnia Lane, Liberal, KS or www.good-sam.com EEO/Drug testing required. Annual 2012 Concession Area Available at Meade State Park & Lake “Visitor Center”

The Friends of Meade State Park & Lake are now accepting proposals for anyone interested in being the vender/operator at the Visitor Center midMarch until year-end 2011. Contact Rodger DeGarmo at 620.873.8795 on or before Tuesday, March 20, 2012.

Situation - Job Wanted

OPPORTUNITY!! Change you or your child’s life with music! Piano lessons- $11 a week. Music builds character, enhances selfesteem, and encourages perseverance. Will give one student free lessons in exchange for conversational Spanish lessons. 620-391-0653

Education

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-220-3977 www.CenturaOnline.com

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-248-7449

Real Estate

Apartments for Rent 1-2-3 bdrm low-income apts available. No pets. Pick up application at Westkan Apts. 104 Harold Blvd, Liberal, KS. HUD Vouchers Welcome

Classified

FOR RELEASE SATURDAY, FEB. 25, 2012

Hints from Heloise ®

The Southwest Guidance Center Is seeking to fill 2 postions Full-Time Parent & Peer Support Specialist

Parent Support Specialist The successful applicant will possess the following characteristics: Team player, coach, flexible, dependable and have an interest in assisting families through the process of interpreting service choices for their children.

E.H.O.

Applicant must be at least 21 years of age Have a high school diploma (or equivalent) Minimum of two years experience working with children. Must pass KBI, SRS child abuse check and motor vehicles screen. Peer Support Specialist The primary function of a peer support specialist is to assist individuals experiencing symptoms of mental illness develop skills to help in their own treatment and recovery.

Several 1 bedroom apartments with kitchenettes. All bills paid including FREE cable. Starting at $625 per month. Storage units also available. 620629-5604.

Applicant must be at least 18 years of age Have a high school diploma (or equivalent) Possess keyboarding skills and computer knowledge Self identify as a present or former consumer of mental health services. Successfully pass KBI, SRS abuse checks and a motor vehicles screen. Interested persons may submit a resume to:

New 2 & 3 bedroom apartments, starting at $700.00, new appliances, new carpet, new everything, water paid. 620629-5604

Leader&Times

Geraldine Barrows Office Manager/HR Southwest Guidance Center PO Box 2945 • Liberal, KS 67905-2945 620-624-8171 An Equal Opportunity Employer

Sudoku

Soup Up Your Canned Soup! Dear Readers: It’s winter, and what better way to warm up on a cold day than to have a HOT BOWL OF SOUP? If you’re too busy to make a big pot of homemade soup, I have a few hints for making canned soup more appetizing. Try these: * Try adding grated cheese, chopped hard-boiled eggs or a few croutons to thick soups for extra flavor. * To jazz up cream soups, add a dollop of sour cream, yogurt or chopped herbs. * For clear soups, add dumplings, won tons, rice or noodles to give the soup a little more substance. * For chili or bean soups, add slices of avocado or some grated cheese, and top with a little sour cream. If you’d like to try new soup recipes, I have several in my Heloise’s Spectacular Soups pamphlet. To receive one, send $5 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (65 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Soup, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 782795001. FYI: If your soup is too hot, toss in an ice cube, or better yet, some frozen veggies! — Heloise PILLOW HELPER

Dear Heloise: I look forward to reading your column each morning in the San Angelo Standard-Times here in the great state of Texas. Clean used pillows, towels and blankets are welcomed at your local animal shelter. There are so many animals that would welcome a soft pillow to rest on. This is a great way to help an animal and recycle at the same time. Check

Yesterday’s Sudoku Answer

with your local shelters to find out if they would like your used pillows, etc. — Nancy in San Angelo, Texas PET PAL

Dear Readers: Bill Steele of Manchester, N.H., sent a picture of his long-haired, tricolored cat, Muffy, sitting on a couch specially made for her by Bill’s son. Bill says Muffy is his best friend! To see Muffy and our other Pet Pals, visit www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” — Heloise A WORN-OUT KEY

Dear Heloise: My car ignition seemed to be “jammed” and unable to be turned on. A neighbor suggested that it might be due to the ignition, and it would cost several hundred dollars to have it replaced. Fortunately, my honest mechanic suggested that it might simply be because my key was worn out. Sure enough! When I tried the second key (that came with the car), it worked perfectly. It had never dawned on me that car keys could wear out! Stupid me! — Elaine W., via email GROCERY GAL

Dear Heloise: My hint is for grocery shoppers. I use an old shower-curtain ring and hook it on the side of the grocery cart. I hang my handbag on it. No more squished bread, crushed chips or bruised fruit, and no broken eggs! Also, I used to be called the bag lady before they sold those fancy recycled or reusable bags; I had about 15 canvas bags that I made myself! — Marie from Harrisburg, Pa. ©2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.

P

Crossword CUSTOMER SERVICE: (800) 708-7311 EXT. 236

Horoscope

JACQUELINE BIGAR’S STARS

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, FEB. 27, 2012 BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

For entertainment purpose only. The Daily Leader does not endorse predictions.

Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. A baby born today has a Sun in Pisces and a Moon in Taurus.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 27, 2012: Energy combines with drive this year. You will be close to unstoppable when you are focused. You also will express yourself with precision in building more support for projects, your lifestyle and anything else of importance. If you are single, your strength and awareness make you desirable on yet another level, causing others to feel intimidated. The person you hook up with this year might not be right for your life. You will enjoy the bond nevertheless. If you are attached, include your significant other more often in your plans. You do not want him or her to feel isolated. You could work together to make a goal a reality. TAURUS understands you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ##### You have the right words to convince another person of how skilled you are. You could be uncomfortable with a boss, no matter how nice he or she is. Stay on top of your work and accept the situation. Tonight: Pick up several items you need. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ##### You are all smiles, as others let you know that they are there for you. You gain insight as you connect with them. A new interest, be it a person or hobby, seizes your time and attention. There is little you can do but explore and

learn more. Tonight: Whatever makes you smile. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### Listen with a touch of cynicism to news that comes forward. You could be surprised by what is happening. Use a free moment to catch up on another’s news. You might like what you hear. Tonight: Know what you want. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ##### Keep the grand plan in your mind’s eye. You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening, but if you make your goal a high priority, you will be on cruise control. Listen and share more with an instrumental friend. Tonight: Confirm where you are meeting. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ### You are running the show, whether you like it or not. An associate proves to be unusually responsive. You like what you hear. Use caution with your finances. You easily could see too much money leave your checking account. Tonight: Working late. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Clearly you can be feisty. See what is happening behind the scenes to gain understanding. Detach and look at the big picture rather than react. Be more sensitive to an in-law or someone at a distance. Tonight: Brainstorm with a buddy. Note the self-imposed restrictions on your thinking. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Resist having an immediate, knee-jerk reaction. A close partner makes demands, and you respond. Discussions put the two of you on different footing. Look within to see where all the frustration and anger is coming from. Tonight: Chat over dinner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) #### You might want to see someone take more responsibility. Whenever he or she decides to be more dominant, even if the timing is not suitable for you, let it h I i

his or her anger or frustration. Help this person work through it. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ### Pace yourself, and know when to stop. You act like your own drill master. You have reasons for this, but at the same time, allow your humanness to come out. You can and will accomplish a lot. Worry less and act more. Tonight: Easy works. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ##### Your creativity flows, which allows a more fun exchange to take place in conversations. You discover how much your attitude can impact others. Be assertive when seeking new information, and you will discover another perspective. Tonight: So what if it is Monday? AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ### Fundamental issues become very important matters. Though work might be important, basic issues in your home and personal life need to become a high priority. Why do you work? Probably to support your personal lifestyle. Work on balancing all elements of your life. Tonight: Happy at home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### Recognize what is doable, then proceed. Trying to catch the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow is a lovely thought, but it will not happen. You will be happier if you stay realistic in your emotional demands. A partner or friend helps you remove your rose-colored shades. Tonight: Hang out with a trusted friend. BORN TODAY Author John Steinbeck (1902), actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932), presidential daughter Chelsea Clinton (1980) *** Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.


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NEWS

Sunday, February 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

7A

Kan. gov. defends involvement in redistricting By JOHN HANNA • Associated Press TOPEKA — Gov. Sam Brownback on Friday defended his involvement in the Kansas Legislature’s redistricting debate, saying he’s trying to protect communities with major state and federal institutions and not pursuing political goals as he tries to influence how senators redraw their districts. The Republican said he favors creating a Senate district for Leavenworth County in northeast Kansas because it is home to Fort Leavenworth, along with state and federal prisons, and would benefit from having a resident-senator representing its interests. The county is currently split between two districts — both represented by Democrats who were on the ticket opposing Brownback in the 2010 governor’s race. Brownback’s chief of staff, David Kensinger, created a stir at the Statehouse this week by submitting public testimony to the Senate committee drafting a plan for redrawing senators’ districts. Kensinger, who’s been monitoring the committee’s meetings, said Leavenworth County should have its own Senate district. Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, a Topeka Democrat who’s served in the Legislature more than 35 years, called Kensinger’s actions unprecedented and said Brownback is attacking Sen. Tom Holland, of Baldwin City, the last Democratic nominee for governor, and Sen. Kelly Kultala, of Kansas City, the party’s last nominee for lieutenant governor. The governor noted that he would have to sign any redistricting legislation for it to become law. He said he had Kensinger testify this week because he wants lawmakers to know Leavenworth County’s status is important in drawing new Senate districts. “I thought it important to say that now as the process is forming rather than wait until the end of the process and say, ‘Well, OK, I don’t like this map or that map,’” Brownback said. “It’s their map build, but it’s ultimately one I have to address as well.” Brownback also has jumped into the debate over redrawing the state’s four congressional districts. He said earlier this month that he’d reached an agreement with the Legislature’s top Republicans to keep Manhattan, home to Kansas State University, in an eastern Kansas district, rather than move it into a district with western and central Kansas. The move would force lawmakers to consider splitting the Topeka or Kansas City areas among two districts. Legislators must redraw their districts and congressional districts to reflect shifts in population over the past decade. The debate over a

BROWNBACK state Senate plan is likely to be contentious because areas that lost population are trying to avoid losing clout. Many Republicans would like to draw the new lines to lock in their dominance in the Senate, where the GOP has a 32-8 majority. Also, eight moderate Republican incumbents, including Senate President Steve Morris, of Hugoton, have been targeted by conservatives aligned with Brownback, though he has said he’s staying out of GOP primary races. Hensley and House Minority Leader Paul Davis, of Lawrence, said Brownback’s involvement in the redistricting debate represents an attempt by the Republican governor to shift power from lawmakers. “There is no more inherently legislative function than legislative redistricting,” Davis said. “Whether or not the intent is there, the fact that this affects Senator Holland and Senator Kultala, I think, makes the governor look a little petty.” Senate Republican leaders, including Morris, said they weren’t upset that Brownback had become involved in the Legislature’s redistricting debates. Leavenworth County has a population of almost 77,000, exceeding the ideal population of 70,986 for a state Senate district, and Brownback noted that it’s the most populous county in Kansas without its own district. Kultala’s district covers part of Wyandotte County and Holland’s, all of Jefferson County and part of Douglas County. Leavenworth County has been split between two Senate districts for the past 20 years, but Brownback said his desire for the county to have a resident-senator is driven partly by discussions in Washington about cutting the federal budget. He called suggestions that he has political motives mere “spin.” “Anything that’s associated with the federal government now, I’m watching carefully,” he said. “Craft whatever you want to around it, but I think this is significant.”

E AS Y , I ’M T I C K LI SH H o p e U n r u e o f H u go t o n g i v e s a p e d i c u r e t o T a r a M a r t i n e z o f Ho o k e r , O k l a . , a s p a r t o f t h e N a i l T e c h n o l o g y t r a i n i n g i n t h e S e w a r d C o u n t y C o mm uni t y C o ll eg e/ A r ea T ec hnic a l S c hoo l C o sm et ol og y pr o g r am . F eb r uar y i s C a r eer an d Tec hni ca l E du ca t io n Mo nt h. Courtesy photo

W E T HA NK Y OU !

Thank you Liberal and our surrounding communities for allowing us to tell your stories and record your history for generations to come. Readers of the Leader & Times, whether it be the printed daily or the less complete Web site edition, hail from all around the world. They read the L&T in the seacoast jungles of Borneo in the village of Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia; to Ireland and Winslow, United Kingdom, and Olney, of course; Australia and New Zealand; to the great Northwest in Seattle to southern California and numerous states from coast to coast across this great nation. They read about their friends and families right here on the High Plains, and we are proud to tell your stories and keep those readers abreast of what’s happening here at home – because, ‘THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME!’

TH A NK S! To subscribe, call 626-0840


7B

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 25,2012 LEADER&TIMES

CLASSIFIED

news@hpleader.com

High Plains

Free to a good family— 6 month old Female Cheweenie. This part dotson part chihuahua is great with kids & very sweet. Please call 620-518-0753 or 785-422-1571 Seward County

Auto Parts Specialist

Seward County is seeking qualified applicants to join our JCAPS (Juvenile Corrections and Prevention Services) Department.

(Inside Sales Coordinator)

RECEPTIONIST/BOOKKEEPER – The employee in this position performs a variety of routine clerical work including but not limited to answering phone, receiving the public, providing customer assistance and data processing. Bookkeeping skills are required with skills in Quicken helpful. Bilingual skills are also helpful but not required. A high school diploma or GED and a valid driver’s license are required. This is a full-time position with benefits.

Job Description:

Selling recycled and after market auto parts Establishing customer base through calling inactive accounts and cold calling Marketing and building interpersonal business relationships Taking inbound calls and completing customer orders Addressing and resolving customer's issues Contributing the LKQ team by meeting of exceeding individual and company sales goals

Requirements:

Benefits Include: BlueCross BlueShield Health & Dental Insurance; PTO time; 11 Paid Holidays; KPERS Retirement; ING Deferred Comp; AFLAC Supplemental Insurance; and Wellness Benefit.

2-5 years of sales experience is desired Good driving record Self motivated and fast paced with serious work ethic Knowledge of basic computer skills Good organizational and communication skills Good phone skills Automotive knowledge a plus Must pass background check Must pass drug screening

All applicants must pass a pre-employment drug and alcohol test.

Position opened until filled. Qualified applicants may request an application or send, fax or e-mail their resume to:

April Warden County Administrator 515 N. Washington, Suite 205 Liberal, KS 67901 620-626-3330 Fax 620-626-3397 E-mail awarden@sewardcountyks.org

FULL BRICK HOME

IN G

1013 S. PENNSYLVANIA One level 3 Bedroom Brick home with attached garage. Remodeled kitchen with cherrywood cabinets. CA/CH. Ready to move into today! MLS #3068 ND

1008 S. SYCAMORE This ranch home features nice size bedrooms plus 1 3/4 baths, bsmt, wood burning fireplace, attached 2 car garage plus 2 car carport and storage bldg with a loft. MLS #2919

1410 N. Fairview 4Br. 3 Full Bath Home with over 2900 sq. ft.The family will love the build in beds & desks in kids rooms. Great main floor laundry, 3 living rooms, storm shelter in bsmt,Attached garage with new driveway. Covered patio, sprinkler system. Lincoln School District MLS #3280

523 WEST 3RD ST. Charming turn of the century 4 or 5 bedroom Victorian home w/relaxing covered front porch. Original woodwork including ornate staircase leading to 2nd story, lovely bay windows. Elegant formal dining room w/stained glass windows accent. MLS #2537 PRICED UNDER APPRAISAL!!

PE

MAKE AN OFFER!

UNIQUELOFTTYPEDUPLEX

2 FORTHE PRICE OFONE!

CT

SOUTHLAWN DISTRICT

READY TO MOVE INTO!

7854 Road P Liberal, KS (Straight S. of Ethanol Plant)

Houses for Rent Exceptionally nice homes & apartments in Liberal / $375-$1,000 / Tenant pays utilities. / Call 620624-2226 or 580-7783840.

Houses for Sale

Repossessed 1991 16x80 Mobile Home set an approximately 1 acre of real estate with a 30x60 wood frame metal shed with concrete floor. Please call Matt at 620-563-7242 for more information.

HOME FOR SALE 27 S. Prospect Liberal, KS

4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2story home, fenced in backyard, home security system. $95K. Call Dianne at 620-309-9503 for more information.

Commercial Property

Commercial Location available a 1,500 square foot in Northtowne Square Mall. GREAT prices Call Roger at 620624-8168 or leave a message at 620-655-2866.

LKQ is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

RA

424 CORNELL Near Harrison Circle Park. Spacious family room w/freestanding fireplace, & bay window, could be used as a 3rd bedroom. Hardwood floors & arched entryway. Covered patio. Large corner lot, near High School and Middle School. Immediately available. MLS #2896

or email resume to jmejia@lkqcorp.com No Phone Calls Please

514 W. 4th St. Each apartment has 1 bedroom, living room, kitchen and bathroom. Two car garage included MLS #2767 PRICE REDUCED TO

$69,000

CUSTOM BUILT HOME

911 N. HOLLY 4 Br. 3 full Ba w/ Huge Master Suite, Formal living room w/ bay window, cozy den, woodburning fireplace. You will love having 3 levels, a large kitchen, immaculae garage & yard. Call for your private showing today. MLS #3144

NT

2500 S. SYCAMORE Sprawling Custom Built Brick home with over 7000 sq. ft. situated on 21 acres just 3 minutes from Liberal. 8 stall horse barn with corrals. Dad will love this perfect auto collection garage. Several other huge and useful outbuildings. The estate you have been looking for, is now available. MLS #2474

For Rent: 2 Bedroom $550 Per Month, $550 Deposit. No Pets. Call 624-8471 between 8AM and 5PM.

For Sale: Repossessed 1985 28x64 Mobile Home set on a permanent foundation with an acre of real estate. It is located at 16247 Andrew Lane just south of the ethanol plant and has new windows. Please call C.J. Wettstein with Action Realty for an appointment at 620-6243333.

Interested persons may submit resume at: 114 W. 2nd St. Liberal KS 67901

CO

COZY STARTER HOME

Classified

Mobile Homes for Sale

LKQ is a medium sized publicly traded company (LKQX). We are the largest nationwide provider of after market collision replacement products. To join this team is opening your career for advancement.

Seward County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Seward County considers applicants for all positions without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, the presence of a non-job-related medical condition or disability, or any other legally protected status. Seward County will not refuse to hire a disabled applicant who is qualified to perform requirements of the job with reasonable accommodation. Applicants must request reasonable accommodations.

COUNTRY LIVING!

Leader&Times

LAN/WAN Administrator, Computer Technician

MACARTHUR DISTRICT

1917 N. CALHOUN AVE. Ranch with over 2,100 square feet. Beautiful wood and tile flooring, granite countertops, pull out pantry, formal dining room, cozy woodburning fireplace, covered patio. 3 Spacious Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, dbl garage, covered patio with TV hook ups, 2 storage buildings and sprinkler system MLS #3340 CHARMING 2 STORY HOME

210 N. Pershing Ave. 4Brs and 1 3/4 baths, formal dining room, large kitchen with breakfast nook, Detached 2 car garage. MLS #3523

Pioneer Electric Cooperative, Inc. is seeking professional individual for the vacant position of LAN/WAN Administrator, Computer Technician in its Ulysses, Kansas office. Responsibilities include serving as backup to System Administrator and assisting with coordinating all management information activities with the Service Bureau; developing and maintaining the Cooperative’s and its subsidiaries Information Technology Plan; and establishing/maintaining a reliable and secure Window’s based local/wide area network comprised of a digital telephone system and 120 desktop/tablet users located in three offices and in the field. Will provide troubleshooting, technical support and coordinate training relating to networking, use of smart phones, all computer hardware and Microsoft and utility industry specific applications, Internet and Exchange e-mail. Will assist with evaluating new software/hardware to take advantage of automation, serve as liaison to service bureau and other vendors. Must possess excellent oral and written communication skills, including the ability to interact daily with other employees, develop presentations, maintain and document all necessary operating procedures and applications, and assist with developing annual Technology budget. Attention to detail and able to organize work to meet deadlines with minimal supervision required. Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science or related field. A minimum of two years of support experience with computers, software and wide or local area networks is preferred. Salary commensurate with education and experience. Competitive benefit package includes employer provided familymedical, dental, vision and life insurance, pension and 401(k) plan with employer matching contribution, holidays, vacation and sick leave. Finalist will be required to successfully pass a post-offer physical examination, drug/alcohol test and must possess a valid drivers’ license and reside in the service territory at the time of hire. Applications for employment can be downloaded by visiting www.pioneerelectric.coop or resumes may be sent to Pioneer Electric, ATT: HR- LAN/WAN Administrator, Computer Technician, PO Box 368, Ulysses, KS 67880 or email jparsons@pioneerelectric.coop. Deadline for submission of resumes is Friday, March 9, 2012. Pioneer is an E.O.E.

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Donat ions N Hand eeded! & Ba Baby th Towels, Blank ets

(M) Shephard Mix r! so on Sp a ed ne I

Adoptee Info

Boxer / Pit (F)

Please Sponso r Me! Adoptee Info Adopt Outside City Limits

(F) Chihuahua Mix r! I need a Sponso Adoptee Info

Pit Mix (M)

Please Sponso r Me! Adoptee Info Adopt Outside City Limits

AUCTION CALENDAR

GATLIN AUCTION

MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ART AUCTION FRIDAY MARCH 2

) Shitzu Mix (M e!

rM Please Sponso Adoptee Info

Amer. Shorthai r

I need a Sponso r! Adoptee Info

(F) Chihuahua Mix e! se Sponsor M Plea Adoptee Info

Weenie Mix (M ) I need a Sponso r! Adoptee Info

For only $5 per picture, per week you can give the Gift Of Life by sponsoring a pet in the Pet of the Week ad.

It gives the public a chance to see which animals are available for adoption. Call 620-626-0840 ask for Classifieds for details on a Sponsorship ad.

Come See Our Animals Today At 1985 N. Country Estates Rd. • 620-626-0576

PICKLE CREEK EVENT CENTER 822 NE 6TH STREET GUYMON, OKLAHOMA 6:00 PM - Social Hour • 7:00 PM - Prime Rib Dinner • 8:00 PM - Auction Contact & Ticket Info 580-349-2611 Ask For Any of the Following Brent Shoulders, Byron Test or Larry Wiggins or Brent @opsu.edu

ESTATE AUCTION - SAT., MARCH 10, 9:30 AM

AG BUILDING - SEWARD COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS LIBERAL, KANSAS 03 Lincoln Town car signature series loaded & clean! Leather 4.6L V8, 38,000 miles Furniture, Appliances, Household Goods, Collectibles, Coins, Tools, 7’Snow Blade For Pickup, Aingle Axle Trailer, Riding Lawn Mower, Commercial Steam Carpet Cleaner, Clete Cannaley Estate & Others

NATIONAL WILD TURKEY FEDERATION BANQUET SATURDAY, MARCH 24

AG BUILDING - SEWARD COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS LIBERAL, KANSAS 5:00 PM - Social Hour • 7:00 PM - Dinner • 8:00 PM - Auction Contact & Ticket Info - Tom Frederick 620-482-3865

GATLIN AUCTION Mike Gatlin • 719-252-3758 www.gatlinauction.com

CUNNINGHAM AUCTION COIN AUCTION FRIDAY NIGHT APRIL 13, 7PM

LOCATION: CIVIC CENTER ELKHART, KS Consignments of coins welcome Call Auctioner Jim Cunningham at 620-360-0249

INDIAN ARTIFACTS, WESTERN & ANTIQUE AUCTION SATURDAY APRIL 14 9AM

LOCATION: CIVIC CENTER ELKHART, KS Consignments of Indian Artifacts, Western or Antiques Welcome Call Auctioner Jim Cunningham at 620-360-0249

CUNNINGHAM AUCTION Jim Cunningham Auctioneer 620-360-0249

J&M AUCTION

BOYD OLNEY & OTHERS SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 10AM

LOCATION: 702 E. RUSSELL 1BLK S. OF HWY 54 ACROSS FROM CHAPALA RESTAURANT Vehicles, Antiques & Collectibles, Appliances, Kitchen Items, Furniture, Household Items, Tools, Lawn & Garden, Coins, Guns, Miscellaneous Items, View online at www.auctionzip.com auctioneer id 20585 Concessions Available Oklahoma Smoke BBQ by David Ray

J& M Auction Service Jerry Allen 580-652--2753

Going Once... Going Twice...

Sold!!


8B

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 25,2012 LEADER&TIMES

news@hpleader.com

High Plains

Exceptionally nice homes & apartments in Liberal / $375-$1,000 / Tenant pays utilities. / Call 620-624-2226 or 580-778-3840. Shop and office for lease. US 83 and Stateline; 8,000 sq. ft. 620-4825270 Office & Retail Spaces For Lease Village Plaza 620-624-3018

Open Space great for retail, Large office space, Small office spaces, Medical offices.

Automotive

Miscellaneous

ADOPTION Loving couple wished to give love, happiness and security to your newborn. Let’s help each other. Can help with expenses. Donna & Al 877-492-8546.

Merchandise Health & Beauty IF YOU USED YAZ/YAZMIN/OCELLA BIRTH CONTROL PILLS OR A NuvaRING VAGINAL RING CONTRACEPTIVE between 2001 and the present and developed blood clots, suffered a stroke, heart attack or required gall bladder removal you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

DIVORCE with or without children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7 or www.Pay4Divorce.com

For Sale: Gift shop clothing. Purses, wallets, rhine stone flip flops, western decor, baby gifts, jewelry, luggage. All display units. Real nice merchandise for your store, craft show, fle market. For more information call 580-487-3823 or 620-655-5638

Pets & Supplies

Leader&Times

Classified

Pets To Give Away Free to a good family— 6 month old Female Cheweenie. This part dotson part chihuahua is great with kids & very sweet. Please call 620518-0753 or 785-4221571

Farm & Ranch Farm Misc.

Bobwhite & Blue Scale Quail eggs, chicks, & adults. NPIP & AI tested. Delivery & Shipping available. Call 580-528-1222 or 580-528-1422

720 W. Second Street

515 N. Sherman

421 N. Lincoln

17523 V Road

320 Quail Circle - Turpin

423 Yale

506 N. Calhoun

729 N. Calhoun

5 bedrooms 3 bath $157,500 • Call Lidia

4 bedrooms 4 bath REDUCED $135,000 • Call Gary

5 Bedroom, 3 bath REDUCED $99,500 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom, 2 bath $135,000 • Call Lidia

5 bedrooms 4 bath REDUCED!! $223,500 • Call Lidia

5 bedrooms 3 bath REDUCED $118,000 • Call Lidia

3 bedrooms 2 bath $101,500. Call Lidia

4 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, bsmt, 2 storage bldgs $162,500. Call Lidia

811 N. Holly

210 Lilac Drive

1521 N. Carlton

5 bedrooms 3 bath $278,000 • Call Lidia

5 bedroom 3 bath 3 bedrooms 3baths on LCC golf course REDUCED! $179,000 • Call Lidia $284,000 • Call Lidia

355 E. Pancake Lease/Purchase Option Avail REDUCED $400,000 Call Stephanie

NEW LISTING!

210 Princeton

614 N. Cain

1128 Fairview

1940 N. Calhoun

2 bedrooms $73,900 • Call Lidia

2 Bedrooms $69,500 • Call Lidia

4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath REDUCED! $110,000 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom, 2 bath REDUCED! $160,000 • Call Steph

NEW LISTING!

402 Piute, Satanta

1661 N. Cain,

Rt. 2 Box 39 Hooker, OK

817 W. 8th,

319 Locust,

2311 Sierra

8091 Main - Hayne

410 Griffith

2 bedroom, 1 bath $45,000 • Call Rose

3 bedroom, 2 bath, $164,500 • Call Lidia

2 Bedroom on 2.75 acres. $68,000 • Call Gary

3 bedroom, 2 bath, $109,500. • Call Gary

2 bedroom, 2 bath, REDUCED $63,500 • Call Steph

3 bedroom, 2 bath, $176,000 • Call Gary

3 bedroom, 1 bath REDUCED! $69,000 • Call Gary

3 bedroom, 3 bath, $115,000. Call Rose

$2000 PAID CLOSING COSTS

NEW LISTING!

618 Nottingham

620 Harold

1711 N. Calhoun

2111 Rose Lane

1109 N. Pershing

1904 N. Webster

1006 Harrison

811 N. Main, Kismet

3 bedroom 2 bath REDUCED! $45,000 • Call Lidia

4 bedroom, 2 bath $125,500. • Call Lidia

3 bedroom 2 bath, $155,000 • Call Gary

3 bedroom 2 bath $115,000 • Call Gary

4 Bedroom, 3 Bath, $178,900 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath REDUCED! $143,500 • Call Steph

3 bedroom, 3 bath REDUCED! $110,000 • Call Rose

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath $89,900 • Call Lidia

1650 N. Calhoun

612 E. Curtis,

40 S. Prospect

1123 Maple Blvd

103 S. Peters - Turpin

422 N. Sherman,

1658 Nelson Ct.

1731 James Ct.

3 bedroom, 2 bath $144,900 • Call Steph.

4 bedroom, 2 bath, $126,500. Call Gary

3 bedrooms, 2 baths REDUCED! $139,900 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom 2 bath $149,900 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom 2 bath REDUCED! $110,000 • Call Stephanie

4 bedroom, 3 bath, REDUCED! $185,900 • Call Lidia

4 bed, 2 ba, 3 car garage on cul-de-sac $126,500. Call Gary

4 bedroom, 4 bath $269,900. Call Steph

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 102 S. Grant -$106,000 124 S. Grant -$115,000 708 N. Washington - $54,500 803 & 807 Missouri - $68,000

Residential • Farm • Commercial 2 S. Kansas - 620-626-6100 • Outside Liberal - 866-626-6100

People you know & trust ... Professionals you can depend on

ABC S T O2 loRcatioAns G E • Airport • 415 S. Kansas

Lidia J. Hook-Gray Broker 621-1222

Economy Storage 1239 Larrabee Rd. Liberal, KS

620-624-2632

( Terminal Road)

620-624-5161

10x10, 10x20, 10x30, 10x40 Security Lighting & Fencing • Paved Outside Storage

Gary Classen Assoc. Broker 629-0063

118 W. 2nd

626-8244

Cellular: 620-629-7630 • Fax: 620-626-6902

RECYCLING H U G O T O N M E TA L RECYCLING

**We Buy Iron & Metals** **We Buy Aluminum Cans** 2 Miles North Of Hugoton on K25 Highway

620-544-2270

Rose Aragon Bilingual Agent 629-7588

DON WHITAKER Con str uc tion

Residential & Commercial Building Contractor, New Construction, Additions, Garages, Total Interior & Exterior Remodeling

Work Guaranteed 620-624-7564

Chrisenberry’s COMMERCIAL• INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL

Stephanie McVey Agent 629-0240

Automotive Repair

Complete Auto Repair Special Courtesies for the Elderly

626-4613

111 111 Trail Trail St. St. •• Liberal Liberal

D & S Rentals Storage Units 620-621-2012 • 580-259-6423 420 E. Cedar Liberal, Ks.

Let us help you highlight your business with an ad in our BusinessBriefcase. Call 626-0840 to place your ad.


8A

Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

LIVING

CONNECTING WITH YOUR PAST

news@hpleader.com

The Bookworm Sez

The Bookworm Sez is a nationally syndicated book review column by Terri Schlichenmeyer of LaCrosse, Wis.

Genealogy columns by Karen Rinehart

Our elusive ‘The Darlings’ by female ancestors Cristina Alger A maiden name is the family surname before marriage. The maiden name is usually indicated by using the word “née” which is a French and English adopted term meaning “born as” (e.g. Marie Wolfe married Ernest Johnston becomes Marie Johnston née Wolfe.) There are not any laws that state a woman has to take her husband's surname after marriage although women do through tradition. Today many women retain their maiden names after marriage or sometimes hyphenate their maiden and married names (e.g. Marie Wolfe-Johnston.) An even more confusing problem is when a couple has the same last name and the husband has a sister with the same first name as his wife and are the same age, making it hard to distinguish between the two unless using their dates of birth or middle initial. Deciding who is the sister and who is the wife may take some creative thinking along with documents. As a genealogist, I find the hardest part of researching my family history are my female lines. Nothing can be more annoying or discouraging than to look at a pedigree chart and see a blank line because of being unable to locate the maiden name of that female line. With patience and continued research it eventually pays off and you locate the missing surname. In the 18th Century and earlier, a woman was generally under the protection of their father until they married and then their husbands took over responsibility for them. Since women didn't have the same rights as men before the 20th Century, they did not generate records like their husbands did with owning property, wills, estate records, businesses and controlling government. Few immigrant women that spoke little or no English left diaries or letters. It was the same with any inheritance that the wife would inherit from her father, the husband had full control of it or any that she earned. A widow in most states consisted of one-third or more of both real and personal which was hers permanently and the ability to write wills and own and manage possessions and property. Prior to changes in laws, heirs had to support the widow if the dower was inadequate which left her at the mercy of the rest of the family, which were her sons or those of her husband by a prior marriage. When searching for your female ancestor remember to check all records pertaining to her husband, especially tax, property and naturalization records. Most of the time an obituary will list brothers and sisters and you can find her maiden name there. Look at the vital records of her children. Birth certificates will have her maiden name listed. Standard marriage applications will have a space that will list the parents names. Town, county and church histories can provided clues into maiden

names. If there isn't a history on her, there could be one on her children that may list her maiden name. Pension records for the husband if he served in the military. Census records are sometimes a good source because in the 1850 census each person was listed by name and in the 1880 census they began to list the relationship to the head of the household. Family members stayed close. Be sure to check the ten (10) families up and down from your ancestor and check children's names. They could be living with a child. Older relatives, mothers and grandmothers, moved in with their children when their husband died. Also, daughters sometimes moved back in with their parents when their spouse died or they divorced. I have found that in checking census records it is always a good thing to write down the different spellings of your surname and check those. Although time consuming, you may want to check page by page of the census record for the town, county and state of your ancestor. Witnesses listed on deeds may or may not be related. Always keep the names in mind when searching for the maiden name. Naming patterns can give a clue to the possible maiden name. Families often named a son or daughter with the maiden name of the wife. Unusual middle names of boys and girls could be the maiden name of the mother or grandmother. Estate sale records will list the purchasers by name of the holdings. Usually does not list the relationship to the deceased but the Wills will list the first name of the wife and sometimes the deceased brothers in law along with children, spouses and sometimes grandchildren. Making a timeline could help in that it place her in a specific place and time where you could begin your search. Studying social history will give you insight to what life and times were like in her time period and location. If you are still encountering problems, make a list of possibilities and begin eliminating them one at a time. Family treasures (diaries, journals, letters and photographs) can give clues to those elusive maiden names also. Although finding our elusive female ancestor can be frustrating. The reward is worth all the work in the end. Success and the beginning of a new line to research. Happy hunting. EDITOR’S NOTE: Anyone having a specific question should address them to: news@hpleader.com. Please put “Genealogy” in the subject line, and include your name, city of residence and a contact number if Karen should decide to contact you with further information. Your questions will be answered at the end of Karen's column, and only your initials will be used.

Have your name placed at the top of the Leader & Times Have your name, a family member’s name or a friend placed at the top of the Leader & Times in the “Serving the home of …” section at the top of the front page. It is first-come, first-serve when selecting dates for the entry. Call 626-0840 to reserve a date now.

CALL NOW

Make sure your ads are reaching the people you want to reach – PAID subcribers. Call 626-0840.

It was hardly worth picking up. Yep, there was once a time when that penny you spotted on the pavement was worth something more than just one cent. You could buy lots of things for a penny back then, and saving them was rewarding on many levels. Now they’re tossed and forgotten in desk drawers and fountains, or lost beneath cushions. You almost can’t give pennies away these days, and you probably won’t bother picking one up off the pavement. But what will happen if critics get their wish and pennies are eliminated? Or paper dollars, or $100 bills? Find out in the new book “The End of Money” by David Wolman. For most of human history, people lived quite nicely without money. We traded and bartered, which

worked fine until it became necessary to keep track of inequalities in resources and trading. Specified objects were the first markers of wealth and commerce, with the invention of coins not far behind. And ever since, our attitudes toward money have been mixed. You’ve heard, for example, that money is the root of all evil but to some, credit cards are the Devil’s vehicle to the End Times. Others hate that “filthy lucre” can be taken literally, and that cash and coins “harbor all kinds of bugs.” And because money doesn’t grow on trees, still others point to the huge resources required to make coins and bills, only some of which is sustainable. Still, though it costs money to make money, the government keeps on producing it (for a tidy profit) and we keep on using it, knowing that it’ll always be

around. The words “In God We Trust” are nice, in fact, but the reason money works is because we trust the government to uphold its value. Still, much like every transaction, we get change. If it seems like you rarely see $100 bills, it’s because most of them go overseas for drug deals and crime. If it seems like our paper cash is constantly changing, it’s to stay one half-step ahead of counterfeiters. And if it seems like there’s got to be a better, more efficient way than our paper-andmetal method, there is… and it might be as close as your pocket. If you look after your pennies, they say, your dollars will take care of themselves. But “The End of Money” looks at both, and what you’ll learn is surprising.

With thoughts worth way more than a penny, author David Wolman tried for several months not to touch cash, partly as an experiment for this book and partly because of money’s germiness. He traveled during this time, to countries with jawdropping inflation, places where cash is not king, villages in which poor people learn how to collect wealth, and locales where counterfeiters hope you’ll repeatedly part with foolish money. Whether you’ve got greenbacks or gravy, pennies, pounds, or plastic in your pocket, I think you’ll find “The End of Money” extremely interesting. Money might not buy happiness, but reading this book is the next best thing.

Queen Elizabeth bio: ‘Compulsively readable’ So, then, dear Poppets, I see that it is our special time again to discuss a few books and Life, in general, and what you might like, in particular. This finds me at my old, dear desk in Memorial Library with the special sights, sounds, and “book odors” that I so miss when in Texas. Until you’ve been in a library that is, shall we say, not “properly run, you may not appreciate one that is such as ours. What I do not miss, when not in Liberal is the 30 to 40 mph wind. Gracious but this takes some getting acclimated to, again, once one is no longer in it anymore. I am always so pleased to come back to where I spent 57 years and not much has changed – except I miss Bob’s Diner and Dinah and if anyone knows where she is. The book, “Elizabeth, the Queen; The Life of a Modern Monarch,” by Sally Bedell Smith, author of several autobiographies of well-known names tells all sorts of things about her. She’s an excellent mimic of other people’s traits, loves her two months on the grounds of Balmoral, walking her Corgis and going out with hunting parties and, if not shooting the birds, is directing the hunting dogs where to go to pick up the gamebirds that very important people have shot and certainly cannot be expected to go and “fetch” for themselves. I mean to say, it just isn’t done. So, if the beaters (men with the party, employed by the Queen) are busy loading the guests’ guns or whatever and unavailable when the bird or deer goes down, the Queen takes over and sees that the game is brought to them. I love it. There’s Her Majesty, in rough gear, boots, scarf on her head, lined leather gloves, game warden’s whistle over her neck, making the proper motions to the dogs, calling their names, and then using hand gestures to convey what they were to do. And whaddya bet the dogs knew what she meant? Cold, rainy, trampling over old logs, leaves, the crashing of gun barrels, your sandwich and flask of whiskey in the leather bag over your shoulder. Life, for her, is not always wearing a diamond tiara, she became Queen at a very young age and had to balance those duties in both Motherhood and State areas, her sister wasn’t allowed to marry the divorced

CHECK IT OUT Connie Yoxall

Royal Air Force pilot she adored – Prince Phillip saw to that and he should object? On what grounds? Other than he was a divorced man whom Princess Margaret loved. Let me finish on one note;”An undercurrent to the speculation about Charles as the next king is that he is destined to be a transitional figure with a short reign before the succession of his more popular son,Prince William, and Kate. It is William that monarchists count on to keep the dynasty strong in the new millennium; the Palace is full aware that the monarchy’s future depends not only on reaching young people by emphasizing its own next generation.” William and Kate are very popular, they dress in khakis and sneakers to visit children’s hospitals, he went to New Zealand to give comfort and a personal solace to victims of natural disasters, much as his beloved mother, Diana, had done and the paper there wrote – ”He came, he saw, he charmed their bloody socks off!” William and his brother, Harry, are easing into “royalty,” still being called “Prince” but not “Sir” and they won’t hear of “Your Royal Highness.” We’ll see what the future holds but do get this book, and you will enjoy all of its 560 pages – it’s compulsively readable. Did anyone see some of the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on TV recently? There’s a delightful book, “Show Dog: The Charmed Life and Trying Times of a Near-Perfect Purebred,” by Josh Dean, wrote about spending a year “alongside Jack, is champion Australian shepherd – and his canine and human friends – and presents a revealing look at our love affair

with the world’s most doted-upon and tinkered with animal species.” We certainly get to know this lovable dog and the people around him, and we’re given an up-close look at the dog show world, its traditions, its rules, along with the many people who inhabit it, taking part in judging, training, naming, promoting, hair-styling, RV-driving, hotel finding, and everything related to owning and showing a champion dog. There are more than 2,000 dog shows available every weekend, here in the U.S. Breeding a champion dog sounds simple in that “you want to re-enforce the good traits while eliminating flaws and responsible owners of a certain breed work in concert to eliminate problematic traits. On several personal notes, Jack jumped up on the judge, as he walked by to put a third place win behind Jack’s name, and Jack’s chief rival for all of the judges’s eyes was the beautiful moving Beyonce. She floated around the ring and went so fast you almost couldn’t see her legs moving. The Westminster dog show is the pinnacle. This book is truly, honestly a great picture of a great dog, Jack, his mistress and handler, his mistakes, his heart, his triumphs, so go check it out and let me know what you think. Here’s a new book by Kris Jenner, “Kris Jenner and All Things Kardashian.” You gotta give the girls credit, though, they’re all very attractive and not necessarily role models. She was married, at one time, to the Olympic champion, Bruce Jenner, then Robert Kardashin “and how it was Bruce who finally

helped end the Kardashian’s messy divorce so they could all move forward as a family.” It was Kris’ brainstorm to make the family into an empire and has made it into a TV franchise that many millions of women watch and envy. In this book, Kris also gives details/stories of her “intimate connection” with O.J.Simpson and Nicole Brown, the trial of O.J. and its aftermath. She and Robert had to deal with the important fact that they had each believed something different – Robert sat with O.J,at the trial, and honestly believed him innocent while Kris did not and kept remembering Nicole’s words to her – ”he’s going to kill me and he’s going to get away with it” – and so it came to pass. O.J. later failed a lie detector test – too late for his trial. A really, interesting, pretty intelligent story and I very much enjoyed hearing Kris’ voice in it all. I came out with a different point of view of the family and certainly was admiring of what and how Kris handled all her decisions. So, my dears, “the time has come, the walrus said, to speak of other things – ”and there’s always the weather, which, on the day I’m writing this, is cold and windy and, again, to say how great it has been to be back at my first “home,” see dear friends, relax at Spencer Browne���s over tea and a Hawaiian muffin (heated, of course), and just “kick back.” I wish all of my readers a good Spring ahead, keep walking, smile at strangers, and try to not get too upset. Think of me in Kerrville, Texas, and if you’re “in the neighborhood,” call and stop by. Take care, Poppets, and good luck.


