Page 1

KIA’S NEW-AGE SUVs: SORENTO SEVEN-SEATER • NIRO EV ELECTRIC-HYBRID

SUV • UTE • VAN • LIGHT-TRUCKS

May/June 2018 $7.50

/NZlcvmag

LCV.CO.NZ

9 421900 196159

ISSN 2382-1221

FORD TRANSIT CUSTOM VAN The auto has landed... finally!

HOLDEN EQUINOX LTZ-V FIVE-SEAT Full review, performance times, it’s good!


Reserve your Mercedes-Benz X-Class from Trucks & Trailers. The new Mercedes-Benz X-Class arriving in April is available to order. To reserve yours visit your local Trucks & Trailers dealership now. X-Class Pure from

$53,300 incl GST*

*Excludes ORC. Trucks and Trailers have preordered stock arriving early 2018, Progressive 4WD Auto from $63,000inc + ORC, Power 4WD Auto from $69,000inc + ORC. Style, Comfort and Leather Packages available also. Power model pictured above. Terms & Conditions Apply.

Trucks & Trailers 0800 327 777 www.trucksandtrailers.co.nz/x-class


8

10

14

20

34

42

46

56

May/June 2018

2 FRONT SEAT Editor thoughts and opinions on this month’s motoring happenings.

4 NEWS It’s a busy month. Though in the SUV, ute and LCV world, it always is.

8 NIRO FAR Kia’s hybrid electric SUV arrives, and it’s shockingly good (bad pun intended).

10 FOX IN ’NOX Holden’s new Equinox – feels smaller than it is, faster, too!

14 KIA TO SUCCESS

20 UTE-LYMPICS Gathering the greatest together for a 10-event ute shootout, as they go for gold.

34 TOW NAILED We know SsangYong’s Rexton is good, but can it tow 2000 kilos?

40 MARKET VIEW: SUV/UTE The month in ute and SUV sales and success.

42 AUTO TRADER Ford’s Transit finally scores an auto… frees up the high-five!

44 MARKET VIEW: VANS The month in van sales – aka, measuring how much Hiace is leading by.

46 MARKET VIEW: LIGHT-TRUCKS The month in light-truck sales and stories.

49 SHOWROOM Listing all the SUVs, utes, vans and light-trucks on sale.

56 UTE-OPIA Send them in, we’ll show them off.

Kia lifts its already good game with the seven-seat Sorento update. LCV | 1


KIA’S NEW-AGE SUVs: SORENTO SEVEN-SEATER • NIRO EV ELECTRIC-HYBRID

SUV • UTE • VAN • LIGHT-TRUCKS SUV • UTE • VAN • LIGHT-TRUCKS

www.lcv.co.nz

May/June 2018 $7.50

MANAGEMENT Publisher

Trevor Woolston

027 492 5600

trevor@trucker.co.nz Advertising

Trish Barnett

021 925 600

lcv@trucker.co.nz EDITORIAL Editor

Dean Evans

dean@trucker.co.nz Cory Martin,

Robin Yates,

Arna Evans,

Olivia Beauchamp

ART DEPARTMENT Design & Production

Luca Bempensante

Zarko Mihic

/NZlcvmag

LCV.CO.NZ FORD TRANSIT CUSTOM VAN The auto has landed... finally!

ISSN 2382-1221

Mike Stock,

HOLDEN EQUINOX LTZ-V FIVE-SEAT Full review, performance times, it’s good!

9 421900 196159

Contributors

MARKETING ASSISTANT Lisana De Castro ADMINISTRATION & SUBSCRIPTIONS Administration Manager Sue Woolston accounts@trucker.co.nz Subscriptions

Linley Wilkinson

linley@trucker.co.nz NZ subscription price

$36 incl. GST for one year

(6 issues)

Overseas rates on application

Phone

+64 9 571 3544

Fax

+64 9 571 3549

Freephone

0508 TRUCKER (878 2537)

Postal Address

PO Box 112 062,

Penrose, AUCKLAND

Street Address

172B Marua Road,

Ellerslie, AUCKLAND

Web

www.lcv.co.nz

www.alliedpublications.co.nz PRINTING Nicholson Print Solutions DISTRIBUTION Gordon & Gotch Publication: NZ Light Commercial Vehicle is published by Allied Publications Ltd. ISSN 2382-1221 Contributions: Editorial contributions are welcomed for consideration, but no responsibility is accepted for loss or damage of submitted materials (photographs, graphics, printed material etc…). If the return of material is required please include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Please contact the editor by mail, fax, or email prior to submitting material. LCV reserves the right to edit submitted material. Copyright: Articles in LCV are copyright and may not be reproduced in any form – in whole or part – without the permission of the publisher. Opinions expressed in the magazine are not necessarily the opinions of, or endorsed by, the publisher.