LIVING

news@hpleader.com

Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

9A

Riggs – Meek Engagement Chris and Leanne Keith, formerly of Liberal, are proud to announce the engagement of their daughter Shanae Nichole Meek to Jacob Edward Riggs. Shanae is the daughter of Chris and Leanne Keith, Goddard, and Shawn and LaVestia Meek, Russellville, Ark. Grandparents are Loren and Karen Wenzel, Liberal; Bill and Michelle Meek, Liberal; Steve and Denise Williamson, Russellville, Ark.; and Cary and Rhonda Keith, Kismet. Greatgrandparents are Eileen Tollefsrud, Bowman, N.D.; Bill and Anna Lee Meek, Liberal; Dale Pedigo, Russellville, Ark.; Veda Schwindt, Russellville, Ark.; Connie Graham, Liberal; and Coke and Salty Keith, Thomas Okla. Jacob is the son of Shawn and Luz Riggs, Liberal. Grandparents are Emma Rash and the late John Rash of Liberal and Rosalie Riggs and the late Earl Riggs of South Coffeyville, Okla., (formerly of Liberal). Shanae is a 2008 Liberal High School graduate and is currently attending Butler Community College to attain a degree in elementary education. Jacob is a 2007 Liberal High School graduate and is attending Wichita State University and will graduate in the Spring of 2013 with a bachelors in art with a minor in communications and a film certificate. The wedding ceremony will take place on Aug. 4 at the Beach Palace Resort in Cancun, Mexico. The couple plans to reside in Wichita, where they currently live.

Charles O. Lundberg 90th Birthday Charles O. Lundberg will celebrate his 90th birthday with reception by and for his family and friends from 1 to 4 p.m. March 3 at the Liberal Senior Center. He was born March 5, 1922, in Haxtun, Colo. He lives with his wife of 43 years, Bobbi Regehr. His children are stepson, James Regehr of Denver. He has four grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

TE A CH A PE R SO N T O CO OK O NC E, TH E Y E A T FO R A M O NT H L i n d s e y C l a u s e , l e f t , a s s i s ts i n s t u f f i n g p a s t a s h e l l s a t t h e K - S t a t e E xt ens io n C oo k Onc e wo r ksho p. Courtesy photo

Collins – Howard Engagement Regina Howard of Meade would like to announce the engagement of her daughter, Alina Howard, to DeWayne Collins of Plains. DeWayne is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Collins of Plains. Alina is a 2010 graduate of Meade. DeWayne is a 2008 graduate of Southwestern Heights. He graduated from Southwes Kansas Technical School in 2009 with a welding degree. He is currently employed with the City of Plains. The couple has planned a May 12 wedding date.

Finally, Beulah Winchester is having her 21st Birthday. Everyone looks forward to that 21st birthday right? Born Feb. 29th, 1928, she has had to decide whether to celebrate her nonbirthdays on Feb. 28 or March 1 for 3 out of 4 years. This year, there is no question. This is an official bitrhday. The family would like to celebrate Beulah’s birthday with a card shower. If you would like to send a card, the address is 200 E. 8th Street, Beaver, OK 73932.

Carpenter – Velazco Engagement Chalen Carpenter and Melissa Velazco announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of Jose and Dalila Velazco of Shamrock, Texas. She is the granddaughter of Jesus and Pilar Velazco of Sunland Park and the late Augustine and Maria Meraz. She is a 2011 graduate of Shamrock High School. She is currently attending West Texas A & M University in Canyon, Texas, with plans to transfer to Amarillo College. Her fiance is the son of Wyatt and Dayna Carpenter. He is the grandson of Obie Covington and the late Bob Covington of Shamrock and Madge Carpenter and the late Milton Carpenter of Gaffney, S.C. After home schooling in Turpin, Okla., he plans to attend Amarillo College in the fall. The couple has planned a wedding for June 16 at Living Water Christian Fellowship in Canyon.

Organization learns American history at Presidents Day meeting At the recent Daughters of American Revolution meeting in Liberal at the MidAmerica Building, Sammy Cope, Honorary State Regent of Kansas and local member presented a review for the President Day’s meeting. Cope reviewed “Best Little Stories from the White House by Brian Kelly and Ingrid Smyer.” After explaining that the White House was built by an Irishman James Hoban with oversite from leaders like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, the building site excavation began by hired slaves in 1791 and it was eight years under construction. Every president or first family has made some lasting changes on the building and

as a result over the two centuries, it is a graceful home of 132 rooms, situated on 18 acres in the middle of Washington D.C. The house is the residence of the first families, but the First Ladies throughout history have been the keepers of the home for our Presidents and their families. Therefore excerpts from the contributions of the First Ladies was told about by Cope. Some of the ladies came from aristocracy and some from humble beginnings. Some of them were formally educated ,

but most were not. Some were beautiful and some plain. Some were trendsetters and some social leaders, many were frail and sickly or invalids.Frequently the women were into “marrying up” pattern, but when they had power and fame and glory they loved their husbands. The review highlighted the contributions and interests of the ladies during their time in the White House for the 44 Presidents and their continued contributions to the nation.


L&T

SUNDAY, February 26, 2012

Page 10 Section

High Plains Living

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L I V I N G P A G E S R UN EV ER Y W E DN ES DA Y, SU N DA Y I N T HE LE A DER & T I M ES

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FAMILY FEATURES

ummer time means plenty of play time — so why not play with your food? Finding creative ways to enjoy healthy foods like watermelon is a great way to encourage the whole family to eat well — and have fun while doing it. Here are three ways you can get the whole family in on some fun and healthy eating:  The wetter, the better — Playing hard on a hot summer day can take a lot out of you. In addition to drinking plenty of water, look for foods that can help you keep hydrated. Watermelon is 92 percent water — so keep some slices or cubes in the refrigerator for a handy, hydrating snack. For a fun, kid-friendly twist, use cookie cutters to cut watermelon into fun shapes.  Get colorful — For a real nutritional boost, serve plenty of colorful, deeply pigmented produce. For example, red peppers, carrots, broccoli and grapes are packed with minerals, vitamins and antioxidants. In addition to vitamins A and C, watermelon has a higher level of the antioxidant lycopene than any other fresh fruit or vegetable. Let the kids use an ice cream scooper or melon-baller to scoop out watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew to make a colorful and nutritious dessert.  Think outside the recipe box — Look for fun and unusual ways to serve healthy foods. These recipes from the National Watermelon Promotion Board, for example, are creative enough to appeal to kids and grownups, and easy enough for just about anyone to make. Healthy eating doesn’t have to be boring at all — it just takes a little creative thinking to get everyone in the family playing with their food. You can find more deliciously fun ways to enjoy watermelon, and sign up for a free newsletter, at www.watermelon.org.

Pick a Good Watermelon It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3

1. Look the watermelon over. You are looking for a firm, symmetrical watermelon that is free from bruises, cuts or dents. 2. Lift it up. The watermelon should be heavy for its size. Watermelon is 92 percent water. 3. Turn it over. The underside of the watermelon should have a creamy yellow spot from where it sat on the ground and ripened in the sun.

Watermelon Strawberry Shake and Frozen Smoothie Pops

Watermelon Pizza Supreme

Serves 6 1 slice watermelon (8 to 10 inches around and 1 inch thick), drained to remove excess moisture 1 cup strawberry preserves 1/2 cup white chocolate chips 1/2 cup raisins 1/2 cup chopped walnuts 1 cup sweetened shredded coconut Place watermelon slice on a serving platter and cut into 6 wedges, leaving them in the shape of a pizza. Spread preserves over watermelon and sprinkle toppings over the top.

Makes 4 Strawberry Shake 1 container (8 ounces) lemon nonfat yogurt 2 cups cubed, seeded watermelon 1 pint fresh strawberries, cleaned and hulled 1 medium banana, peeled and sliced In blender or food processor, process yogurt, watermelon, strawberries and banana until smooth and frothy. Serve immediately. Frozen Smoothie Pops Strawberry Shake Small paper cups Popsicle sticks Pour prepared Watermelon Strawberry Shake into small paper cups. Freeze, inserting popsicle sticks or plastic spoons when mixture is partially frozen. Or, pour Watermelon Strawberry Shake into ice cream machine. Set and enjoy.

Surf Wave

Oval or round shaped watermelon Kitchen and paring knives Cutting board Green dry-erase marker (preferably washable) Large bowl and spoon Brown sugar or raw sugar Small dolls or beach themed toys 1. Wash watermelon under cool running water and pat dry. 2. On a cutting board, place watermelon on its side and cut off 1/4 to 1/2 inch from the stem end, being careful not to cut too deep into the white part of the rind. This will provide a sturdy base. 3. Using the dry-erase marker, draw a wave from the top of the watermelon halfway down, similar to a backwards C. Repeat on the other side to form a wave. 4. Use the knife to carefully cut away the parts of the watermelon that you will not be using. Use the spoon to hollow out the watermelon, reserving the inside watermelon to cut up and serve. 5. Place the carving on a serving platter covered with brown sugar. Decorate with toys and shells and fill your carving with fruit.

Ice Cream Cone Sundaes

Serves 8 8 ice cream cones of choice 8 tablespoons pineapple cream cheese frosting (recipes available online) 1/2 cup dried Craisins 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt 8 scoops seedless watermelon (use an ice cream scooper) Additional toppings of your choice: sprinkles, pineapple chunks, chocolate chips or coconut flakes Pipe a tablespoon of the frosting into the bottom of each cone. Divide Craisins over frosting. Top Craisins with yogurt. Place an ice cream scoop of watermelon on top of each cone. Top with additional toppings as desired and serve.

Helpful Carving Hints   

Read through the directions before you start. Have the watermelon at room temperature when you carve. That makes it easier to cut. Drain cut watermelon and other fruit before placing it in the carving.

 

When removing excess flesh, try to leave it in big pieces. It’s easier for making melon balls or cubes. Use a green dry erase marker, then wipe off excess marker after making cuts.


75¢

V ol . 1 2 6 • I s s . 4 5 • 1 8 Pa g e s

SUNDAY

June 10, 2012

LEADER &TIMES Your daily news & views for 126 years

The Federal District Court may have used a mallet rather than a gavel when hammering out the redistricting map that was released late Thursday night after the Kansas Legislature failed to agree on maps of their own.The result is 48 districts where incumbent representatives will face each other and 25 new districts were created without a representative at all.The Senate saw four districts with two incumbents and four new districts with no senators.The filing deadline for candidates in House and Senate districts is Monday, leaving many across the state scrambling to make sure candidates will be on the ballot. L&T photo illustration/Earl Watt

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Could your cell phone save your life?

DIVIDING

KANSAS

Emergency alert system now sends info to phones By KEELEY MOREE • Leader & Times

FEDERAL COURT COMPLETES JOB KANSAS LEGISLATURE COULD NOT

SENATE

HOUSE

Western Kansas keeps senators

◆ See EMERGENCY ALERTS/Page 3A

House starts from scratch LOVE

By EARL WATT • Leader &Times While the Kansas Senate will have some unforseen challenges elsewhere due to the new redistricting map handed down by the federal court, Southwest Kansas was able to remain whole. Despite a proposal by Senate President Steve Morris, which passed the Senate on a 21-19 vote, Liberal will not be split in half.

Ever get a text message from a number you didn’t recognize? As early as this month, millions of Americans may begin receiving an “extreme alert” message on their cell phones advising them to seek shelter from a summer storm. But these alerts are not a hoax put on by a group of mischievous hackers — they’re messages from the U.S. government issued during emergencies, and they could help save lives. These Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs) are sent through the Commercial Mobile Alert System.

T h i s Dr o i d X s ma r t p h o n e b y M ot or ol a i s on e o f 1 2 p h on e s of f e r e d b y V e r iz on W i r e l e ss w h ic h is co m p at i b le wi t h C MA S a n d a b l e to r e c e i v e a l e r ts . S i x o f t h e 1 2 p h on e s on V e r iz on ’ s l is t o f c om p a t ib l e p h on e s ar e D r o id s , w h il e A p p le ’ s p o p u l ar i Ph o n e s ar e n o t y e t c om p a t ib l e w i t h t h e al e r t s y st em . Courtesy photo

O’NEAL

“The 38th District remains almost identical,” Senator Garrett Love (RMontezuma) said. “We keep all out Western Kansas seats. It is a victory for us.” But that victory is somewhat bittersweet for the rest of the state where some incumbents were put into the same district, and some new districts were created without a current senator at all.

◆ See SENATE/Page 8A

By EARL WATT • Leader &Times Perhaps the biggest irony in the redistricting debacle is that changes to the House map may have more of an effect on the Kansas Senate, according to Speaker of the House Mike O’Neal (R-Hutchinson). “Overall, the House districts drawn by the court will favor Republicans, even if not incumbents,” O’Neal said. “The Senate will rue the

day they held up the House map. It has drawn a lot more challengers then what they would have.” Due to 48 of the 125 House seats being drawn in a way to cause sitting legislators to face other sitting legislators, O’Neal said the chances were high that some of them would opt to challenge their Senate counterparts. But that was the outcome of the unwillingness of the Senate to

◆ See HOUSE/Page 8A

Parklane Towers gets federal upgrade By ROBERT PIERCE • Leader & Times Some residents at an apartment complex in north Liberal are now living a little more comfortably thanks to some grant money from the federal government. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development last year awarded the Liberal Housing Authority $1 million to help with renovations of Parklane Towers. LHA’s Carol Beckwith said the biggest portion of the money was used on new air units for tenants that can be used around the clock. “We did a water pump cooling heating system, which allows us to have both heat and air 24/7 365,” she said. “We are energy efficient.” Beckwith said Parklane Towers now has recovery systems in its attic that help recover air that is already climatized and bring it to a set temperature. “It should be extremely energy efficient,” she said. “Instead of the boiler and chiller

◆ See PARKLANE/Page 5A

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L&T

SUNDAY, June 10, 2012

Page 1 Section

High Plains Living

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FAMILY FEATURES

s your family tired of eating the same thing for breakfast, lunch or dinner? Not sure if trying a new recipe fits into your busy schedule? It’s easier than you think to break out of the usual routine, especially when you have these quick, kid-friendly recipes that bring a taste of the tropics to your meals. Mangos make the difference in these recipes — adding a splash of color and vibrant flavor to a savory breakfast burrito, hot panini or a tasty salmon and veggie dinner. And adding mango to the menu provides plenty of good nutrition. Mangos are an excellent source of vitamins C and A. Vitamin C promotes healthy immune function, while vitamin A is important for vision and bone growth. For more quick and easy recipes for your busy weeknights, visit www.mango.org. When choosing a mango, don’t rely on color alone. Instead, gently squeeze the mango. A ripe mango will be firm with just a little give, like a ripe peach or avocado. If your mango isn’t ripe, keep it out on the counter; it will continue to ripen at room temperature, becoming sweeter and softer over several days. Once ripe, move it to the refrigerator, where whole, ripe mangos will keep for up to five days.

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L I VI N G PA G E S R U N E V E R Y W E D N E S D A Y , S U N D A Y IN T H E L E A D E R & TI ME S

Chicken and Mango Panini

Serves 4 1/2 loaf Italian bread, (8, 1/2-inch slices) 8 slices deli-sliced mozzarella cheese 1/2 cup whole basil leaves 1/2 red onion, sliced thin 1 large mango, peeled, pitted and sliced thin 2 cooked chicken breasts (about 1 pound total), sliced thin Layer half of the cheese on 4 slices of bread; divide basil, red onion, mango, chicken and remaining cheese among bread slices. Top with second slice of bread. Heat grill pan, panini press or large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat; spray with non-stick cooking spray. Place 2 sandwiches in pan (close lid or weigh down sandwiches in skillet with heavy pot). Cook sandwiches until bread is golden brown and cheese is melted, about 4 minutes per side. Repeat with remaining sandwiches. Nutrition Information: Each serving (1 sandwich) contains 438 calories, 40g carbohydrate (13% Daily Value), 3g fiber (11% Daily Value), 40g protein (81% Daily Value), 12g fat (19% Daily Value), 6g saturated fat (28% Daily Value), 100mg cholesterol (33% Daily Value), 746mg sodium (31% Daily Value), and 644mg potassium (18% Daily Value).

Salmon in Foil Packets with Mangos, Carrots and Sugar Snap Peas

Serves 4 4 salmon fillets (about 6 ounces each), skin removed Salt and pepper 1 large mango, peeled, pitted and diced 1 cup matchstick cut carrots 1 cup sugar snap peas, stems snapped off and strings removed 4 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon butter, cut into 4 pieces Preheat oven to 450°F. Cut 8, 12-inch squares of heavy-duty foil. Pat salmon dry and season with salt and pepper. Place 1 piece of salmon on 1 piece of cut foil. Top each with diced mango, carrots and sugar snap peas. Pour 1 tablespoon soy sauce on top of salmon and veggies, top with 1 piece of butter. Place second piece of foil over salmon and veggies. Fold foil pieces together, sealing around all 4 sides, creating approximately a 7-inch square. Repeat with remaining ingredients and foil. Place on rimmed baking sheet and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on desired doneness of salmon. Note: Your favorite firm white fish such as tilapia can be substituted for salmon. Just purchase same size fillets and follow recipe. Nutrition Information: Each serving (1/4 recipe) contains 439 calories, 13g carbohydrate (4% Daily Value), 2.3g fiber (9% Daily Value), 37g protein (74% Daily Value), 26g fat (40% Daily Value), 7g saturated fat (35% Daily Value), 101mg cholesterol (34% Daily Value), 868mg sodium (53% Daily Value), and 875mg potassium (25% Daily Value).

Making Panini Without a Press

Don’t have a panini press? No worries — you just need a non-stick pan and one of these everyday items:  Cast iron skillet  Tea kettle weighted down with water  Brick wrapped in aluminum foil  Pot, weighted down with canned goods All you need to do is: Preheat the non-stick pan.  Spray the bottom skillet with non-stick cooking spray.  Add sandwich.  Spray bottom of weighted object with non-stick cooking spray, place on top of sandwich. 

Mango, Sausage and Potato Breakfast Burritos

Serves 4 9 ounces (about 5) small red potatoes, washed and diced 2 teaspoons olive oil 8 ounces spicy sausage, casings removed 1 large mango, peeled, pitted and diced 6 tablespoons shredded Monterey Jack cheese 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro 4 small whole wheat tortillas In medium microwave-safe bowl, toss diced potatoes with oil and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Microwave until cooked through, about 5 minutes. Drain potatoes, set aside. In medium non-stick skillet, cook sausage until no longer pink and internal temperature reaches 170°F, about 10 minutes. Remove from pan with slotted spoon; drain and cool on paper towel-lined plate. Heat same skillet over medium heat and add potatoes. Cook until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer hot potatoes to large bowl and mix with cooked sausage, mango, cheese, and cilantro. Divide sausage and potato mixture among tortillas. Nutrition Information: Each serving (1 burrito) contains 455 calories, 40g carbohydrate (13% Daily Value), 5g fiber (20% Daily Value), 19g protein (37% Daily Value), 26g fat (40% Daily Value), 3g saturated fat (15% Daily Value), 13mg cholesterol (4% Daily Value), 218mg sodium (9% Daily Value), and 390mg potassium (11% Daily Value).


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Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

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Agenda • Hospital • weather • calendar

Sunny, with a high near 92. Wind gusts as high as 28 mph. Tonight: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 61. Wind between 13 and 16 mph.

LEADER&TIMES

A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before noon. Partly sunny, with a high near 86. Northeast wind between 13 and 18 mph. Monday night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 61.

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Subscriptions rates for the City of Liberal in city limits are: 1 year at $70.56 6 months at $43.42 3 months at $27.14 1 month at $9.04 Outside of city limits and in town mailing 1 year at $130.26 6 months at $78.16 3 months at $39.08 1 month at $13.03 Outside of Kansas 1 year at $120 6 months at $72 3 months at $36 1 month at $12

ISN No. 262273494 The High Plains Daily Leader&Times is published every day except Saturday by Seward County Publishing Company at 16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal, KS 67901 and entered under Periodicals Postage Paid at Post Office in Liberal, Kan. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any contributed material. Postmaster: Send address changes to: High Plains Daily Leader&Times, 16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal KS 67901. Phone: (620) 626-0840 Fax: (620) 626-9854

hospital SOUTHWEST MEDICAL CENTER FRIDAY ADMISSIONS: None reported BIRTHS: None reported DISMISSALS: Rebecca Sue Naab, Liberal Lluvia L. Diazorona and daughter, Liberal Melvina E. Wichert, Hooker, Okla. Venita R. Combs, Liberal Total admissions: 2 Total dismissals: 14

jail log The Seward County Jail Calendar will now be published daily only in the Leader & Times. The information is provided by the Seward County Sheriff’s office at L&T’s request and only lists when and why a person was incarcerated. Those reasons do not mean the individual was charged with those crimes, or if any charges were incurred. That decision is determined separately by the Seward County Attorney’s office.

Jail Log from May 31, 2012 Name – Age – Date in – Address – Charges Pedro Espinoza, 47 – 5/31 – Route 2, Turpin, Okla. – TOC Juana Luna-Hernandez, 27 – 5/31 – Route 2, Turpin, Okla. – No DL Gregorio Pastor, 22 – 5/31 – 1110 W. Seventh, Liberal – No DL Jesus Ventura-Marin, 25 – 5/31 – 546 N. McComas, Wichita – Speeding and no insurance Cirilo Ruiz-Gutierrez, 33 – 5/31 – 607 W. Ninth, Friona, Texas – No DL Rolando Perez, 40 – 5/31 – 1696 Road F, Liberal – No DL Jesus Ibarra, 48 – 5/31 – 2500 N. Western, Liberal – Speeding and no DL Roy Arange, 70 – 5/31 – RR 1 Box 17A, Liberal – DWS, no insurance and improper driving on laned road Ramiro Payan, 19 – 5/31 – 1500 N. Bluebell, Liberal – Speeding and no DL Jesus Martinez, 23 – 5/31 – 633 Seward, Liberal – DWS and no seat belt Robert Jenkins, 24 – 5/31 – 117 W. Walnut, Liberal – Remanded from court Daniel Russell, 40 – 5/31 – 401 Woodland, Jefferson, Texas – Forgery, theft and making false information Stephen Downing, 24 – 5/31 – 1503 N. Roosevelt, Liberal – FTA and FTC Tiffany Holland, 29 – 5/31 – 306.5 Birch, Liberal – Theft, possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, ID theft, ID fraud and criminal use of a financial card Velma Martinez, 50 – 5/31 – 1015 W. Ohio, Liberal – FTA Pamela McElroy, 37 – 5/31 – 903 S. Grant, Liberal – Lewd and lascivious behavior Charge codes: DL – Driver’s License DUI – Driving Under the Influence DV – Domestic violence DWS – Driving While Suspended FTA – Failure to appear FTC – Failure to comply LEO – Law Enforcement Officer MIP – Minor In Possession PBT – Preliminary Breathalizer Test PFA – Protection From Abuse TOC – Transporting an Open Container WWI – Walking While Intoxicated

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agenda SEWARD COUNTY/CITY OF KISMET PLANNING COMMISSION The next meeting of the Seward County/City of Kismet Planning and Zoning Board will be at 5:45 p.m. Monday in Suite 200, located upstairs at the Seward County Administration Building at 515 N. Washington. ❏ Call to order ❏ Approval of minutes a. May 14 ❏ Public comments ❏ Zoning administrator report ❏ Old business a. Comprehensive plan reviewed, continued ❏ New business a. Changing perceptions (discussion) ❏ Adjournment SOUTHWEST MEDICAL CENTER BOARD OF TRUSTEES The regular meeting of the Southwest Medical Center Board of Trustees will be at 7 a.m. Thursday in the Conference Room No. 2 at SWMC. Agenda items include: ❏ Call to order ❏ Minutes of previous meetings a. May 24 ❏ Community comments ❏ Additional agenda items ❏ Information items a. Medical staff meeting b. Hospital safety report c. Nabholz Construction meeting minutes d. Next regular board meeting Board member at July 11 medical staff meeting ❏ Unfinished business a. Return CEO performance evaluations b. Return board self-evaluations ❏ New business a. Financial report for May b. SWMC medical staff membership and privileges ❏ Reports a. In house meeting minutes 1. Medical staff meeting 2. Management meeting 3. Medical executive committee b. Administrative report 1. CEO report 2. Physician recruitment and practice management ❏ Other items

Local Grain Market – June 9 at 9:20 a.m. Truck bids for Grains Delivered to Hooker, Okla. (Price per bushel)

Location Hooker

Wheat Corn 6.16 6.35

a. Suggestion box ❏ Executive session ❏ Adjourn LIBERAL CITY COMMISSION The next meeting of the Liberal City Commission will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the city commission chambers at 325 N. Washington. ❏ Call to order ❏ Roll call ❏ Pledge of Allegiance ❏ Invocation ❏ Awards, proclamations and presentations ❏ Approval of agenda ❏ Minutes – Approve the minutes of the May 22 regular meeting ❏ Items from citizens ❏ Items from groups ❏ Consent agenda a. Acknowledge receipt of minutes b. Approval of airport leases ❏ Public hearing – KDHE revolving loan fund application ❏ Agreement for installation of highway signs ❏ Resolution No. 2156 – Kansas Municipal Investment Pool account autorization ❏ Police department a. Upgrade on pending grant proposals b. Purchase of McGruff the Crime Dog ❏ Intuit QuickBooks point of sale system – Tourism ❏ City manager’s report ❏ Items from commissioners ❏ Vouchers ❏ Adjournment

calendar TUESDAY ■ New Community Missionary Baptist Church hosts a food cupboard beginning at 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Residents in need should bring identification to receive services. The cupboard is located at the Community Missionary Baptist Educational

YOU RIGHTFULLY EARNED IT. NOW RIGHTFULLY KEEP IT. Looking to keep more of your income and cut your taxes? Then tax-free municipal bonds * may be for you * Bonds may be subject to state, local or the alternative minimum tax.

........................................................................................ Call or visit your local financial advisor today.

Leo Riley Gregory J. Bird 16 E. Second St. 111 E. Tucker Rd. 624-1611 624-1612

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Milo 5.80

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Local market prices provided by Grain prices checked daily at Hooker Equity

Center. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Women’s Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. at 909 N. Clay. WEDENSDAY ■ Overeaters Anonymous of Guymon, Okla., will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the AA Club on Main Street across from Homeland in Guymon. All who have a problem with food are welcome to attend. ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays through the Liberal Senior Center. Transportation is also offered from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. THURSDAY ■ The Western Avenue Church of Christ has a benevolent room which is open to the public from 9 to 10 a.m. every Thursday. For those in need of clothing, come by 215 S. Western Ave. ■ The Liberal Table Tennis Club will meet at 7 p.m. at the Parks and Rec office. ■ T.O.P.S. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), a non-profit weight loss group, meets at 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Southern Baptist Church in Liberal. The first meeting is free. Dues are $28 per year. Call Gail at 626-5032 with questions. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Men’s Support Group will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. at 909 N. Clay.

should bring identification to receive services. The cupboard is located at the Community Missionary Baptist Educational Center. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Women’s Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. at 909 N. Clay. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20 ■ Overeaters Anonymous of Guymon, Okla., will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the AA Club on Main Street across from Homeland in Guymon. All who have a problem with food are welcome to attend. ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays through the Liberal Senior Center. Transportation is also offered from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511.

If you miss your paper, call (620) 6260840 or (620) 624-2541 between 5 and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday.

TUESDAY, JUNE 19 ■ New Community Missionary Baptist Church hosts a food cupboard beginning at 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Residents in need

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Black family reunion on the Black Mesa June 1, 2 and 3 were the dates for the 23rd gathering of the Black Family Reunion at Camp Billy Joe one and a half miles southeast of Kenton, Okla., on the Black Mesa. The family is descended from William Henry and Catherine Jane Black whose old house still stands in Kenton but is uninhabitable. The Blacks and their oldest daughter, Mary, came in a covered wagon from Petersburg, Texas, in 1903. They homesteaded about seven miles southeast of Kenton and lived there until they needed to move closer to school. Five more children were added to the family: Addie, Bob, Jim, Katie and Burton.

Mr. Black drove a freight wagon into Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma. Later he drove a Model T Ford through the countryside selling Rawleigh home and health products. All the original family is now deceased with Katie living to celebrate her 100th birthday in 2008. This reunion began in 1939 when Henry and Catherine hosted all their family except Jim, whose family was unable to attend. There were no more reunions until 1977 when Danny and Cathy Black Michael invited all the family to their farm home east of Moscow. For several years, different families hosted the group in their respective homes. In 1995, the family began meeting at Camp Billy Joe which

seemed to be a good location with so much family history in the area. Each year, visits are made to the old home, the homestead area, Black Canyon named for this family, many family graves in the cemetery and other places of interest. Different families prepared meals for everyone. On Saturday night, a silent auction took place to pay the expenses. Sunday morning worship service took place with Monte Duncan as speaker. Opening prayer was led by Joe Black and closing prayer by Robert Duncan. John Lee led singing, and communion was served by Mitch Jenkins, John Lee and Monte Duncan. Hosts for 2012 were Jim Bob Black and

Monte Duncan. Accepting the responsibility for 2013 were Tommy and Carie Black and Tonya Shafer. One person – John Duncan – has been able to attend every reunion. Attending from Texas were Jim Bob Black and Robin Foust, Hartley, Jim Black, Booker, Joe and Leverne Black, Bovina, Thomas and Carie Black, Ben, Aaron and Shayanne, Dalhart, Steve and Janna Shelton, Lydia and Benny, Richland, Hills, Berta Mirhashemi, San Antonio, Tonya Shafer, Alana and Collin, Kathy Black, Tabitha Black and friends, Katie and Kennedy, Amarillo, Tony Black, Tom and Billie Black, Dalhart, and Kim Lee and Jesse, Sunray.

Those from Oklahoma were Linda Holmes, Woodward, Nikki Eveleigh and Paisyn and Chris Bare, Elk City, and Marlin and Marsha Woods, Boise City. From Kansas were Lisa Neeley and Eric Maxwell, Garden City, Donalda Eveleigh, Ulysses, Clara Lee, Hugoton, Mitch and Renee Jenkins, Hutchinson, John and Kristi Lee and Jr. Elrod, Ashland, Monte Duncan, Natasha, Kathleen and Andrea, Wamego, Robert and Margaret Duncan, Lakin, John Duncan and Lawrence and Wilma Moore, Liberal.

Due to space restrictions, please limit club notes to 300 words or less. Submit club notes to robert@hpleader.com. For more information, call 626-0840.

B OL E S E D U C A T E L HS YO U T H O N LI B ER A L H I ST O R Y E a r l y th i s s p r i n g , L i b e r a l H i g h Sc h o o l w a s h o n o r e d t o h a v e P a u l a n d P a t s y B o l e s a s g u e s t s p e a k e r s . T h e y e x p l a i n e d s o m e o f t h e h i s t o r y o f L i b e r a l d u r i n g W o r l d W a r I I a n d h o w t h e A r m y A i r Ba s e c a me a b o u t , a s w e l l a s w h a t h a p p e n e d t o t h e p r o p e r t y a f t e r t h e w a r w a s o v e r . T h e B o l e s a l s o a g r e e d t o s p e a k t o W e s F o x ’ s A V I D c l a s s r e ga r d i n g t h e i r c o l l e g e e x p e r i e n c e s , w h a t m o t i va t e d t h e m t o a t t e n d c o l l e g e , w h a t c h a l l e n g e s t h e y f a c e d a n d h o w t h e i r l i v e s h a ve c h a n g e d s i n c e a t t e n d i n g c o l l e g e . A V I D i s a n a c r o n y m t h a t m e a n s A d v a n c e m e n t V i a I n d i v i d u a l D e t e r m i n a ti o n . S t u d e n t s a r e b r o u g h t i n t o t h e p r o g r a m b a s e d o n t h e i r a c a d e mi c a b i l i t i e s . T h e y a r e s tu d e n t s w h o a r e v e r y c a p a b l e o f s u c ce e d i n g i n r i g o r o u s c o u r s e s , s u c h a s A d v a n c e d P l a c e m e n t c o u r s e s , b u t ma y n e e d s u p p o r t t o d o s o . t h a t i s w h e r e th e A V I D t e a c h e r s t e p s i n . A V I D t e a c h e s t h e s e k i d s th e “ H i d d e n C u r r i c u l u m” s u c h a s n o t e t a k i n g , o r g a n i z a t i o n a n d t i m e m a n a g e m e n t. St u d e n t t u t o r i a l s a r e c o n d u c t e d o n T u e s d a y a n d T h u r s d a y e a c h w e e k . D u r i n g t u t o r i a l s , s t u d e n t s a r e r e q u i r e d t o h a ve a q u e s t i o n r e g a r d i n g a c o r e s u b j e ct , a n d t h e y r e c e i v e h e l p w i t h t h e q u e s t i o n f r o m th e i r p e e r s a n d tu to r s . T h e y a r e n o t t o l d co r r e c t o r i n co r r e c t a n s w e r s . T h e y a r e t a u gh t p r o c e d u r e s f o r d e d u c i n g i n f o r m a t i o n . T h t A V I D t e a c h e r “ l o o p s ” w i t h h i s / h e r A V I D k i d s . T h e y c o m e t o g e t h e r w h e n t h e k i d s e n t e r t h e h i g h s c h o o l a s f r e s h m e n a n d s t a y w i t h t h e s a m e A V I D te a c h e r u n t i l t h e y g r a d u a t e . T h e c u r r i cu l u m t h e A V I D t e a c h e r f o l l o w s i s d i f f e r e n t e a ch y e a r , ta k i n g s t u d e n ts f r o m e x p l o r i n g c o l l e g e o p ti o n s , t o a p p l y i n g t o c o l l e g e s a n d s e e k i n g s c h o l a r s h i p s . T h e s tu d e n t s a l s o h a v e co l l e g e v i s i t s e a c h y e a r . I n f o u r y e a r s , t h e y w i l l s e e e i g h t t o n i n e d i f f e r e n t co l l e g e s i n K a n s a s , O k l a h o m a a n d T e x a s . T h e s t u d e n t s i n t h i s p i c tu r e a r e i n W e s F o x ’ s A V I D c l a s s . T h e y a r e j u n i o r s a n d w i l l g r a d u a te i n 2 0 1 3 . T h e y a r e J e s s i ca M a r ti n e z , J o a n n a C a m p o s , K i l l i a n D o z e , E r i k a F r a i r e , G a b y G a la n , J e s s ic a G al in d o, A l e ja n d r a G o n z a le z , M ar i a H e r n a n d e z , A le j a n d r a H e r n an d e z , N al l e ly H e r n a n d e z , N i c k In g r a m , J oa n n a M ar i n , E s t e b a n M i c h e l , N a y e l y M o r a l e s , V i v i a n a O r t i z , R i c a r d o P a ti n o , M a r i s o l R e g a l a d o , A b i g a i l R i v e r a , K a r l a R o d r i g u e z , L e o n e l R o d r i g u e z , A b e l i n e R u e d a , Za i r a R u i z , Br i a n n a S a l d a n a , M a y r a Sa n c h e z , C o u r tn e y S m i th a n d Y u b i s e l a T o l e d o . P a t s y B o l e s w a s r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e D a u g h t e r s o f t h e A m e r i ca n R e v o l u t i o n a n d s p e a k i n g a b o u t t h e h i s t o r y o f t h e A m e r i ca n ’ s C r e e d . S h e m e n t i o n e d t h e a t th e cr e e d w a s w r i t t e n a s a r e s u l t o f a n a t i o n w i d e c o n t e s t . He n r y St e l i n g C h a p i n o f N e w Y o r k c o n c e i v e d t h e i d e a o f p r o m o t i n g t h e c o n t e s t f o r t h e w r i t i n g o f a n a t i o n a l c r e e d , w h i ch s h o u l d b e t h e b r i e f e s t p o s s i b l e s u m m a r y o f A m e r i c a n p o l i t i c a l f a i th a n d y e t b e f o u n d e d u p o n th e f u n d a m e n t a l t h i n g s m o s t d i s t i n ct i v e i n A m e r i c an h i s t o r y a n d t r ad i t i o n . M a y o r J a m e s H . P r e s t o n o f Ba l t i m o r e , M d . , o f f e r e d a r e w a r d o f a t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s f o r th e w i n n i n g c r e e d . W i l l i a m T y l e r P a g e , a s tu d e n t o f h i s t o r y , w o n t h e c o n t e s t . T h e f a mi l y r o o t s o f W i l l i a m T y l e r P a g e g o b a ck t o 1 6 5 0 , w h e n t h e f i r s t A m e r i ca n p r o g e n i to r o f h i s f a mi l y , J o h n P a g e , s e t t l e d i n W i l l i a m s b u r g , V a . M r . P a g e w a s a d e s c e n d a n t o f P r e s i d e n t J o h n T yl e r . T h e l a s t p u b l i c a p p e a r a n c e o f W i l l i a m T y l e r P a g e w a s o n S u n d a y e v e n i n g , O c t . 1 8 , 1 9 4 2 , w h e n t h e D a u g h t e r s o f t h e A m e r i c a n R e v o l u ti o n a t t h e 5 0 t h a n n i v e r s a r y c e l e b r a ti o n o f t h e P l e d g e o f A l l e g i a n c e t o t h e F l a g , a n d h e l e d i n th e r ci ta t i o n o f th e A m e r i ca n ’ s C r e e d . T h e n e x t d a y, O c t . 1 9 , 1 9 4 2 , M r . P a g e p a s s e d a w a y . T h e A m e r i c a n ’ s C r e e d a s g i ve n t o u s b y W i l l i a m T y l e r P a g e a r o u s e s i n e v e r A m e r i c a n a d e e p s e n s e o f r e s p o n s i b i l i t y to p r e s e r v e o u r c o u n t r y a n d o u r co n s t i tu ti o n a l f o r m o f g o v e r n e m e n t a s g i v e n t o u s b y o u r f o r e f a t h e r s . P a t s y B o les the n han ded o ut t o e ac h st uden t a sm al l c op y o f t he Am er i c an’ s C r ee d. Courtesy photo

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Dustin Wooldridge promoted to sergeant Army Spc. Dustin Wooldridge has successfully completed WLC “Warrior Leadership Course.” Some of the requirements included, but not limited to were drill and ceremony leadership both tactical and garrison and army writing. May 4, Wooldridge went before the promotion board and was asked a series of questions pertaining to military knowledge. He was successful in answering every question with precision. His MOS is air defense. Wooldridge has demonstrated the skills, knowledge and dedication to warrant the promotion of sergeant in the United States Army. He and his family are crrently stationed at Fort Lewis-McCord, Tocoma, Wash. He is the son of Larry and Sherri Wooldridge, Liberal, and the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Boese.

Select Spring & Summer Merchandise % Off Color-rich ornamental vines now available in FASHION TREE BOUTIQUE ‘compact’ varieties

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OLATHE – Ornamental sweet potato vines (Ipomoea batatas) are increasing their niche in the home annual-plant market. “Gardeners love the vines’ intense, dramatic foliage colors. The original varieties – ‘Blackie’ and ‘Margarita’ – have been very popular for more than a decade. But ... they‘re almost too vigorous in some settings. So, plant breeders have been coming up with new cultivars that are more compact,” said Alan Stevens, K-State Research and Extension horticulturist. When the compact varieties reach about 3 to 4 feet long, they simply stop, Stevens said. After that, they put out side branches that make their display thicker, lusher. As a result, they can function as an eye-catching annual groundcover. They can drape down a retaining wall or slope. They can be the “spiller” plant in window boxes, pots and hanging baskets. With a little help, they can even climb a trellis, the horticulturist said. “And, as if that weren’t enough, ornamental sweet potato plants have almost no problems,” he said. North Carolina State University

•Excluding Brighton

209 N. Kansas Ave. • Liberal, Kansas 67901 • 620-626-7550 Mon.-Sat. 10 am - 5:30 pm

is making some of the new, compact varieties easy to identify, Stevens said. Except for ‘Bewitched,’ NCSU’s 14 current releases all have ‘Sweet Caroline’ in their name. They include a unique cultivar with bronze leaves. Several variegated types, some flowering ones and a border series are in the university’s research pipeline. A few could be market-ready next year. “Not every retailer is going to carry everything that’s available now. At the very least, though, homeowners should be able to find some compact varieties with a variety of leaf-shape options,” Stevens said. “Color selections can range from almost black to deep purple, rich green and a brilliant chartreuse.”


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HAPPENINGS high plains It’s back for a second season! LEADER&TIMES

2 Races take place each Saturday this summer beginning in June. Win one week, and your team qualifies for the final race for the cash at the Five State Fair! A team consists of a minimum of two and up to a carload. Also, teams do not race every week – call for details of how competitions are set up.

To enter your team, email earl@hpleader.com Memorial Day flowers, decorations must be removed by Monday The staff at Liberal Cemetery and Restlawn Memorial Gardens would like to remind the public all flowers and decorations placed during Memorial Day observations must be removed by Monday. Any items not removed by this date will be disposed of.

REMOVE BY MONDAY

Big Brothers Big Sisters hosting Grif Golf next week Big Brothers Big Sisteres will be hosting a full week of miniature golf at Grif Golf in Blue Bonnet Park in Liberal. It will be operated by BBBS from 6 to 9 p.m. starting Monday through June 17. Proceeds will be split between BBBS and Kid’s Inc. For more details, contact Kerry at 624-9000

STARTING MONDAY

Soroptimist Club seeking fair queen contestants Single girls wanting to add some fun to their summer should look to the Soroptimist Club, which is seeking contestants to run for the Five State Fair Queen. Votes are gathered at a penny a vote. Contestants can raise money through car washes, bake sales, and numerous other activities.All money raised goes toward scholarships and other Soroptimist projects. Contestants will win prizes and scholarships. For those interested in running for fair queen, they can pick up an application at First National Bank, Byron Bird & Associates or the Chamber of Commerce. Add excitement to the summer, join the fun and run for fair queen. Application deadline is July 2.

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NEWS

Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

Emergency alerts ... ❖ Continued from Page 1A The system is a joint-project created by the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security and the National Weather Service. In cooperation with hundreds of large and small cell service providers across the nation, the system has been put in place to revolutionize the way in which people are informed during a crisis. The messages themselves come in the form of pop-up messages which the FCC explains are immune to the heavy signal traffic which can bring down communication networks during emergencies. “CMAS alerts are transmitted using a new technology that is separate and different from voice calls and SMS text messages,” the FCC stated. “This new technology ensures that emergency alerts will not get stuck in highly congested user areas, which can happen with standard mobile voice and texting services.” FEMA explained that only the most important messages will be sent out through the messaging system. “WEAs will relay Presidential, AMBER, and imminent threat alerts to mobile phones using cell broadcast technology that will not get backlogged during times of emergency when wireless voice and data services are highly congested,” FEMA said. “CMAS/WEA complements the existing Emergency Alert System which sends warnings to television and radio via broadcast, cable, satellite, and wireline communications pathways.” Imminent threat alerts are able to send out a variety of weather warnings ahead of time to reach people where warning systems such as tornado sirens may sometimes fail. The service aims to reach every cell phone in the country through all major cell carriers and most small service carriers; however, certain models of phones such as Apple’s iPhones are not compatible with the WEA system. This may mean that one member of a household may receive a message while another does not. Cell phone users are able to check the CMAScompatibility of their phone with

Weather Warning Categories A WEA message will be sent during the following weather situations: -Tsunami Warning -Tornado Warning - Extreme Wind Warning - Flash Flood Warning - Hurricane Warning -Typhoon Warning - Blizzard Warning - Ice Storm Warning - Lake Effect Snow Warning - Dust Storm Warning

their service provider. Even prepaid phones will be able to receive alerts if they are compatible and their provider is participating in the CMAS system. Estimates project that by 2014 every cell phone will be able to operate CMAS as older phones are phased out of use. Because of the way the CMAS system operates, people will only

receive messages relevant to the area where they are located at the time. This means a person on vacation can receive updates on severe weather in a city they are visiting, but will not receive messages for weather updates back home. This technology does not track people’s locations — the messages are instead broadcast to

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all compatible phones in an area from cell towers in the same way that emergency weather alerts are broadcast on all local televisions in the affected area. Those worried about data limits and the costs of text messages can rest easy — there are absolutely no costs to consumers to receive a WEA alert. Cell customers can also choose to opt out of the services if they wish by contacting their wireless carrier; however, Presidential messages will be delivered to every cell phone in a national emergency regardless of whether or not a person has opted out of the service. The National Weather Service explained that while these messages are a great form of immediate information, it is always important to check out all the facts on an emergency, as alerts are limited to 90 characters. “WEA is one of many ways you can receive emergency notifications. Other sources include NOAA Weather Radio, news media coverage, the Emergency Alert System on radio and TV broadcasts, social media, and other alerting methods offered by local and state public safety agencies,” the NWS stated. “Your best use of WEA is to immediately seek additional information about the imminent threat impacting your area.” FEMA explained that once a WEA is sent out to an area, the public should be able to recognize it as coming from the government’s CMAS system. “WEAs use a unique ring tone and vibration to signal that an alert has arrived. The unique vibration, which distinguishes the alert from a regular text message, is particularly helpful to people with hearing or vision-related disabilities,” FEMA stated. “Alerts will automatically ‘pop up’ on the mobile device screen and will be limited to 90 characters.” Cell phone users are encouraged to learn more about whether their cell phone is compatible with the CMAS system by contacting their mobile service provider. EPIC PCS, United Wireless, Verizon Wireless and AT&T are all participants in the alert system in the Liberal area.


LIVING

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Mr. and Mrs. William D. Harrison 60th Wedding Anniversary

Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

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William D. and Helen Harrison will celebrate their 60th anniversary June 17 with a reception hosted by their sons and their families from 2 to 4 p.m. at the First Christian Church at 10th and Clay in Liberal. William and Helen were married June 15, 1952, at the First Presbyterian Church in Liberal with the Rev. Gene Harrison presiding. William worked at Beech Aircraft, the Nash Finch Warehouse and the Seward County Sheriff’s Department. Helen worked for the Southwest Guidance Center, Panhandle Eastern and the First Christian Church. Both are retired. They have three children, Joe Harrison and wife, Connie, Durant, Okla., Dan Harrison, Liberal, and Martin Harrison and wife, Sherrie, Liberal. They have 17 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Mr. and Mrs. Sal Sosa 50th Wedding Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Sal Sosa of Liberal will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary by renewing their wedding vows at Faith Tabernacle Church today during the morning service. Salvador and Sandra McGillivray Randle were married on June 15, 1962, by the Rev. J.D. Thorne at First Baptist Church in Liberal. The ceremony will be officiated by their son, the Rev. Cameron Randle. He and his wife, Angelica, and daughter, Angie, reside in Accomac, Va., where he is pastor of two Episcopal churches, St. James and St. George’s.

Take off pounds sensibly Mr. and Mrs. JL Handy 50th Wedding Anniversary with TOPS

JL and Norma were married June 3, 1962, in the Kismet United Methodist Church. They celebrated their 50th by going to Washington D.C. with all their children and most of their grandchildren. Their children are Meta and Craig Helsing, Fountain Hills, Ariz., Myra and Steve George, Salina, Jerrod and Dana Handy, Wichita, and Jon Handy of Kismet. Their grandchildren are Casie and Dustin Curtis, Taylor, Kail and Conner Brinton, Daley and Jacey Handy and Jeannie George. Great-grandchildren are Kyler, Jocelynn, Christian, Brysie and JJ.

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Abigail Marie Bird ...turned 3 years old on May 14. She is the daughter of Andrew and Jennifer Bird from Park City. Her grandparents are Alicia and Greg Bird, Liberal, and Tammy and Rob Barr of Wichita. Her great-grandparents are Billie and Dale Warden of Lenexa, Byron and Donna Bird of Liberal, Janice Barr of Wichita and Joyce Salyar of Florida.

Submit birthday, wedding, engagement and anniversary announcements and club notes to the Leader & Times. All announcements are run free in the Sunday Living section. Any other days will be charged at display ad rates.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly hosted its regular meeting May 31. Gail Owens called the meeting to order at 6 p.m., and five members were present. There was no overall weight loss, but there was a total gain of 4.6 pounds. The group continued to read from “The Choice is Mine” book and discussed as they read each section. The fruits and vegetables to try this week are dark green leafy vegetables selected by one of the members.


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Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

EDITORIAL Opinion LEADER &T IMES

“A gentleman is a man who can play the accordion but doesn't.”

UNKNOWN

EARL WATT President and Publisher

LARRY PHILLIPS

JASON EPP

Managing Editor

General Manager

MEMBER The Associated Press and Kansas Press Association

FOUNDED 1886

GOP backing down from Holder contempt resolution Operation Fast and Furious is blamed for, among other things, the death of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry and possibly the death of Immigration & Customs Enforcement Agent Jaime Zapata.

committee are in favor of the Holder While Rep. Darryl Issa contempt charge, with about eight (R-CA) is eager to hold GOP caucus members preferring to stay out of the fray. Attorney General Eric “It’s like I have said all along: GOP Holder in contempt of lawmakers don’t possess the strong congress for failing to stomach for confrontation the way their opponents do. Democrats -provide all records and progressives -- apparently information regarding the especially possess the intestinal fortitude to do controversial Operation battle in the House of Representative,” said Det. Snopes. Fast and Furious gunIn fact, most of the Republican smuggling fiasco, a leadership has reluctantly shown number of GOP members minimal support for Issa’s investigation of Holder and his of his Justice committee G U E S T C O L U M N Department underlings, appear to be according to getting “cold several sources. feet at the Issa and his colleagues on the thought of Oversight going up Committee at first conducted an against intensive probe of Holder,” a the Justice Jim Kouri law Department’s approval of the Fast & Furious “gun enforcement source in walking” operation. Issa repeatedly Washington, D.C. said on alleged that the covert action had to have the approval by upper-echelon Sunday. As a result Rep. Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, may not have the full support of his fellow Republicans in taking action against Holder and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and therefore he’ll lack the votes to proceed with the contempt resolution and his investigation, according to the Law Enforcement Examiner source. Operation Fast and Furious is blamed for, among other things, the death of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry and possibly the death of Immigration & Customs Enforcement Agent Jaime Zapata. If passed by a House vote, the contempt citation would order the controversial Attorney General to deliver to the House Oversight Committee and to the Judiciary Committee thousands documents related to the probe of the gunsmuggling operation. According to the Law Enforcement Examiner source, too many Republican members on Issa’s committee are fearful of pursuing the proposed action so close to the November elections. “Apparently some feckless GOP lawmakers are willing to allow Holder and his minions to escape any scrutiny or punishment for an operation that cost lives on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border,” said former NYPD detective and military intelligence officer Mike Snopes, who has been following the aftermath of what he called a “blown covert operation.” An anonymous police source told the Law Enforcement Examiner that only about 15 Republicans on the

members of the DOJ and he wanted to know their names, according to his frequent appearances on Fox News and CNN. When Issa issued a second subpoena last October for thousands of files pertinent to the gun-walking tactics, he hoped to at least identify those ATF and DOJ members involved in the failed operation. Issa complained last week on the Fox News Channel that DOJ officials stopped turning over records and documents for the committee thereby violating a congressional subpoena. And earlier this month, he began circulating a draft copy of a resolution that would hold President Barack Obama’s attorney general in contempt of Congress. With only 15 committee Republicans supporting the resolution – and with none of the Democrat members signing on – Issa won’t have the 21 votes needed to pass the contempt resolution out of the 40-member Committee onto the floor of the House, said the law enforcement source close to the investigation. “This is a perfect example of why Republicans in congress are held in such low regard. Rather than play hardball when they are in the right, they attempt to appear civil while the Democrats and their comrades in the news media paint them as unreasonable and harsh,” said Det. Snopes. Jim Kouri, CPP, the fifth Vice President and Public Information Officer of the National Association of Chiefs of Police, has served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country.

Crossing the creek in good company, good time During the drive to the mountains, my father and I never ran out of conversation topics. My parents and I were headed to Manitou Springs, Colo., to pick up my daughter from a two-week conference. With Mom at the wheel, Dad and I reviewed what we’d been reading, skimmed through history to the reign of Charlemagne and back to the present, reminisced about long-gone relatives and family events.

rence in an unsuccessful creek crossing was watersoaked jeans and blue lips. Three decades and a six-hour drive later, we arrived in Manitou Springs, an upscale hippie hotspot, with ‘shroom-themed shops and self-consciously hipster tourist attractions. It was exactly the sort of place I would have loved when I outgrew my childhood contentment with the icy creek and quiet afternoons reading library books. That was right around the time I began lobbying my father to find a church in a place more diverse and sophisticated than Minneola — a city with museums and symphonies and fashion boutiques Then, “Look! I see the mountains,” Mom said. Her and ethnic food. New York, maybe, or New Orleans. intonation, or perhaps the far-off outline of the Rockies Dad stayed put in his small town pastorate, and I against a hazy horizon, pulled me back and forth rebelled. When I was the age of this granddaughter through time, so that for a moment I did not know for we’d driven across the Plains to collect, I’d logged hard sure whether I was 10 or 43. The feeling that comes mileage: a pregnant, runaway teenage bridge at 16, when the mountains first manifest themselves on the divorced before I was old enough to buy cigarettes, still barely visible edge of the plains was intimately familiar, angry at God when I reached my 20s. My daughter, by embedded in me like unconscious memory. contrast, is college-bound and full of real wisdom. She When I was growing up, my family took a yearly loves Jesus. So do I. vacation in the mountains. My father’s modest salary as As we navigated the narrow, steep streets that crissa small-town pastor didn’t enable crossed the base of Red Mountain, us to choose pricey destinations, I wondered how my life might have G R AV I T Y but a family in the congregation been different if I’d followed my & S TA R S owned cabins near Boulder and father’s advice more often. I could they were glad to share. have attended conferences like the The property was far from posh. one Ananda had just completed. I A squeaky, iron-spring mattress might have kept my balance. It isn’t occupied half the main room, as though my life now leans offwhile my brother and I bedded kilter: I’m proud of the way my down in a narrow adjacent room parents and I have found our way nearly equally divided between through the redemptive maze of closet and floor space. Narrow, relationship rebuilding, a task nearly ancient-looking appliances made as daunting as the route we’d traced one corner of the main room into to find the conference lodge. a kitchen, and a rudimentary The conference speaker at the bathroom occupied the other. I student send-off picked up the recall shuddering with fear when it same theme in his address. was my turn to enter the crude “It’s easy to begin things well, and shower stall. many of you have done that,” he told the 180 young Even so, we loved that cabin. Outside the rough log adults in the room, “but it’s harder, and much more front a small meadow glowed radiant in the high important to finish well.” His speech continued in that morning sunlight, speckled with daisy heads, asters, vein, as appropriate for the parents as for the students the wild snapdragons people called “eggs and butter” in the audience. and delicate mountain bluebells. Behind the cabin, I sat next to my father, who is still the best company down a steep, gravelly drive, rushed the Lower St. I could choose for a Colorado trip. I listened, but my Vrain. The glacial stream’s power unnerved my younger mind also drifted across decades: summers at the brother and me. We were sure we’d drown if we were cabin, the hike to the top of the mountain, where we careless enough to slip into the deepest part, where the picnicked in a place that felt close to the sky itself; the water looked black beneath its white froth. If that lost years and the murk of those memories; the didn’t kill us, we would probably die from having our moment I called to ask my father if I could come heads dashed against the gleaming rocks that jutted home; the way he came to get me. How had we ended through the foam. up here, I wondered, having the kind of experience we My dad knew how to navigate, though. He spied out could have had in the first place? the likely-looking branches that would serve as walking Dad reached for my hand and squeezed it, and he sticks, then rolled up his pants legs to wade through kissed my cheek. the shallow stretches of the creek. We could do it too, “Rachel, I’m proud of you,” he whispered. “You are he told us: the walking sticks would help us balance, finishing well.” and the main thing was to test each rock on the I know how to cross perilous waters, a step at a time. bottom before putting our full weight into the next The thing is, you need something stable to keep you step. We were amazed to discover that the worst occur- from falling. Fathers do that. At least, mine did.

Rachel Coleman

Liberal City Commission: City Hall; 324 N. Kansas Ave.; 626-2202. Seward County Commission: County Administration Building 515 N. Washington 626-3300. Kansas Senator Garrett Love, P.O. Box 1, Montezuma, KS 67867.Topeka office contact Info: (785) 296-7359. E-mail: garrett.love@senate.ks.gov. Kansas Senator Steve Morris, District 39: 600 Trindle, Hugoton, KS, 67951; Phone: 620-544-2084; E-mail: morris@senate.state.ks.us. Kansas House Rep. Carl Dean Holmes, District 125: P.O. Box 2288, Liberal, KS, 67905; Phone: (620) 624-7361. Topeka Office: 174-W Capitol Building, Topeka, KS 66612-1504. Phone: (785) 2967670. Fax: (785) 368-7074. Kansas House Rep. Steve Alford, District 124: 4179 East Road 19 Ulysses, Kansas 67880 Phone: (620) 356-1361. Email:j.stephen.alford@house.ks.go v U.S. Representative Tim Huelskamp: 126 Cannon HOB

Getting in Touch

Washington, DC 20515 Phone: (202) 225-2715 Fax: (202) 225-5124. Salina Office (785) 309-0572. E-mail: http://huelskamp.house.gov. U.S. Senator Jerry Moran: 4 Russell Courtyard (Temp), District of Columbia 20510-1604 Phone: (202) 2246521. Fax: (202) 228-6966; E-mail: MoranNews@moran.senate.gov U.S. Senator Pat Roberts: 100 Military Plaza, Suite 203, P.O. Box 550, Dodge City, KS 67801. Fax: (620) 2272264; Phone: (620) 227-2244; E-mail: pat_roberts@senate.gov.

Tips on contacting elected officials: I Identify who you are and where you live — make it clear you are a constituent. Include phone and address so your official can contact you. I Keep to one topic per letter or call. If appropriate, refer to the specific ordinance, bill or date pertaining to the subject. I Be clear about what you hope your elected official will do. I Remain polite, even when disagreeing.


4B

Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

LIVING

Do summer with a book You’re staying. No, you’re going. You’re staying and then you’re going. The truth is that it’s going to be a nice long summer, so you can do what you want to do. One thing’s for sure, though: you want to do it with a book. So here are some great new releases scheduled to come out this summer…. JUNE If you like thrillers, you’re in luck this month! Look for new heart-thumpers by Tom Clancy, Robert Ludlum, Clive Cussler, James Rollins, and Eric Van Lustbader in June. If you’re looking for something a little gentler, you’ll find novels by Mary Kay Andrews out in June, as well as Dorothea Benton Frank, Emma McLaughlin & Nicola Kraus, Ridley Pearson, Janet Evanovich, and Alexander McColl Smith. James Carville has a new book coming out in June. There are two different books about the Obamas being released; one about Michelle and one about the President. There’s a new memoir by Anthony Swofford, a new book of devotions by Billy Graham, diet books this month (because it’s never too late for beachwear season), a new book for runners, too, as well as a new Rachel Ray cookbook, and lots more. For the kids, look for a new Splat the Cat book, a new release by Rosemary Wells, and a delightful new young adult book byJodi Picoult and her teenage daughter (and it’s not just for teens, either!) JULY Oh, you’re not done reading, are you? Because here’s what’s in store for July… Love biographies? Then look for new ones about Freddie Mercury, Marco Rubio, Marilyn Monroe, Abraham Lincoln, and Daniel Smith. James Patterson fans will be happy because he has a new book out in July. So does Andrew Gross, Meg Cabot, and Karin Slaughter. Iris Johansen has a book due out, as does James Lee Burke, J.A. Jance, Danielle Steel, Emily Giffin, Kay Hooper, Catherine Coulter, and Dean Koontz. I’m seeing lots of history on July’s

A Bonus Bookworm Sez

schedule, quite a few devotional books and Christian novels, a handful of interesting psychology / cognitive behavior books, and a book about Batman. The kids will be happy to find a new Geronimo Stilton book out in July, a new R.L. Stine, several new Disney books, and I can’t wait to get my hands on “The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.” AUGUST The summer’s winding down but the books keep rolling in! There’s a new W.E.B. Griffin novel coming out, as well as a new releases from Wanda Brunstetter, Stuart Woods, P.J. Tracy, and William Kent Krueger. There’s a new Sneaky Pie Brown book coming out from Rita Mae Brown. A new novel from Kathy Reichs. A new Star Wars novel. A new bio on Julia Child. I see lots more devotionals on the schedule, and more cookbooks to get you ready for fall. And before the kids go back to school, they’ll be happy with a new Nevermore book by James Patterson. They’ll want the new Bill Reilly book, the new Kevin Henkes picture book, the latest Marley book by John Grogan, a new Captain Underpants book, and one last release from Stan & Jan Berenstain. Keep in mind that release dates are approximate and can be changed. Books can also be postponed indefinitely. Ask your bookseller or librarian for the final word because they’ll know. They’re smart like that. So now, go. Book a great summer!

news@hpleader.com

The Bookworm Sez

The Bookworm Sez is a nationally syndicated book review column by Terri Schlichenmeyer of LaCrosse, Wis.

‘Swim: Why We Love the Water’ by Lynn Sherr You’re a little scared. Looking at the temperature these days is not for the faint of heart. The red line on the thermometer has to be somewhere in the Hades which means the less you know, the more comfortable you’ll feel - although you won’t be totally comfortable until you get home and slip into the dip, take a cool plunge, have a cold drink while lounging in the drink. You need to go swimming. But why do we – land animals that we are – spend so much time trying to be fish? In the new book “Swim: Why We Love the Water” by Lynn Sherr, you’ll wade into the answer. It doesn’t take much to imagine the first human who joyfully leaped into the water. Ancient Egyptians were so familiar with swimming that they

created hieroglyphs for it. A cave in the Eastern Sahara not only proves that there was water there once, but that humans swam in it. Early Greeks created coins depicting a skinnydip, and Roman noblemen thought swimming was one of “the manly arts.” Yes, humans swam until about the late Middle Ages… and then we stopped, for reasons that historians can only guess at. For about 500 years, we shunned water – possibly because of its lack of cleanliness – but by the latter 1500s, humans were once again splashing away and inventing ways to get wet. While Native Americans and Africans had “practiced the art with natural grace,” Sherr says that white Americans “struggled with the proper way to enjoy the water.” It didn’t take long for them to

figure it out, though, and it didn’t take long for them to deny their darker brethren a chance to dip their toes in the pool. Even today, 60% of African American children don’t know how to swim. For water-lovers, a lot has changed over the centuries, including the water itself: pools are much cleaner than 11th-century moat swimmers found. Swimsuits are racier, and racing results are more precise. Various strokes have been “invented” and most are scientifically measured for speed and efficiency. Even the way we enter the water is different than it was a hundred years ago: chances are that your bashful greatgrandma got wet by wagon. Beginning with a legendary challenge that took her on a swim from one continent to another,

author Lynn Sherr strokes readers’ curiosity and gives us plenty of excuses to go jump in the lake. She glides from psychology to seaside, from bathing beauties to beach bums, and from ancient Greece to swimmer’s grease here. What sets this book apart, though, is that Sherr’s words are as meditative as the act about which she writes. You’re lulled into the kind of relaxation you’d get from a 75-degree pool, but Sherr will also surprise you with splashes of sidebars that are pure fun. If you’re sometimes regretful that you don’t have gills, or if you spend most of your workday thinking about your pool, then “Swim” is definitely your kind of book. Grab a copy, and dive right in.

Listen to the....book? The ice cream scoop Whether you are in your car, on the beach, or hiking a trail — anytime is a good time to listen to an audio book. June is National Audio Book Month, and the staff of the Liberal Memorial Library would like to remind everyone that an audio book is a pastime that can be enjoyed anywhere and fits any schedule. It’s not surprising that people are passionate about this format: The Association of American Publishers reports that one in every five American households currently uses audio books. That’s approximately 23 million families listening to titles like “The Hunger Games” “The Lord of the Rings” and “The Cat in the Hat.” Since the beginning of time, people have gathered around campfires to listen to stories and tall tales. Growing up, many of us couldn’t fall to sleep at night until we heard our favorite bedtime story. As humans, we yearn for the sound of the spoken word. This is one of the reasons why audio books are so popular. If you ask fans of this format why they enjoy it so much, many will say it is the expression and inflection in a narrator’s voice. If you have ever listened to an audio book, you know that the narrator is as critical as the words themselves. Luckily, most of the readers today are professional actors who are well-trained in the art of the spoken word. This makes listening to audio books a much more enjoyable experience. The Liberal Memorial Library offers a large selection of audio books you can borrow or download using a library card. Along with State Library of Kansas and other Kansas libraries, the Liberal Memorial Library provides access to a collection of audio books using the program One Click Digital. To access this program, you will need to visit our website and catalog at http://www.lmlibrary.org/catalog or via the State Library of Kansas website at www.kslib.info/kansasez-library.html. The State Library site will require a Kansas Library

LIBRARY DIRECTOR

Jill Pannkuk

Card to download audio books. You can get this card from any Kansas library. If you need a player, our library has MP3 players that you can check out. If you prefer the CD format, the library has more than 1,700 titles available for checkout. The collection includes both children and adult books in all genres. Some of the recently added titles include: “11th Hour” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro “A Blaze of Glory: A Novel of the Battle” of Shiloh by Jeff Sharra “Canada” by Richard Ford “The Columbus Affair” by Steve Berry “Deadlocked” by Charlaine Harris “Dreams: Reimagining my Life After Loss” by Jai Pausch “The Family Corleone” by Ed Falco “Home” by Toni Morrison “Master & God: A Novel of the Roman Empire” by Lindsey Davis “Stolen Prey” by John Sandford “The Storm” by Clive Cussler and Graham Brown If you have never tried an audio book, please stop by and check one out. They are great to listen to while you exercise, do crafting or travel. They can make a long car trip seem much shorter and are an excellent way to share books with your children.

Make sure your ads are reaching the people you want to reach – PAID subcribers. Call 626-0840.

Ice cream rates as America’s favorite dessert and leading comfort food. Ninety-eight percent of all households purchase ice cream – vanilla being the most popular flavor and chocolate syrup the favorite topping. Each American consumes a yearly average of 23.2 quarts of ice cream, ice milk, sherbet, ices and other commercially produced frozen dairy products with consumption the highest during July and August. What is your favorite frozen treat to order at the drive-through this summer? If it’s a milkshake, think again if you’re out for a healthy snack. Milkshakes are usually made of ice cream, fullcream milk and sugar and have enough calories to count for two meals. A large, chocolate, softserve shake can easily add up to 1150 calories, 30 grams total fat and over ¾ cup sugar. Adding chewy baked brownie pieces and chocolate chunks to the shake puts you over the top with 1440 calories, 67 grams total fat and 33 grams saturated fat – more calories and fat than two large bacon cheeseburgers. The calories in a medium vanilla soft-serve cone can vary between 150 and 330. Dipping that medium cone in chocolate adds 140 calories and doubles the grams of fat. Waffle cones, candy, syrup, sprinkles, and whipped

K–State family and consumer sciences agent

Kathy Bloom

cream add calories, sugar and fat. Fast-food restaurants post online nutrition calculators that are easy for customers to use. Customers can also look for nutrition information charts located inside the store. Ask for information if you don’t see it posted. In the 1970s, frozen yogurt was introduced as a healthier alternative to ice cream. It is similar to ice cream, but is lower in fat due to the use of milk instead of

Each American consumes a yearly average of 23.2 quarts of ice cream, ice milk, sherbet, ices and other commercially produced frozen dairy products with consumption the highest during July and August

cream. Sweeteners, colorings and flavorings are mixed in and air is incorporated into the mixture to create extra volume and smooth consistence. One-half cup of frozen yogurt has about 100 to 120 calories compared to 150 to 220 calories for the same amount of ice cream. Other types of frozen delights include gelato, which is traditionally made with milk rather than cream; sorbet, which does not contain milk or cream; and frozen custard, which is similar to ice

cream and made with eggs in addition to cream and sugar and prepared fresh on-site. Since ice cream treats are such universal favorites, there are many calorie-conscious alternatives available. If you’re still in the mood for a cold dessert, share one with a friend or enjoy a 100-calorie fudge bar. For more information on health and nutrition visit our website at www.seward.ksu.edu, come by our office at 1081 Stadium Road, e-mail us at sw@listserv.ksu.edu or give us a call at 620-624-5604.

Mayhan Garden Center

Closeout Sale! Plants 1/2 price

401 S. Clay • Liberal KS North of 54 & Clay Intersection

620-624-7946


THE WEEK IN REVIEW news@hpleader.com

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WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE

7,553.77 +261.54

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

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2,629 548 159 194 3,216 39 18,687,944,875

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AMEX

2,262.89 +86.97

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Chg +1.61 +.99 +.51 +.62 +1.12 +.55 +1.60 +.43 +1.12 +.66

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Name Last ParametSd 8.75 OptCable 3.80 Medtox 26.75 ColonyBk 6.90 CredoPtr 14.34 StreamHlt 2.97 SunHlth 5.79 WstptInn g 30.55 HovnEn pf A4.44 Pharmacyc39.49

Chg +2.85 +1.06 +7.05 +1.72 +3.48 +.72 +1.39 +7.25 +1.04 +9.03

%Chg +48.3 +38.7 +35.8 +33.2 +32.0 +32.0 +31.6 +31.1 +30.6 +29.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg CentEuro 2.89 -1.00 -25.7 Ubiquiti n 13.48 -4.18 -23.7 PrimaBio n 4.46 -1.30 -22.6 RosttaG rs 11.30 -3.09 -21.5 GeneticT h 3.52 -.96 -21.4 KiOR n 6.82 -1.79 -20.8 CarverB rs 3.61 -.90 -20.0 ReadgIntB 5.33 -1.07 -16.7 Telik rs 3.66 -.70 -16.1 FstUtdCp 4.26 -.81 -16.0

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) CheniereEn414961 NovaGld g236070 NwGold g 149853 GoldStr g 149851 Rentech 112573 Vringo 98296 CFCda g 73663 Rubicon g 61859 VirnetX 58130 AntaresP 56584

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Last 12.57 5.99 10.06 1.23 1.75 3.51 20.36 2.91 34.57 3.19

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322 185 17 48 529 22 395,668,868

Name Vol (00) Last Chg PwShs QQQ244426762.87 +2.46 Microsoft 2179763 29.65 +1.20 Facebook n200539027.10 -.62 Cisco 1604253 16.73 +.77 Intel 1583050 26.41 +1.27 SiriusXM 1455678 1.86 +.02 Oracle 1398286 27.16 +1.16 MicronT 1369073 5.88 +.43 Zynga n 1247271 6.05 +.04 NewsCpA 951851 19.44 +.89

Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

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1,985 681 85 194 2,726 60 8,215,786,289

Parklane Towers ... ❖ Continued from Page 1A system, where you had boiler on, chiller on and everyone had to stick with that system, we can have air conditioning on the third floor and heat on the first floor or total individual control.” Beckwith said this has allowed Parklane to keep up with the times. “The renovation is excellent,” she said. “We did a lot of extra cosmetic work also. HUD came down on Tuesday and said it was one of the nicest facilities they have seen. They’re very impressed with the money that they gave us and how we’re using it to help our tenants.” Beckwith, who presented

Parklane’s latest updates at Friday’s Chamber breakfast, said the HUD grant was received in the spring of 2011, and work on the project began in August 2011. “We just finished it up a couple of weeks ago,” she said. Work on the Parklane project was done by an area company. “We contracted,” Beckwith said. “We went out for bids. We publicized that. Tatro Plumbing out of Garden City received the bid, and they were the ones who did most of the work.” The complex has 75 apartments, with 73 of those having one bedroom and the remaining two having two bedrooms.

Name

AT&T Inc AirProd AlcatelLuc Altria Anadarko BP PLC BakrHu BkofAm Bar iPVix Boeing Caterpillar ChesEng Chevron Cisco Citigroup CocaCola Deere Dell Inc DirSCBear DukeEngy EMC Cp ExxonMbl Facebook n FordM GenElec Hallibrtn HarleyD Hastings HewlettP HomeDp iShEMkts iShR2K Intel IBM

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1.76 34.55 +.65 +1.9 +14.3 2.56 79.62 +2.74 +3.6 -6.5 ... 1.59 +.10 +6.7 +1.9 1.64 32.91 +1.22 +3.8 +11.0 .36 63.84 +5.71 +9.8 -16.4 1.92 38.10 +1.34 +3.6 -10.9 .60 39.25 -1.49 -3.7 -19.3 .04 7.56 +.54 +7.7 +36.0 ... 18.40 -4.18 -18.5 -48.2 1.76 69.94 +2.70 +4.0 -4.6 1.84 87.60 +2.08 +2.4 -3.3 .35 18.36 +2.78 +17.8 -17.6 3.60 100.84 +4.43 +4.6 -5.2 .32 16.73 +.77 +4.8 -7.2 .04 27.77 +2.38 +9.4 +5.5 2.04 75.24 +2.15 +2.9 +7.5 1.84 74.31 +2.79 +3.9 -3.9 ... 12.12 +.05 +0.4 -17.2 ... 20.90 -2.92 -12.3 -21.1 1.00 23.15 +.80 +3.6 +5.2 ... 24.64 +1.46 +6.3 +14.4 2.28 80.84 +2.92 +3.7 -4.6 ... 27.10 -.62 -2.2 -29.1 .20 10.66 +.54 +5.3 -.9 .68 19.20 +.66 +3.6 +7.2 .36 27.96 -1.92 -6.4 -19.0 .62 48.66 +2.39 +5.2 +25.2 ... 2.04 -.05 -2.4 +27.5 .53 22.31 +1.06 +5.0 -13.4 1.16 52.35 +4.39 +9.2 +24.5 .81 37.93 +1.24 +3.4 ... 1.10 76.97 +3.15 +4.3 +4.4 .90 26.41 +1.27 +5.1 +8.9 3.40 195.14 +6.06 +3.2 +6.1

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NEWS

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

JPMorgCh 1.20 33.68 +1.75 +5.5 +1.3 JohnJn 2.44 62.98 +1.20 +1.9 -4.0 KindMorg 1.28 31.53 -.82 -2.5 -2.0 KindrM wt ... 2.10 -.09 -4.1 +14.1 Kroger .46 21.57 -.07 -0.3 -10.9 MktVGold .15 46.33 -.25 -0.5 -9.9 McDnlds 2.80 87.75 +1.04 +1.2 -12.5 Merck 1.68 38.46 +1.28 +3.4 +2.0 MicronT ... 5.88 +.43 +7.9 -6.5 Microsoft .80 29.65 +1.20 +4.2 +14.2 MorgStan .20 13.71 +.98 +7.7 -9.4 NokiaCp .26 3.02 +.38 +14.4 -37.3 OcciPet 2.16 85.05 +7.02 +9.0 -9.2 ONEOK s 1.22 41.28 +1.38 +3.5 -4.8 Oracle .24 27.16 +1.16 +4.5 +5.9 Penney ... 25.18 -.65 -2.5 -28.4 PepsiCo 2.15 68.31 +.80 +1.2 +3.0 Pfizer .88 22.14 +.50 +2.3 +2.3 PwShs QQQ .49 62.87 +2.46 +4.1 +12.6 PrUShS&P ... 16.63 -1.33 -7.4 -13.8 RegionsFn .04 6.15 +.27 +4.6 +43.0 S&P500ETF 2.64 133.10 +4.94 +3.9 +6.1 Schlmbrg 1.10 64.54 +2.47 +4.0 -5.5 SiriusXM ... 1.86 +.02 +1.1 +2.2 SonicCorp ... 8.66 +.54 +6.7 +28.7 SprintNex ... 2.98 +.47 +18.7 +27.4 SPDR Fncl .22 14.14 +.65 +4.8 +8.7 TimeWarn 1.04 35.23 +1.47 +4.4 -2.5 WalMart 1.59 68.22 +2.67 +4.1 +14.2 WellsFargo .88 31.43 +1.27 +4.2 +14.0 Wendys Co .08 4.52 -.15 -3.2 -15.7 WmsCos 1.20 29.37 +.66 +2.3 +8.9 Yahoo ... 15.65 +.73 +4.9 -3.0 Zynga n ... 6.05 +.04 +0.7 -35.7

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MONEY RATES

Prime Rate Discount Rate Federal Funds Rate Treasuries 3-month 6-month 5-year 10-year 30-year

Last 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

Pvs Week 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

0.09 0.14 0.71 1.64 2.75

0.07 0.12 0.62 1.45 2.54

“In those 75 apartments, four are handicap accessible,” Beckwith said. “They’re complete handicap accessible with row in showers. The building was originally built to be elderly and handicap disabled.” Beckwith said that has now changed. “We do take singles and young adults,” she said. “There are typical HUD rules and regulations that you have to follow. The building is just an eclectic group from 90 down to 19 – all living well, living nicely and working together.” There are currently some vacancies at Parklane. “When the city put in the tax credits, it hurt us a lot,” Beckwith said. “Now that we’re able to offer them the individual climate control of their own apartments, I think people are starting to come back.”

Meade State Park conducting fishing derby on Father’s Day weekend On Father’s Day weekend, June 16 and 17, Meade State Park and Friends of Meade State Park and Lake will host a “Father’s Day fishing derby” at the lake. Cost to enter the fishing derby is $3 per adult and $2 per child. All regular park fees still apply. Participants must register at the park office. Registration and the fishing derby will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, June 16.The registration will cut off at 10 a.m. on Sunday, June 17. Prizes will be given for the largest fish in the following categories: bass, crappie and catfish.A half-dollar prize will be given for each carp caught and brought in. Fish can be weighed in from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. The final weigh in time is at 2 p.m. on Sunday. Participants do not need to be present to win. For more information, call the park office at 620-873-2572.

JUNE 16 AND 17

Name

CURRENCIES

Australia Britain Canada Euro Japan Mexico Switzerlnd

Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

Last

Pvs Day

1.0097 1.5462 1.0293 .7996 79.48 13.9564 .9603

1.0055 1.5553 1.0247 .7936 79.68 13.9678 .9532

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show dollar in foreign currency.

Rent at Parklane is calculated at 30 percent of the tenants’ income, and the cost of utilities is zero. “It makes it very affordable living. Instead of having mother or dad down in a house that’s falling apart, you move them in here at 30 percent of their income, no utilities, no electric, no gas, and

5A

WEEKLY DOW JONES Dow Jones industrials

-17.11

26.49

286.84

46.17

93.24

Close: 12,554.20 1-week change: 435.63 (3.6%)

MON

TUES

WED

THUR

FRI

13,500 13,000 12,500 12,000

11,500

D

J

F

M

MUTUAL FUNDS

Total Assets Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV American Funds BalA m MA 31,929 19.00 American Funds CapIncBuA m IH 54,842 49.99 American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS 43,069 32.89 American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 27,383 35.55 American Funds FnInvA m LB 30,415 36.85 American Funds GrthAmA m LG 53,417 30.82 American Funds IncAmerA m MA 53,306 17.02 American Funds InvCoAmA x LB 42,743 28.33 American Funds NewPerspA m WS 27,777 27.52 American Funds WAMutInvA m LV 38,121 29.26 Dodge & Cox IntlStk FB 34,241 28.93 Dodge & Cox Stock LV 36,796 106.77 Fidelity Contra LG 56,819 73.65 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 38,163 2.09 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv IB 27,554 12.50 PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI 31,831 11.26 PIMCO TotRetIs CI 157,531 11.26 Vanguard 500Adml LB 54,161 122.68 Vanguard InstIdxI LB 62,536 121.89 Vanguard InstPlus LB 42,262 121.90 Vanguard MuIntAdml MI 27,649 14.21 Vanguard TotBdAdml CI 33,327 11.08 Vanguard TotIntl FB 30,828 12.92 Vanguard TotStIAdm LB 52,965 33.14 Vanguard TotStIIns LB 34,216 33.14 Vanguard TotStIdx LB 67,292 33.12 Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 33,142 55.90

A

Total Return/Rank 4-wk 12-mo 5-year -2.0 +5.7/A +2.3/A -2.2 +0.6/A +0.2/C -4.4 -8.4/C -2.1/B -6.2 -15.3/B -2.9/A -3.1 -0.8/D -0.7/B -3.0 +0.7/D -0.8/D -1.7 +3.0/B +1.1/C -2.3 +2.7/C -1.2/C -4.2 -4.8/B +0.1/A -2.4 +6.3/A -0.7/A -6.3 -18.5/D -5.6/B -2.8 -2.1/D -4.5/D -2.3 +7.9/A +2.8/A -1.8 +0.2/D +2.1/D -3.1 -3.4/E +9.0/A +0.2 +5.7/C +9.0/A +0.2 +6.0/B +9.3/A -2.5 +5.9/A -0.4/B -2.5 +5.9/A -0.4/B -2.5 +5.9/A -0.3/B -0.2 +8.4/B +5.7/B +0.3 +6.3/B +6.9/B -6.6 -17.2/C -5.4/B -2.8 +4.6/B +0.1/A -2.8 +4.6/B +0.1/A -2.8 +4.5/B 0.0/B -1.9 +4.4/A +3.3/A

M

J

Pct Min Init Load Invt 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 4.25 1,000 NL 50,000 NL 1,000,000 NL 1,000,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL200,000,000 NL 50,000 NL 10,000 NL 3,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 50,000

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.

they get maintenance free,” Beckwith said. “We do all of the maintenance. They don’t have to worry about mowing a lawn or changing a light bulb. We do it all.” Parklane does have federal government limits on income, and those depend on the size of the household. Beckwith said her

tenants love the changes brought in through the HUD grant. “They are so happy that they’re not mandated that you have heat or air,” she said. “Each one can control it. They’ve got a thermostat in their apartment. They’re extremely happy with the way it’s working.”


High Plains Leader&Times

Shrine Bowl, July 28, Emporia, Benefiting Shriners Hospital for Children. 1-800-5305524, ksshrine.com, 2M Race, FREE Parade, HS Combine/Clinic, All-Star Foorball & Cheer, AllState Band, and MORE.

Living Independently in Northwest Kansas, LINK is available in your area to work with individuals with disabilities. LINK provides 5 core services of: Information and Referral, Independent Living Skills Training, Advocacy, Peer Support and De institutionalization. If you would like to know more information on how to access services please call the Hays office for English at 785-625-6942 / 800-5695926 and speak with Angie or call 620-6246776 - 866-546-5004 for Spanish and speak with Debbie. LINK, serving 37 counties in western Kansas.

Auctions

HUGE ABSOLUTE (unreserved) farming/construction equipment auctionFriday, June 29-Ritchie Bros St. Louis site: 2436 Old Country Inn Dr, Caseyville. Details: rbauction.com or 855-331-5842

Lost

Found: White male dog in the vicinity of 11th and Roosevelt on May 30. Approximately 1 year old, non- neutered, 35-40lbs. Please call 620-624-1569 to claim.