NZ Light Commercial Vehicles Magazine Net circulation – ended 30/06/2015

5,768

www.lcv.co.nz

2 | LCV

HELLO AND THANK YOU! IF THIS IS THE first issue of LCV magazine you’ve picked up and started reading, thanks for looking, and welcome to the celebration of what has become the most popular, best-selling and versatile vehicle market over the past five years. It’s no secret that the ute market, coupled with the SUV market, are insanely popular right now with growth and market share unrelenting: Hilux and Ranger and have taken over the mantles of Corolla and Focus. As we head into Fieldays 2018, the 50th anniversary event, we’re keenly looking forward to what has become not just the proxy New Zealand (and Australian, for that matter) motor show, but a niche market for utes and SUVs too. Fieldays has become ‘neutral ground’, the perfect place to showcase a vehicle brand, model and even launch a new or special model in a casual, relaxed and conversational atmosphere, without the pressure of a showroom or sales pitch – especially if it’s a ute. Over the last decade, we’ve seen a remarkable shift of buyers habits, where now the majority of buyers conduct their initial research on vehicles online: buyers are smarter, more informed and better prepared to take on the dealer and by the time a foot is placed onto a new or used showroom floor,

the buying decision is as good as done – it’s then just a matter of the price and maybe a few unconsidered extras. In a market where utes and SUVs dominate not just the top 10, but the top 25, the days of Commodore and Falcon being one-two are long gone, and while Ranger, Hilux and Colorado have displaced them, the Korean Hyundais and Kias are also showing what 20 years of listening to customers can do, with its SUVs as good as anything on the market, if not better. And with the Chinese (and other) market influx, the reality is we’re spoilt for choice and it’s become a buyer’s market, with an SUV or ute to suit almost any budget or use. Why buy a car? Apart from the physical size, for a family or work vehicle, the gap to car fuel economy has all but been eliminated, with diesel technology proving resoundingly capable for carrying the extra weight of all the luxuries expected in a modern large car. If you have a ute, whether it’s a company fleet car, family run-around or workhorse, post a photo on our Facebook page and tell us why you like it - and thanks again for finding LCV magazine. Dean Evans – dean@trucker.co.nz

www.facebook.com/NZLCVmag


Canopies

Your One Stop Van and Ute Fit Out Specialists • Quality service and workmanship • Impartial expertise / solutions focused • Customer-driven fit out solutions at an affordable price • Attentive and innovative with over 60 years in the industry

• Auckland and Wellington locations • We match any Motor Company warranty

Fitting out fleets for over 60 years.

Trade and Reseller enquiries welcome.

www.haleman.co.nz

AUCKLAND Steve Newland

AUCKLAND Michelle Stretton

WELLINGTON Geri Kraal

National Automotive Division Manager

Business Development Manager

Business Development Manager

P: +64 9 573 1820 M: 027 274 9998 E: steven@haleman.co.nz

P: +64 9 573 5999 M: 021 357 232 E: michelle@haleman.co.nz

P: +64 4 568 7035 M: 021 994 794 E: Geraldine.Kraal@haleman.co.nz

LCV26990

• Available Nationwide through our Agent network


NEW HILUX $10,000 CHEAPER!

Haggling is gone, but new Toyota prices lower.

CUSTOMERS COULD SAVE AS MUCH AS $10,000 off a new Hilux, in a shake-up of the new car buying system, according to Toyota New Zealand CEO Alistair Davis, that includes no new vehicles in any Toyota dealership. On March 29’s AM Showw, the CEO said prices are set to drop with a refinement of the online buying experience, saving “in the order of $10,000 off a retail price off of a Hilux”. Davis says Toyota is “changing the whole business model”, with cars specified online and cars stored and picked up from one of the 50 regional ‘stores’ – the new term for dealer, and the same number as current. Basically an elimination of new cars from dealers, customers will still be able to visit a local dealership for a test-drive (or to buy used), and once happy with their selection, configure their vehicle and it will be delivered to their local store - though wait times were not mentioned.