5

Classified

To place an ad call

Public Notice

Section B

626-0840

Restaurant Manager LTD Enterprises, Inc. Job duties to include: Payroll for multiple job sites; order supplies and food; interview job candidates; in charge of safe and bookkeeping for multiple job sites; close and open registers; wait on tables and take orders; assist with employee scheduling; supervise kitchen and wait staff; deliver paychecks to multiple job sites; in charge of inventory; accounts payable and receivable. Must have ability to speak Spanish and English. 8 months experience Required as Restaurant Manager. Resume Required. Send Resume by 6-30-12 to Chester Mayhew P.O. Box 977 Sublette, KS,67877

Hiring professional drivers with class A CDL with Tanker/Hazmat. Great pay, home most nights with occasional nights away from home scheduled days off, benefits and pay review after 90 days, 2 weeks vacation after 1st year, Please call Chuck @ 432-638-9807

Help Wanted: Full time position in print shop bindery department. Duties include cutting, folding, numbering, stitching, booklet making, padding etc. Apply in person at Southern Office Supply 417 N. Kansas, Liberal,KS Exp. Flatbed Drivers: Regional opportunities now open with plenty of freight & great pay! 800277-0212 or primeinc.com

Wheatridge Park Care Center is seeking excellent staff to provide quality care to our residents. Our

success is linked to a culture of opportunity and talent. We know our most important resource is our team members who are treated with respect and “Dignity in Life.” If you are seeking a challenging career, new growth ad a team-oriented environment, consider us! Join a team of leading edge providers of long term care services. Interested individuals should apply at: Wheatridge Park Care Center 1501 S. Holly Drive

Drivers: NO EXPERIENCE? Class A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Ask about our NEW PAY SCALE! Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697885 www.centraltruckdriving jobs.com 1 Agricultural Equipment Operator - Layne Angell of Meade Co, KS. Job duties include: Operating tractor trailer, planters, combines, and other planting and harvesting equipment. Must have knowledge of: all crop planting and harvesting, all related farm machinery, applying fertilizers and chemical with a sprayer, mixing fertilizers and chemicals, irrigation sprinklers and engines, using GPS systems, welding. Must be willing and able to work as the weather and harvest demands, including Sundays if required. 3 months experience as Agricultural Equipment Operator Required. Resume Required. Send Resume by 6-30-12 to Layne and Billie Joint Venture P.O. Box 249 Plains, KS, 67869 RN’s & LPN’s needed now. Immediate openings for all shifts. Must be professional and compas

626-9854 sionate. We offer top wages in the state, mileage comp, flex schedule. Ability to travel up to an hour a plus. Contact First Call Medical Group today @ (785)945-3666

Sales/Management $75,000+ Management Positions Now! No Charge Backs Great Compensation Complete Training Company Ownership 1-800-503-1217 Do you want a career?? Liberal Gasket Mfg. 15 West 5th, Liberal,KS, Now accepting applications for shop position to start in July.

Transfer Drivers -Need 20 CDL A or B to transfer straight trucks, tractors, motor homes, buses, etc.. www.mamotransportation .com 1-800-501-3783

CNA’s & CMA’s needed now. Immediate openings for all shifts. Earn top wages, mileage comp, flex schedule. Ability to travel up to an hour a plus. Contact First Call Medical Group today @ (785)945-3666 Part time (20+hours) CDL/Driver/Laborer. Must speak, read, and write english fluently. No Smoking.References required. Drug Testing. Must live within 15 miles of Liberal. Fax resume & MVR to 620-626-9811. Call 620-629-7212 with any questions.

SUMMER JOB / TEACHERS Paint houses for landlord. Call 620-624-2226

CLASS A OTR DRIVERS: WE CARE AND ARE COMMITTED TO YOU,YOUR HOME TIME, FAMILY AND MONEY .36 Per Mile Plus Insurance, Refrigerated Freight 913928-6713

Sunday June 10, 2012 FAX

Oilfield hand needed. Must have valid drivers licence, At least 21 years of age. Good English communication, reading, writing and spoken. Monday-Friday. Paid weekly $13.00/hour. Sargeant & Lillard Casing Pulling Contact John at 580651-7811

www.hpleader.com

Now Hiring Cooks AM/PM

Competitive Wages Benefits

Looking for roustabout help. Starting Wage w/ Drivers License is $11.50 w/ Experience up to $20. Must have a valid Drivers License and be able to pass a UA. Call 620-6552758 or 580-487-0977.or 620-655-0580

Apply Online at www.appplebeesjobs.net or Apply Within 2611 N. Kansas Ave.

CDL driver wanted to haul grain and hay. local runs. Nice equipment. Home every night. Must have 2 years exp. TRIPLE S ENTERPRISES 620-629-3603

Help Wanted: 1 Agricultural Equipment Operator- Gale Frank of Copeland, KS. Job duties include: operating tractor trailer, planters, combines, and other planting and harvesting equipment. Must have knowledge of: all crop planting and harvesting, all related farm machinery, maintenance of farm machinery. Must have knowledge of: cattle management, feeding, and doctoring; operating, repairing, and maintaining irrigation systems. 6 months experience as Agricultural Equipment Operator Required. Resume Required. Send Resume by 6-30-12 to Gale Frank 405 WW Rd Copeland, KS, 67837

Accountant needed, required, associates degree in accounting and excel spreadsheet experience. Good benefits. Send Resume to: Leader & Times % Blind Box BG PO Box 889 Liberal, KS 67905 EOE

Imperial Security 8 Officers needed Officers $9-$11 per hour Lead Officers $11-$13 per hour Call 866-840-2066 Ask for Carl

Rok-hard Ready -mix is looking for CDL Drivers. Must have a valid CDL License and some driving experience. Please come in and fill out an application at 1200 E Pancake Blvd., Liberal, KS.

Driver & Heavy Equipment Operator Needed for Dirt Construction Co. in the Meade & Surrounding areas. MUST HAVE CDL & SPEAK ENGLISH. Duties include pulling a belly dump, operating dozier, backhoe, & loader. Will train the right person with CDL to operate equipment. Benefits after probation period includes uniforms, insurance, vacation, & paid holidays. This is NOT a 9-5 job. Only the serious need to apply. Call Dan at 620793-2817 if no answer please leave a message. Legal Assistant. Law Firm seeks full time Legal Assistant; proficient in Word, Excel & Outlook. Ideal candidate will be able to work independently, prioritize workload and meet deadlines. Good organizational skills, detail oriented multi-tasker. Competitive salary with health insurance. Send resume to: Sharp McQueen P.O Box 2619, Liberal, KS 67905 or fax to 620-624-9526

Do you want to make a difference in people’s lives? Summitt, ResCare is seeking qualified individuals to fill Direct Support Staff and Homecare positions in our Liberal location. These positions will provide services for assigned consumers in the Liberal or surrounding area in their Residential setting. We offer a competitive starting wage and benefits including: medical, vision, dental, 401k, tuition reimbursement and stock options. High school diploma or GED and a valid Driver’s license are required. If interested, please apply online at www.rescare.com then select careers. Summitt, ResCare is an EOE employer.

Good Samaritan Nursing Home - Liberal is looking for a dependable maintenance person, able to trouble shoot problems, work independently, handle a preventative maintenance program, and supervise the housekeeping program. Apply at 2160 Zinnia Lane, Liberal, Kansas or www.good-sam.com (EEO/Drug testing required)

CASCADE has been staffing hospitals & nursing homes all over the state, for 23 years! PRN & Travel Contracts..... We are a LOCAL company & only staff KS & MO…

an

WE ARE BUSY in the SW area of KS, and need a few more excellent people!

Quality & Quantity is CASCADE. Book a few shifts monthly OR every other day! You will notice the difference in our agency-we guarantee it!

RN $28-38 hr, LPN $18-27 hr, CMA/CNA $10-19 hr

*PT/OT/RT/RNP – inquire, we often have PERM jobs, contracts or PRN in Wichita, Topeka, KC… Apply online www.CascadeStaff.com or Call Scott at Corp: 888.229.5801 or email scott@cascadestaff.com

Found

ions Donat d! Neede oap, Dishs Rags, se Cleaner rpo All Pu

Donat ions N Hand eeded! & Ba Baby th Towels, Blank ets

FOUND: large brown, female beagle mix, house dog, very friendly. Found in the vicinity of Pershing & Walnut. Call 620-6556596

Employment Business Opportunities

LOOMIX Feed supplements is seeking Dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Bethany @ 800-870-0356 / becomeadealer@adm.com to find out if there is a Dealership opportunity in your area.

Boxer (F)

AIRLINE CAREERSbecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualifiedHousing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2487449

ility Med-Link Mob d. R er ck 80 E Tu 1 90 67 S. K l, ra Libe

“You got the drive, We have the Direction” OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass Pets/passenger policy. Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. 1-800-5287825

“Can You Dig it?’ We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Kansas. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. 866362-6497

Lab Retriever [M ] Donna French Liberal, KS.

) Border Collie (F

Help Wanted

Anthony, Kansas (pop. 2,300) is seeking Assistant City Superintendent, Electric Department Lineman, and PT Planning & Zoning Clerk. Applications and complete job descriptions: www.anthonykansas.org. 620-842-5434. E.O.E.

p

Girl Scout Trou #60005

Shih Tzu (M) Anonymous Community Supporter

rd (F) German Shephe t ke as B German Shephe er Flow rd (F) Ave. 212 N. Kansas 901 67 Liberal, KS.

rd (F) German Shephe ee

Name of Adopt tside Must adopt ou . city limits

Elkan Drug 1033 N. Kansa s Ave. Liberal, KS. 67 901

Boxer (M)

Name of Adopt ee & Info

For only $5 per picture, per week you can give the Gift Of Life by sponsoring a pet in the Pet of the Week ad.

It gives the public a chance to see which animals are available for adoption. Call 620-626-0840 ask for Classifieds for details on a Sponsorship ad.

Buyers premium does not apply to real estate.

OPEN HOUSE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, FROM 5:30 - 7:00 PM

Come See Our Animals Today At 1985 N. Country Estates Rd. • 620-626-0576


6A

Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

LHS Booster Club to meet Monday The Liberal Redskin Booster Club will meet at 6 p.m. Monday in the LHS Cafeteria. Parents of incoming freshmen athletes are encouraged to attend.

MONDAY

Applications available for not-for-profit funding requests Applications for not-for-profit funding requests for the 2013 budget year are available at City Hall located at 324 N. Kansas Ave. The applications are due to the city by June 29. For more information, contact the administration department at 6262201.

DEADLINE JUNE 29

Epic PCS to offer free ‘Lunch and Learn’ seminar “Interesting things cell phones can do” and “Back to the Basics.” Noon to 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Epic Touch Conference Room at the Landmark Center at 307 N. Kansas Ave., Suite B 103. Presented by Brandon Romero mobile professional with Epic PCS. Free lunch provided by Epic PCS. Reservations required by 5 p.m. today Contact: Brandon Romero at bromero@epictouch.com Epic PCS at 580-468-6060. Bring your own cell phones and be ready to learn and have fun.

SATURDAY

NEWS

news@hpleader.com

Judges’ redistricting ruling resets Kan. landscape By JOHN HANNA Associated Press TOPEKA (AP) — Kansas lawmakers scrambled Friday to adjust to a new political landscape after three federal judges redrew the state’s voting districts and created more than two dozen open legislative seats and potential incumbent-onincumbent matchups. The judges released maps Thursday night that imposed new boundaries for congressional, state House, state Senate and State Board of Education districts because the Legislature failed to do so. The maps needed to be redrawn to account for population shifts over the last decade, but a bitter feud among Republicans blocked lawmakers’ proposals, so a lawsuit was filed that forced the judges to step in. In their 206-page order, the judges acknowledged that they were “pushing a re-set button” for legislative districts and imposing dramatically different boundaries — and the results stunned lawmakers. The judges created four open Senate seats and 25 open House seats, while pairing up dozens of other legislators in districts that now have two incumbents each. Two House districts even have three incumbents each. “You couldn’t be more disruptive if you tried,” said House Speaker Mike O’Neal, a conservative Republican from Hutchinson. “Some of these boundary lines look like they had to go out of their way to put two incumbents in the same district.” The filing deadline to run for office is noon Monday, so Republican and Democratic party officials are facing a busy weekend of finding candidates for open seats. And some legislators will be left with doubtful political futures. Lawmakers weren’t sure whether the political chaos would help Democrats or either side of the feuding Republicans, who are split between moderates and

conservatives. “This is probably the most disruptive change in legislative districts that the state has ever seen,” said Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a conservative Republican who was the lawsuit’s initial defendant because his office oversees elections. The order can be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, but neither Kobach nor Robyn Renee Essex, the GOP precinct committee member from Olathe who filed the lawsuit, expected to do so. Essex’s attorney, Brent Haden, said Essex wanted constitutional maps in place for the elections was “prepared to move forward.” Kobach said county elections officials still expect to meet all deadlines ahead of the Aug. 7 primary election, including one June 23 for distributing ballots to military personnel overseas. The judges’ order denied two key requests from Gov. Sam Brownback. The conservative Republican had wanted a single Senate district for Leavenworth County and to keep Manhattan, home to Kansas State University and the site of a planned federal biosecurity lab, in a congressional district with other eastern Kansas communities. Instead, the judges split the county and put Manhattan in a district with western and central Kansas. “It’s now in the hands of the people,” Brownback said in a statement, his only response to the redrawn maps. The possible scramble for candidates was evident when Sen. John Vratil, a Leawood Republican and moderate GOP leader, announced Friday that he wouldn’t seek re-election and quickly endorsed Rep. Pat Colloton, another moderate Leawood Republican, as his successor. Colloton had been drawn into a House district with another representative. “It’s a complete political reset,” said Rep. Scott Schwab, a conservative Olathe Republican.

Thank Thank yyou, ou, aalumni lumni aand nd ffriends riends ooff FFort o Hays State University. “The economy had collapsed a year earlier, and the nation was still reeling. Fort Hays State University was growing, but declining state support threatened our future. In September 2009 we launched the Cornerstone Campaign to raise $60 million for new scholarships, endowed faculty positions, enhanced research, departmental projects, athletic programs, technology upgrades and renovations.” – Dr. Edward H. Hammond President, Fort Hays State University

You heard the call. Thank you on behalf of the state of Kansas and Fort Hays State University. Our Our llargest argest ffundraising undraising ef effort fort ever, ever, wh which ich w was as lled ed bbyy tthe he FFHSU HSU FFoundation, oundation, hhas as be been en a ggreat reat success. The goal to raise $60 million by 2012 has arrived ahead of time time and and aabove bove expectations. expectations. TThe he C Cornerstone ornerstone C Campaign ampaign hhas as rraised aised $$68,743,800. 68,743,800. Nothing Nothing is is m more ore vital vital ttoo tthe he ccontinuing ontinuing eeconomic conomic tturnaround urnaround iinn K Kansas ansas aand nd tthe he nnation ation tthan han hhigher igher eeducation, ducation, wh which ich pr pprovides ovides tthe he ttrained rained w workers orkers ttoo ddrive rive innovation innovat a ion aand nd ccreate reate new new enterprises. enterprises. TThe he C Cornerstone ornerstone C Campaign ampaign w was as nneeded eeded ttoo m meet eet bbudgetary udgetary cchallenges hallenges aand nd ttoo aaccomplish ccomplish tthe he ed educational ucational ggoals oals at FHSU FHSU for for tthe he coming coming yyears. ears.


6B

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY JUNE 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

denasa@hpleader.com

High Plains

Found: White male dog in the vicinity of 11th and Roosevelt on May 30. Approximately 1 year old, non- neutered, 35-40lbs. Please call 620-624-1569 to claim.

Leader&Times

Classified

FOR RELEASE SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 2012

Hints from Heloise ®

Stevens County Healthcare is searching for a Director of Nursing at Pioneer Manor Nursing Home. This is a Full-time Supervisory position primarily responsible for the maintaining of each Household as well as nursing services. Three to five years management with a BSN is preferred, but not required for this position. We offer a sign-on bonus along with an outstanding benefits package.

Two Is Better Than One? Dear Heloise: I am writing to suggest adopting TWO DOGS, if you can afford it. I always had onee dog at a time and never thought about the dog being lonely all day, with nothing to do but eat and sleep. I was at work, so the dog was alone. No wonder I would get such a great greeting when I came home! My friend was given a dog when she already had a dog. She said it was such a difference! The dogs are both female, about the same age, and they do everything together. They play, eat and spend lots of time together. She said she would never have just one dog again. — Dorothy J., Youngstown, Ohio If you can manage it, two dogs are a good fit. Check your shelters and rescue groups to find two of a kind! — Heloise

Please contact Robyn Medina in Human Resources for more information (620) 544-8511 Job Posting TOWN OF HOLLY, COLORADO Field Services Supervisor

The Town of Holly, Colorado is accepting applications with resume for the position of Field Services Supervisor: plans, organizes, and directs the functions of Public Works including streets, storm water systems, sanitary sewer system, water system, a 24 square mile electric distribution system, facilities, maintenance, parks system, municipal landfill. Certifications are not required but are preferred. The position is full time permanent and offers salary with benefits. Salary discussions will be based on experience and aptitude to job requirements. A minimum of three years of work experience in the development and administration of Public Works, to include at least two years of supervisory capacity or lead responsibility, is preferred. Satisfactory experience with electric distribution operations (management preferred), including general knowledge of emergency generation systems. Current job description and application are available on-line at: www.townofholly.com Interested applicants must submit application with resume (to include three work-related references). EOE. Position open until filled.

PET PAL

Sudoku

Dear Readers: Barbara G. emailed a picture of her adorable pug, Mac. Mac goes for a two-mile walk every day in the park, where he loves to chase squirrels. He doesn’t know exactly what the squirrels are, but he knows he wants one really badly! To see Mac and our other Pet Pals, visit www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” — Heloise COBWEB BRUSH

Dear Heloise: I buy numerous toilet brushes at the dollar store when I’m there. I keep an ample supply in the garage, and I use them on sticky cobwebs! I go around the outside and

Please remit information to: Email: clerk@townofholly.com USPS: Town of Holly, PO Box 458, Holly, CO 81047 Facsimile remittances will not be accepted.

— Gail, via email

Yesterday’s Sudoku Answer

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inside of my house, brushing them off the bricks, eaves and corners of windows. The toilet brush is rough enough in texture to snag the cobweb, but not rough enough to mar the walls or paint, and they are very inexpensive. — Cindy, via email EASY ALMONDS

Dear Heloise: Here’s a hint that others might like: Sometimes I have trouble chewing nuts. I toss a couple of cups of almonds in the blender and grind them up. Then I use them in all kinds of ways: in cereal, oatmeal, cake batter, pudding, smoothies, burgers — you name it. — Elsie in Port St. Lucie, Fla. P.S.: I’ll always remember your mom’s cute way of saying, “Add a blub blub” of whatever liquid she was cooking with! NEW USE FOR OLD TIRE

Dear Readers: Have an old car tire lying around? Here’s an easy way to put it to good use: Wipe out the tire to remove dirt, cobwebs, etc. Spray-paint it a couple of times. Use a color that complements your decor. Bring it inside and place a pillow, two or several in the middle of the tire. What do you have? A great, comfortable dog bed! — Heloise LOTION IN MOTION

Dear Heloise: I use a contact-lens holder to carry just enough hand cream in my purse. It’s a leakproof way to carry just the right amount with you.

©2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.

G

iled a picture of her adorable pug, Mac. Mac goes

Crossword CUSTOMER SERVICE: (800) 708-7311 EXT. 236

Horoscope

JACQUELINE BIGAR’S STARS

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, JUNE 11, 2012 BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

For entertainment purpose only. The Daily Leader does not endorse predictions.

Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. A baby born today has a Sun in Gemini and a Moon in Pisces if born before 9:21 p.m. (PST). Afterward, the Moon will be in Aries.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, June 11, 2012: This year you learn to let go even more. Make it OK for both sides of the Twins to voice their thoughts. You also might discover that many people get confused by your distinctive personality. If you are single, you could meet someone very sensitive. The issue is that you have a salty sense of humor at times, which this person could take too seriously. If you are attached, what you say and what you do often reveal different agendas. These mixed messages could become an issue between you and your sweetie. PISCES often is very emotional, yet he or she pushes you hard to achieve your goals. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### Note a sarcastic tone around you that forces some strong, fixed reactions — not only from you, but also from others. An element of shock runs through your actions. Naturally, misunderstandings will arise. Center yourself. Tonight: Head home, relax … then decide. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) #### While there is an element of harshness that surrounds you, do not lose focus on your bigger goal. Opportunities appear later today, when people calm down. Straighten out a misunderstanding as soon as possible. Tonight: Make it

early. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ### Sometimes being a natural-born leader is no fun. You inevitably will have to deal with a difficult situation. You have a lot of empathy for those around you, but at a certain point you need to cut the line and deal with what is required. As a result, someone might be quite resentful. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ### Do necessary research. Though people could say some wild and outrageous things, you will not want to trigger a reaction. If you need advice, detach from your immediate situation. You might want to seek out an expert who is not involved in the issue. Tonight: Could be late. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### Others try to come through for you but get hit with one problem after another. You might decide to do what you must on your own, but there could be a liability that you have yet to see. You are walking a tightrope, and it might be close to impossible not to involve others. Tonight: Till the wee hours. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ### Defer to others with the knowledge that this, too, will pass. If you act, there will be a problem; however, if you do not act, there also will be a problem. An element of the unexpected can turn nearly any situation upside down. Tonight: Nap, then decide. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ### Focus on one project at a time. Whatever you do, do it 100 percent if you want to feel good about the results. The unexpected occurs involving a key partner. You might need to regroup afterward. Detach to find the right response. Tonight: Go with a loved one’s choice. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) #### Your imagination helps you understand where others are coming from. You could find a pushy friend to be

a distinct problem. In fact, what this person does could trigger a series of events that you might prefer not to deal with. Tonight: Make it an early night. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### You move slowly but successfully. You might witness a lot of confusion along the way. Determine just how involved you want to be with the present happenings, as a child or loved one could get testy. Tonight: When push comes to shove, you’ll discover the implication of a misunderstanding. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ### You make efforts that could backfire. You observe others’ frustration levels and give some thought to tossing your own demands in the air. Settle in and find the most effective course of action. Tonight: Do only what you must. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) #### You might want to say little and observe more. There is a side of you that wonders why you are caught in the middle of a situation. Misunderstandings will prevail if you are not careful. You might be creating a lot of your own tension through a judgment. Tonight: Do your errands. Then catch up on someone’s news. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You get an extra push into your day, but you also could be overwhelmed by what is going on around you. Consider what is happening, and be careful as you decide how much to invest, emotionally and financially. Tonight: Enjoy the moment. BORN TODAY Journalist Lawrence Spivak (1900), football coach Vince Lombardi (1913), retired professional football player Joe Montana (1956) ***

Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.


Chloe — EPIC PCS

Joyce Brothers

© 2012 by King Features Syndicate

Retail

Hi & Lois

***

Dear Dr. Brothers: I need you to tell me if I am a prude. I have a group of friends who get together pretty regularly for happy hour after work. We are mostly all in our late 20s. A lot of time at the bar or at dinner, they spend time outdoing one another with dirty jokes. I never contribute, but I do laugh along with them even though sex jokes make me very uncomfortable. They’ve been bugging me to tell a few jokes, but I just can’t. How can I get into the swing of things? — S.C. Dear S.C.: It seems a rather strange goal to spend your precious time on, but I suppose you could buy a book of jokes or look some up online and memorize them. Then you could try to act casual and unembarrassed as you deliver them at the next get-together. And you could keep laughing it up and try to fool your friends. But what would all of this get you? You may not know exactly why all this makes you uncomfortable, but you seem to feel even worse about being found out as a prude or having your friends think you are who you are. And that’s problematic. Why kid yourself and your friends? They need to see the real you. If you enjoy the camaraderie of this group of friends and want to fit in, why not try elevating the discourse a bit so you don’t have to be embarrassed by what they say or by your own inability to join in the fun? When it’s your turn, surprise them with a limerick — they often are naughty but not disgusting. Or turn to some political humor, which might actually start a discussion and lead to some new insights or spawn a slew of less off-putting jokes. Use your creativity — you don’t have to compromise your principles or your sense of propriety to have fun and fit in.

Zits

Dear Dr. Brothers: I need you to tell me if I am being paranoid or if I should be concerned about my boyfriend’s behavior. We’ve been together about two months and are having a great time dating and getting to know one another. We met online, but I told him right away that I want to meet the right person and I am committed to dating only him. He said he felt the same, but I recently found out that his profile is still on the site. Would you be suspicious? — G.D. Dear G.D.: I might or might not be suspicious or spend time imagining scenarios in which my guy is seeing other women or at least looking for them. But before I invested any time in that kind of thinking, I probably would address the issue head-on with a couple of questions for my guy. If you are really enjoying getting to know one another, you probably are spending time learning how to trust one another, and are becoming emotionally closer. The fact that you dropped out of the site right away seems to have been your decision. You were sure that’s the way you operate, and you were serious about developing a relationship with your new boyfriend. He may feel as strongly as you do, but simply forgot about the website with his profile. Or he may have decided to wait and see what would happen with you before he deleted his profile. Or he may indeed be keeping an eye out for other fish in the sea. The only way you’re going to find out is to ask him! If you are indeed headed for a committed relationship, he will want to assure you that he no longer will have a presence on that website. If he isn’t really on board with your idea for the future, he easily can switch to another site or date other people behind your back. So it’s not really about the dating site, but about building that trust.

Hagar

Dustin

CRYPTOQUOTE

Blondie

Beetle Bailey

Baby Blues

Sunday, June 10, 2012 Page 7A


7B

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY JUNE 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

The ancient Egyptians and Romans used black for mourning, as do most Europeans and Americans today. Milt’s Cell (620)629-1747 Email: milt@ptsi.net Connie’s Cell (620)629-0000 Email:cseigrist@hotmail.com

FAR AWAY FROM THE HUSTLE & BUSTLE OF THE CITY!

310 Yucca Lane Ponderosa, Turpin, OK. Sprawling home with 3 Brs. 2 1/2 baths, 2 living areas, pretty wood deck, CA/CH, 2 car attached garage, plus an additional acre to build your customized shop. MLS #3362 SOUTHLAWN DISTRICT

MAKE AN OFFER!

1008 S. SYCAMORE This ranch home features nice size bedrooms plus 1 3/4 baths, bsmt, wood burning fireplace, attached 2 car garage plus 2 car carport and storage bldg with a loft. MLS #2919

MACARTHUR DISTRICT

1917 N. CALHOUN AVE. Ranch with over 2,100 square feet. Beautiful wood and tile flooring, granite countertops, pull out pantry, formal dining room, cozy woodburning fireplace, covered patio. 3 Spacious Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, dbl garage, covered patio with TV hook ups, 2 storage buildings and sprinkler system MLS #3340 AFFORDABLE!!!

418 Princeton

HARRISON CIRCLE AREA

Affordable 3 Br. home with 1 3/4 baths near Harrison Circle. CA/CH Covered Patio, Dog Run and more. Perfect for the 1st time Homebuyer. MLS #3425

The “Blackshirts” were the security troops in Hitler's German army, also known as the S.S. 2 FORTHE PRICE OFONE!

denasa@hpleader.com

High Plains

Black humor is morbid or unhealthy and gloomy humor. A “blackhearted” person is evil. A “blacklist” is a list of persons or organizations to be boycotted or punished.

LINCOLNSCHOOLDISTRICT

COZY STARTER HOME

Leader&Times Good Samaritan-Liberal is taking applications for a H u m a n Resources/Nursing Education person. Must be an LPN or RN. Apply at 2160 Zinnia Lane, Libera l Kansas or www.goodsam.com (EEO/Drug testing required)

Classified

1-2-3 bdrm low-income apts available. No pets. Pick up application at Westkan Apts. 104 Harold Blvd, Liberal, KS. HUD Vouchers Welcome

523 WEST 3RD ST. Charming turn of the century 4 or 5 bedroom Victorian home w/relaxing covered front porch. Original woodwork including ornate staircase leading to 2nd story, lovely bay windows. Elegant formal dining room w/stained glass windows accent. MLS #2537 GREAT FOR ENTERTAINING

New Listing!

805 W. 2nd St 3 Bedroom, basement, CA/CH, wood deck, fenced yard, detached garage. Priced under $80,000. MLS #3533

1203 N. Carlton AMust See in Lincoln School District.All on 1 level! 3 BR, 1, 3/4 , 1/2 bath, 2 living areas, beautiful custom kitchen By Knudsen Inc. 1203 N. Carlton. MLS #3487

227 W. Seventh ST.

McKinley District- 3 Br, 1 2/4 baths, Detached Garage, Large Corner Lot. MLS #3460

CUSTOM BUILT HOME

MACARTHUR DISTRICT

911 N. HOLLY 4 Br. 3 full Ba w/ Huge Master Suite, Formal living room w/ bay window, cozy den, woodburning fireplace. You will love having 3 levels, a large kitchen, immaculae garage & yard. Call for your private showing today. MLS #3144

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice , *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-220-3977 www.CenturaOnline.com

Real Estate

1650 N. Calhoun Ave. 3Br. 1 3/4 baths, open floor plan with cathedral ceilings, formal dining room, spacious neat and tidy room. Oversized attached 2 car garage. MLS #3387

Beautiful 1 bedroom apartments now available. SENIORS 55 AND BETTER- $100.00 OFF FIRST MONTHS RENT. All kitchen appliances, & washer /dryer furnished, maintenance free living, scheduled activities. INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. Call 620626-5756 or visit our website at www.liveatcottages.com

Several 1 bedroom apartments starting at $625.00 per month plus Security Deposit, all bills paid including FREE cable. Storage units also available. 620-629-5604.

Mobile Homes for Rent LOCATED 3 MILES SOUTH OF LIBERAL 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home; CA/CH; W/D hookups; single car carport; $500 rent; $500 deposit.

NO PETS!!!

Call between 9a.m.-8p.m. 620-391-3357

Houses for Rent

REDUCED! 1545 N. Bellaire Ave Reduced $254,900 5 BR, 3 BA, 3+ Car Garage Basement Call Connie – 629-0000

REDUCED! 1652 Nelson Ct. $114,500 3 BR, 2 BA Call Milt – 629-1747

1441 S. Clay Avenue Reduced $127,000 5 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Full Basement Call Milt – 629-1747

2330 S. Holly Drive $239,000

A 5 bedroom home, open floor plan, excellent move in ready condition. Beautifully landscaped front & back yard on a corner lot. Includes all appliances.

2 bedroom, 1 bath, house for rent; $650/month plus $500 deposit. Call 620626-6243 after 5 p.m.

Exceptionally nice homes & apartments in Liberal / $375-$1,000 / Tenant pays utilities. / Call 620624-2226 or 580-7783840.

Houses for Sale

3 BDRM, 2 BATH, 2 Car Garage, Heat & Air, Jacuzzi, 0% Crime Rate, Excellent Schools, $80K, Call 580-487-3710 or 580528-1188.

Apartments for Rent

(1) bdrm apt, 25 S. Sherman. $525/month, $475/deposit. All bills paid. 620-629-1574 or 620-655-2723.

860 Holly Ridge Court $399,000 6 BR, 4 BA, 3+ Car Garage Basement Call Cheryl – 629-1264

3 miles east of Liberal, 3 BDRM, $625 a month, $625 Deposit. NO PETS!! Call 620-626-7905 in the evenings.

1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Rentals avaliable in Kismet & Meade, Starting at $375.00 a month Call 620-482-5175

E.H.O.

Education

PRICED UNDER APPRAISAL!!

HOUSE FOR RENT

300 Canna Lane $359,000 5 BR, 6 BA, 2 Car Garage Basement Call Connie – 629-0000

REDUCED! 1711 N. Calhoun Avenue $150,000 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Call Cheryl – 629-1264

2501 Arrowhead Lane Reduced $209,000 5 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage Full Basement Call Bill – 482-1114

321 Canna Lane $315,000 8 BR, 3 BA, 3+ Car Garage Basement Call Milt – 629-1747

2420 Lilac Drive $349,500 5 BR, 4BA, 3 Car Garage Basement Call Richard – 655-6981

715 N. Pershing Ave. $110,000 4 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Basement Call Cheryl – 629-1264

2221 Sierra Drive $182,200 5 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage Basement Call Bill – 482-1114

2110 Bellaire Ct. $119,900 5 BR, 2 BA Basement Call Milt – 629-1747

516 N. Tulane Avenue $145,000 5 BR, 2 BA, Basement Call Cheryl – 629-1264

1017 N. Jordan Avenue Reduced $132,000 4 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Full Basement Call Richard – 655-6981

Call Connie - 629-0000

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, 1 Car Garage, Washer/Dryer hookups. $900 Rent, Call 620-4173830 or 620-417-0103

1138 N. Jordan, 4 bdrm, 3.5 bath, over 3,000 sq ft, all brick, spacious home; $220K, 620-626-7754 or 620-482-2595

Commercial Property

Shop and office for lease. US 83 and Stateline; 8,000 sq. ft. 620-4825270 Office & Retail Spaces For Lease Village Plaza 620-624-3018

Open Space great for retail, Large office space, Small office spaces, Medical offices.

Automotive

Miscellaneous

Well Established Oilfield Company ready to hire an experienced SAFETY DIRECTORS ASSISTANT to work alongside our team of professionals. Candidate must be able to perform a variety of complex administrative, supervisory & confidential record keeping. Must be knowledgable in the field. Send resume & references to terri.long@posci.net

REDUCED! 1957 N. Webster Ave. $185,000 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Call Milt- 629-1747

715 W. Sixth St. Reduced $109,000 3 BR, 2 BA, Single Carport Call Cheryl – 629-1264

Rt. 1 Box 87- Forgan $110,000.00 2 BR, 1 BA, 3+ Car Garage Call Ron – 629-7405

FOR SALE 747 S. Kansas

REDUCED! 401 Princeton Ave. $95,000 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 Car Garage Call Richard

SCOTT AUCTION 28 VEHICLES MOTORHOME SEMI FLATBED APPLIANCES ESTATE COLLECTABLES ANTIQUES - OFFICE & SHOP EQUIPMENT HUGE LOT OF ESTATE BOOKS OPEN HOUSE FRIDAY JUNE 1ST 1PM-5PM SAT, JUNE 2ND 9AM CT

622 Warren Ave. $59,000 2 BR, 1 BA Call Cheryl – 629-1264

J&M AUCTION

HOP RAFF, O.R. ARNOLD & VELMA MCGOWAN ESTATES JUNE 02 - 10AM J&MAUCTION BARN 702 E. RUSSELL1 BLK SOUTH OF HWY 54 (ACROSS FROM CHAPALA RESTAURANT) HOOKER OK.

724 S. New York Ave. $85,000 3 BR, 1 BA, Single Carport Basement Call Milt – 629-1747

AUCTION CALENDAR

GATLIN AUCTION

GATLIN AUCTION

EQUIPMENT & TOOLS AUCTION FRIDAY, JUNE 29 - 5PM BEEF BARN - SEWARD COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

GATLIN AUCTION

LIVING ESTATE AUCTION ESTAT OF BUDDY WREN OF WALKSH, CO SUNDAY, JULY 1 - 11:30AM JULY 7 - 9AM HWY, 83 & HWY64 JCT. NORTH ELKHART CITYHALL OF TURPIN, OK, 4 MILES EAST Large Collection of Coins, Lots of ON HWY64, TO ROAD NS 123, 1 Antiques & Collectibles, 30 Beer Modern & antique furniture, col- 1995 24’ Beckham elclosed trailer; MILE NORTH, 1 MILE EAST, 1/2 Mugs, Beer Lights & Clocks, John lectibles, glassware, sterling and 09 14’ single axle utility trailer; MILE NORTH Deere Belt Buckles, Dolls, PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION JUNE 16 10:30AM 11900 ROAD 24.6 TRINIDAD, COLORADO

Antiques, Collectables, Household precious stone jewelry, majestic snap on mig welder; small metal Items, Guns, Tools, Appliances, cast iron wood burning stove, pool lathe; multi plazmarc generator; Furniture, Misc. Items 20 ton shop press; ingresoll rand table, original artwork See item list online at uprigh air compressor; cutting OWNER: JEAN PACHOREK Auctionzip.com Auction ID 20585 torch, large selection of power & THEAUCTION CENTER REAL ESTATE & PERSONhand tools J&M Auction Service BUILDING, 3280 W. JONESAVE., AL PROPERTY AUCTION SELLER: DON MOORE 580-522-1548

2001 2500 single cab chevy pickup 142K miles, Yamaha Electric Gold Cart, w/Charger; Nice selection of modern & antique furniture, Appliances; Glassware; Antiques & Collectibles; Sewing Notions & Quilting Supples SELLER: LINDA H. PLETT

JUNE 23 9:30AM (MDT) REAL ESTATE & PERSONAutos, Furniture, Appliances, 558 CONIFER DR. GATLIN AUCTION AL PROPERTY AUCTION GUN AUCTION Household, Books, Collectables, SOURTH FORK, COLORADO JUNE 30 10:30AM Antiques, Electronics, Computers, JEAN SUTTON ESTATE JUNE 22 - 5:30PM (MDT) 3 Level 5200 SQ.FT. Home in the AUCTION 2132 CARLTON, LIBERALKS Commercial, Office Equip, Sho SOUTH FORK COMMUNITY San Juan mountains! Check our 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1821 SQ.FT., SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Tools - Misc., Exercise BLDG., 254 HWY149 website www.gatlinauction.com Brick home w/double car garage, 21 S. GOLFWOOD DR. Equipment, Sporting Goods SOUTH FORK COLORADO PUEBLO WEST, COLORADO enclosed patio, fenced yard, sprinfor picutes & details See complete list and pictures at 75 Total fire arms - handguns, Construction tools, power tools, Antiques, Collectibles, Furniture, kler system, central heat & air, www.scottauction.com hand tools, construction supplies, Appliances, Household, Shop & shot guns, rifles, ammo, hunting OPEN HOUSE JUNE 14, hardware, used lumber Scott Auction 5:30 -7:00PM supplies, sporting goods, gun vault Construction Tools, Plus MORE! 3280 W. Jones Box 398 For showing info contact Heritage Absentee bids welcome SELLERS: Garden City, KS PERSONAL PROPERTY Real Estate Group - Lidia Gray, Complete listing & color pictures JIM & ROSANNE BROWN 620-276-8282 Broker AUCTION at www.gatlinauction.com 620-626-6100, 8’X12’ STORAGE SHED SATURDAY, JUNE 16 Gatlin Auction Real estate will be offered at GATLIN AUCTION ON SKIDS Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 10:30AM Noon! ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK 719-252-3758 FRIDAY, JUNE 29 12:30PM Personal property includes, 11900 ROAD 24.6 TRINIDAD, FOUNDATION BANQUET SHED IS LOCATED INALLEY Furniture, Appliances, Household www.gatlinauction.com COLORADO Items, Antiques, Collectibles, BETWEEN PRINCETON & SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Modern and antique furniture, colCoins, Whitney Piano CORNELLJUST SOUTH OF 5TH NRAWHITTINGTON CENTER lectibles, glassware, sterling and 7:30AM - All Day Fun Shoot STREET precious stone jewelry, majestic SELLER L.E. “Gus” CUSTASON 6:00PM - Banquet (This is the only item being sold ESTATE - CHRISTINE GUSTAcast iron wood burning stove, pool 7:00PM - Auction at this location) table,original artwork SON, OWNER KAROLYN FMI - IRA Simpson SELLER: DON MOORE SCHROEDER, POA 575-707-0250 OWNER: JEAN PACHOREK Gatlin Auction Gatlin Auction GARDEN CITY, KS

CUNNINGHAM

Knives, Die-Cast Cars & Trucks SEE WEBSITE FOR COMPLETE LISTING & PICS Cunningham Auction Auctioneer: Jim Cunningham 620-360-0249 www.kansasauctions.net

TNT AUCTION

MYRTLE RAMSTAD LIVING ESTATE JUNE 16 - 9:30AM TX. COUNTYCOMMERCIAL BUILDING 5TH & SUNSET GUYMON OK Vehicles, Furniture/Applicances, Tools/Lawn/Outdoor, Antiques/Collectibles, & Household/Misc. Joel Tuxhorn T-n-T Auctions 806-339-4152

Going Once... Going Twice...

Gatlin Auction Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 719-252-3758

Gatlin Auction Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 719-252-3758

Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 719-252-3758 www.gatlinauction.com

Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 719-252-3758 www.gatlinauction.com

Sold!!

620-391-7715 3,800 Sq. Ft. Building, Store Front Facing Kansas Ave. Great location!! Good Parking, Asking Price $95K. Call for More Information. **Sepulveda’s Appliance is moving to a new location**


8B

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY JUNE 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

denasa@hpleader.com

High Plains

Several 1 bedroom apartments starting at $625.00 per month plus Security Deposit, all bills paid including FREE cable. Storage units also available. 620-629-5604.

Good Pay, Great Benefits Bartlett Grain L.P. has year-round opportunities. We are looking for a hard working Yard Laborer. You will be involved in both fertilizer and grain operations. Ideal candidate has ag background and CDL. HAZMAT preferred.

Apply in person or send resume:

Bartlett Grain Company, L.P. Highway 56, Moscow, KS 67952 Fax 816-753-1775 jobs@bartlett-grain.com EOE/AA/D/V/Drug Screen/ Background Checks

1621 Bellaire

270 W. Pancake

843 Sycamore

618 Nottingham

3 bedrooms 2 bath REDUCED $139,000 • Call Lidia

Service Station & Vacant Lot $165,000 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom REDUCED $69,500 • Call Lidia

3 bedrooms 2 bath $45,000 • Call Lidia

Classified

ADOPTION: Stay at home mom and hard working dad, looking to expand their family. Loving secure couple hoping for a newborn. Contact our lawyer 800-492-2011.