Added Davis: “Toyota New Zealand will still have the people selling the cars, so the stores will be there really for facilitating the sale. The big savings come from consolidating all our stock into just three locations.” Savings in freight will be passed on to customers, almost $10k off a $60k Hilux, says Davis, and though this hampers the ability to price haggle and negotiate person-toperson, he says the ultimate price will be

cheaper anyway. Davis added that no jobs will be affected, with staff retrained for the new system. Freight companies however... There will also be a seven-day moneyback buyer’s remorse allowance, for genuine buyers, and with less than 500km. Of the 1.2 million vehicles sold in NZ each year, 160,000 of those are new cars. See the interview here: https://bit.ly/2GSXjLP

MAGNUM 1 SOLD THE FIRST HOLDEN COMMODORE MAGNUM Ute was recently auctioned off for charity, with the winning bidder paying $73,100 for the Phantom Black, build plate #01 and collectors pack. Just 51 were built for NZ, inspired by the original Magnum developed by HDT in 1983, and it’s the

4 | LCV

fastest, best equipped Holden Ute ever created (HSV being a separate arm), with a 6.2-litre V8, six-speed auto, FE3 suspension with firmer, shorter springs, Brembo brakes, unique 20-inch wheels, hard tonneau and Magnum graphics. Auctioned at Leadfoot Festival in February, proceeds from the sale went towards

supporting disadvantaged youth to participate in the Holden Street Smart Programme, a road safety initiative aimed at improving young driver skills. The auction was run through TradeMe, viewed by 50,000 people, and closed to coincide with the completion of the Festival.


Photo: Geoff Ridder

ACTYON UTE SERIES CURTAIN CALL – FOR NOW

LAUNCHED IN 2014, THE SSANGYONG ACTYON ute racing series came to a close at Pukekohe recently, with the final round of the fourth series bringing to a close the popular and wellsupported entry level racing series – at least with ownership under SsangYong NZ. With the new

SsangYong Musso looming, the Actyon’s days as an on-track brand ambassador came to an end, with 25 cars on track for the final two 90-minute races at Pukekohe Park in March. Though 30 seconds a lap slower than a V8 Supercar, the identical Actyons made for some close and

spectacular racing, with Peter Bennett (paired with Jordan Baldwin for the enduro) winning the 2018 championship. The SsangYong ute series is planned to continue under new owners, with the race cars for sale for $10,000+GST.

Above: The SsangYong Acyton Ute series Right: Jordan Baldwin & Peter Bennett, winners in 2018. Photo: Geoff Ridder Far right: SsangYong’s new Musso is due later in 2018.

Photo: Geoff Ridder

SEAT COVERS SEAT COVERS SEAT COVERS

Trucks • Utes – Vans – Commercials • Construction Machinery • •high Genuine high quality 12oz canvas • Genuine quality 12oz canvas Agriculture Machinery • Quad Bikes • Genuine high quality 12oz canvas • Manufacturing for over 20 12oz yearscanvas • Manufacturing for over 20 years • Genuine high quality • Manufacturing for over 20 years Water & rot proof • Water & •rot proof • Manufacturing for over 25 years • Water & rot proof a new • Easy to to fit clean -&easy to clean • Easy to fit - easy if buyingspecify • Water rot proof • Easy to fit - easy to clean vehicle Duck • Side airbag • Side airbag compatible • Easy tocompatible fit - easy to clean • Side airbag compatible Black Tailored to fit each type of seat • Tailored •specifically to fit each type of seat • Sidespecifically airbag compatible • Tailored specifically to fit each type of seat • Over 3000available patterns available • Over 3000 patterns • Tailored specifically to fit each type of seat • Over 3000 patterns available • Protect your vehicle investment • Protect your vehicle investment • Over 3000 patterns available • Protect your vehicle investment • Overnight delivery available on most products • Overnight delivery available on most products • Protect your vehicle investment • Overnight delivery available on most products • Overnight delivery available on most products

Ph: 0800 479 - sales@blackduck.co.nz - www.blackduck.co.nz Ph: 0800 158 479158 - sales@blackduck.co.nz - www.blackduck.co.nz Ph: 0800 158 479 - sales@blackduck.co.nz - www.blackduck.co.nz

LCV28006

SUPSEUSRHPUEPRERH TOUTGOTUOGUHG

LCV | 5


NARVA LED BAR

Narva’s new Explora LED: turn day into night, and roadkill into medium-well.

NARVA HAS INTRODUCED A NEW COMPACT DRIVING LIGHT bar for SUVs and utes that’s 30 percent brighter than a conventional 12-inch single-row LED bar. The ‘Explora’ LED Driving Light Bar employs ‘Advanced Optic Drive Technology’ to produce an impressive 2400 Lumens and 1 Lux of light at 269 metres, making night-time motoring on very dark roads, around the farm or in off-road locations much safer. The special reflector profile efficiently captures the light from the unit’s 12 x 3W high-powered LEDs (producing 6000°K) and concentrates the focus to achieve a penetrating light output further down the road – plus it’s designed to withstand the tough weather conditions and demanding onand-off-road applications here in New Zealand. The light bar features a durable one-piece diecast aluminium housing with stainless mounting brackets, without end caps for superior heat dissipation and protection against moisture, and the 9-32V multi-voltage Explora is suitable for both 12 and 24V vehicles with a Deutsch connector, and has a five-year LED warranty. There’s also an optional alloy numberplate mounting bracket compatible with NZ plates without drilling, and an optional wiring harness for quick and easy fit.