(First published in High Plains Daily Leader & Times on June 10, 2012)t1

Well Established Oil Field Company is in search of a Crane Operator in the Liberal, Dodge City, Garden City, Jetmore, KS area. The Crane Operator will be responsible for safely operating a 26 ton crane for setting Oilfield Production Equipment. Prior Oilfield experience is strongly preferred. Candidate is subject to passing a background check, drug screen & pre-employment physical prior to employment. Apply at: 1600 W. Pancake Liberal, KS 67901 620-624-6023

Bartlett offers competitive wages along with GREAT BENEFITS: Health and life ins. premiums paid 100% for employee, dental, vision, 401k w/company match, profit sharing, paid vacation, & more.

Leader&Times

Merchandise

Misc Merchandise ITEMS FOR SALE

3 bedrooms + out bldgs $60,500 • Call Steph

902 S. Washington

606 W. Second

2 bedrooms $69,500. Call Lidia

3 bdrm $60,000 • Call Lidia

Rt. 1 Box 82, Forgan OK

40 S. Prospect

1521 N. Carlton

635 S. Oklahoma

423 Yale

1119 N. Calhoun

729 N. Calhoun

3 bedrooms 2 bath $103,000 • Call Gary

3 Bedroom, 2bath $139,900 • Call Lidia

5 bedroom, 3 bath $179,000 • Call Lidia

2 bedrooms $72,000 • Call Lidia

5 bedrooms 3 bath REDUCED $118,000 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom, 2 bath $124,000 • Call Lidia

4 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, bsmt, 2 storage bldgs REDUCED! $145,900 • Call Lidia

$3,500 BUYER INCENTIVE

355 E. Pancake

210 Princeton

202 S. Clay

322 N. Pershing - Hooker

1940 N. Calhoun

2 bedrooms $69,000 • Call Lidia

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bath $79,900 • Call Rose

3 bedrooms 2 bath $127,250 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom, 2 bath REDUCED! $160,000 • Call Steph

612 E. Curtis,

3 bedrooms 3baths on LCC golf course $284,000 • Call Lidia

4 bedroom, 2 bath, REDUCED! $118,500 Call Gary

Lease/Purchase Option Avail REDUCED $400,000 Call Stephanie

FOR SALE: Traditional sofa and two chairs. Mission style bunk bed’s, Armoire & Chest. Please call for appointment to view. 620-624-2908

This deal is HOT, HOT, HOT! Save $100 on ANY acoustic or digital piano when you mention this ad. Mid-America Piano 800950-3774 Visit us online. Piano4u.com

Pets & Supplies

605 N. Cain

210 Lilac Drive

Excellent Condition!!! 30� Double Wall Oven, 2 Smooth cook tops, New over stove microwave w/ Built In Fan, Built In Dishwasher, White Double Sink w/ Faucets, Nice Bathroom Vanity w/ Sink & Faucets. Call 620482-2516 or 620-6246909 for more information.

NEW LISTING!

NEW LISTING

1661 N. Cain,

Rt. 2 Box 39 Hooker, OK

817 W. 8th,

2202 Dahlia Lane

2311 Sierra

422 N. Sherman,

6263 Meadow Lane

3 bedroom, 2 bath, REDUCED! $161,500 • Call Lidia

2 Bedroom on 2.75 acres. $68,000 • Call Gary

3 bedroom, 2 bath, REDUCED! $103,000. • Call Gary

3 bedroom, 2 bath, $203,000 • Call Steph

3 bedroom, 2 bath, REDUCED! $169,000 • Call Gary

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8A

Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

HAPPENINGS

NEWS

news@hpleader.com

on the high plains

CAPITOL PUNISHMENT

Sign up for Baker Arts’ children’s workshop ‘All Spaced Out’ In conjunction with the NASA Youth Art Competition art exhibit, the Baker Arts Center is offering the children’s workshop “All Spaced Out.” Young artists will be inspired to create their own “Space” themed works of art. A field trip to the air museum displays will further fuel their imaginations to design their own space ship paintings, galaxy mobiles and crazy constellations. Preschool ages 3 to 5 meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon June 12, 13, 14. Kindergarten to 6th grades meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon June 19, 20, 21.The center is located at 624 N. Pershing in Liberal. Cost is $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. Call 624-2810.

SIGN UP NOW

Summer fun with K-State The Seward County K-State Research and Extension office is hosting Summer Fun Thursdays, starting with Latin American Food Day for $15 for ages 10 and up from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Ulysses and Build Your Own Pizza with Professor Popcorn for $5 on June 21 for ages 5 to 9 in the Seward County Ag Building. Kids need to be registered by June 16. Cost includes lunch. Other activities include: • June 28 – Fishing day at Arkalon for ages 7 and up from 8:30 to noon.The cost is $5. Participants need to bring a snack lunch, hat, water bottle and sunscreen. RSVP by June 21. • July 5 – Photography day for ages 8 and up from 9 to 11 a.m.The cost is $3. Participants need to bring a camera. RSVP by June 28. • July 12 – Day camp at Meade Lake for ages 6 to 10 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.The cost is $15 and includes a hat, lunch and snack. Participants need to bring a hat, water bottle and sunscreen. RSVP by June 25. • July 19 – Air rifle and archery day for ages 8 and up from 9 to 11 a.m.The cost is $3. RSVP by July 14. • July 26 – Craft day for ages 9 to 12 from 9 to 11 a.m.The cost is $4 and includes a craft and snack. RSVP by July 19. All participants need to meet at the Extension office at the north end of the fairgrounds at 1081 Stadium Road in Liberal for all activities.All activities are available on a first come, first serve basis. Participation forms must be filled out for a child to take part in these activities.This form is available at the Extension office at 1081 Stadium Road in Liberal or online at www.seward.ksu.edu. For more information, call 624-5604 or e-mail sw@listserv.ksu.edu. Come join the fun on Thursdays this summer with these awesome activities.

THURSDAYS IN JUNE AND JULY

College seeking public’s comments Seward County Community College/Area Technical School is seeking comments from the public about the college in preparation for its periodic evaluation by its regional accrediting agency. The college will host a visit Sept. 24-25, with a team representing the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. SCCC/ATS has been accredited by the commission since 1975.The team will review the institution’s ongoing ability to meet the Commissions Criteria for Accreditation. The public is invited to submit comments regarding the college by writing the Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500 Chicago, IL 60604-1411.The public may also submit comments on the commission’s Web site at http://www.ncahlc.org/Information-for-the-Public/third-partycomment.html. Comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution or its academic programs. Comments must be in writing. All comments must be received by Aug. 27.

GET INVOLVED

Taking fall classes? Sign up for All Saints Day Prospective students who are interested in attending Seward County Community College/Area Technical School in the fall need to sign up to attend an All Saints Days. Individuals can meet with SCCC/ATS staff, enroll in classes and meet future classmates. All Saints Days are scheduled June 21, July 10, July 29, July 26 and Aug. 7 Register at allsaintsdays.com. Make sure you have submitted an application for admission before signing up for an All Saints Days. For information, call 620-417-1100.

NEXT ONE IS JUNE 21

Good Sam seeking donations of yard sale items for fundraiser The Liberal Good Samaritan will be having a yard sale starting at 8 a.m. Saturday to raise funds for their much needed whirlpools.The public is invited to donate their unwanted items to the sale. Items may be dropped off from 8 a.m. til 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the center located at 2160 Zinnia Lane.

DONATE ITEMS NOW

Since the Kansas Legislature could not decide on how to redistrict Kansas, the Federal Court stepped in and created maps that gave no consideration to the location of current legislators. The result ...

48 25

New House districts with at least 2 incumbents. New House districts with no representative at all.

4 4

New Senate districts with 2 incumbents. New Senate districts with no senator at all. L&T graphic/Earl Watt

Senate ... ❖ Continued from Page 1A Four Senate districts will have two incumbents, and four districts have no senator. And the new lines gave no clear advantage to the moderates or conservatives. “I haven’t heard anyone say this helps one or another,” Love said. Love said the House saw similar issues where 48 districts now have two incumbents and 25 new legislative districts were created with no representative at all. “The courts didn’t give any regard where sitting legislators lived,” Love said. “That has caused some problems. I don’t know if that will serve people well.”

With the map being released late Thursday night, and an impending filing deadline of Monday, current office holders, and perhaps some that have never thought about running because they had adequate representation, will now have to decide whether or not to seek office. “It will come down to finding good people for those open seats,” Love said. “Twenty nine districts that have no one in them — no incumbent legislator. That’s unheard of.” Other changes to the Senate may come due to the forced contests in the House. According to Love, some legislators may relocate, or opt to run for the Senate instead. “There’s been a lot of conversations in the past 12 to 18 hours of people possibly, if they are going to run, moving, or running for a different office,” he said. “Rather

House ... ❖ Continued from Page 1A compromise, according to O’Neal. “From the House side, we didn’t turn it over to the courts voluntarily,” he said. “It was inevitable that the Senate and Congressional districts would end up there. There were not enough votes on the Senate side to get anything done. There were sufficient votes to get the House map done. We are suffering the consequences of a failure to sit down and agree. The House was willing to sit down and work this out. The governor offered to mediate. We had meetings on our concerns and what it would take to fix it. The Senate would just go the opposite direction. They were not willing to compromise. This is the consequence. If they thought they would get a better shake in the court, this is a lesson.” If anything, the court went completely nonpolitical in drawing the new maps, and in doing so effected almost half of the seats in the Kansas House of Representatives. As for the 125th District, which includes most of Seward County, it remained in tact.

than taking on an incumbent house member, some might go for the Senate. You have four senate seats without a sitting senator. I’m sure you will see House members making a run for the Senate.” But Love said the House and Senate had a chance to put together maps that would have been more acceptable, but the failure to compromise led to the current map that is unlikely to be challenged and will be the law of the land for 10 years. “We don’t like these maps,” Love said. “At the end of the day, it is the Legislature’s fault. We could have compromised. We could have found a map that could have had the support it needed through compromise. The process frustrated people, and they hardened up. Some wouldn’t budge, and they are the ones who ended up hurt the most.”

But the courts may have wanted to send a message to future Kansas Legislatures that if they cannot agree on a map, the courts will not take current lawmakers or partisan attachments into consideration. “I would concede the court doesn’t have the same requirements or guidelines,” O’Neal said. “The court went out of its way to point that out to us. They followed almost none of the guidelines. They were not the least bit interested in incumbents. When legislature fails, the court decides.” While O’Neal has made it clear that he is not seeking re-election, he still has a tough task in making sure there are candidates in each of the 25 open districts, and to see what those in the contested districts intentions are. In some cases, three incumbents are now in the same district. “I can’t be specific, but I know a number of individuals over the weekend are weighing their options,” O’Neal said. “They are wondering if this important enough to uproot and move. I guess the thing I would say is it is hard to recruit good people to do this work. When you have someone who made their decision to run and got elected in a freshmen class of 30, to suddenly have the court redraw the lines, and now decide to give it up or move is unfortunate. It’s not like

While the court could have rewritten Western Kansas, Love was glad that the original map passed by the Senate was also rejected and hopes that the Legislature can focus on the real work ahead. “Obviously redistricting is an important issue,” Love said. “What’s more frustrating to me is there are other things more important — growing the state, better business environment, strengthening our schools. I’m still very pleased we were able to change the conversation. No maps collapsed a western Kansas seat. We effectively changed the tone of that conversation and protected Western Kansas. It was very helpful in not having attorneys or a lawsuit advocating for that. We protected rural representation and Western Kansas. That was victory, in spite of the big mess.”

people are in line wanting this job. It’s a tough job, and the further away from the capital, the harder it is to recruit. Court is giving us less than 72 hours to make decisions.” O’Neal will spend the weekend trying to make sure that candidates are ready to register in every district, but there could be a chance that the filing deadline passes and some districts remain vacant. “We are scrambling to make sure we have candidates in every district,” he said. “If a district remains open, we resort to rules on write-ins. If it is truly a new district with no incumbent, it is not an appointment. You don’t have a party in power.” While the House overwhelmingly passed its version of a redistricting map, the Senate President Steve Morris (R-Hugoton) would not allow for a vote without including his Senate map, but in the end, that may mean more challenges for Senate seats. “The Senate held the map hostage trying to get a gerrymandered senate map passed,” O’Neal said. “It was totally unnecessary to look at fundamental changes in the House. House members have to make decisions — run against a colleague or in the Senate district. There will be quite a few more House vs. Senate matchups than what we were looking at.”


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Sunday, June 10, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

9A

Local observance of Juneteenth spans four decades ‘We wanted to celebrate, and remember our heritage’ By RACHEL COLEMAN Leader &Times Juneteenth — the celebration commemorating the moment when Texas slaves learned they’d been emancipated, two years after the fact — has been observed since its beginning in 1865, but it was only in 1981 that Liberal joined the party. Longtime Liberal resident Beverly Williams recalls those early days. “When I came here with my husband Carlon, in 1983, we got involved with the people who’d started it,” she said. “As I understand it, 10 couples got together and decided we ought to celebrate; it was important, and it was important to tell the young people about it. So they started out with a picnic, and more and more people joined in.” Williams had personal reasons for observing Juneteenth. A Texas girl, she’d grown up hearing stories

about her grandmother, born in 1863, who came to Texas in a covered wagon. “My great-grandparents were homesteaders who had been part of the slave industry and broke away,” she said. “They were very fortunate to be able to homestead on white peoples’ land.” Although the family was considered wealthy, compared to other black Texans who did not own land, Williams grew up hearing stories of a segregated society. “My dad was born in 1911, and he would tell us stories about what it was like to grow up there,” she said, “and even though they were fortunate, they still had to abide by the laws of the land. That meant Jim Crow. And so, if a white lady was walking on the sidewalk —back then it was probably just boards — my father had to get off the sidewalk as he passed.” It’s stories like that, Williams said, that the younger generation

Juneteenth 2012 When: Friday, June 15 — block party and dance Saturday, June 16 — picnic, games and activities for all ages Where: Mahuron Park, 701 E. Seventh Cost: Free to the public

History of Juneteenth President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation Jan. 1, 1863, but for the slaves in Texas, it might as well not have happened. It wasn’t until Union soldiers landed in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, that the news arrived: the slaves were now free. Historians have never completely explained why the news of freedom was delayed. The story of a murdered messenger is often told; another version speculates that slaveowners and even northerners waited until the cotton crop had been harvested before announcing Lincoln’s edict. Whatever the reason for the delay, Gen. Gordon Granger read the following to the people of Texas: “… in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights, and rights of property, between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.” Slaves heard the news with elation and joy; slaveowners were not as happy. The changes were difficult for everyone, though, and Juneteenth became a way of marking the profound change, reassuring fellow former slaves that life would get better, and offering prayers of thanksgiving for newfound freedom. Galveston, Texas, became the home of Juneteenth, hosting rodeos, fishing, barbecue and baseball, church gatherings and picnics. Over the years, Juneteenth celebrations began in other states, and many (41 at last count) chose to recognize it as an official holiday; the White House and the Republican National Committee have also issued official statements recognizing the importance of Juneteenth. In 2009, the Kansas legislature also affirmed the legitimacy of Juneteenth.

needs to know. She said it’s not a matter of nursing grievances or dwelling on past offenses; instead, knowing those painful stories gives young people a way to understand their own lives, and to honor those who went before them. “It’s about knowing how hard our parents, grandparents and greatgrandparents worked, and struggled, and fought, to give the young people what they have now. Some of our young people don’t realize the freedom they have now is a result of what their great-grandparents did,” she said. Though Juneteenth’s origins link to serious history, the mid-month event is more like a “big, relaxed

party” than a lecture series. Organizers sponsor a block party and street dance on the Friday that falls nearest to June 19; this year, that will be June 15. The Saturday that follows offers a full day of casual fun in Mahuron Park: bingo, basketball, free food, children’s games and activities like facepainting and water balloon tosses, a watermelon feed and plenty of time to visit. As the event grew, Williams noted, it became a miniature demonstration of race relations in Liberal. Throughout the 1980s, Juneteenth grew exponentially. Community activism was at a high, led by church officials, community advocates and professional people who’d become part of local institutions like the police department, the school system, and the big oil and gas companies. In the 1990s, Williams said, “we kind of held off for a while because there was a lot of racial unrest and tension in the community.” Several incidents between members of the

black community and local law enforcement led to community meetings that did not completely alleviate the sense of conflict. The Juneteenth Committee didn’t want to create an environment that might turn sour, “and we didn’t want to put anybody else’s life in danger until things settled down,” Williams recalled. Over time, things quieted, and the Juneteenth committee resumed its planning. Now a standard part of summertime activities in Liberal, Juneteenth has balanced the desire to remind the younger generation of its history and the pleasure of hosting a giant community gettogether. “We don’t want the kids to think, ‘oh, it’s just a time to party,’ and miss the heritage that started it,” Williams said. “But we like having people think of it as a big community picnic.” These days, Liberal residents of all races and ethnic groups join in the festivities. “Everybody comes now — black,

white, Hispanic, and anyone else who wants to join in,” Williams said. “That’s what we want to do, bring people together. That’s our purpose.” Last year, “a father and son drove down here from Great Bend, because they’d heard what a great Juneteenth celebration we have here in Liberal,” she said. “Now, we’ve been working to keep it going and not let it die, even if it dwindles off a little. We want to pass it down. And when that man came from Great Bend, my heart just overflowed. We must have been doing something right. All that work, it’s not in vain.” As Juneteenth celebrations gear up on the 15th and 16th, Williams anticipates a great time. “I’m 62, and it’s time to step back a little,” she said. “We have some great young people who are really into it, and they’re doing a great job. I’m planning to go there this year, sit back and really enjoy myself.”


Sports HIGH PLAINS

S U N DAY June 10 Page 10A

ZONE

Road win YHAW J AL E A G U E K est. 1976

JAYHAWK LEAGUE STANDINGS

W Hays 3 Liberal 2 El Dorado 2 Derby 2 Dodge City 2 Haysville 0 FRIDAY Dodge City 7, Derby 5 Hays 5, El Dorado 1 Liberal 5, Haysville 1

L 0 2 2 2 2 3

SATURDAY Dodge City at Derby, 7 p.m. Hays at El Dorado, 7 p.m. Liberal at Haysville, 7 p.m. TODAY Dodge City at Derby, 7 p.m. Hays at El Dorado, 7 p.m. Liberal at Haysville, 7 p.m.

Bee Jays bounce back with 5-1 win By EARL WATT • Leader &Times After dropping two Jayhawk League games at home, the Bee Jays went on the road to ended the skid with a 5-1 win over the Haysville Heat. Stephen Gandy hit a solo home run in the win, and Cody Crabaugh had a solid start for the Bee Jays to contirbute to the win. “We played real well,” Bee Jay manager Brandon Kitch said. “We hit the ball real well. We were stinging balls early on, but right at people. We came with an aggressive approach at the plate, and overcame a one-run deficit in the middle of the game. Our guys stayed hooked up.” Crabaugh had a no-hitter going in to the fourth before the Heat was able to score a run. But the Bee Jays responded with three runs to take a lead they would not surrender. “Our bullpen shut them down,”

Kitch said. “We made good pitches when we needed them. We committed some errors late, but we were able to pitch through them.” The Bee Jays have added to the roster with some players from UTArlington. “One of them threw two-thirds of an inning last night,” Kitch said. “He will be really good for us. We have more depth in bullpen. That will help us down the road.” After dropping two in a row, Kitch challenged the team to play a full nine innings, and the Bee Jays responded against Haysville. “I really like this team,” Kitch said. “They are a bunch of dirt bags, and I mean that in a good way. They get after it. I want them to come in, play hard, and leave it on the field.” Keegan Hucul was the expected starter late Saturday night in the second game of a three-game set Stephen Gandy prepares for a pitch last week against the Kansas Cannons. Friday, Gandy hit a home run to help the Bee Jays defeat the Haysville Heat 5-1. L&T photo/Earl Watt with the Heat.

Help SWAT by sponsoring the Heat Sheet Special to the Leader &Times SWAT (Southwest Aquatic Team) is going to host The Adventure Bay swim meet Saturday, June 30 at the Adventure Bay water park. SWAT is a non-profit organization and the meet is used to raise money and keep fees low for local swimmers. Fees include a team swim suit, swim cap, coaching, pool rental, registrations, etc. This year 13 teams are coming to Liberal (Guymon, Garden City, Dodge city, Spearman, Dumas, Scott City, etc). More than 400 families from around the area are expected to attend. These families are going to spend money in Liberal by eating, shopping and purchasing fuel. Before this event SWAT sells ads to include in the heat sheets. Families buy heat sheets to keep track of their swimmers. By purchasing an ad, more than 400 potential customers will see the ad. In addition to business ads, individuals can purchase an ad to

Dylan rocks for the Sox ABOVE: Dylan Shellenberger throws a pitch for the Black Sox against the Reds Friday at Rosel Field in City Recreation action. Shellenberger hit an in-the-park home run in a 6-0 win. RIGHT: Black Sox’s? That’s what the jerseys say. Coach Derek Shields meets his team after winning the minor league game Friday at Rosel Field.The Back Sox(‘s) won both the minor and major league games. L&T photos/Earl Watt

Clemens perjury trial slogs toward finish line By FREDERIC J. FROMMER Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton said he hopes to get the Roger Clemens perjury trial to the jury by Tuesday, although that could prove overly optimistic given the pace of the trial so far. The defense plans to wrap up its case Monday morning, and the government will call rebuttal witnesses, which could take about a half day. Walton said he expects to get to closing arguments Tuesday and then send the case to jurors. On Friday, which concluded the eighth week of the trial, Clemens’ wife, Debbie, testified that Roger Clemens was not present when she received a shot of human growth hormone from his strength coach. That contradicted a portion of the testimony from the coach, Brian

McNamee, who is the former pitching star’s chief accuser in the case. McNamee testified last month that not only was Clemens present, he had summoned McNamee to the couple’s master bathroom in Houston to give Debbie Clemens the drug. McNamee said she looked at her husband and said, “I can’t believe you’re going to let him do this to me,” and Roger Clemens responded, “He injects me. Why can’t he inject you?” McNamee is the only person to give firsthand testimony that Roger Clemens used performance-enhancing drugs during his baseball career. On cross-examination by the prosecution, Debbie Clemens said of her husband’s view of HGH, “I don’t think he thought it was bad.” She added, “It wasn’t like doing heroin.” Clemens is charged with lying to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing

drugs. Among more than a dozen false statements he’s alleged to have made are that he never used HGH and that McNamee injected his wife without Roger Clemens’ prior knowledge or approval. Friday’s session at times felt like an episode of “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,” as the jury was shown pictures of the palatial master bedroom in Clemens’ home and a bathroom that Debbie Clemens said was as big as a kitchen. She said the property has seven bedrooms and 10 bathrooms, counting the pool house. Walton, who allows jurors to ask questions that he deems appropriate, relayed one from a juror who wanted to know if Debbie Clemens would take HGH now. “I might. I don’t yet. I don’t know that I’m old enough yet, but this is aging me,” she replied with a laugh.

Full page Half Page Quarter Page Business Card

$150 $80 $40 $20

To support SWAT on the Heat Sheet, contact Tano Tovilla (President)

(620) 214 3740 Wanda Covert (Secretary)

(620) 629 5004 show support for a local swimmer. Plus those who buy a full page will be allowed to display their business banner during the event. SWAT would appreciate the support.


75¢

V ol . 1 2 6 • I s s . 1 6 5 • 3 2 Pa g e s

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Free public showing of ‘Obama’s America 2016’ at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Ag Building, sponsored by Garrett Love, Reid Petty and the Leader & Times. SERVING THE HOME OF FRANCES BOOTH

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 28, 2012

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Governor unveils Meals on Wheels; much more than food ‘property tax transparency’ plan By ROBERT PIERCE • Leader & Times

By ROXANA HEGEMAN • Associated Press WICHITA — Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback and fellow Republicans in the Legislature on Friday unveiled a proposed “property tax transparency” law designed to keep such taxes from rising automatically when a property values rise. If passed, their bill would require local governments to either drop their property tax levies when property values rise so that property owners’ tax payments would remain stable or to vote publicly to take advantage of the higher values and collect the additional tax revenues. Because property taxes are levied against values that can grow annually, an owner can still pay more in taxes even if a city, BROWNBACK county or school district doesn’t increase its levies. “Kansas families and businesses are taxed every time they turn around — income taxes, sales taxes, use taxes, gas taxes, property taxes, the list really goes on and on,” Brownback said. “That is why we worked together this year to provide historic pro-growth tax relief and make our state income taxes flatter and fairer after the lost decade of jobs in Kansas.” The proposal outlined Friday would put a flexible cap on property taxes and exempt new construction, said state Sen. Susan Wagle, a Wichita Republican. The Republicans’ news conference came less than two weeks before the Nov. 6 election and after weeks of criticism from Democrats that Brownback and his allies had essentially ignored rising property taxes in favor of making massive income tax cuts this year. Backers of the income tax cuts believe they’ll stimulate the economy. Critics contend that the income tax reductions will cause budget shortfalls, force the state to cut aid to its 286 schools districts and compel those districts to raise their local property taxes. “Kansans know intuitively you can’t cut income taxes like

N See TAX PLAN/Page 5A

It is estimated that as many as 8.3 million seniors face the threat of hunger every day in America. Programs such as Meals on Wheels help alleviate some of the problem, and with 5,000 local Senior Nutrition Programs in the U.S., more than one million meals are provided to seniors who need them each day. Numbers also indicate that between 800,000 and 1.7 million individuals volunteer to deliver those meals. Some of those people deliver to seniors in Liberal and have been doing it for a few years. Steven Fosdick, Carolyn Warren and Maria Ortiz are delivery drivers for the Liberal Senior Center’s Meals on Wheels program, and all of them say the program is about more than just feeding those in need. “You make sure they’re safe,” Fosdick said. “You make sure they get up and go the door, and make sure they’re OK.” Vicki Haverfield, the manager for Liberal’s Meals on Wheels, said drivers have encountered many situations in which clients were not safe. “We’ve found people that’s fallen out of bathtubs that had to lay overnight,” she said. “If we hadn’t come the next day to deliver a meal, they’d still be there. They had no way of getting up or anybody to help them.” Fosdick, who has delivered meals for nearly 10 years, described one such scenario. “There was one that was in a wheel chair,” he said. “She was wedged in between the bathroom door and the kitchen door. She was so weak that she couldn’t move the wheels any more to get out of the kitchen.” Warren, who has been with Liberal’s Meals on Wheels for eight years, said, however, having a daily nutritional meal is one of the best benefits of the program. Haverfield, who has been with the program for 11 years, said many of the people who use Meals on Wheels simply do not have anyone to rely on for their needs. This is where the senior center comes into play. “Their families are dead, or they just never had any kids,” she said. A B O V E : M e a l s o n W h e e l s d r i v e r M a r i a O r ti z p r e p a r e s o n e o f t h e m e a l s s h e a n d “The only contact they have sometimes is just the bus drivers that day. ot h e r d r i v e r s w il l t ak e ou t t o c li e n t s o n T h u r s d ay . It really helps them. All three of mine go in, and they take care of I N S E T : T h is is o n e o f t h e b l iz z ar d k it s r e c e n t l y t a k e n t o l oc a l c u s t om e r s . T h e k i t s a r e d e s i g n e d a s a p r e c a u t i o n f o r M e a l s c l i e n t s f o r w h e n t h e L i b e r a l Se n i o r C en te r i s c lo sed d ue t o ba d wea th er or a h ol ida y . Courtesy photos N See MEALS/Page 6A

3 Air Force F-16s entertain Liberal residents with Friday fly-over Hometown boy (Major Bryan Meek) performs fly-over in F-16 with two other teammates Friday By LARRY PHILLIPS • Leader & Times Shortly before 2 Friday afternoon, Liberal residents experienced a flyover conducted by three United States Air Force F-16 fighter jets. As the jets regrouped to make a landing at Liberal Municipal Airport from the south, numerous townspeople jumped in their vehicles and headed west to the airport. The jets made their landings as a small traffic jam ensued near Lyddon Aero Center’s parking lot and people were piling onto the concrete outside the center to get pictures. One woman was trying to get her cell phone camera to work to capture the moment. Her name was Sharon Meek of Liberal, and it turns out her son, Bryan Meek, was the Air Force Major leading the three-jet team into Liberal. “He’s my son, Bryan Meek,” Sharon said. “We’re pretty proud of him.” Maj. Meek was born and raised in Liberal, according to Sharon, and he is currently stationed in San Antonio as a trainer of fighter pilots. “He spent almost three years in Korea and just got back

N See F-16S/Page 3A

© 2012 SEWARD COUNTY PUBLISHING LLC

Liberal’s Sharon Meek and her brother, Jim Darnell, right, greet their son and nephew, Major Bryan Meek, respectively, Friday afternoon at Liberal Airport. Maj. Meek and two other F-16 pilots landed in Liberal to refuel for a trip to Colorado from San Antonio, where the men are stationed. Courtesy photo


High Plains Leader&Times

TOY’S FOR TOT’S Liberal, Ks H.O.G. Chapter 2012 Toy’s for Tot’s ANYONE wanting to donate a NEW toy ($10.00min), please contact any liberal Kansas Chapter H.O. G member or take the toy to: Liberal Harley Davidson 900 E. Pancake Blvd Liberal, Kansas

626-0840

******LOST: ********** Lost-Lost-Lost-Lost-

(First published in High Plains Daily Leader & Times on October 28, 2012)t1

Huskey Heeler, mostly black with white spots & feet, camo collar, white eyes, approx 1 year old female. Please call with any information -620-417-4862 **********************

CIRCUIT COURT CIVIL DIVISION STATE OF WISCONSIN SMALL CLAIMS RACINE COUNTY

FOUND: Tiny black female chihuahua found 4th and Prospect. Call to describe 620-370-5774

CASE NO. 2012SC4527 PATRICK JOHNSON Defendant’s Name 530 N JORDAN AVE STE B LIBERAL KS 67901 ____________________ DEFENDANT’S ADDRESS, if known You are being sued by Wellston Apartments in the small claims court for Racine County, Wisconsin, 730 Wisconsin Avenue, Racine WI 1st floor Court room. A hearing will be held at 8:30 a.m. on November 29, 2012. If you do not appear, a judgment may be given to the person suing you. (A copy of the claim has been mailed to you at the address above.) Dated this 25th day of October 2012. Christina L. Bass Plaintiff’s Atty. (262) 835-0555 Phone number Bass Law Offices 4438 N Raynor Avenue P.O. Box 61 Union Grove, WI 53182 Address

Lost

1

Classified

To place an ad call Public Notice

Section C

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AIRLINE CAREERSbecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualifiedHousing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2487449

Help Wanted

COMMUNITY CLINIC OF TURPIN Full Time Position Available Receptionist/Insurance Clerk 8:00 to 5:00 M-F Apply at The Community Clinic of Turpin P.O. Box 299 104 N. Hibbs Turpin, OK 73950 580-778-3966

Verizon Wireless/z Wireless Premium Wireless Retailer in Liberal, KS is now hiring Store Manager that is career-oriented, ambitious, and friendly. Sales/Customer Service experience preferred. Professional sales training! Discounts on wireless phone service plans! Competitive base pay and commissioned sales with unlimited earning potential! Email resume to careers@gozwireless.co m EOE

Stevens County Healthcare is searching for Full-time RNs, LPNs, and CMAs to work at Pioneer Manor Nursing Home. These positions are for the night shift (6pm-6am). Interested candidates must be certified with a Kansas License to be eligible for these positions. We offer excellent benefits and competitive wages.

626-9854 Please contact Robyn Medina in Human Resources for an application (620)544-8511

Stevens County Healthcare is searching for a Full-time CMA to work the night shift (6pm6am) at Pioneer Manor Nursing Home. Interested candidates must have a current Kansas CMA license to be eligible for this position. We offer competitive wages and an excellent benefits package.. Please contact Robyn Medina in Human Resources for an application. (620) 544-8511

Looking for CDL class A drivers with 5 years verifiable experience in roustabout work and equipment operating. Apply within Shawnee Lease 321 A South Clay

Friday, October 26, 2012 FAX

Looking for a reliable caregiver to care for my mother out of her home. Night / plus weekend shift. Duties include: caring for her, cleaning, cooking. Serious inquires only! Call 620-621-1016 or 620-6245607

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Well Established Oil Field & Gas Company now hiring experienced FLATBED TRUCK DRIVERS with CDL and a Class A license.

E-mail your resume to steve.nuss@posci.net or pick up an application at 1600 Pancake Blvd. Liberal, Kansas.

Milt’s Cell (620)629-1747 Email: milt@ptsi.net Connie’s Cell (620)629-0000 Email:cseigrist@hotmail.com

(First published in High Plains Daily Leader & Times on October 28, 2012)t1

Labrador Retriev Flower B reet er (M) 13 E. 2nd St67 Anonymous 1 90 S. K l, ra be Li Community Su pporter

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Drivers: NO EXPERIENCE? Class A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Experienced Drivers also Needed!!!!!!! Central Refrigerated (877) 369-7885 www.centraltruckdriving jobs.com

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er (F) Labrador Retriev g Sunrise Staffin

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Elkan Drug 1033 N. Kansa s Ave. Liberal, KS. 67 901

Chihuahua (M)

Name of Adopt ee & Info

For only $5 per picture, per week you can give the Gift Of Life by sponsoring a pet in the Pet of the Week ad.

It gives the public a chance to see which animals are available for adoption. Call 620-626-0840 ask for Classifieds for details on a Sponsorship ad. CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK! “Liberal Animal Shelter”

New Hours: Mon-Wed, Fri, Sat • 9AM-12Noon Thursday & Sunday • 1PM - 5PM 1985 N. Country Estates Rd. • 620-626-0576


S U N DAY

Sports HIGH PLAINS

Oct. 28 Page 1B

ZONE

SEASON IS

OVER

L i b e r a l co a ch C l i f f A b b o t t h u d d l e s w i t h h i s p l a y e r s a f te r a 4 9 -1 2 l os s t o B is h op C a r r o ll F r i d a y . It w a s t h e l as t g am e f or t he sen io r s as Reds kin s. L&T photo/Earl Watt

Third quarter crushes upset hopes against Carroll By EARL WATT • Leader & Times

Bulldogs tussle with Bison 3B

Dusters continue to struggle 2B

WICHITA — For a half, the Liberal Redskins challenged the state’s top ranked team including a goal line stand in the final two minutes of the second quarter. But Bishop Carroll could not be stopped in the third, and the Golden Eagles cruised to a District 8 championship by defeating the Redskins 49-12. Trailing by 15 at half, the Redskins appeared to have momentum when they recovered an onside kick to start the third quarter. But two plays later a deflected pass was intercepted, and the Golden Eagles scored on the next play on a 13-yard run to take a 28-6 lead. Another Britton Abbott interception resulted in another Carroll touchdown in two plays to take a 35-6 lead. Abbott was sacked on fourth down on Liberal’s next possession, and the Golden Eagles took possession at their own 46 yard line. Three plays later, they were back in the end zone, and in less than six minutes of the third quarter Carroll had matched their first half point total to take a 42-6 lead. After Liberal came up one yard short on fourth down, Carroll again took over at the 47 yard line, and after a snap went over the quarterback’s head for a 20yard loss, Carroll was able to convert for a first down and scored on a seven-play drive with 2:14 remaining in the third quarter for a 49-6 lead. It was the last Golden Eagle touchdown of the game despite playing their starting offense until the final three minutes. The Redskins were able to move the ball and maintain possession in the fourth quarter and held the Golden Eagles on a fourth down attempt twice and forced a rare Golden Eagle punt. The punt was a wobbling rainbow snap to the punter, a sign that either explained why Bishop Carroll opted to go on fourth downs most of the night, even in their own territory, or a sign that the punting unit was not very experienced. Liberal added a touchdown in the final two minutes against the defensive reserves that took the field with less than four minutes to play. In the first half, the Redskins fell behind early, 14-0, ■ See LIBERAL/Page 2B

Bulldogs back in playoffs with win By JASON EPP • Leader & Times

Bobcats suffer last second loss 4B

The Hooker Bulldogs made the long trek to Enid, Oklahoma to take on Oklahoma Bible Academy. Hooker came away with a close 20-14 victory, and clinched a spot in the playoffs. Hooker struggled to get much going offensively, especially early. Oklahoma Bible took a 60 lead. Hooker answered with a TD pass and two-point conversion to take an 8-6 lead. The Bulldogs added another score before half, leading 14-6 at the break. The Bulldog defense got a critical stop just before half. The Trojans had a first and goal at the Bulldogs’ one on their final possession of the first half. Hooker held them out four straight plays to maintain their eight-point lead. Hooker added an insurance touchdown in the fourth, before OBA scored late for the final score. Hooker is now 6-3 overall, and 4-2 in district play. They will host county rival and top-five ranked Texhoma Friday to end their regular season. “We’re going to give it everything we’ve got, but we have to be smart about it with the playoffs starting the following week,” Bulldogs coach Jacob Kreamer said.

JERRY HARDING 500 N. Kansas 624-2535 ROGER CROSSMAN 20 E. Tucker Road 624-8168

J o e B e a n b r e a k s l o o s e o n a b i g g a i n e a l r i e r t h i s s e a s o n . B e a n a n d t h e H o o k e r B u l l d o g s q u a l i f i e d f o r p o s t- s e a s o n pl ay F r id ay wi t h a wi n ov e Ok la ho ma Bi bl e Ac ade my , 20- 14. Courtesy photo

STATE FARM ROGER CROSSMAN/JERRY HARDING SCOREBOARD L IB E RA L C A R R OL L

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BEAVER FA IR V IE W

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2A

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

LOCAL

news@hpleader.com

OBITUARIES

TOMORROW

TODAY

Agenda • Hospital • weather • calendar Sunny, with a high near 61. West southwest wind 6 to 15 mph. Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 33. South wind 7 to 10 mph.

LEADER&TIMES

Sunny, with a high near 69. West wind 5 to 7 mph becoming light and variable in the afternoon. Monday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 41.

FOUNDED 1886

EARL WATT President and Publisher earl@hpleader.com

JASON EPP General Manager jason@hpleader.com

LARRY PHILLIPS Managing Editor news@hpleader.com

DENASA RICE Business/Classified Manager denasa@hpleader.com

TREVOR FELDHAUSEN Composing Manager ads@hpleader.com

Liberal Senior Center Friendship Meals Monday, Oct. 29 – Chicken tetrazzini, California blend vegetables, whole wheat roll, sliced cinnamon apples and milk Tuesday, Oct. 30 – Roast beef with gravy, mashed potatoes, buttered spinach, whole wheat bread, pudding parfait and milk Wednesday, Oct. 31 – Country fried steak with cream gravy, mashed potatoes, seasoned carrots, whole wheat roll, mandarin oranges and milk Thursday, Nov. 1 – Pork cutlet, mac and cheese, brussel sprouts, whole wheat bread, peaches and milk Friday, Nov. 2 – Meat loaf, mashed potatoes, broccoli and cauliflower, wheat bread, chilled pears and milk

Family burial will be at Highland Cemetary, Winfield, at a later date. Memorials are suggested to Covenant Presbyterian Church and Harry Hynes Memorial Hospice. Condolences may be left at Legacy.com.

hospital SOUTHWEST MEDICAL CENTER FRIDAY ADMISSIONS: Fabiola Varela Gonzalez, Satanta Irma Berenice Cervantes, Guymon, Okla. Larisa Von Smith, Montezuma BIRTHS: A daughter to Irma Bernice Cervantes of Guymon, Okla. A son to Fabiola Varela Gonzalez of Satanta DISMISSALS: None reported Total admissions: 15 Total dismissals: 8

Activities

MYRON REIMER Production Manager News Room E-mail: news@hpleader.com Classifieds E-mail: denasa@hpleader.com Advertising E-mail: ads@hpleader.com Sports E-mail: sports@hpleader.com

Subscriptions rates for the City of Liberal in city limits are: 1 year at $70.56 6 months at $43.42 3 months at $27.14 1 month at $9.04 Outside of city limits and in town mailing 1 year at $130.26 6 months at $78.16 3 months at $39.08 1 month at $13.03 Outside of Kansas 1 year at $120 6 months at $72 3 months at $36 1 month at $12

ISN No. 262273494 The High Plains Daily Leader&Times is published every day except Saturday by Seward County Publishing Company at 16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal, KS 67901 and entered under Periodicals Postage Paid at Post Office in Liberal, Kan. The publisher reserves the right to refuse any contributed material. Postmaster: Send address changes to: High Plains Daily Leader&Times, 16 S. Kansas Ave., Liberal KS 67901. Phone: (620) 626-0840 Fax: (620) 626-9854

Monday, Oct. 29 8:30 a.m. – Aerobics 9 a.m. – Strong bodies 1:30 p.m. – Bridge 1:30 p.m. – Chicken scratch 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Tuesday, Oct. 30 9 a.m. – Ladies snooker 9:45 a.m. – Bible study 1 p.m. – Train 7 p.m. – Bridge 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Wednesday, Oct. 31 8:30 a.m. – Aerobics 9 a.m. – Strong bodies 11:55 a.m. – Birthday cake 1 p.m. – Pitch 2 p.m. – How about a Halloween part? Come in costume if you like 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Thursday, Nov. 1 Noon – Epic PCS is buying your friendship meal today and showing their senior phones. Please make sure Vicki knows by the 31st if you plan to eat. We do hope to see you there. 3 p.m. – Tea at Three 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Friday, Nov. 2 8:30 a.m. – Aerobics 9 a.m. – Coffee N Rolls 1:30 p.m. – Buck bingo 8 p.m – Happy Steppers dance. Cost is $6 each. The band is Oklahoma Cowboy and Texas Lady. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. – Rides Saturday, Nov. 3 Open for snooker at 1 p.m.

deaths ELIZABETH ALLISON JOHNSON – Elizabeth Allison, 91, died Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, at Stanton County Long Term Care Unit in Johnson. ❏ Funeral arrangements will be announced by Garnand Funeral Home in Johnson.

obituaries CECIL E. REYNOLDS Cecil E. Reynolds, 76, died Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012. He is survived by his wife, Lois, Wichita, daughters Kristina (Kevin) Gray, Wichita, Jennifer (Greg) Freeman, Liberal, Linda (Dean) Murray, Lowell, Ark., one brother, two sisters, nine grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and 27 nieces and nephews. ❏ Jazz memorial service will be Friday, Nov. 2, at Covenant Presbyterian Church, Wichita. Reception and visitation will follow service. Creamation has taken place.

jail log The Seward County Jail Calendar will now be published daily only in the Leader & Times. The information is provided by the Seward County Sheriff’s office at L&T’s request and only lists when and why a person was incarcerated. Those reasons do not mean the individual was charged with those crimes, or if any charges were incurred. That decision is determined separately by the Seward County Attorney’s office.

Jail Log from Oct. 10, 2012 Name – Age – Date in – Address – Charges James Garang, 32 – 10/10 – 604 N. New York, Liberal – Agrravated battery Jan Tracy Kilborn, 40 – 10/10 – 7005 Backacres, Hutchinson – Day server Victor Gerreca, 34 – 10/10 – 323 S. Calhoun, Liberal – DV battery Jose Vega, 24 – 10/10 – 324 S. Western, Liberal – Day server Marina Castro, 20 – 10/10 – 555 Pine, Liberal – No DL and illegal display Cynthia Cantu, 34 – 10/10 – 406 S. Cottage Road, Tyrone, Okla. – No DL and no insurance Tiffany Gray, 30 – 10/10 – 830 S. Clay, Liberal – TOC Charge codes: DL – Driver’s License DUI – Driving Under the Influence DV – Domestic violence DWS – Driving While Suspended FTA – Failure to appear FTC – Failure to comply LEO – Law Enforcement Officer MIP – Minor In Possession PBT – Preliminary Breathalizer Test PFA – Protection From Abuse TOC – Transporting an Open Container WWI – Walking While Intoxicated

It’s DAILY!

agenda LIBERAL CITY COMMISSION A special meeting of the Liberal City Commission will be at 5:30 p.m. Monday at the Rock Island Depot at 4 Rock Island Road. Agenda items include: ❏ Presentation by Be Liberal group ❏ Adjournment

calendar MONDAY ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. ■ First Baptist Church of Liberal is offering a women’s bible study, “Jesus The One and Only” by Beth Moore on Monday nights beginning Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. in the Family Life Center at Third and Sherman. This is a 10-week study. To pre-register, call Kim at 6241641 or Joan at 629-3124. Registration will also be accepted any time. TUESDAY ■ New Community Missionary Baptist Church hosts a food cupboard beginning at 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Residents in need should bring identification to receive services. The cupboard is located at the Community Missionary Baptist Educational Center. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Women’s Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. at 909 N. Clay. ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. ■ Weight Watchers meeting every Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5 for registration and weigh-ins. Come to 215 S. Western to Western Avenue Church of Christ. Questions? Call 580-778-3602. WEDNESDAY ■ Overeaters Anonymous of Guymon, Okla., will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the AA Club on Main Street across from Homeland in Guymon. All who have a problem with food are welcome to attend. ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1

YOU RIGHTFULLY EARNED IT. NOW RIGHTFULLY KEEP IT. Looking to keep more of your income and cut your taxes? Then tax-free municipal bonds * may be for you * Bonds may be subject to state, local or the alternative minimum tax.

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Leo Riley Gregory J. Bird 16 E. Second St. 111 E. Tucker Rd. 624-1611 624-1612

Jeff Weeast 18 W. 3rd St. 624-0967

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Edward Jones

Westin Weeast 925 N. Kansas 624-0970

Member SIPC

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING

to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. THURSDAY ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. ■ The Western Avenue Church of Christ has a benevolent room which is open to the public from 9 to 10 a.m. every Thursday. For those in need of clothing, come by 215 S. Western Ave. ■ The Liberal Table Tennis Club will meet at 7 p.m. at the Parks and Rec office. ■ T.O.P.S. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), a non-profit weight loss group, meets at 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Southern Baptist Church in Liberal. The first meeting is free. Dues are $28 per year. Call Gail at 629-1379 with questions. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Men’s Support Group will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. at 909 N. Clay.

Moore on Monday nights beginning Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. in the Family Life Center at Third and Sherman. This is a 10-week study. To pre-register, call Kim at 6241641 or Joan at 629-3124. Registration will also be accepted any time. TUESDAY, NOV. 6 ■ New Community Missionary Baptist Church hosts a food cupboard beginning at 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Residents in need should bring identification to receive services. The cupboard is located at the Community Missionary Baptist Educational Center. ■ The Liberal Area Rape Crisis and Domestic Violence Services Women’s Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. at 909 N. Clay. ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. ■ Needles and Friends Quilt Guild meets the first Tuesday of each month at the First Christian Church at 7 p.m. Area quilters are invited to come for an informative and entertaining evening.

FRIDAY ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. MONDAY, NOV. 5 ■ Morning transportation for persons age 55 and older is available from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday through the Liberal Senior Center. For more information or to schedule a ride, call 624-2511. ■ The recently chartered men’s auxiliary of V.F.W. Post No. 3166 will meet at 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month at the Post Home. For more information, call Paul Harrington at 629-1205, David Peugh at 391-0235 or the V.F.W. post at 624-7447. ■ First Baptist Church of Liberal is offering a women’s bible study, “Jesus The One and Only” by Beth

■ Weight Watchers meeting every Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. Doors open at 5 for registration and weigh-ins. Come to 215 S. Western to Western Avenue Church of Christ. Questions? Call 580-778-3602.

If you miss your paper, call (620) 626-0840 or (620) 624-2541 between 5 and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday. Leader

& Times


2C

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY OCTOBER 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

denasa@hpleader.com

High Plains

Exceptionally nice homes & apartments in Liberal / $375-$1,000 / Tenant pays utilities. / Call 620-624-2226 or 580-778-3840.

Leader&Times

FOR RELEASE SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 2012

7th President of the U.S. Martin Van Buren was born on Dec. 5, 1782, at Kinderhook, N.Y. After graduating from the village school, he became a law clerk, entered practice in 1803, and soon became active in state politics as state senator and attorney general. In 1820, he was elected to the United States Senate. He threw the support of his efficient political organization, known as the Albany Regency, to William H. Crawford in 1824 and to Jackson in 1828. After leading the opposition to Adams's administration in the Senate, he served briefly as governor of New York (1828–1829) and resigned to become Jackson's secretary of state. He was soon on close personal terms with Jackson and played an important part in the Jacksonian program.

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REDUCED!

1008 S. SYCAMORE This ranch home features nice size bedrooms plus 1 3/4 baths, bsmt, wood burning fireplace, attached 2 car garage plus 2 car carport and storage bldg with a loft. MLS #2919

1640 N. WEBSTER

HARRISON CIRCLE AREA

3BR with pretty wood floors. Updated kitchen and baths, CA/CH, attached garage, Carport, heated storage building Price Reduced to $112,900 MLS #3566

Owner Says SELL!

805 W. 2ND ST 3 Bedroom, basement, CA/CH, wood deck, fenced yard, detached garage. REDUCED TO UNDER $70,000 MLS #3533

25 SOUTH PROSPECT AVE 5 Br. 2 bath, 1 1/2 story in central Liberal. Priced to sell at MLS #3568

12149 ROAD 2. Lovely 3 Br. 2 Bath, DBLWIDE on a permanant foundation, Nice detached garage and storm shelter. Relax with a cup of coffee on this covered deck MLS #3675

CUSTOM BUILT HOME

ND

911 N. HOLLY 4 Br. 3 full Ba w/ Huge Master Suite, Formal living room w/ bay window, cozy den, woodburning fireplace. You will love having 3 levels, a large kitchen, immaculae garage & yard. Call for your private showing today. MLS #3144

IN

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MACARTHUR DISTRICT

PE

GREAT FOR ENTERTAINING

ROOM TO ROAM IN THE COUNTRY

1650 N. Calhoun Ave. 3Br. 1 3/4 baths, open floor plan with cathedral ceilings, formal dining room, spacious neat and tidy room. Oversized attached 2 car garage. MLS #3387

CT

MACARTHUR SCHOOL DISTRICT

523 WEST 3RD ST. Charming turn of the century 4 or 5 bedroom Victorian home w/relaxing covered front porch. Original woodwork including ornate staircase leading to 2nd story, lovely bay windows. Elegant formal dining room w/stained glass windows accent. MLS #2537 PRICED UNDER APPRAISAL!!

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RA

SOUTHLAWN DISTRICT

1105 N. PURDUE Beautiful 5 Br. 3 full bath brick home on a large corner lot. Three brs and 2 baths on main level. Pretty Tile flooring adorns this large living room. Finished bsmt with gigantic rec room, 2 brs and a new full bath. Huge backyard w/sprinkler, fence & storage. MLS #3700

2 FORTHE PRICE OFONE!

NT

901 N. SHERMAN AVE. in Established Neighborhood. 2 Brs. 2 Full Baths, Formal Dining Room, 2 Living Areas, Partial Basement, Vinyl Siding, Huge Oversized Garage, CA/CH, Sprinkler System. Priced in the 80's. MLS #3566

COTTONWOOD DISTRICT

CO

WELL KEPT HOME

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Horoscope

JACQUELINE BIGAR’S STARS

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, OCT. 29, 2012 BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

For entertainment purpose only. The Daily Leader does not endorse predictions.

Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. A baby born today has a Sun in Scorpio and a Moon in Taurus all day.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Oct. 29, 2012: Charisma and intensity mark this year. You will look at life more deeply. You often swing from being emotional to being highly intellectual. Make a note of which mood works better for you. You will need some time alone to process your feelings. If you are single, a slew of admirers follow you nearly wherever you go. You might date several people before you meet someone you feel comfortable with. If you are attached, your relationship is exciting, yet you will note a backand-forth emotional struggle. If those feelings are new, they are likely to disappear in a year. If you need more space, say so rather than act out. TAURUS can challenge your very foundations. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### Curb a possessive streak, as it could cause a problem in your interactions. You also might become quite competitive with someone, which could strain the trust that exists between you. Confusion and mixed messages are amplified right now. Curb your need to win. Tonight: Don’t let others pressure you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ### Your will could be tested by someone who is just as strong as you are. Others might not want to be around you with this power struggle going on. Be willing to seek an alternative way of doing something. As the saying goes, “If the mountain will not come to

Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain.” Tonight: Make peace, not war. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ## You might want to be hard to find with today’s Full Moon looming over you. Recognize a tendency to be more sensitive than you realize when dealing with others. You could make an assumption, thus taking the first step to a misunderstanding. Tonight: The wise shall not be found. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### You might be on the verge of achieving a long-term goal, and you have many people rooting for you. Confusion surrounds communication. Realize the different possibilities that surround a key relationship. Make time for this person. Tonight: You soon will have a lot to smile about. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ### You are in the limelight, and you can’t seem to escape it. You might feel tired and withdrawn when dealing with others’ issues, and a misunderstanding could occur as a result. You will have a lot of errands and tasks to complete. Don’t worry; you will do just that. Tonight: A must appearance. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Reach out to someone at a distance. This person often makes suggestions that you see as unusual yet effective. You have a lot to juggle, and somehow you will manage not to drop any balls. Cancel plans if you feel overwhelmed. Tonight: Decide on a trip in the near future. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Deal with a partner on a one-onone level. You could prevent a misunderstanding, though you might need to clarify a plan of action first. Do not be overgenerous, as you ultimately could create a problem, whether it has to do with the other person or with your finances. Tonight: Be with a special friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) #### Defer to others and appease their requests rather than get into a power struggle. You will be much happier as a

result. You will have many invitations, so choose according to your preferences. Be with people you enjoy. Tonight: Let someone else make the first move. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ### You might choose to take a practical approach at this point, but you have some concerns that you have not chosen to share. You could be experiencing a low-level depression and not really be able to isolate what is going on within yourself. Tonight: Move forward with a project. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ##### Your creativity surges. You also could feel quite amorous and just be waiting for the right time to express your deeper feelings. Don’t wait too long, though, or you could discover that the apple of your eye has lost interest. Not everyone is as patient as you are. Tonight: Follow your feelings. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ### You are able to relax around those you know well. You might be feeling as if you want to spend more time at home, yet your work or commitments force you to be out more and more. You intuitively will know what to do. Do not play into today’s Full Moon frenzy. Tonight: Make it easy and stay at home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You have a lot to say, and your words could trigger multiple reactions. Use care and just smile. Others might be more confused than you realize. Your intuition will kick in, and you will know exactly what to say. Tonight: Hang out with friends. BORN TODAY Humorist Fanny Brice (1891), guitarist Peter Green (1946), actor Richard Dreyfuss (1947) ***

Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.

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Dear Heloise: My nails tend to peel and crack, but I don’t want to get artificial nails, which might make my nail beds more brittle than they already are. I’d like HEALTHY NAILS. What can I do? — Cait E. in Philadelphia This is a classic Heloise Hint that has left many with beautiful, strong nails. Treat them with white (otherwise known as colorless or decolorized) iodine. Before running out to a big chain drugstore, call around, especially to local or independent pharmacies, and ask the pharmacist if the store has iodine available. It may be kept behind the counter in some states, or your pharmacist may be able to order it for you if you ask. If all else fails, check online using a search engine and typing in the words “white iodine.” To treat damaged nails, use a cotton swab or a nail-polish brush (cleaned thoroughly with nail-polish remover) to spread colorless iodine on JUST the tips of your nails. After doing this daily for one week, begin to use the iodine only once a week. Continue until you see that your nails are getting stronger. While using white iodine, DO NOT use hydrogen peroxide or any products that contain hydrogen peroxide, or you will end up with yellow or orange fingertips. Remember, when cleaning up around the house, use rubber gloves to protect your hands and nails. — Heloise HANDY TONGS

Dear Heloise: To keep tongs from getting tangled in my utensil drawer, I cut a paper-towel tube the right length P

and slide the tongs inside. Love your column in the Houston Chronicle! — Jonna C. in Houston Jonna, great hint! Tongs are handy for turning meatballs when cooking. Don’t have a meatball recipe? Try my Heloise’s Spicy Swedish Meatballs — they are delicious. To receive a copy of this and other Heloise favorites, like Shrimp Dijon and Southwestern Veggie Rice, simply send $3 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (65 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Main Dishes, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 782795001. Make an extra batch of meatballs and freeze them in a lined egg carton. — Heloise PET PAL

Dear Readers: Pamela C. from Kihei, Hawaii, sent a photo of her two cats, Boudreaux (on the left) and Scarlett (on the right), watching birds eating birdseed on a windowsill. To see the cats and birds, just visit my website at www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” — Heloise COFFEE CAN

Dear Heloise: I took an empty coffee can, the kind with a plastic lid, spraypainted it and cut a hole in the lid. I use it to store grocery bags. I also have one that I store twine in. The hole in the lid makes it easy to pull the bags through the lid. It can be decorated to match any room. — Kim in Illinois What a cute idea! Readers, what about you? What do you use old coffee cans for? Write in and tell us your ideas. — Heloise ©2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.

Crossword


Sunday, October 21, 2012

sports@hpleader.com

2B

Leader&Times

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Hard to root for Carroll the rest of the way Liberal … ■ Continued from Page 1B

Many times after losing to a team, there is a tendency to support the victors in the playoffs. The adage goes that if you couldn’t beat a team, you want to say that you lost to the state champion. But it’s hard to root for Bishop Carroll., and it’s not because of their players or their kids. It’s hard to root for Bishop Carroll because of what happens around the team. For one, they pull the best players from a city of 400,000 people to compete against other schools, public schools, in Class 5A that do not get that advantage. Think how good Liberal would be if we pulled the best players from Hooker (Joe Bean ring a bell?), Beaver, Forgan, Hugoton, Tyrone and any other school in a 30mile radius. That’s still only about 50,000 people. But we don’t. We work within our district of 20,000 people playing against a team that pulls from 400,000. Why the Kansas State High School Activities Association continues to allow this disparity, I don’t know. Other states use weighting systems for private schools to make it fair, but not Kansas. Another issue involves some signs that came from Carroll’s PA announcer. Carroll was given an unsportsmanlike penalty after Liberal attempted a fake punt, and after quarterback Britton Abbott received the snap, the PA

announcer during the play said, “Fake punt.” With a 40 point-plus lead, Shuckman sent his Later in the game, with the outcome clear, starters out for several possessions and the PA announcer, with more than two minutes continued to go for it on fourth down. One still on the clock, announced, back-up quarterback played “With tonight’s win, Carroll will about three snaps before a third win the district and host a game. string quarterback saw limited We will be back here next week.” action. Everyone knew that the game During a decade of dominance was decided, but it’s somewhat by the Redskins over Carroll in classless that while there is still the 1990s, Liberal’s starters time on the clock and kids rarely saw the field in the fourth playing, some in their final game quarter. ever, that the PA announcer Several Carroll back-ups could couldn’t wait two minutes to easily started at other Wichita make the announcement when schools. There’s nothing wrong the game was actually over. with being a back-up if you get It was also odd that facing some action on Friday night. But fourth and 12 on their own 42 with a 40-point lead in the fourth yard line, with a sizable lead, that quarter, and you are still Carroll did not punt. You would watching, the thought has to go wonder why coach Alan through your head that perhaps Shuckman wouldn’t want to it would have been better to have EARL WATT practice the play to be prepared gone to another school where to face the top teams in Class 5A you could have played rather in the playoffs. The one punt Carroll did kick, than simply being content by wearing a late in the fourth quarter, was ugly. The snap uniform as a sideline spectator. looked like something you would see at a There is no question Carroll is a good team, middle school game, not from the highest rated but I won’t be rooting for them to go all the team in Kansas. way. I’d like to be able to do that, but I can’t. But finally, and perhaps the biggest reason it Their players are talented, an they have a lot of is hard to root for Carroll, is with 102 players them. But it is difficult to see what is on the roster, including 37 seniors, and none of happening around them that got them where the 102 freshmen, that Shuckman couldn’t find they are and respect it. They are winning, but I a way to play his reserves on offense before the have trouble believing that they are winning final four minutes of the game. with class.

4& GOAL th

before responding with a touchdown drive that started at the Liberal 25 yard line. The Redskins drove the length of the field in eight plays and ended with a nine-yard touchdown pass from Abbott to JJ Lewis. Carroll added one more score early in the second quarter but had a drive stall before half when the Redskin defense stuffed Carroll on a drive inside the Redskin 10 yard line with less than two minutes to play in the second quarter. The loss ended the Redskins’ season at 2-7, the same record as in 2011.

See Cliff’s Notes in Monday’s Leader & Times

Season-long slide continues for Beaver By JASON EPP Leader &Times The Beaver Dusters struggled to compete with one of District 1-A’s best teams, the Fairview Yellowjackets, losing 45-0 at home. Fairview threw four touchdown passes of 25 yards or longer and returned a punt 59 yards for a touchdown to build a comfortable 38-0 lead at the half and cruised in the second half. Beaver struggled to find any offense, gaining only 62 total yards on 43 plays. Fairview forced Beaver to punt eight times. The Dusters also lost the turnover battle, losing two of three fumbles, and throwing an interception on their only pass of the game. Fairview fumbled twice, losing one, and threw an interception. Fairview gained 273 total yards on 41 plays against the Dusters’ D. The Yellowjackets were 9-19 for 175 yards passing, and rushed 22 times for 98 yards. Both teams struggled with penalties; Beaver tallied six for 81 yards, while Fairview had seven for 85. Beaver gained eight first downs, to Fairview’s 15. Beaver falls to 0-9 overall, and 0-7 in district play. They finish their season at county rival Turpin, who is also winless.

B e a v e r ’ s He a t h T h o m a s c a r r i e s t h e f o o t b a l l F r id ay n i g h t a g ai n s t F ai r v i e w at Mc V a y S t ad ium in B ea v er . Herald-Democrat photo/Brent Lansden

ABBOTT CONSTRUCTION • Blueprints • Doors • Windows • Concrete • Roofing

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Proud Supporters of Area Athletics 1490 General Welch Blvd. Liberal, KS 67905 1-620-624-7433 . . . Customer Service 1-800-670-4381. . . . . . . . . . . Toll Free www.southernpioneer.net


news@hpleader.com

NEWS

Asian Super Buffet ALL YOU CAN EAT

Chinese Chinese •• Japanese Japanese •• American American •• BBQ BBQ Over Over 100 100 Items Items Daily Daily •• Party Party Room Room Available Available

HAPPENINGS

on the high plains

SLEIGH RIDE

CHRISTMAS ’70s style! P A R A DE

Christmas is groovy in Liberal! 3 P.M. - 6 P.M. SATURDAY, DEC. 1, 2012 DOWNTOW N LIBERAL Sign up (one entry per visit) at the business where you see the 2012 Christmas car, the El Camino, and make sure you’re at the Dec. 1 Christmas Parade when the winning name will be drawn. You must be in attendance to win the car. Here is the following schedule of where the car will be on display: Tues., Oct. 30 – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Good Samaritan Society Center Wed., Oct. 31 – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Aqua Shield in Hugoton Thurs., Nov. 1 – 1 to 5 p.m. Hunters Warehouse/Cottonwood Springs Taxidermy Fri., Nov. 2 – Spalon By Girlfriends Sat., Nov. 3 – Baker Arts Center Sun., Nov. 4 – Baker Arts Center

Reserve a spot in the Food Court for 2012 Christmas Parade entertainment

The Food Court will be open from 3 to 6 p.m. at Kansas Avenue and Third Street, across from the fountain, during the live entertainment prior to the 2012 Sleigh Ride Christmas Parade Saturday, Dec. 1. The parade starts at 6 p.m. from Light Park. The Food Court is open to non-profits, school and church organizations so they can raise funds for various causes, and to provide concessions to the public during the entertainment. Groups must provide their own electricty if needed, and spots are on a first-come, first-serve basis. To resserve a spot, call Larry Phillips at the Leader & Times at 6260840.

LIMITED SPACES AVAILABLE

First Church of the Nazarene hosting Hymn Sing today

First Church of the Nazarene, located at 2211 Zinnia Lane, is inviting the public to a Hymn Sing at 5 p.m. today. Selections will include singing from the congregation, solos, duets, readings and instrumental music.A time of fellowship will follow the service.

TODAY

OTLR seeking homeowners for its annual Holiday Home Tour set for Dec. 2 Original Town of Liberal Revitalization has announced its OTLR Holiday Home Tour has been scheduled for Sunday afternoon, Dec. 2, and is seeking eight to 10 homeowners to volunteer to show their home with holiday decor during the tour. Whether it’s decorated traditionally, electric or your own style of decorating, it’s a fun time of year to come together. OTLR invites you to show off your home for the 2012 Holiday Home Tour. The deadline to sign up is noon Monday. For more information, call Cheryl Louderback at 624-6069

SIGN UP BY NOON MONDAY

Family and friends walk out onto the tarmac at Liberal Airport Friday afternoon to greet Major Bryan Meek, a Liberal native, who flew into town to refuel his and his teammates F-16 fighter jets on their way to Colorado. L&T photo/Larry Phillips

F-16s ... O Continued from Page 1A

around the first of the year,” Sharon said. The team only spent a short time in Liberal in order to refuel and head to Colorado. “They’re going to fly a missing man formation at a ceremony at the Air Force Academy in Colorado,” Sharon said. “And then Saturday, they’re going to do the fly-over at the KU game.” Sharon went back to working with her cell phone as her brother, Jim Darnell, called to her to go out to meet her son and his nephew. “We’re sure glad to have him back,” she said with a big smile as they headed out onto the tarmac.

Pat Roberts, Garrett Love to attend campaign fundraiser in Liberal

U.S. Senator Pat Roberts will be the special guest in a fundraiser for him and Kansas State Senator Garrett Love from 5 to 6:30 p.m. today at the Rock Island Depot in Liberal. For a guest, the suggested donation will be $15 per person or $25 per couple. Organizers are also still seeking sponsors. Sponsorship levels are: Host Committee – $1,000, Platinum Sponsors – $500 and Gold Sponsors – $250. People can RSVP to Love’s wife, Caley, at (620) 846-0215 or caley.m.love@gmail.com.Tickets will also be available at the door.

TODAY

Local CHECK

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

802 802 E. E. Pancake Pancake Blvd. Blvd. Liberal, KS 67901 Mon-Sun Mon-Sun 11:00a.m. 11:00a.m. -- 10:00 10:00 p.m. p.m.

620-626-8888

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SUNDAY OCTOBER 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

CLASSIFIED

denasa@hpleader.com

Free to good home Siamese mix kittens, litter box trained, also outdoor calico cat 6 mos old. Call 620-655-8930

FIRST CARE HOME MEDICAL PATIENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN

First Care is looking for a Patient Service Technician to deliver and

service home medical equipment for patients using company vehicles. Duties may also include but not limited to maintenance work on equipment, filing paperwork in the office, teaching patients about the

Correction Officer Position The Ochiltree County Sheriff’s Office is accepting applications for Corrections Officer. Ochiltree County has an excellent employee benefits package including family health care, paid vacation, retirement, health club membership and longevity pay. Current salary range is from $2,784 - $3,119/Month. For more information contact: Sheriff Terry Bouchard, 21 SE 6th, Perryton, TX 79070, or email txsheriff@ptsi.net

Wheatridge Park Care Center is currently seeking a creative, engaging individual to enhance quality of life for elders living in our community as our full-time Life Enrichment Assistant.

equipment they are using. Candidate must possess a valid driver’s license and good MVR, good communication. Send resume or apply in person at First Care Home Medical, 111 E. Tucker Rd., Ste C, Liberal, KS. Leadership Opportunity Direct Support Manager MOSAIC, a growing not for profit organization that provides individualized services to people with disabilities, is now seeking a caring, dedicated Direct Support Manager who desires to make a difference in our community and the lives of others. Functions of the JobHire, train, supervise and schedule staff. Coordinate activities and appointments of individuals served, and maintain records. Bachelor’s degree preferred but previous Human Services and supervisory experience could be substituted.

Responsibilities: • Assisting the Life Enrichment Coordinator in providing Life Enrichment services to residents including assessments, goal setting, and facilitation of individualized interventions. Experience: • Previous experience working in long-term care or another health-care field preferred but not required. Wheatridge Park Care Center believes in our mission of “Dignity in Life.” We feel it is vitally important for our team members to radiate warmth and compassion while skillfully performing their duties. We would love to have you join our facility family.

Mosaic offers paid training and an excellent benefits package including tuition assistance and a free health coverage option. Starting salary $32,000 per year. Applicants must pass a drug screen, criminal background and motor vehicle check and have a valid driver’s license. Submit resume to: Human Resources 441 North Industrial Ave. P.O. Box 1871 Liberal,KS,67901 620-624-3817 Ext18 http://www.mosaicinfo .org/liberal/employment/ E.O.E

Our CNA’s make over $200 per shift!! We have multiple openings for all shifts. FT, PT, PRN. Must be responsible, caring, and a team player. Choose your own schedule. Contact First Call Medical Group today @ 785-945-3666.

Busy Dental Office seeking Bilingual Front Office Assistant. Ideal Candidate will possess excellent customer service skills, verbal and written communication skills, well organized, and a multi tasker. Must have outstanding computer skills. Previous experience working in a medical/Dental office is a plus. Mail Resume at: P.O. Box 946 Liberal, KS, 67901 Or Fax to 620-624-2474

Drivers - Regional. 3-4 days out. $1500 Sign-On! Bonuses & Full Benefits. 1-800-973-9161 or www.heyl.net. Heyl Truck Lines.

1501 S. Holly Drive Liberal, KS 67901 Ph. 620-624-0130 Fax 620-624-0144 EOE

Direct Support Associate

Looking for an opportunity to help others? Mosaic is seeking individuals looking for a career helping and teaching adults with intellectual disabilities. Mosaic offers competitive wages with possible increases within 6 months, paid training, paid time off, free health insurance and tuition assistance available. No experience necessary. We will train you! Must have high school diploma/GED, valid driver’s license, and pass drug screen and background checks. Full time, part time and on-call positions available. For more information, contact Human Resources at (620) 624-3817 ext. 18 or e-mail davidjasper@mosaic info.org or apply in person at: 441 N. Industrial Ave. Liberal, KS 67901 E.O.E. http://www.mosaicinfo.org / liberal/employment/

New Construction project located at DCP National Helium Plant, Liberal Kansas. We are currently accepting applications for the following: Document control/Time Keeper All civil crafts: Surveyors, Form Carpenters, Rod Busters, Cement Finishers, Equipment Operators, Inventory Control, Tool Room Attendants, Labors...

High Plains Leader&Times Please send/email resume to TGarrett@Azotaltd.com Houston fax 281-7684370 Houston phone 281-7684310 DPC Midstream National Helium Plant C/O Larry Cordes @ Azota Ltd. 12260 Road R Liberal,KS,67901 620-626-5181

Stevens County Healthcare is searching for a Part-Time Home Aide to work Monday through Friday (five hours each day). Interested candidates must have a Kansas Home Health Aide license. We are looking for an individual who is sufficient and very knowledgeable with computers. Applications may be picked up at the Information Desk located by the Medical Clinic. For questions you may contact Human Resources (620)544-8511

Stevens County Healthcare is searching for a Full time, Part-time, and PRN, RNs, or LPNs to work on the Med/Surg floor. Theses positions are for night shift (7pm-7am). All candidates must have a Kansas RN/LPN license to be eligible. We are also searching for PRN CNAs to work as needed. All Candidates must have a Kansas CNA licence to be eligible. We offer

Classified

outstanding benefits, competitive wages, signon bonus for Full-time and Part-time RNs/LPNs, and mileage reimbursement to RNs or LPNs that live 15 miles or more outside of Stevens County. Please contact Human Resources with any questions or pick up an application form the information Desk located by the Medical Clinic (620)5448511

Education

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-220-3977 www.CenturaOnline.com

“Can You Dig It?” Heavy Equipment School. 3 wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. 866-362-6497

Real Estate

Apartments for Rent Apartments for rent, All bills paid including, Free cable, Special on Security deposit. 620-629-5604.

3 Bedroom apartment $695.00 you pay Gas and Electric. 620-629-5604.

LAND AUCTION HARPER COUNTY LAND WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH 10:00 A.M. AUCTION LOCATION: ROSSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT Land Location: North of Laverne at intersection of Hwy 283 & 64 go 4 miles north on NS176 and 1 mile east on EW10 to the land or from Rosston go 2 miles east on Hwy 283 then 4 miles north and 1 mile east. Tract #1: S/2 of SE/4 and NW/4 of SE/4 of Sec. 27 T28N R25WIM. 120 acres m/l. Tract #2: SW/4 of Sec. 26 T28N R25WIM. 160 acres m/l.

1102 Oklahoma Ave. Woodward, OK 73801 580-254-3975 Are you looking for an exciting new career, one that is rewarding?! Are you dependable, hardworking and a team player?! Well, look no further, Wheatridge Park Care Center is looking for you. We are a premier nursing facility that is part of a premier company. Currently the following positions are available:

RN CNA/CMA

1501 S. Holly Drive Liberal, KS 67901 Ph. 620-624-0130 Fax 620-624-0144 EOE

UPCOMING SHORES AUCTIONS GLEN PIERCE & OTHERS NOV 10 - 10AM FROM GUYMON, OK. MEW ON HWY 16 MI TO M17M S 3 MI, 1 MI W, CURVE TO S.

TRIPLE S LAND LLC & OTHERS NOV 17 -9AM

FROM KEYES, OK.: S ON 171 16 MI THEN E 2 MI ON DIRT ROAD. FROM STRATFORD, TX.: NW ON 287 TO JCT 171, 5N ON 171, E 2 MI ON DIRT ROAD

Going Once... Going Twice... Sold!

SHORES AUCTION

WORTH JEFFUS, LEWIS MAYER, VIRGIL HIGGINS ESTATE & OTHERS OCT 27 - 9AM FROM GUYMON, OK. 2 1/2 MI. E ON HWY 412, NORTH SIDE Farm & Hay Equipment, Irrigation, Shop, Tanks, Tractor & Industrial, Truck & Pickups, Trailer, Cattle Equip., Gun & Ammo

CARL DOUGHERTY ESTATE & OTHERS NOV. 3 - 10 AM FROM GUYMON, OK; 31 MI NW ON 64 HWY, TO MM4, 21/2S. FROM ELKHART, KS: S ON 95 TO JCT GW, 3 W TO MM4, 21/2S, FROM BOISE CITY: 35 MIE ON 64 HWY TO MM4, 21/2S. Farm Equip., Pickup, Truck, Car, Tractors, Cattle, Antiques, Trailers Check Websites for Updates www.globalauctionguide.com or www.shoresauction.com

Auctioneer Terry Shores License #10092 Goodwell, OK 806-339-3490

GATLIN AUCTION

PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION OCT. 27- 9:30AM HOOKER, OK. FROM NW CORNER OF TOWN AT HIGH SCHOOL-1MI. W, 13/4 MI N. 2011 MX5100 Kubota Tractor, JD 4020, JD 721 Loader, 1974 Ford 4000 Tractor, Polaris Ranger Mule ATV, VIP Decliner boat, 1972 Toyota Land Cruiser, 2 Cheyv Pickups, Trailers, farm equipment, mowers, tools, shope equipment, guns ammo, furniture and appliacnes, Pool table Sellers: Jeff & Rohnda Parker

DUCKS UNLIMITED BANQUET NOV. 3 - 6PM OPEN 7PM DINNER 8PM AUCTION AG BLDG. LIBERAL, KS.

Ticket Info - Mike Aichele 620-629-0884; Jerry Bennett 620-655-2786; Chris Ford 620-629-3115; Jeff Mitchell 620-626-4322; Greg Bird 620-624-1612

Gatlin Auction Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 719-252-3758 www.gatlinauction.com

SPICER AUCTION REAL ESTATE FARM MACH & EQUIP. AUCTION OCT. 27 - 10:30AM BOISE CITY, OK. REAL ESTATE SELLS @ 1:30PM

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPURTUNITY: SEWARD COUNTY DISTRICT COURT IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR A TRIAL COURT CLERK POSITION. COMPUTER SKILLS A MUST. GRADUATION FROM HIGH SCHOOL OR EQUIVALENT. APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE AT SEWARD COUNTY DISTRICT COURT, 415 N. WASHINGTON, SUITE 103, LIBERAL, KANSAS OR ONLINE AT KSCOURTS.ORG. THE KANSAS JUDICIAL BRANCH IS AN EEO/AA EMPLOYER.

LIBERAL KENWORTH LIBERAL, KS

Liberal Kenworth of Liberal, KS is currently seeking to fill the following positions

3 Bdrm. home w/1 bath. Address: 501 NW 5th St., Boise City, OK. JD 4630 tract.; CIH 1680 comb., CIH 8465T rnd. blr.; Chevy 50 tdm. truck; Grain bin on legs., approx. 500 bu.

ASSISTANT SERVICE CLERK

PHESANT HEAVEN CHARITIES NOV 9 - 5PM DINNER AUCTION 7PM GREAT PLAINS GAS COMPRESSOR BLDG 210 E. 1ST, HUGOTON KS. For more information Contact Brad Musgrove 620-428-1099

COMBINED ESTATES AUCTION 2 DAYS NOV 10, 11 9:30AM BOTH DAYS Spicer Auction & Realty, AG BUILDING, SEWARD LLC COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Sam Spicer Auctioneer & LIBERAL, KS. Real Estate Broker Outstanding Henridon items, 620-886-5307 Beds, Dining tables, Chairs, www.kiowanews.com Bar Stools, Baby grand

HEGLIN AUCTION

ESTAT AUCTION NOV 3 - 10AM GATE SCHOOL, GATE, OK Following is a small list of items we will be selling ‘02 Ford Taurus SE; Round Gale buggy; Riding Lawn mowers; Furniture’ Appliances; Numerious Antiques; For pictures & complet list go to www.heglinauctions.com Sellers: Different Estates & Buffalo School

Heglin Auction 580-934-2005 Robert Heglin - Auctioneer

piano, Grandfather clock, Furniture, household items, antiques, collectibles, PLUS MORE! Sellers: Wallace Martens Estate, Jamie Howell, Linda Sager & Others.

BAKER ARTS NIGHT OF LIGHTS MIDNIGHT IN PARIS NOV 17 DINNER 7PM AUCTION 7:45PM AG BLDG. LIBERAL KS.

For more information Baker Arts Center 620-624-2810

Gatlin Auction Mike Gatlin, Auctioneer 719-252-3758 www.gatlinauction.com

Roomy, furnished, 1 bedroom apartment; CH/CA; water paid. NO PETS!!! Rent $400; deposit $300. Call 620-624-9799. 1-2-3 bdrm low-income apts available. No pets. Pick up application at Westkan Apts. 104 Harold Blvd, Liberal, KS.

E.H.O..

Mobile Homes for Rent Located outside of Kismet, 2 bedroom, mobile home $450 monthly, $350 deposit, $100 per pet deposit, tenant pays electricity/propane. Serious inquires only. Call 620-624-5607 M-F 9am-5pm

1,2, & 3 bedroom houses for rent in Kismet, Plains, & Meade Call 620-4825175

Must possess own tools, be familiar with Class 8 semi-trucks, possess good decision making skills, diesel engine experience and CDL a plus.

GATLIN AUCTION

SENIORS 55 AND BETTERBeautiful 1 bedroom apartments now available. $100.00 OFF FIRST MONTHS RENT. All kitchen appliances, & washer /dryer furnished, maintenance free living, scheduled activities. INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. Call 620626-5756 or visit our website at www.liveatcottages.com

Houses for Rent

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1 bedroom apartment; all utilities paid. Stove, refrigerator,washer & dryer $650 plus security deposit. NO PETS!! Call 620-624-3444

Duties to include but not limited to anwsering phones, filing and assisting the service manager and service clerk in the everyday operations of the service department. Must have computer experience, good communication skills, and the ability to work in a fast-paced environment. Liberal Kenworth offers health and dental insurance, paid vacation, and 401K program.

Interested applicants can drop of resumes at 342 S Country Estates Rd in Liberal, or mail to PO Box 1851. You may also call Joe or Stacie at 620-624-2500.

Exceptionally nice homes & apartments in Liberal / $375-$1,000 / Tenant pays utilities. / Call 620624-2226 or 580-7783840.

Houses for Sale HOME FOR SALE

124 W. COOLIDGE Ranch Style Home, 2 BDRM, 1 BATH, Full Basement, Privacy Fenced Backyard, Asking Price $79,999. To schedule appt to look at the home call 580-854-6582..

Commercial Property

COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE. 1,100 square ft. 11 West 5th Street, Liberal, KS. Tenant pays gas & electric. (620)624-5599.

Automotive

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Merchandise

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Misc Merchandise


Sunday, October 28, 2012

3B

Leader&Times

sports@hpleader.com

Balko Bison give Forgan Bulldogs a stiff

CHALLENGE F o r g a n ’ s T r e v i n L o p e z ( 2 1 ) r u n s t h r o u g h a n a t t e m p t e d t a c k l e F r i d a y n i g h t a g a n s t B a l k o . T h e t h i r d - r a n k e d F o r g a n B u l l d o gs o u t l a s t e d a t oug h c ha ll eng e by t he B al ko Bi so n fo r a 58- 34 w in. L&T photo/Chris Linenbroker

Forgan outlasts Balko in Beaver County battle By JASON EPP • Leader & Times

F o r g a n ’ s J a k e R e g i e r m ak e s a t o u ch d o w n ca t ch w i t h Ba l k o ’ s W y a t t C a sp e r t r y in g t o i n t e r c e p t F r id a y in B a lk o . T h e B u ll d o g s w e r e a b l e t o o ut la st the Bi so n, 5 8-34 . L&T photo/Chris Linenbroker

The third-ranked Forgan Bulldogs stayed undefeated, and clinched a district championship Friday night, but not without a fight from county rival Balko. Forgan's offense helped the Bulldogs keep the lead in a 58-34 win over the Bison. "We should be happy tonight; we won the district," Bulldogs coach Billy Nichols said. "But we gave up so many big plays. Our ends got hooked too many times tonight. I wonder if we over thought some things defensively. They were good, that was a big part of it." Forgan's offense racked up 532 yards of offense on 40 plays, but gave up 362 yards to Balko, who controlled the time of possession by running 64 plays. Trevin Lopez (nine carries for 98 yards and three touchdowns) got the Bulldogs stared with a 12 yard touchdown run less than three minutes into the game. Balko's Casper answered back with a 75 yard touchdown run to knot the game at 6-all. Forgan put some distance

between them and Balko with three rushing touchdowns. Dalton Lemieux (15 carries for 228 yards and 2 TDs) scored on runs of 13 and 87, and Chandler Bryer (6 carries for 73 yards and 2 TDs) scored from 30 yards out to put the Bulldogs up 26-6. But Balko's Casper snuck in the endzone from one-yard out with 16 seconds left in the half to cut the lead to 26-12. Lopez opened the second half with a 44-yard TD run on Forgan's opening drive of the second half. Casper again answered for the Bison, making the score 34-20 with 5:44 left in the third. Jake Regier (4 catches, 94 yards) got six of those points back on the ensuing kickoff, returning it 82 yards for the touchdown. Lemieux (6-9, 126 yards passing) then scored on a 61-yard run to put Forgan up 46-20. It was Casper for the fourth time, this time from 55 yards out keeping the Bison within striking distance at, 46-28. Lopez and Bryer each scored again in the fourth quarter, Lopez from 12 yards out, Bryer from 40 to put the 'Dogs up by 30 with 4:31 left, 58-28.

Casper found the endzone for a fifth time on a three-yard run in the game's final minute. Casper finished the game with 206 yards on 20 carries and 5 TDs. Forgan is now 8-0 overall and 60 in district play. They will host

winless Goodwell Friday to finish out the regular season. Balko is now 6-3 overall and 5-2 in district play. They will host Tyrone in a critical district match to determine playoff seedings, and to guarantee a place in the playoffs.

Mistakes costly for Cardinals in 25-6 loss By JASON EPP Leader & Times The Turpin Cardinals watched as another chance at victory slipped through their fingers, as the Mooreland Bearcats returned two interceptions for touchdowns in a 25-6 win over the Cardinals. "I thought we played hard, just mistakes got us again," Cardinals coach Mario Mendoza said. Turpin was within one score of the Bearcats until Mooreland scored with 1:44 left in the game to make it 19-6. The final score came

when the Bearcats returned their second interception for a TD on the game's final play. Mooreland took the early lead,

and then returned an interception for a touchdown on the ensuing drive to go up 13-0. Turpin's Willy Enriquez scored from 10 yards out to cut the lead in half at the half. The Turpin defense was stout when their backs were against the endzone, turning the Bearcats away three separate times they got inside the five-yard line. The Cardinals also stopped Mooreland twice on fourth-and-short. Two other times Turpin looked to get the ball back, but mistakes kept the ball in the hands of the Bearcats. Turpin committed a

roughing the punter on fourth and nine than extended their drive. Then with seven minutes left, and Mooreland clinging to a 7-point lead, Turpin was set to get the ball back. But instead an offsides penalty helped continue the drive. Turpin is now 0-9 overall and 0-6 in district play. They will face off Friday against county rival Beaver with both teams looking to finish the season with a win. "We're hoping we can continue building and put everything together for Beaver, "Mendoza said.

Member FDIC

130 S. Douglas Ave. Beaver, Oklahoma (580) 625-4511

10 E. Tucker Rd. Liberal, KS (620) 624-0707

Hill and Main Turpin, Oklahoma (580) 778-3444

www.bankofbeaver.com


4C

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

news@hpleader.com

Back From the Grave Cake Makes about 12 servings 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 1-1/4 cups granulated sugar 3 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 3/4 cups sweetened applesauce 1-1/4 cups diced Granny Smith apple (about 1 medium apple) 1 can (16 ounces) White Decorator Icing

B

Back From the Grave Cake and Spooky Pop Cupcakes

Preheat oven to 325°F. Prepare 3D Skeleton Casket pan with vegetable pan spray. In medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt; set aside. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, and vanilla; mix well. Alternately add flour mixture and applesauce to butter mixture. Spread about 1/2 of cake batter so that it reaches the first horizontal line inside the pan. Sprinkle diced apples evenly over batter. Top with remaining batter, smoothing out the top. Bake 58 to 62 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. Cool 15 minutes; remove from pan and cool completely on cooling grid. Decorate cooled cake with tip 5 and decorator icing.

Spooky Pop Cupcakes

Each cupcake serves 1 Graveyard Cupcake Decorating Set, Spooky Pop Cupcake Combo Pack or solid color baking cups Favorite cupcake recipe or mix 1 can (16 ounces) White Decorator Icing Orange, Green or other desired Icing Color 1 can (16 ounces) Chocolate Decorator Icing Preheat oven to 350°F. Line cavities of standard muffin pan with baking cups. Bake your favorite cupcakes in prepared pan. Cool completely. Place some cupcakes in Skeleton Cupcake Wraps. Tint white decorator icing with icing color. Use a spatula to ice smooth or pipe tip 1M icing swirls on cupcake top. Insert icing decorations or pix from decorating set and combo pack.

FAMILY FEATURES

e the ghostess with the mostess this Halloween, and throw a wickedly wonderful celebration. The entertaining experts from the Wilton Test Kitchen know all the tricks and offer plenty of treats for hosting a bone-chilling blast that will have friends and family shrieking with delight. Start by scaring up some fun with an array of graveyard goodies. Tombstone and monster-shaped sandwich cookies paired with ghostly graveyard cookies set an eerie scene. Add fang-tastic monster-faced popcorn balls, and a parade of monster pretzels — a breeze to make using a Halloween Candy Kit. Pour melted candy into monster molds, insert pretzel rods and refrigerate until set. They are the perfect hand-held treats for kids and look great on display. There’s no bones about it, a spooktacular skeleton cake will make for a boo-tiful Halloween centerpiece. Using a skeleton casket pan makes this impressive dessert — filled with fall flavors like cinnamon and apples — easy to achieve. Simply decorate with icing and watch as your skeleton comes back from the grave. For added fright, surround the coffin with Spooky Pop Cupcakes — swirled with brightly-colored icing and things that go bump in the night. Just be sure to pair sweets with a be“witch”ing beverage and you’ll be caught in a web of friends all evening long. All of these and other terrifyingly-terrific project ideas, supplies and more are available at www.wilton.com.

Monsters on Parade Pretzels

Each pretzel serves 1 Halloween Candy Kit for Pretzels Pretzel Rods Melt Candy Melts candy following package instructions. Mold pretzels following package instructions. Refrigerate until set, about 15 minutes. Remove from mold.

Ghostly Graveyard Cookies

Each cookie serves 1 Roll-out cookie dough (recipe available at wilton.com) Buttercream Icing (recipe available at wilton.com) Leaf Green, Black and Brown Icing Colors Prepare and roll out cookie dough following recipe instructions. Cut cookies using the Graveyard Cookie Cutter Set. Bake and cool. Using icing colors, tint buttercream. Ice all cookies using a spatula. Pipe the outline of the tree with tip #22 brown buttercream icing. Tint coconut flakes green using icing color; sprinkle over base cookie. Attach all cookies to base cookies with icing.

Popcorn Ball Monsters, Monsters on Parade Pretzels, Peanut Butter 3D Sandwich Cookies, and Ghostly Graveyard Cookies

Popcorn Ball Monsters

Each serves 1 1 jar (about 7 ounces) marshmallow crème Violet and Orange Icing colors 4 cups popped popcorn, divided White Candy Melts Candy, melted following package instructions Large Candy Eyeballs Animal and People Faces Sprinkle Sets, candy corn, Jumbo Confetti Sprinkles Green and Black Candy Strings

Spray Dimensions Multi-Cavity Mini Pumpkin Pan cavities with vegetable pan spray. In large microwave-safe bowl, microwave marshmallow crème 1 minute at 50% power. Remove bowl from microwave and divide marshmallow crème in half; stir icing color into each half (tint slightly darker than how you want your finished treat to look). Stir 2 cups popped popcorn into each marshmallow mixture mixing until evenly coated. Press popcorn treat mixture in bottom cavities only of pumpkin pan to 1 1/2 in. deep; reserve some unmolded popcorn. Let set; unmold. Attach 2 popcorn ball halves together on one edge, using unmolded popcorn to prop opposite edge open. Using melted candy, attach Candy Eyeballs and sprinkles and candy corn teeth, and Jumbo Confetti nose. Attach candy strings for hair.

Peanut Butter 3D Sandwich Cookies Makes about 1 dozen sandwich cookies 3/4 cup solid vegetable shortening 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter 1/2 cup firmly-packed light brown sugar 1/3 cup granulated sugar 1 egg 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour Buttercream Icing Kelly Green, Orange Icing Color

Preheat oven to 325°F. Spray 3D Sandwich Pan with vegetable pan spray. In large bowl, beat shortening and peanut butter with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add brown sugar and granulated sugar; mix well. Add egg and vanilla, mixing until smooth. Add flour; mix well. Press dough into pan cavities, filling 2/3 full. Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove from pan to cooling grid; cool completely. Meanwhile, tint portions of icing green and orange. To assemble cookies, spread icing on half of the cookies; sandwich with second cookie. Pipe details with icing.


Sunday, October 28, 2012

sports@hpleader.com

Leader&Times

4B

206 E. Indiana Plains, KS 620-563-7269

620-563-7269 Plains • 620-563-7340 Kismet 620-626-4539 Liberal • 620-563-9261 Hobart 806-624-2311 Darrouzett, TX

Heartbreaker in Tyrone — Bobcats fall in final seconds L E F T : Bu f f al o p l ay e r s ce l e b r at e i n th e b a c k g r o u n d a f t e r t h e f i n a l t ac k l e , w h il e T y r o n e ' s C o le W a l l l ay s o n t h e g r ou n d . B u f fa lo sc o r e d t h e w i n n i n g t o u c h d ow n w i t h 2 .9 s e c on d s le ft in t h e g a me .

By JASON EPP • Leader &Times Two first half fumbles inside Buffalo's five-yard line proved to be costly Friday night in a game with major playoff consequences. Buffalo's David Oden nosed across the goaline for the winning score with just 2.9 seconds left to hand Tyrone a heartbreaking 52-48 loss. "It's tough," Bobcat coach Josh Bell said. "Coming into this game I knew they had nothing to lose. Our kids played hard and laid it all on the line. We helped because we couldn't hold onto the ball at times." It looked like Tyrone had overcome their turnover troubles when Cole Wall hit Austin Olivas on fourth and six at their own 20 for a 60-yard touchdown. The play helped Tyrone take a 48-46 lead with just 50.3 seconds left. The Bobcats overcame double-digit deficits three times to finally take back the lead. Buffalo returned the squib-kick to their 33-yard line. After two incomplete passes, Bison quarterback Kyle Hash hit running back Kyle Baggs on back-to-back screen plays that got the ball down to the one. Buffalo quickly lined up and spiked the ball with 9.3 seconds left because they were out of timeouts. Buffalo gambled with a running play, but made it pay off as David Oden scored the winning TD with 2.9 seconds left. Tyrone had taken the early lead when Cole Wall hit Payson Slater for a 22-yard touchdown pass on the Bobcats opening drive to lead, 8-0. Buffalo answered quickly, but missed on the conversion, leaving the Bobcats in the lead, 8-6. Buffalo took over at their own two-yard line on the next two drives, both after first and goal fumbles by Tyrone. The Bison were able to capitalize on the Bobcats mistakes building a 22-6 lead. But Tyrone surged back into the game at the end of the first half. Tyrone took over with 1:10 left in the half. Wall found Slater for a 21yard gain and then Olivas for 10 to give the Bobcats a first down at the Bison 17. After three straight incompletions, Tyrone faced fourth and 10. Wall threw a short pass to Olivas who pitched it to Ethan Reece who

B E L O W : T y r o n e ' s Et h a n R e e c e s t i f f ar m s a Bu f f al o d e f e n d e r t r y i n g t o g e t o u ts i d e o n a r u n . L&T photos/Jason Epp

took it the distance for the touchdown with 16.3 seconds left

in the half. Reece also ran in the two-point conversion, closing the

gap to just six. Buffalo then fumbled the ensuing kickoff and Tyrone recovered at the Bison 21s with 8.8 seconds left. On first down, Buffalo was called for pass interference, which put the Bobcats at the 10 yard line with just 4.8 seconds left. Wall took the snap and handed it to a streaking Olivas who threw to Slater for the touchdown with the clock showing 0.0. The teams went to halftime knotted at 22. "The way we surged at the end of the half and came back at the end shows the character of our kids," Bell said. Tyrone came out on fire, going 68 yards in just seven plays to retake the lead for the first time since the first quarter, 30-22. Buffalo answered right back, scoring 30 seconds later. The twopoint conversion failed, leaving the Bobcats in the lead 30-22. Tyrone's next possession was an odd one. Another big catch by Slater appeared to have Tyrone back in Bison territory on the first play. But a block in the back

penalty erased it. On third and five, Slater was called for offensive pass interference which should have made it third and 20. For some unknown reason Tyrone was also assessed a loss of down, and turned the ball over at their own 24. "What's frustrating about that is that they had it third down until we broke the huddle and then said it was fourth down," Bell said. "We would have punted in that situation." Buffalo took advantage and retook the lead.

Wall made a great kick return, but ended it with a costly mistake, fumbling it, which Buffalo recovered at their 31.Three plays later; Buffalo pushed the lead to ten, 40-30. Tyrone answered right back with seven straight run plays for 58 yards with Reece finishing the drive with a one-yard plunge. Buffalo again put the lead at ten, before Tyrone scored twice to surge back ahead, until those last few seconds. "They were fortunate to sneak one in on us at the end to get the win," Bell said. "Our season is not over. We go to Balko and we will be in the same situation they were in tonight. Win and you are in. I'm proud of my kids. They played for this community tonight, and they should be proud of that." Tyrone (6-3, 4-3) travels to Balko (6-3, 5-2) Friday where they face a must win situation to make the playoffs.

Broncs buck Mustangs, 65-0 By JASON EPP Leader &Times Five Southwestern Heights’ turnovers made what would have been a tough matchup even tougher as Lakin steamrolled over the Mustangs, 65-0. “We moved the ball a little, but turnovers killed us,” Mustangs coach Matt Scripsick said. “We couldn’t stop them when we were on defense; they were too powerful on offense.” Lakin’s powerful offense racked up 553 yards of offense on just 54 plays (10.2 yards per play), including 470 yards rushing. The Broncs’ backfield had three players rush for over 100 yards, and as a team scored nine rushing touchdowns. Meanwhile, Heights was held to just 162

yards of offense, 89 on the ground and 73 through the air. Mustang quarterback Ben Johnsrud was held to just 4 of 13 passing, and threw two interceptions. He was also more than held in check in the running game, carrying the ball five times for just 15 yards. Lakin wasted little time, and built a 21-0 lead

Lana M. Miller

401 Grand Ave. Plains, Ks. 67869 lm@lanamillercpa.com 620-563-7261 Fax: 620-563-9212 1-800-974-2034 Certified Public Accountant

in the first quarter. They added another 27 in the second to take a commanding 48-0 lead at half. Efrain Chaves was the Mustangs leading ground-gainer, carrying the ball seven times for 58 yards. Trevor Lee caught two passes for 52 yards, and Brandon Kinser caught two for 21 yards, Defensively, Johnsrud was Heights’ leading tackler with 11. Rogelio Martinez finished with 10.5. Heights’ season ends with a 0-3-district record, a 1-6 record in the Hi-Plains League, and a 1-8 overall record. “We have a great bunch of kids,” Scripsick said. “We just need to work (in the off-season) on a lot of little things, and our tenacity towards playing football so we can turn things around.”

Over 100 Years of Trusted Service Mon-Thurs 8am to 4pm • Fri 8am to 6pm Sat 8am to noon

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Go Mustangs! Have a GREAT SEASON!!

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Have a great season Mustangs! East Hwy. 54 Plains, KS 67869

100 West Greensboro, Plains, KS 67869

620-563-9382


4A

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

“Interestingly, from an identity standpoint, what does it mean to have a disability? Pamela Anderson has more prosthetic in her body than I do and nobody calls her disabled.”

EDITORIAL Opinion

AIMEE MULLINS,TED CONFERENCE, HOW MY LEGS GIVE ME SIPER-POWERS, FEB. 2009

EARL WATT President and Publisher

LEADER &T IMES

LARRY PHILLIPS

JASON EPP

Managing Editor

General Manager

MEMBER The Associated Press and Kansas Press Association

FOUNDED 1886

Obama border patrol: National security on the cheap The leadership at the National Border Patrol Council – the Border agents’ collectivebargaining organization –continue to complain about their members being stuck with outdated equipment.

Homeland Security Wire. President Barack Secretary of Homeland Security Obama’s and Homeland Janet Napolitano’s office announced that the Obama administration Security Secretary Janet canceled the ‘Virtual Fence’ project Napolitano’s plan to along the U.S.-Mexico border. provide new equipment The reason for this latest and technology for the U.S. cancellation is the continued technical equipment problems and the rising Border Patrol remains on costs of constructing and installing the the back-burner with the components including closed-circuit TV cameras and monitors, electronic budgeted money being detectors, and other security used to implement the measures. As reported by in the past by Law administration’s de facto Enforcement the original Amnesty program for over border securityExaminer, plan called for a fence a million illegal aliens, and barriers to be used on parts of the U.S.’s southern border, but with the according to Homeland Democrats Security controlling both G U E S T C O L U M N houses of Newswire on Congress and the Tuesday. Bush

The leadership at the National Border Patrol Council – the Border agents’ collective-bargaining organization –continue to complain about their members being stuck with outdated equipment. For example, the alarm sensors now in use were originally said to be able to put Border Patrol agents in position to capture 90 percent of border invaders, but the Department of Homeland Security’s own inspector general reported that a mere 4 percent of the alarms were confirmed cases of smugglers and border crossers, while 34 percent were false, or nuisance, alarms and 62 percent were undetermined. For example, on Oct. 2, 2012, a false alarm from a ground sensor sent U.S. Border Patrol agents to a remote canyon in Arizona shortly after midnight. For some unknown reason agents opened fire on one another which left one agent dead and another seriously wounded. According to the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the purchases have been postponed for a number of reasons including faulty installation and oversight in the acquisitions. In November 2011, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) determined that Customs and Border Protection technology experts did not determine why specific technologies were necessary under the plan and whether these technologies would be successful, prompting officials to rewrite requirements for the program. “Newer sensors use seismometers, metal detectors, microphones, and infrared cameras that can determine the difference between animals, humans, and vehicles. These sensors are currently used by the military in Afghanistan, but are not being used by Border Patrol agents,” states the

Administration being weak on border security, the plan switched from a real fence to a virtual fence using high-tech equipment. Unfortunately, the Department of Homeland Security’s latest failure to protect the United State, was a costly program to place crucial electronic surveillance systems along the U.S.-Mexico border that is years behind schedule. The security project is grossly over budget because Secretary Janet Napolitano’s agency hasn’t adequately managed the contractor doing the work, according to a Washington, DC watchdog group, Judicial Watch. As a result, hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars will be wasted and the porous southern border will continue to be vulnerable despite the Obama Administration’s assurances that it’s as secure as it’s ever been. So far the troubled project, known as Secure Border Initiative Network, has cost the government $672 million although it’s nowhere near completion, according to Judicial Watch, a publicinterest group that investigates political corruption. The initiative to erect barriers – both electronic and physical – along the U.S. Mexico border has been plagued with a multitude of problems since it was implemented under the George W. Bush Administration. After funding issues got largely settled, some border mayors in Texas blocked the feds from conducting fence work on city property. Jim Kouri, CPP, the fifth Vice President and Public Information Officer of the National Association of Chiefs of Police, has served on the National Drug Task Force and trained police and security officers throughout the country.

Jim Kouri

Listening beats divisiveness even on Election Day jagged inked letters, about what those bad guys were As voting season opens, I can’t help up to. I expect if I reread it all now, I’d be horrified at missing my Grandpa Seth, the most the name-calling; even the memory makes me wince. patriotic man I ever knew. Strangely, I As a child, though, I found Grandpa’s emphatic views uninhibited and hilarious. People in my world didn’t miss him in spite of — not because of — his political opinions, which were pointed, speak their mind that forcefully. Children today don’t have that problem. The culture passionate and unapologetic. Grandpa is saturated with what text-messagers and Facebook loved America in the way that only posters like to dismiss as “TMI,” that is, “Too Much Information.” In addition to bits of random and immigrants can, with a direct, personal unwelcome knowledge, like details about other peoples’ sense of loyalty and affection. If it wasn’t digestive condition and wardrobe malfunctions, we also for America, I think he reasoned, his have what I call “TFM” or “Too Few Manners.” Nowhere is this more present life would have G R A V I T Y evident that in the last run-up to been very different. In the General Election, as normally & S TA R S that, I believe he was civil and decent people engage in correct. no-holds-barred character Grandpa Seth grew up in colonial India, where the Hindu caste system and the British class system combined to lock everyone firmly into a precise social order. As an Anglo-Indian child of mixed blood going back at least two generations, my grandfather and his people belonged in a particular, in-between place, navigating between the “natives” and their colonial masters, the British. His mother worked as a house mother for one of the many European boarding schools favored by the foreign diplomats and military types. His father died in an accident on a tiger hunt. You can’t make this stuff up, though my Grandpa was fond of dramatic tales and two-line poems. When India gained Independence in 1947, the country experienced tremendous turmoil. Opposing groups of Hindu and Muslim people jockeyed for control of the country. As happened all across Africa and much of Asia, the European colonial governments that had reluctantly acknowledged it was time to go home didn’t exert much effort in crafting a peaceful and sane transition. Riots broke out. People killed, stole, fled, despaired. When the dust settled on the new, as-yet-unknown new borders and the wounds inflicted by fear and misunderstanding healed, as they surely would, the fate of Anglo-Indians was unlikely to be pleasant. For centuries, they’d served as the go-betweens. Now, no one needed them. All bets were off, and the rule book had been discarded. My grandfather made his plan to emigrate. The United States seemed the best choice to him. Though all Commonwealth countries offered Anglo-Indians the option to move to a culture they, presumably, might find familiar, my grandfather was not interested in replicating his lesser-than-the-pureblood-British role in life. America, he had the notion, would give him a fair shot at equality, prosperity, stability. In 1954 — seven years after he’d applied for a visa — Grandpa departed for the United States, my oldest uncle at his side. Months later, after a senator from Illiniois intervened, my grandmother and her twin sons — one of whom would become my father — followed. Grandpa, as I knew him decades later, was more than an ardent Republican; he was nearly rabid in his support for the party. Handwritten correspondence we received often referred to “Demo-rats” and worried, in

assassination. No wonder supporters of President Obama feel he is the recipient of racially discriminating remarks. When you are consumed with fear and anger, it’s easy to cross the line and let slip a remark that dehumanizes the person you dislike. No wonder supporters of Governor Romney feel he is the butt of religiously intolerant jokes; for the last five years, people have become accustomed to hearing sarcastic jibes about Ramadan in the White House, so it’s no big deal to substitute the Mormons for the Muslims. And, as far as I can tell, nearly everyone feels comfortable vilifying various groups on account of their economic status: some pick on the Evil One Percent, while others write off the Shiftless 47. As tends to be the case with stereotypes, neither label serves any useful purpose. I can’t help but wonder what my grandfather would think of it all. No doubt, he’d want to stand by his beloved Republicans. But I wonder if the sound of angry Americans uttering threats and warnings might sound, to him, a bit too much like the sound of the rioting mobs he was sent to subdue when he headed to Calcutta in ’47. As part of the British Home Guard, he was expected to keep order while India suffered the birth pangs of Independence in the form of riots and sectarian violence. Grandpa did his duty, and came home with the medals to show it. But he never liked to talk about what he saw there, how people behaved, what it required of him. The very people who’d clamored for freedom — the common people of India — now focussed the anger that was the legacy of the British on each other. Hindus against Muslims, one group deadset on dominating the other. The situation we now see in Pakistan, which flirts with Al Qaeda and collects nuclear weaponry the way Americans collect debt? That’s a direct result of what happened in India more than 60 years ago. It’s a real-life picture of what happens when people don’t take the time to listen, don’t care to understand, wish only to view reality through the lens they know, and expect others to align with their one, limited perspective. I have a feeling that, were he alive to cast a ballot in the 2012 election, my Grandpa might once again exercise his right to be silent. The sound of half your country hating the other half can lead to horrors I hope we never encounter.

Rachel Coleman

Liberal City Commission: City Hall; 324 N. Kansas Ave.; 626-2202. Seward County Commission: County Administration Building 515 N. Washington 626-3300. Kansas Senator Garrett Love, P.O. Box 1, Montezuma, KS 67867.Topeka office contact Info: (785) 296-7359. E-mail: garrett.love@senate.ks.gov. Kansas Senator Steve Morris, District 39: 600 Trindle, Hugoton, KS, 67951; Phone: 620-544-2084; E-mail: morris@senate.state.ks.us. Kansas House Rep. Carl Dean Holmes, District 125: P.O. Box 2288,

Getting in Touch Liberal, KS, 67905; Phone: (620) 624-7361. Topeka Office: 174-W Capitol Building, Topeka, KS 66612-1504. Phone: (785) 2967670. Fax: (785) 368-7074. Kansas House Rep. Steve Alford, District 124: 4179 East Road 19 Ulysses, Kansas 67880 Phone: (620) 356-1361. Email:j.stephen.alford@house.ks.go v U.S. Representative Tim Huelskamp: 126 Cannon HOB Washington, DC 20515 Phone: (202) 225-2715

Fax: (202) 225-5124. Salina Office (785) 309-0572. E-mail: http://huelskamp.house.gov. U.S. Senator Jerry Moran: 4 Russell Courtyard (Temp), District of Columbia 20510-1604 Phone: (202) 2246521. Fax: (202) 228-6966; E-mail: MoranNews@moran.senate.gov U.S. Senator Pat Roberts: 100 Military Plaza, Suite 203, P.O. Box 550, Dodge City, KS 67801. Fax: (620) 2272264; Phone: (620) 227-2244; E-mail: pat_roberts@senate.gov.


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Sunday, October 28, 2012 Page 5B

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Hi & Lois

Dear Dr. Brothers: I’m very familiar with depression. I’ve had a few bouts myself, and my teenage daughter suffered from depression a few years ago and is on medication. Both of us shared the feeling of sadness, and we cried a lot. Now I’m wondering if my mother could be depressed. She’s rarely sad, but she isn’t herself. She’s in a senior community and seems to have stopped participating. Should I stop worrying, since I don’t see her crying? Could she be depressed? — M.C. Dear M.C.: You do have some background that will give you a great deal of insight into depression. What you might bear in mind, though, is that the symptoms can be different for various individuals. While you and your daughter both found yourselves crying a lot, you must consider that the elderly don’t always show the same symptoms. Your mother may not feel as emotionally overwrought as you two did, or she may do all her crying in private and take pains to show her “happy face” to you and the family. She may be having trouble going to sleep or staying asleep. On the other hand, her issues may lead her to sleep too much. If your mother is dropping out of her activities and there is nothing medically amiss, that could be a warning flag. The elderly living in senior communities often are mourning lost friends, and they more easily lose interest in activities. You may see changes that you think are part of aging but that actually are contributing to depression, such as lack of interest in eating, trouble concentrating and increased fatigue. Why not spend some one-on-one time with your mother, and judge for yourself just what is happening? I know you can handle it from then on.

Retail

Dear Dr. Brothers: I work in a large retail environment where everyone has an opinion. It’s always pretty friendly, but not anymore. I have lots of friends and acquaintances here whom I chat with during the day, and until now, politics wasn’t on the radar screen. But lately I’ve observed or been involved in several rather heated exchanges between friends. I’ve even had a few people unfriend me on Facebook after some discussions. How do I get things back to normal? I hate this. — R.M. Dear R.M.: Politics is one of those dangerous topics that people are supposed to avoid, but few can resist putting in their two cents’ worth during a presidential election campaign. If you joined the business in the past couple of years, you missed the last go-round, but I’m sure some of your colleagues have been through this before. They know that people they chat with during a regular year are going to put on their partisan hats come Labor Day every four years, and they are prepared to ride it out. You might want to find some of these old-timers (preferably those who are on your side) and ask them for some advice. They may warn you away from discussing politics with certain individuals who just can’t seem to roll with the punches. The good news is that once an election is over, people tend to calm down. The winners celebrate, the losers grumble, but then everyone goes back to discussing sports and families and whatever else comes along. So if you can keep things on an even keel until that period sets in, you’ll have a good chance of resuming life as you knew it. A recent survey by NM Incite held politics responsible for 14 percent of unfriending decisions on Facebook. Free speech has its drawbacks, but it’s all part of the game. So you can stand by and watch, or keep on chatting.

Zits

Joyce Brothers

Hagar

Dustin

CRYPTOQUOTE

Blondie

Beetle Bailey

Baby Blues

16 S. Kansas • Liberal


news@hpleader.com

d

THE WEEK IN REVIEW

WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

NYSE

8,190.20 -133.95

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Spartch 8.46 Supvalu 3.01 MauiLand 2.58 PilgrimsP 5.32 DeVry 26.01 ProtoLab n 35.68 CascdeCp 65.00 3D Sys 42.67 GardDenv 67.15 CarboCer 73.91

Chg +3.31 +.82 +.56 +.98 +4.46 +6.08 +9.92 +6.45 +10.01 +10.88

%Chg +64.3 +37.4 +27.7 +22.6 +20.7 +20.5 +18.0 +17.8 +17.5 +17.3

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg SpiritAero 14.70 -7.65 -34.2 TempurP 25.40 -7.72 -23.3 NY Times 8.19 -2.48 -23.2 DHT Hld rs 4.35 -1.27 -22.6 NewfldExp 27.08 -7.06 -20.7 TrueBlue 12.89 -3.27 -20.2 Unisys 16.62 -4.15 -20.0 AllegTch 26.71 -6.10 -18.6 Cabelas 45.15 -10.00 -18.1 CliffsNRs 36.49 -7.96 -17.9

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 6493296 9.12 -.32 S&P500ETF6262034141.35-2.04 SPDR Fncl3222973 15.80 -.31 SprintNex2871606 5.49 -.16 GenElec 2725933 21.11 -.92 FordM 2214246 10.36 +.18 iShEMkts2064429 41.21 -.29 Citigroup 1854965 36.60 -.56 RegionsFn1847356 6.58 -.55 NokiaCp 1820380 2.56 -.18 Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

1,165 1,977 230 110 3,203 61 16,603,274,938

d

NYSE MKT

2,375.28 -33.25

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last MGTCap rs 6.65 Medgen wt 4.00 ChaseCorp18.09 WalterInv 46.62 Libbey 17.05 EntGmg rs 2.55 IncOpR 3.38 MAG Slv g 12.26 VirnetX 30.10 SL Ind 14.07

Chg +3.64 +.80 +2.09 +5.28 +1.89 +.27 +.28 +.95 +2.31 +1.07

%Chg +120.9 +25.0 +13.1 +12.8 +12.5 +11.8 +9.0 +8.4 +8.3 +8.2

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg Crexendo 2.12 -.33 -13.5 Glowpoint 2.00 -.25 -11.1 ImpacMtg 9.65 -1.05 -9.8 NovaCpp n 2.30 -.25 -9.8 Bellatrix g 4.00 -.40 -9.1 Aerosonic 3.15 -.31 -9.0 GranTrra g 4.87 -.48 -9.0 TriangPet 6.49 -.58 -8.2 GoldResrc 16.30 -1.28 -7.3 KeeganR g 3.73 -.29 -7.2

d

NASDAQ

Name

2,987.95 -17.67

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last AnnapBcp 11.73 Overstk 15.49 PSS Wrld 28.57 Cyclacel rs 6.69 KiOR 6.50 AMCC 5.73 Stamps.cm26.20 TASER 8.07 MaysJ 25.00 support.cm 4.73

Chg +3.63 +4.39 +6.72 +1.47 +1.40 +1.23 +5.58 +1.69 +5.15 +.96

%Chg +44.8 +39.5 +30.8 +28.2 +27.5 +27.3 +27.1 +26.5 +25.9 +25.5

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg ConstantC 11.93 -5.17 -30.2 FisherCom25.85 -10.51 -28.9 AvidTch 6.02 -2.15 -26.3 HMS Hldgs20.61 -6.45 -23.8 Crocs 12.73 -3.65 -22.3 iRobot 17.99 -5.07 -22.0 IPC 34.83 -9.40 -21.3 ImunoGn 11.47 -3.05 -21.0 DeckrsOut 29.48 -7.60 -20.5 Rdiff.cm 3.18 -.77 -19.5

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Vringo 452551 CheniereEn183721 NovaGld g139484 GoldStr g 132412 Rentech 90714 WalterInv 74568 NwGold g 71682 AlldNevG 47921 NA Pall g 46627 VirnetX 39512

Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

Last 4.00 16.00 4.93 2.09 2.54 46.62 11.61 36.64 1.59 30.10

DIARY

Chg +.07 +.30 -.07 +.08 +.06 +5.28 -.24 -2.81 -.06 +2.31

190 281 19 21 496 25 348,051,057

HAPPENINGS

Name Vol (00) Last Chg Facebook n400152921.94 +2.94 SiriusXM 3701960 2.82 -.10 Microsoft 3107077 28.21 -.43 Intel 2870794 21.95 +.69 PwShs QQQ224637165.35 -.33 Cisco 1976319 17.29 -.75 MicronT 1720155 5.47 +.02 Yahoo 1713606 16.79 +.95 Zynga n 1689691 2.31 -.09 Apple Inc1206354 604.00 -5.84

Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

1,124 1,494 108 173 2,678 60 9,090,388,128

on the high plains

Diversity Council to host 7th annual International Fair

The Diversity Council is again sponsoring the seventh annual International Fair at the Seward County Activity Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The International Fair is a free community event featuring booths from many nations. There will be entertainment featured throughout the day. Booths will offer food, activities and fun for all ages. Everyone is welcome to attend.

SATURDAY

Benefit soup supper to help Barbara Hoffman with medical expenses

Div

Last

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

AT&T Inc 1.76 34.63 -.69 -2.0 +14.5 AMD ... 2.07 -.11 -5.0 -61.7 AirProd 2.56 77.92 -2.07 -2.6 -8.5 AlcatelLuc ... 1.03 -.09 -8.0 -34.0 AlphaNRs ... 8.71 -.26 -2.9 -57.4 Anadarko .36 66.49 -3.85 -5.5 -12.9 vjA123 ... .14 +.01 +9.7 -91.6 Apple Inc 10.60 604.00 -5.84 -1.0 +49.1 ArchCoal .12 8.09 +.18 +2.3 -44.2 BP PLC 1.92 41.73 -1.37 -3.2 -2.4 BakrHu .60 43.42 -1.33 -3.0 -10.7 BkofAm .04 9.12 -.32 -3.4 +64.0 BariPVix rs ... 36.30 +1.31 +3.7 -74.5 Boeing 1.76 71.11 -2.90 -3.9 -3.1 Caterpillar 2.08 84.25 +.39 +0.5 -7.0 Chevron 3.60 111.18 -2.20 -1.9 +4.5 Cisco .56 17.29 -.75 -4.2 -4.1 Citigroup .04 36.60 -.56 -1.5 +39.1 CocaCola s 1.02 37.04 -.36 -1.0 +5.9 Corning .36 11.82 -1.70 -12.6 -8.9 Deere 1.84 85.47 +.48 +0.6 +10.5 Dell Inc .32 9.24 -.31 -3.2 -36.8 DukeEn rs 3.06 65.11 -.40 -0.6 ... EMC Cp ... 23.91 -.67 -2.7 +11.0 ExxonMbl 2.28 90.62 -1.53 -1.7 +6.9 Facebook n ... 21.94 +2.94 +15.5 -42.6 FordM .20 10.36 +.18 +1.8 -3.7 GenElec .68 21.11 -.92 -4.2 +17.9 Hallibrtn .36 32.40 -2.58 -7.4 -6.1 HarleyD .62 46.12 +2.24 +5.1 +18.7 Hastings ... 2.01 -.03 -1.5 +25.6 HewlettP .53 14.09 -.39 -2.7 -45.3 HomeDp 1.16 60.04 -1.85 -3.0 +42.8 iShEMkts .82 41.21 -.29 -0.7 +8.6

Name

MONEY RATES

Prime Rate Discount Rate Federal Funds Rate Treasuries 3-month 6-month 5-year 10-year 30-year

Last 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

Pvs Week 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

0.12 0.16 0.76 1.75 2.91

0.10 0.14 0.75 1.76 2.94

Australia Britain Canada Euro Japan Mexico Switzerlnd

The United Methodist Women of the Hooker, Okla., church will be hosting their annual “Traditional” Turkey Dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the fellowship hall located at 202 E. Imo.The cost is $7 per plate or $16 per family (mother, father and school aged children living at home). Carry out and delivery service is available within Hooker. Call 580-6522920. Proceeds go to support various missions.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7

Last

Pvs Day

.9650 1.6099 .9988 .7733 79.66 13.0069 .9352

.9650 1.6124 .9940 .7723 80.29 12.9693 .9343

5A

WEEKLY DOW JONES Dow Jones industrials

2.38

Close: 13,107.21 1-week change: -236.30 (-1.8%)

MON

14,000

-243.36 -25.19 TUES

WED

26.34

3.53

THUR

FRI

13,500 13,000 12,500 12,000

M

J

J

MUTUAL FUNDS

Total Assets Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV American Funds BalA m MA 34,216 20.11 American Funds CapIncBuA m IH 58,387 52.63 American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS 46,423 35.94 American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 29,224 39.66 American Funds FnInvA m LB 32,715 39.77 American Funds GrthAmA m LG 56,620 33.43 American Funds IncAmerA m MA 57,461 17.96 American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 45,691 30.29 American Funds NewPerspA m WS 29,905 30.21 American Funds WAMutInvA m LV 40,753 31.05 Dodge & Cox IntlStk FB 38,150 32.91 Dodge & Cox Stock LV 40,363 118.55 Fidelity Contra LG 61,129 76.89 FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 41,267 2.23 Harbor IntlInstl d FB 29,233 59.11 PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI 33,104 11.57 PIMCO TotRetIs CI 169,317 11.57 Vanguard 500Adml LB 60,102 130.33 Vanguard InstIdxI LB 68,758 129.47 Vanguard InstPlus LB 48,113 129.47 Vanguard MuIntAdml MI 30,290 14.41 Vanguard TotBdAdml CI 34,972 11.17 Vanguard TotIntl FB 35,374 14.29 Vanguard TotStIAdm LB 59,062 35.17 Vanguard TotStIIns LB 37,490 35.17 Vanguard TotStIdx LB 74,849 35.16 Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 37,273 59.04

A

S

Total Return/Rank 4-wk 12-mo 5-year -0.3 +13.1/A +2.9/A -0.5 +11.4/A +0.2/D -0.1 +12.2/B -2.0/C +0.3 +8.4/A -2.9/A -0.3 +14.4/C -0.2/C -0.4 +15.2/A -0.5/C +0.1 +12.8/A +2.1/B -1.1 +14.2/C -0.3/C -0.2 +13.1/A 0.0/A -0.6 +14.3/C +0.4/B +1.0 +6.3/C -3.7/B +0.2 +19.0/A -1.8/D -2.8 +13.4/B +1.4/B +0.5 +13.4/A +3.6/C +0.1 +8.3/A -3.0/A +0.1 +10.9/A +8.3/A +0.1 +11.2/A +8.6/A -1.4 +16.2/A +0.6/B -1.4 +16.2/A +0.6/B -1.4 +16.2/A +0.6/B +0.5 +8.3/B +5.6/B -0.1 +5.5/D +6.2/C +0.5 +5.5/C -5.2/B -1.3 +15.8/B +1.0/A -1.3 +15.8/B +1.0/A -1.3 +15.6/B +0.9/A +0.1 +13.4/A +3.8/A

O Pct Min Init Load Invt 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 4.25 1,000 NL 50,000 NL 1,000,000 NL 1,000,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL200,000,000 NL 0 NL 10,000 NL 3,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 0

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.

College names Sherry Ferrell director of outreach • Provided by SCCC/ATS Seward County Community College/Area Technical School has a new director of outreach who will be working with area communities to offer off-campus courses. Sherry Farrell will oversee concurrent courses that are offered at 11 high schools within the SCCC/ATS service area. In addition, she will work with each academic program on campus to offer classes in the communities of Meade, Southwestern Heights, Sublette, Satanta, Johnson, Ulysses, Rolla, Moscow, Hugoton

and Elkhart. “I would like to help SCCC/ATS grow the Outreach Department by offering more outreach courses online and at alternate times and days for students who can’t take traditional college courses,” Farrell said, who finished her education through outreach courses and wants to make sure that opportunity is available to others. Farrell, who has been active in the Liberal community, looks forward to working with area educators and other community leaders to promote the college. She has a bachelor’s of science

the governor did and not have an effect on property taxes going up,” Democratic state Rep. Jim Ward of Wichita said. Brownback said the state won’t be increasing its own, relatively small property tax levies for schools and building projects. Both levies are set by law. “The next important step we need to take must make our state more competitive and improve the financial well-being of Kansas is to make tax increases more transparent — especially when it comes to property taxes at the

United Methodist Women serving up traditional turkey dinner in Hooker, Okla.

-0.9 +10.0 +3.2 -9.5 ... +5.1 -2.7 +23.8 -1.3 +8.1 +0.2 +4.0 +6.5 +15.6 -2.3 -13.6 -1.9 +22.4 +0.4 -13.0 -1.5 +8.7 -6.6 -46.9 -4.6 -14.2 -1.0 +8.8 +1.7 +20.8 -2.1 -27.6 -1.3 +4.0 -1.3 +17.5 -0.5 +17.1 -7.7 +53.0 -1.4 +12.6 -5.3 +2.6 -3.4 +54.9 +1.5 +49.0 -2.8 +134.6 -1.9 +21.5 -2.9 +20.8 -0.7 +25.7 -1.1 +23.3 -0.7 -22.4 -0.4 +29.2 -7.0 -18.5 +6.0 +4.1 -3.8 -75.5

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show dollar in foreign currency.

SUNDAY, NOV. 4

DONATE TODAY

-.71 +.69 -.09 -1.16 -.96 +.05 +.42 -2.01 -.88 +.02 -.43 -.18 -3.91 -.48 +.52 -.55 -.90 -.33 -.33 -.55 -2.04 -3.90 -.10 +.15 -.16 -.31 -1.29 -.51 -.37 -.03 -.15 -.49 +.95 -.09

CURRENCIES

Tax plan ...

The college’s Student Nurse Association is conducting a winter coat drive through Thursday, Nov. 15.The group is looking for donations of coats, sweaters, sweatshirts, snow boots, hats, gloves, blankets, etc., to be distributed to those in need before hard winter sets in. Items can be used or new and can be dropped of at four locations: Epworth Building lobby, Hobble Academic Building,Area Technical School student union and the Colvin Center. Also, if you or anyone you know is in need of winter clothes, please call 620-417-1401. More information is also available at that number. Help us bring a warm coat to someone in need.

Last

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

The First Church of Nazarene is hosting a benefit soup supper for Mrs. Barbara Hoffman, who is battling cancer.The supper is from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, at the church located at 2211 Zinnia Lane.The cost is a free will donation.

Student Nurse Association is seeking winter clothing for those in need

Div

iShR2K 1.32 81.14 Intel .90 21.95 IBM 3.40 193.27 JPMorgCh 1.20 41.16 JohnJn 2.44 70.90 Kroger .60 25.18 LSI Corp ... 6.88 McDnlds 3.08 86.71 Merck 1.68 46.15 MicronT ... 5.47 Microsoft .92 28.21 NokiaCp .26 2.56 OcciPet 2.16 80.44 ONEOK s 1.32 47.14 Oracle .24 30.99 Penney ... 25.46 PepsiCo 2.15 68.98 Pfizer .88 25.43 PwShs QQQ .61 65.35 RegionsFn .04 6.58 S&P500ETF 2.85 141.35 Schlmbrg 1.10 70.10 SiriusXM ... 2.82 SonicCorp ... 10.03 SprintNex ... 5.49 SPDR Fncl .25 15.80 TimeWarn 1.04 43.64 WalMart 1.59 75.11 WellsFargo .88 33.97 Wendys Co .08 4.16 WmsCos 1.25 34.82 Xerox .17 6.49 Yahoo ... 16.79 Zynga n ... 2.31

NEWS

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

O Continued from Page 1A

degree from Weber State University and a master’s of business administration from the University of Phoenix. She is currently working on a doctorate of education at Wichita State University. For the past seven years, Farrell has taught business administration courses and, most recently, began an online Health Information Management Program. Before relocating to Liberal, she was an instructor at San Juan College in Farmington, N.M.

local level,” the governor said. Ward said Democrats welcome what he called Brownback’s newfound interest in property tax relief. They pushed this year for property tax relief, though their proposals would have boosted state aid to local governments so that they could keep property taxes in check. Ward said Kansas’ property taxes are too high and need to be cut. But he dismissed the new GOP proposal as “political stuff.” Legislative researchers estimate the income tax will be worth $4.5 billion over the next six years and also project that they’ll lead to collective budget shortfalls approaching $2.5 billion during the same period. Also, Democrats have noted that Brownback unsuccessfully proposed this year to eliminate limits on school districts’ ability to raise property

FERRELL

taxes. “Kansas common sense says, be skeptical of politicians bearing gifts a week before the election,” Ward said. Brownback’s allies hope conservative Republicans emerge from this year’s elections with control of both chambers. Republicans have majorities of 32-8 in the Senate and 92-33 in the House, but GOP moderates had retained control in the Senate. Conservatives succeeded in ousting eight moderate Republican senators in August primary races and are now looking to defeat Democratic incumbents this fall. Also, Wagle is asking her GOP colleagues to name her the next Senate president, a decision that Republican senators and senators-elect will make in December.

No grand jury indictment over Kansas sculpture OVERLAND PARK (AP) — A bare-breasted sculpture at a northeast Kansas arboretum isn't criminal. The Kansas City Star reported that a Johnson County grand jury chose Friday not to issue on indictment over the life-size bronze sculpture at the Overland Park Arboretum. Known as “Accept or Reject,” the sculpture depicts a

woman wearing an opened blouse, her breasts exposed, taking a photograph of herself Critics collected enough signatures through a petition drive to summon the 15-member jury. Johnson County District Judge Gerald Elliott told the jurors their job was to determine if the sculpture violated the Kansas obscenity law.


5C

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY OCTOBER 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

denasa@hpleader.com

High Plains

Wanted To Buy: John Deere diesel engines running or not. 785-263-6312

FOR SALE

8 Place setting of bone china and crystal. These are 70 years old. Hand sewn bed spreads. Call for Appt. 620-271-7330.

A Storm is Coming Are You Prepared? The Crisis Store your local one stop shop for Guns, Ammo, Survival Food & Supplies, Stun Guns, Pepper Spray, spy cams, home alarms and more. Check out our GUN SEARCH GENIE on our w e b s i t e www.crisisstore.co or drop by .... 1010 S. Kansas (behind sears store in TMT Office) 6245789. FREE Buy one Get One Pepper Spray FREE Mention this ad .5 ounce limit one per household.

Pets & Supplies

Pets To Give Away Free to good home Siamese mix kittens, litter box trained, also outdoor calico cat 6 mos old. Call 620-655-8930

Kittens free to a good home. Litter box trained. 1 Male black tabby, 2 male orange tabby, 2 female orange tabby. Call 620228-2030 for more info Two miniature Schnauzers, one salt & pepper male 12 years old, and one black female 6 years old. Both are fixed and great pets. They are indoor dogs!!!! Looking for a good family to adopt them both Inquire at 620-391-6284

Free: 1/2 pointer puppies, 1 male, 5 female 620-4824639

Pets for Sale

English Bulldogs 2 Male Available Born: 8-10-12, Call 316-284-2276 cute, lovable. Needing a loving family. Up to date on shots. AKC Registered

Farm & Ranch Farm Misc.

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Leader&Times

Classified

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L&T

SUNDAY, October 28, 2012

As moonlight falls upon the Liberal skyline, youngsters are seen across the softball complex in Parks and Rec’s annual

GREAT PUMPKIN HUNT

Page 6 Section

High Plains Living

B

F A R L E F T : T h e m oo n r is e s a s n i g h t t i me b e g i n s T u e s d a y e v e n i n g i n L i b e r a l . L EF T : T h e s u n s e t s o n an ot h e r a u t u m n e v e n in g a s d a r k n e s s d e s ce n d s w e s t o f L i b e r a l T u e s d ay . T h e c ol or s o f f al l m a d e fo r a p e r fe c t b a ck d r op f or L i b e r a l P ar k s an d R e c ’ s an n u al G r e a t P u m p k i n H u n t an d co s t u m e co n t e s t . R o n n a S t u m p of Pa r k s a n d R e c s a i d 8 3 co s t u m e s w e r e e n t e r e d i n th e c o n t e s t , a n d p r i z e s w e r e a w ar d e d in 1 0 ca t e g or i e s . T h e e v e n t k i c k e d o ff a w e e k of p r e H al l ow e e n ac t iv i t ie s h os t e d b y P a r k s a n d R e c fo r ch il d r e n t o e n j o y. O t h e r a g e n c i e s , c h u r c h e s a n d o r g a n i z a t i o n s th r o u g h o u t t h e c o m m u n i ty h o s t e d f u n e v e n ts th r o u g h o u t th e w e e k , a n d m or e a r e p l an n e d t o t ak e p la ce t h r ou g h W e d n e sd a y b e fo r e t h e c al e n d a r t u r n s t o N o v e m b e r a n d t h o u g h t s tu r n to th e T h a n k s g i v i n g h o l i d a y.

L&T photos by Robert Pierce

A B O V E R I G H T : W in n e r s o f t h e P a r k s a n d R e c c o s tu me c o n t e s t p o s e f o r a q u i c k p i ct u r e p r i o r to th e s t a r t o f T u e s d ay ’ s G r e a t Pu m p k i n H u n t at th e s o f t b a l l co mp l e x o n W e s t e r n Av enu e. R I GH T AN D B E LOW LE F T: C o s t u me c o n t e s t a n ts a n d a d u l t s p ar a d e a r ou n d t h e b al l f ie l d a s j u d ge s t r y t o c h o o s e w h i c h o u t f i t s a r e t h e b e s t.

V i a n k a M e z a , 2 , t o o k h o m e th e p r i z e f o r t h e c u t e s t g i r ls o u t fi t i n P a r k s a n d R e c’ s c os t u m e c o n te s t a t th e G r e a t P u m p k i n H u n t T u e s d a y a t t h e s o f t b al l c o m p l e x . BE L O W : O t h e r s ch o s e c h a r ac t e r s f am i li ar t o m a n y s u c h as t h e s e f r om t h e S c r e a m m ov i e s .

B a t ma n , r i g h t , p o s e s f o r a q u i c k p i c w i th S t r a w b e r r y S h or t c ak e an d a L e g o p ie c e b e fo r e g oi n g of f t o f ig h t cr i m e a n d p a r t i ci p a te i n P a r k s a n d R e c ’ s co s t u m e c o n te s t .

The Leader & Times is the only newspaper in Liberal reporting local news on a daily basis

T h e p r i z e f o r th e m o s t o r i g i n a l c o s t u m e w e n t t o 4 - y e a r - o l d L a k e n L a m b e r s o n , w h o c am e d r e s s e d as a p la t e of s p a g h e t t i a n d m e at b a ll s .

Costume contest winners Scariest costume: Ninja – Allan Torres, 7 Cutest girl outfit: Queen of Hearts – Vianka Meza, 2 Cutest boy outfit: Cowboy rodeo clown – Dravon Starr Funniest outfit: Crocodile – Logan Seibel, 11 months Weirdest outfit: Zombie – Dammion Brown, 9 Most original costume: Spaghetti and meatballs – Laken Lamberson, 4 Homemade outfit: Older Indian – Jhett Huffman, 6 Best overall: Patriot Uncle Sam – Zayden Norez, 3 Wizard of Oz/storybook: Dorothy – Tiffany Brown, 5 Superhero: Hulk – Kolton Avalos, 4


6A

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

NEWS

news@hpleader.com

on the

HAPPENINGS high plains Thrillls in Turpin The Terror on Hill Street haunted house will run from 7 to 11 p.m. now through Halloween in Turpin, Okla. Admission is $13.

Spooky music Trick-or-treat and enjoy some spooky music during “Halloween Celebration 2012” from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the Southgate Mall. The event is sponsored by the Mexican-American Ministries Liberal Care Center and a $1 dollar admission at the door will go to benefit the Seward County United Way. The Southwest Symphony Society will begin a concert for the fundraiser at 5:30 p.m.

Watch out for the Witch Dorothy’s House and the Land of Oz will host their first-ever, family-friendly “Wicked Oz” haunted house from 7 to 9 p.m. today at the Land of Oz. Children who enter will help Dorothy make it past flying monkeys and other critters to find the Wizard before collecting a sweet treat. “Wicked Oz” is also open from 7 to 10 on Halloween night. Admission is $3 and discounted tickets are available for $2 at the Coronado Museum, the Leader & Times, Liberal Convention and Visitors Bureau, Baker Arts Center, Mid-America Air Museum and the Liberal Memorial Library.

Stop by Pumpkin Festival Friends Church in Liberal will host a Pumpkin Festival for the community from 2 to 4 p.m. today at the church to raise funds for the Stepping Stone Shelter. Crafts, holiday decorations, children’s items, home-made sweets and general sale items will be up for a silent auction which closes at 3:45 p.m. Desserts and pastries will be on sale for guests as they enjoy music courtesy of the Liberal High School Jazzmen.

College candy The place to be on Halloween is Seward County Community College/Area Technical School when it sponsors its annual Trick-orTreat Street for children from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. A variety of clubs and organizations at SCCC/ATS are sponsoring Trick-or-Treat Street in the Student Union and Student Living Center on the east side of campus. Community children are invited to participate in this safe Halloween party and enjoy a variety of activities, entertainment, snacks and a hayride. Children can come dressed in their Halloween costumes, carrying their Halloween sacks. Trick-or-Treat Street is free and open to the public.

Games and hay rides First Southern Baptist Church of Liberal will be hosting a Trunk-orTreat event as a fun and safe Halloween experience. The community is invited to attend. The fun starts at 6 p.m. Wednesday and will conclude at 7:30 p.m. in the First Southern Baptist Church parking lot. Games, prizes, candy, hay rides, train rides, bouncy houses, hot chocolate, cider and popcorn will be provided. Please keep costumes family friendly.

Parking lot goblins “Trunk or Treat” will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at Grace Lutheran Church located at 1200 W. 11th St. Parents can bring their ghosts and goblins to the church parking lot and “trunk or treat.” Some tricks, some treats and some Halloween fun.

Fun for tiny tots Emeritus at Liberal Springs will be hosting a Trick-or-Treat Street from 3:30 to 6 p.m. Halloween Day at 15 Terrace Ave. for children from infants to fifth graders. Residents and staff will be handing out candy.

Gremlins with pets The annual Kiwanis Club’s Pet and Spook Parade has been scheduled for Halloween Day, Wednesday. Line up will start at 3:45 p.m. at Trail Street north of the railroad tracks at Kansas Avenue. The parade starts at 4 and willl travel north on Kansas to Fifth Street and west one block to Tobias Park. Entrants must collect a coupon at the start of the parade in order to receive a free bag of treats at Tobias Park.

Party at Heaven Open Gates Come one, come all to Heaven Open Gates’ first ever Trunk-orTreat, a fun-filled safe Halloween alternative with food, fun, prizes and, of course, lots of candy. The fun starts at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Heaven Open Gates Church at 919 N. Pershing.

Local chapter of Ducks Unlimited to host annual membership banquet

Ducks Unlimited’s Seward County Chapter will be hosting its annual membership banquet on Saturday at the Seward County Ag Building in Liberal. Doors will open at 6 p.m., with dinner at 7 and the auction starting at 8. Ticket prices are $35 for singles and $10 for children (Greenwings). Tickets can be reserved by calling 624-1612 or for more information or to purchase tickets online, go to: http://ks,ducks.org. Ticket includes one year membership to Ducks Unlimited and chances to win a long gun.

SATURDAY

Subscribe to the Leader & Times, call 626-0840

M e a l s o n W h e e l s d r i v e r s M a r i a O r ti z , l e f t , C a r o l y n W a r r e n a n d S t e v e n F o s d i ck h e l p m a n a g e r V i ck i H a v e r f i e l d p a c k b o x e s t o t a k e o u t o n t hei r r out es T hur s day m or n ing a t t he Li ber a l S en io r C e nt er . Courtesy photo

Meals ... O Continued from Page 1A

these people. It’s not just here’s your meal and go. They do a lot of care for these people, and I’ve had a lot of people saying a lot of good things about them. You try to meet their needs as much as you can.” Senior center activity director Michele Stoddard said many clients have developed a level of trust with the drivers. “They value that person coming in their home,” she said. “It was just like having a family member come visit them. It just means so much for these seniors who can’t get out. It gives them a chance to have that interaction every day. They make you feel safe.” Jean Finch, one of Ortiz’s clients, has developed that level of trust with her driver. “She can just come in and do whatever she has to do,” she said. “She’s just an angel. I can see her. I would help her carry some of the stuff. I love Maria. She is the sweetest, the nicest. She’s excellent.” Drivers recently made some extra deliveries. The senior center also provides “blizzard kits” to each Meals customer. The kits are provided as a precautionary measure to clients for days when the center is closed due to bad weather or holiday. Haverfield said $3 donations are given to the senior center for the kits, but most of the funding comes from the government. “The state pays so much,” she said. “They give us so much for that, and some of them that can donate. It helps them.” Haverfield said the food in the

C a r o l y n W a r r e n , r i g h t , h e l p s a n o th e r v o l u n t e e r p a c k b l i z z a r d k i t s f o r th e L i b e r a l S e n i o r C e n t e r ’ s M e a l s o n W heel s pr o g r am . Courtesy photo kits is good for up to a year. “If no one can get to them and we’re having a blizzard, they’ve always got that to fall back on,” she said. “In each box, there’s two meals. The first year we delivered them, they ate them the next day. This year, I don’t know what they’re going to do.” Haverfield described some of the items clients will get in their blizzard kit. “They’ve got hot cocoa,” she said. “They’ve got milk. They’ve got a breakfast bar. They get some beef stew. Here’s some ravioli.” Haverfield said the Meals on Wheels program provides a measure of security for its clients. “When you get older and you don’t have anybody, you can’t get out, you can’t move, that’s a very scary feeling,” she said. “Just having something like this helps them feel secure.” Stoddard said normally, those who receive help from Meals on

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Wheels are 60 or older, but Haverfield said there are younger handicapped people who get assistance. “They have to pay more,” Haverfield said. Before getting that assistance, Meals officials just need a little information from the potential client. “The main thing is they just give us where they live, their phone number,” Haverfield said. “I have to ask them what they eat and if they’re diabetic.” Stoddard said other concerns come into play as well. “If they’ve got a food allergy, we’ll go through so she’ll know when she gets the report that she needs a substitution,” she said. Haverfield said paperwork is then sent to Great Bend. The local Meals program currently serves 60 clients, and the manager said this

varies. “Sometimes, we lose them to a nursing home,” she said. “Sometimes, we get more.” Stoddard said clients do have options with the Meals on Wheels program. “Jean, she normally has hers delivered,” she said. “They’ve got the options. They can do Meals on Wheels or Friendship. They can come in or have it delivered.” Haverfield said an aim of both the Meals on Wheels program and the senior center’s Friendship Meals program is to keep those that can still be active in that condition. “We want them to move as much as they can,” she said. “If they can get down here, we want them down here. When you get older, you’ve got to keep moving.”


6C

CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY OCTOBER 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

news@hpleader.com

High Plains

Award Winning Restaurant “Billy’s” in the Plaza, is now accepting applications for cooks & waitressses. No phone calls, Must apply in person only

Leader&Times

Classified

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4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, $128,500. Call Gary

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5 bedroom, 3 bath $179,000 • Call Lidia

2 bedrooms $72,000 • Call Lidia

4 bedrooms 3 bath $135,000 • Call Stephanie

3 bedroom, 2 bath $124,000 • Call Lidia

4 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, bsmt, 2 storage bldgs REDUCED! $135,500 • Call Lidia

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529 N. Lincoln & 18 W 6th

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3 bedrooms 2 bath $135,000 • Call Stephanie

2 houses & a lot $210,000 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom, 2 bath $126,500 • Call Lidia

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2 bedroom REDUCED $55,000 • Call Gary

4 bedrooms, 3 bath $295,000. Call Lidia

3 bedrooms 2 bath $174,900 • Call Lidia

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3 bedroom, corner lot $76,900 • Call Lidia

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3 bedroom, 2 bath, REDUCED! $165,000 • Call Gary

4 bedroom, 3 bath, REDUCED! $182,000 • Call Lidia

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3 bedroom, 2 bath $187,500 • Call Lidia

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5 bedrooms, 3 bath Over 6700 sq. ft. church bldg on large lot 2 bedroom 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath, REDUCED! $172,000 • Call Lidi REDUCED! $70,500 • Call Rose $190,000 • Call Lidia REDUCED! $99,500 • Call Lidia

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3 Bedrooms REDUCED $69,900 • Call Rose

5 bedrooms 3 bath REDUCED! $149,000 • Call Lidia

3 bedroom 2 bath $137,500 • Call Lidia

4 bedrooms, 2 bath, Agent Owned REDUCED! $205,000 • Call Rose

5 bedrooms 3 bath $278,000 • Call Lidia

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4 bedroom 3 bath $318,500 • Call Lidia

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news@hpleader.com

LIVING

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

7B

The Bookworm Sez

New research for lowering LDL cholesterol The Old saying “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” may have K–State family some validity. Eating an apple each day could lower LDL cholesterol in and consumer the blood. sciences agent Researchers at Ohio State University compared eating apples with taking a capsule of polyphenol extract which are present in apples. They recruited non-smoking adults aged 40 – 60 years old. They had no history of eating apples more than twice a month prior to participating in the study. They also had no prior cardiovascular issues and did not consume phytochemical supplements. Participants were divided into three groups. One group ate an apple each day, the second group took a polyphenol capsules, and the third took a placebo. Results showed the apples and the polyphenol capsules decrease LDL cholesterol levels. The apples, however, gave a larger decrease in LDL cholesterol. Apples prevent the oxidation of LDL cholesterol that leads to atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries. For more information on health and nutrition visit our website at www.seward.ksu.edu, come by our office at 1081 Stadium Road, email us at sw@listserv.ksu.edu or give us a call at 620-624-5604.

Kathy Bloom

The Bookworm Sez is a nationally syndicated book review column by Terri Schlichenmeyer of LaCrosse, Wis.

‘Blasphemy’ by Sherman Alexie Once upon a time, fairy tales were your favorite reading matter. You were thrilled with stories of nasty gnomes, ogres, and dragonslaying heroes. There were princesses, castles, and white horses in those tales, as well as magic, witches, and mayhem. Some of those stories from your childhood had happy endings, but just as many finished in gleeful darkness. And then you grew up. Princesses got divorced, ogres were in the next lane on the highway, and your stories became much, much more real. So maybe it’s time to read “Blasphemy,” an anthology of short stories by Sherman Alexie. Cousins, it’s been said, are friends we happen to be related to,

and with a relationship like that, it’s natural to want to do everything for a cousin who needs us. But in “Cry Cry Cry,” a cousin from the Rez asks for love, support, and secrecy. He only gets two of the above. In “The Toughest Indian in the World,” the narrator of the story says he always helps Indian hitchhikers. When he picks up one scarred money-fighter standing on the side of the road, he learns that even tough guys have vulnerable sides and picking up hitchhikers isn’t such a good thing sometimes. Becoming a parent to your parent is something many of us face, but it’s particularly hard when Dad is an alcoholic, diabetic Indian with kidney damage. Add to that, old head trauma from babyhood,

and one man is overwhelmed in “War Dances.” Everyone agrees that getting an education is important to one’s future success. In “Indian Education,” going to school is a struggle for one young Indian boy – not because of what’s taught in the classroom, but because of what happens in it. And in “The Approximate Size of My Favorite Tumor,” a man and his estranged wife learn that keeping one another laughing may put life back into their marriage, even as one of them is dying. I’ve often said that author Sherman Alexie’s writing is an acquired taste. His stories aren’t always easy to digest, but “Blasphemy” is a chance to sample Alexie, small bite by small bite, until you’ve got a good appetite built up. What’s unusual about these short works is that they don’t begin or

end as do most tales. Stories sometimes start in the middle of a thought, and they often exit that way. In between, there’s melancholy and sadness, wry observations and get-you-thinking commentary – sentiments that make you feel as though you’ve secretly been run over by a steamroller. The stories here – some new, some classic – also include humor that pounces on its readers without warning, and some sudden, brief lightheartedness amid pathos. Then, as if to reassure us that it’s only fiction, this book ends with a sad smile. If you’re an Alexie fan already, here’s something you’ll be proud to put on your bookshelf. If you’re new to this author, take your time with it, savor each story, and let them hit you slowly. Like life in general, “Blasphemy” isn’t always happily ever after.

Tales of fright available at Memorial Library just in time for Halloween Halloween is just around the corner, and if you’re looking for a little fright-in-the-night, look no further than your local library. We have recently purchased some great horror stories guaranteed to frighten even the most sophisticated reader. Or, if it is drama in the horror genre that you crave, we have plenty of new scary dvds available for check out. “Little Star” is a book by Swedish author John Ajvide Lindqvist. Lindqvist, who has also written “Let the Right One In” and “Handling the Dead,” has been crowned heir apparent to Stephen King by numerous sources. In his latest novel, washed-up rocker Lennart finds an abandoned baby in the woods and takes her home to his wife, Laila. They name her Theres and decide to secretly raise her in their basement. When a shocking and catastrophic event occurs, she moves to Stockholm to live with the couple’s son, Jerry. He enters her in a singing competition, where she catches the attention of another

LIBRARY DIRECTOR

Jill Pannkuk

outcast teen, Teresa, and they soon form a violent partnership. Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden’s latest novel Father Gaetano’s Puppet Catechism is a spooky novella set in WWII Sicily. Father Gaetano has been assigned to the convent of San Domenico, which houses children

orphaned by war. Because of the suffering the children have experienced, the priest has a difficult time teaching them the catechism. He soon discovers that the convent’s former caretaker has built a magnificent puppet theater that is stored in the basement. The children inform him of the local legends about the theater and the evil puppets, but he decides to use them anyway to retell his Bible stories. What he doesn’t realize is that the puppets are not pleased with his plan and decide to put a stop to it. This Book is Full of Spiders: Seriously Dude, Don’t Touch It by David Wong is a sequel to the cult classic John Dies at the End. John, who is very much alive in the novel, is joined by his loyal dog, Molly and his freckle-faced, one-handed fiancée, Amy. Together they battle an infestation of spider-like monsters that lodge themselves in their victim’s mouths, take control of their bodies, and wreak havoc on the town of “Undisclosed.” Helen Dunmore’s newest novel

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The Greatcoat is a beautifully written ghost story. In 1952, Isabel Carey moves with her doctor husband, Phillip to Yorkshire, England. She soon finds herself feeling lonely and neglected by her busy husband. One night she wakes up freezing and huddles under an old RAF greatcoat she finds abandoned in a cupboard. Then she hears a knock on the window and discovers a young man wearing a greatcoat just like hers. Billed as Shirley Jackson meets the Twilight Zone, Your House is on Fire, Your Children are All Gone by Stefan Kiesbye is a book that will appeal to readers of psychological fiction and tales of the supernatural. The novel is a collection of evil stories told from the perspectives of four children of Hemmersmoor, a village on the Devil’s Moor. Each story is written in the first person, as if the children themselves are doing the telling. Are tales of witches and curses to be believed? Or does the real reason lie at the end of the railroad

tracks? If you are a lover of horror stories, then you probably have noticed that zombies have been making a comeback in both books and cinema. If you enjoy the television series The Walking Dead, then you may want to read the books the series is based on. The Walking Dead: The Road to Woodbury is the newest book in the series and the follow-up to the best-selling The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor. Trying to escape the zombie plague that is terrorizing Atlanta, Lilly Caul seeks refuge in a walled-in town known as Woodbury, Ga. At first everything seems fine in Woodbury — there is plenty of food and shelter, but everything is not as it seems. The new governor Blake has some strange and disturbing ideas about law and order. If you would rather get your thrills and chills visually, the library has some new dvds you may enjoy. The Intruders is a frightening story about two children living in different countries who are visited

in the night by a faceless being who wants to take possession of them. Clive Owen stars in the film. Produced by Joss Whedon (from Buffy the Vampire Slayer fame), The Cabin in the Woods begins like many other recent horror films. A group of five college friends travel to an isolated country cabin only to be attacked by supernatural creatures in a night of terror and plenty of bloodshed. But wait, there’s a twist. A group of technicians in a control room are watching and controlling every move the teenagers make. Another new addition to the library’s horror collection is the movie The Portal. While investigating a case of what she thinks is a rare strain of some exotic virus, Dr. April Meadows uncover a mysterious black painting. However, this is not any ordinary piece of art, but a portal to another dimension. Don’t let this Halloween go by without “treating” yourself to a good story. Stop by the library and check out a book or dvd today.


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HAPPENINGS

on the high plains

Baker Arts Center presenting its 24th annual French Market

A B O V E: S e n i o r s c u t a r u g on t h e d an c e f lo or t o t h e so u n d s of c l a s s i c c o u n t r y Fr i d a y e v e n in g a t t h e L i b e r a l S e n i o r C e n te r ’ s H a p p y Ha l l o w e e n Pa r t y .

NOV. 3 AND NOV. 4

AARP Driving Safety Course set for Saturday, Nov. 10

The annual AARP Driver Safety Course is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Community of Christ/Believers Ministry Church at 1071 S. Clay in Liberal. Costs are $14 per person or $12 for AARP members, but the course is free for all veterans and their dependents. All residents of Kansas are entitled to an additional discount on their existing automobile insurance for participating in the 8-hour course. The class is designed to improve driving skills, but does not include any driving or written tests. Class size is limited, so call 626-4232 to reserve a spot.

LE F T: The ba nd B O O G ( B u n c h O f O ld G u y s ) , f e a tu r i n g W e s F ox , l e ft , B i ll L e w i s, C h r i s Pe r k in s , J ac k S here r a nd drum m er G r a n t M a th e w s p l a y s s o m e cl as s i c c ou n t r y m u si c F r i d a y e v e n in g a t t he Li bera l S eni o r Cent er’ s H a ppy H al l owe en Pa r t y . L&T photos/Robert Pierce

SATURDAY, NOV. 10

College to offer concealed carry class

Seward County Community College/Area Technical School will offer a concealed carry class through Business & Industry from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, in SU214 E/W, 1801 N. Kansas Ave. in Liberal. The cost is $100 per class and is the mandatory training that is required to carry a concealed handgun. Students must bring a Kansas driver’s license to class. Lunch is not included. Enroll in advance only by calling 620-417-1170 or normajean.dodge@sccc.edu.

SATURDAY, NOV. 3

Attention, all Southwest Kansas Democrats are invited to attend a Watch Party starting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 1002 Harrison Circle in Liberal. For more information, call 624-2026.

TUESDAY, NOV. 6

Shoppers get ready for Liberal’s annual ‘Holiday Open House’

Liberal’s Citywide Holiday Open House kicks off next week The Holiday Open House starts at 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8. It will also be going on during regular business hours Friday and Saturday, Nov. 9 and 10. Everyone is invited to shop and see what’s new for the holidays.

NOV. 8, 9 AND 10

Wellness Center invites public to Lunch and Learn Friday

The Wellness Center at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School invites the public to a lunch and learn at 12:15 p.m., Friday in SU214. Topic of the day is “Increasing Your Memory” presented by Alex Mages. Participants may go through the cafeteria line or bring their own lunch.

FRIDAY

Subscribe today, call 626-0840

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Seniors enjoy Halloween Party

Baker Arts Center will be hosting its 24th annual French Market on Nov. 3 and 4. Join Baker Arts for a weekend of holiday enjoyment. On Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. the gift shops will be open, there will be a silent auction and for lunch, beef bourguinon over rice will be served with salad, rolls and chocolate mousse for dessert for $15 per person. Reserved seating is available at 11 a.m., 12:10 p.m. and 1:20 p.m. On Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m., there will be a fried chicken buffet with all the fixings for only $8 per person and no reservations required. Early bird passes are available for $10 for exclusive shopping from 9 to 10 a.m. and will be sold at the door.

SW Kansas Democrats invited to election night ‘Watch Party’ in Liberal

NEWS

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

C o s t u m e co n t e s t a n t s li n e u p f or j u d g i n g f o ll ow i n g t h e d a n c e . T h e t op t w o w in n e r s ( t h i r d fr o m l e f t w as f ir s t p la ce a n d f ar r i g h t w as se co nd) r ec ei v ed t wo m ea ls at th e Mi ll er C af e i n Tur pi n, O kla . L&T photo/Robert Pierce

Be sure to trade with the businesses that advertise in the Leader & Times, they are the reason you have a daily newspaper!


8A

Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

NEWS on the

HAPPENINGS high plains

Sign ups being taken for final Hunters Safety Education courses

Students, age 11 and up, may now start signing up to take Hunter Safety Education courses to receive their Hunter Safety Card. The final class of the season will be available on Nov. 17 and 18. Students will need to attend the weekend session in order to receive their card. Class will be take place from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 1 to 6 p.m. on Sunday. Classes will be free and lunch will be provided on Saturday. Thel class will be at the Ag Building at 1081 Stadium Road in Liberal. To register, please call the K-State Research and Extension Office at 620-624-5604. A free lunch will be provided on Saturday. Students must attend both days. Student does not need to bring anything to class. No one under the age of 11 will be certified in hunter education. Those under age 11 may take the course on a space available basis. Anyone taking the Hunter Education courses prior to the age 11 will be required to take the course again for certification after turning 11.

SIGN UP NOW

Meade Lake State Park to offer chance to learn sport of trapping

In November, Meade Lake State Park and Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism will be offering one lucky youth the opportunity to learn the sport of trapping. Instruction on techniques and fur handling will take place on a Saturday morning. All participants will be required to attend a pre-trap meeting. Youth ages 9-13 are eligible for this demonstration, which is geared to introduce the sport of trapping to new or inexperienced youngsters. Previous experience is not required.A parent or guardian will be required to attend. For a chance to win this opportunity, please submit a 4x6 card with the name of youth, name of parent or guardian attending, address, and phone number to: Meade State Park 13051 V Road Meade, Kansas 67864 620-873-2572 Applications must be received by Nov. 12.

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Mailings in Kan. legislative races rile both sides TOPEKA (AP) — Democratic state senators are denouncing the Kansas Chamber of Commerce over a mailing to potential voters that exaggerates the depth of unemployment in the state and attacks the incumbents over a sales tax increase that the chamber now wants to keep in place. But even as Democratic lawmakers criticize the powerful, conservative Republican-leaning chamber, the Kansas Democratic Party has been forced to apologize for mailings against two GOP House members. The fliers said the Republican lawmakers voted for the final version of budget legislation in 2011 that included a cut in base aid for public schools, when the lawmakers voted against the measure. The Topeka Capital-Journal reported this week that the chamber’s political action committee sent postcards to voters in the northeast Kansas districts of Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley of Topeka and Sens. Tom Holland of Baldwin City, Kelly Kultala of Kansas City and Laura Kelly of Topeka, suggesting they had supported past economic policies that left “154,643 unemployed Kansans.” In fact, the number of unemployed Kansans peaked in July 2009 at about 122,000, according to the state Department of Labor’s online archives and was fewer than 78,000 in September. “It’s another example of the

chamber spreading falsehoods about the Kansas economy to perpetuate their narrow interests,” Holland said. Jeff Glendening, the chamber’s vice president of political affairs, said the statistic in the mailing reflected the number of new and continuing unemployment claims submitted in Kansas during August. But a person can legitimately file multiple claims simultaneously. For example, someone who lost a job a month ago could submit four claims at the same time to reflect each of four weeks out of a job, so that the number of claims doesn’t correlate to the number of unemployed Kansans. In August, the number was just below 92,000, according to the Department of Labor. Glendening defended the mailer. “Don’t miss seeing the forest for the trees,” he said. “Whether counting unemployment claims or individuals, the fact is our state has endured stagnant private-sector job growth for far too long, and there are too many Kansans unemployed.” Hensley criticized another part of the mailer claiming Democrats were responsible for “repeatedly hiked taxes.” Glendening said it was a reference to an increase in the state sales tax in 2010 from 5.3 percent to 6.3 percent, enacted to help balance the budget. The law raising the tax specifies that it will drop to 5.7 percent in July 2013.

“That’s talking out of both sides of your mouth,” Hensley said. Kent Eckles, the chamber’s vice president of government affairs, said it initially opposed the higher sales tax because advocates sought additional revenue to fuel spending. Eckles said the chamber wanted to keep the tax at its current rate to give lawmakers room to cut income taxes. Lawmakers approved income tax reductions worth an estimated $4.5 billion over six years but refused to cancel the coming decline in the

sales tax. The chamber wants to eliminate all state income taxes. Meanwhile, the Lawrence Journal-World reported that Republicans are angry about Democratic mailings against GOP House members over votes in favor of the final 2011 budget bill, which cut the state’s base aid to public schools by 5.9 percent. Mailings named Reps. Jana Goodman of Leavenworth and Joseph Scapa of Wichita, even though they voted against the measure.

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Rotary Club offering chance on Remington 1187 Sports shotgun

The Liberal Rotary Club is conducting a fundraiser raffle to raise funds for scholarships, the water project and Polio Plus. Donations of $5 per ticket or six for $25, will give people a chance to win three prizes.The grand prize will be a Remington 1187 Sports 12 gauge shotgun. Second prize is a National Beef ribeye roll, and third prize is National Beef hamburger. The drawing will take place Tuesday, Nov. 6, and ticket holders need not be present to win. For tickets or more information, call Larry Wells at 624-5653 or John Engel at 624-2178.

DRAWING ON TUES., NOV. 6

College to offer luncheon with talk on natural gas vehicles

Seward County Community College/Area Technical School in conjunction with the City of Liberal, Chesapeake Energy and Black Hills Energy will sponsor a comprehensive lunch ‘n’ learn on Natural Gas Vehicles, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.,Wednesday, Nov. 14, in room SW229 C&D at SCCC/ATS. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about what the operators of natural gas vehicles already know, including benefits, vehicle conversion, infrastructure development and products. Representatives from Black Hills, Chesapeake, Great Plains Gas Compression and CNG 4 Kansas will provide the featured speakers. Lunch will be provided for this free workshop. However, registration is requested by Thursday, Nov. 8. Call 620-4171170 or email b&i@sccc.edu.

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Sunday, October 28, 2012 LEADER&TIMES

LIVING

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Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Yowell Casie Carlile Jayden Graves ...was 3 years old Oct. 15. She is the daughter of Jonathan and Casie Yowell of Liberal and Jeremy Graves of Kansas City, Mo. She has one sibling, brother Jeffrey Yowell. Grandparents ate Mike and Tracy Carlile of Liberal, Barbara Yowell of Hugoton, Jim and Fran Graves of Liberal and the late Jeffrey Yowell of Liberal. Great-grandparents are the late Bob and Sue Carlile of Liberal, the late Bob and Bev Faulkner of Liberal, the late Don Graves of Liberal, Helen Graves of Liberal, Bob and Iola Jacobs of Hooker, Okla., and Jack and Bev Yowell of Liberal.

Casie Carlile and Jonathan Yowell were united in marriage Sept. 22 at Memorial Hall in Hugoton. Elder Guy Rice presided over the 4 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Michael and Tracy Carlile of Liberal. She is the granddaughter of the late Bob and Sue Carlile of Liberal and the late Bob and Bev Faulkner of Liberal. The groom is the son of Barbara Yowell of Hugoton and the late Jeffrey Yowell of Liberal. He is the grandson of Bob and Iola Jacobs of Hooker, Okla., and Jack and Bev Yowell of Liberal. Maid of honor was Tara Converse of Wichita, friend of the bride. Bridesmaid was Jenifer Yowell of Las Vegas, sister of the groom. Best man was David Schmidt of Hays, friend of the groom. Groomsman was Jacob Yowell of Liberal, brother of the groom. Ushers were Dustin Pettit of Perkins, Okla., friend of the groom, and Hayden Ukens of Hooker, Okla., cousin of the groom. Flower girl was Jayden Graves of Liberal, daughter of the couple. Ring bearer was Jeffrey Yowell of Liberal, son of the couple. A reception with a dinner and dance took place at the VFW in Hugoton. The couple will make their home in Turpin, Okla. The couple are employed at J&R Sand, with the groom working as a truck driver and the bride as safety director.

Needles & Friends hosts home tour Quilt guild honors soldiers

A Q u i l t o f V a l o r P r e s e n t a ti o n w a s h o s te d Su n d a y a f t e r n o o n O c t . 1 4 , a t B ak e r A r t s C e n t e r b y N e e d le s & F r ie n d s Q u il t G u il d of L ib e r a l in c o n j u n c t i o n w i th t h e i r A u n ti e E m Q u i l t/ H o m e T o u r . Q u i l t s o f V a l o r w e r e p r e s e n t e d t o h o n o r n i n e a r e a s o l d i e r s f o r th e i r c o m m i t m e n t , b r a v e r y an d c o u r ag e . T h e A r m y N at io n a l G u ar d p r o v id e d t h e C ol or G u a r d , O l i v i a a n d T a b i t h a R o b i n s o n s a n g t h e N a ti o n a l A n t h e m , f o l l o w e d b y t h e P l e d ge o f A l l e g i a n c e a n d w e l c o m e b y V i c k i C o o p e r . A f t e r t h e r e t i r e m e n t o f t h e f l a gs , M a r t h a S m i t h , R e g i o n a l C o o r d i n a to r f o r Q u i l t s o f V a l o r o u t o f W i ch i t a , s p o k e o n t h e p u r p os e an d b e g in n in g s o f Q u il t s of V a lo r . Pe g g y L u c k s h ar e d t h e h i s t o r y o f Q u i l ts o f V a l o r f o r N e e d l e s & F r i e n d s Q u i l t G u i l d f o l l o w e d b y a b i o f o r e a c h s o l d i e r a s th e y a c ce p t e d t h e i r q u i l t . T h e f o l l o w i n g so ld ie r s, w h o h a d m or e t h a n on e d e p l oy m e n t & h a d a fa m il y , w e r e p r e s e n t e d q u i l ts : S g t . M i k e M i l l e r , 1 s t S g t . T o m N e l s o n , S p e c i a l i s t A l is h a S m i d d y , S S G R o b e r t A r m ab u la , C o r p or a l S k y l a n R e d m an , S g t . T y l e r A n tr i m , S p e c i a l i s t S t e v e n M cB r y d e , a n d S S G T h i m K h a m t h o u vo n g . P a r e n t s C o n n i e a n d R o d n e y B a c h m a n w e r e p r e s e n t e d a Q u i l t o f V a l o r i n m e m o r y o f th e i r s o n S g t . 1 s t C l a s s T r a v i s Ba c h m an w h o w a s k i l l e d i n ac t i o n . I t w as t h e d e s i r e o f N e e d le s & F r ie n d s t o e x p r e s s ou r s in c e r e t h a n k s a n d a p p r e c i at i on t o o u r s o l d i e r s & t h e i r f a m i l i e s f o r th e i r s e r v i c e a n d s a cr i f i c e . T h e c er em on y w as c l ose d in pr a y er by Lua na W al ker . Courtesy photo

Submit club notes, birthday, wedding, engagement and anniversary announcements to the Leader & Times.

N e e d l e s & F r i e n d s Q u i l t G u i l d o f L i b e r a l h o s te d i t s s e c o n d Q u i l t/ H o m e T o u r O ct . 1 3 a n d 1 4 t h . V i s i to r s r e g i s t e r e d f r o m s i x s ta t e s a n d 5 4 c i t i e s t o v i e w q u i l t s d i s p l a y e d i n f i v e h o m e s , Ba k e r A r t s C e n t e r a n d S h a n k H u m an i t i e s Bu i l d i n g a t S e w a r d C o u n ty C o mm u n i t y C o l l e g e . N i n e v e n d o r s f r om q u i lt s h o p s i n K a n s a s , O k l ah o m a a n d T e x a s d i s p l a y e d t h e i r w a r e s f o r vi s i t o r s h o p p i n g at t h e S C C C S t u d e n t A ct iv i t y C e n t e r . A s i l e n t a u c t i o n w i t h i te ms ma d e b y g u i l d m e m b e r s w a s a ls o m ad e av a il ab le t o s h op p e r s . O n S u n d a y af t e r n o on , a Q u i lt o f V a lo r P r e s e n t a ti o n w a s h e l d a t Ba k e r A r t s C e n te r . Q u i l t s o f V a l o r , q u i l t s ma d e b y g u i l d m e m b e r s t o h o n or v e t e r a n s, w e r e p r e se n t e d t o n in e a r e a so ldi er s a nd f am i li es. Courtesy photo

Tour to retrace Lincoln’s steps in Va.’s capital RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — President Abraham Lincoln famously walked the streets of the smoldering city of Richmond on April 4, 1865, as the capital of the Confederacy fell to Union forces. Now the city and the Richmond National Battlefield Park are teaming up to let visitors walk in Lincoln’s footsteps as the Civil War came to a close. The Nov. 4 walking tour is also timed ahead of the release of Steven Spielberg’s much-

A p e r s o n a l i z e d A b r a h a m L i n c o l n c r e d e n t i a l f o r T h u r s d a y’ s v i c e p r e s i d e n t i a l d e b a te h a n g s o n a s ta t u e o f L i n co l n , W e d n e s d a y , O ct . 10, at C ent r e C o ll eg e i n Da nv i ll e, K y . (AP Photo/David Goldman)

anticipated film “Lincoln,” which was filmed extensively in Richmond and the Petersburg area. The walking tour will be led by Park Ranger Mark Gorman. Organizers say he has researched Lincoln’s visit extensively and uncovered many unknown details about the president’s time in the city. The 4-hour tour will begin at 10 a.m. at the city’s restored Main Street Station.


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