Full-time truck driver. Part-time photographer. Take the time to enjoy the scenery around you instead of getting back to do paperwork. Mobilcard can help you with this. It takes care of managing your fleet and fuel costs, freeing you up to be more productive. Which means you can fit work around your life, and the world around you. For information please contact Mobilcard Sales on 0800 662 458, email mobilcardsales@exxonmobil.com or visit mobilcard.co.nz

Mobilcard. The fuel card that helps you run things your way.

6 | LCV MOB2078_NZTnD

MOB2078 NZTnD 210x147Hmm.indd 1

28/04/17 12:45 PM


THE $3 million SUV PART STEALTH FIGHTER, PART BATMOBILE, part matt black origami project, the Karlmann King claims the dubious but headlinegrabbing title as the world’s most expensive SUV, retailing around $2.2mUSD, or more than $3mNZD. Unveiled at the Dubai International Motor Show last year, production is limited to just

12 units. Based on the Ford F550, the body is a mix of steel and carbin fibre, powered by a 6.8-litre V10 producing 400hp. But in a sixmetre long SUV weighing between 4500kg – or 6000kg for the bulletproof versions! – performance is somewhat modest, with a top speed of 140km/h. Inside, the night sky design is illuminated

with LEDs, plus an HD 4K TV, private safe box and phone projection. And we can’t forget the fridge and coffee machine, all controlled by a smartphone app.

Manufacture and and Distributors Distributors of of world world class class automotive automotive accessories. accessories. Manufacture Towbars, Vehicle Vehicle Protection Protection Equipment Equipment and and Load Load Carrying Carrying Solutions Solutions Towbars,

0800 0800 BEST BEST BARS BARS

||

www.bestbars.co.nz www.bestbars.co.nz

|| sales@bestbars.co.nz sales@bestbars.co.nz

Best Best Bars Bars is is a a division division of of Horizon Horizon Global Global NZ NZ Limited Limited

AUTO AUTO ACCESSORIES ACCESSORIES

LCV | 7

12:45 PM


NIRO FAR

Story: Dean Evans Photos: Supplied

Sipping as little as 1.3l/100km, with up to 3200km possible from just a 43-litre tank, Kia says its Niro is NZ’s most economical SUV – and at a reasonable price, too.

SMALLER THAN A SPORTAGE AND larger than a Soul, Kia’s new Niro claims the title as NZ’s most efficient SUV. The headline model is the PHEV – Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle – which combines a conventional 1.6-litre petrol four-cylinder with a 96-cell battery, which it uses to drive up to Plugging in is reserved for the top-spec model only, but charges take between 2.5 and four-hours, depending on the amp rating from the domestic or commercial outlet.

55km in electric-only mode, or a theoretical 3200km between fills of its 43-litre tank! It’s no slouch, either, with 0-100km/h in 10.8 seconds, top speed of 172km/h and solid handling thanks in part to Michelin tyres across the range. And that’s the key feature of the Niro: it performs, handles, weighs and cost the same as a normal compact SUV, but uses substantially less fuel. Or no fuel, in EV mode. The headline fuel number from the plug-in

electric model does require a little effort. Along with petrol in the tank, the battery needs external-sourced charging. Two chargers are included: for a standard domestic three-pin plug, which takes around four hours to fully charge at eight amps, includes a heat-sensitive plug which shuts down if it’s overloading a circuit; or a Type 2/three-phase cable, which pumps in 16 amps (though it can accept up to 32A), for a full charge in 2.5 hours.

Niro can drive up to 55km in electric EV mode, before needing a recharge, which takes between 2.5 and four hours.

DRIVE IT LIKE YOU OWN IT 1

Hybrid system gauge

2 3

Battery level

4 8 | LCV

Petrol gauge

EV mode indicator

RATHER THAN A TACHO, NIRO uses a simplified dash cluster, with a needle pointing to eco driving, power or charge modes, the latter motivated by downhill or braking situations. Designed more for urban driving, the system charges best in slow moving start-stop traffic, though in PHEV, it ultimately requires the charger to regain full battery capacity.


Identifying the Hybrid versus the Plug-in isn’t easy, with a range of mix & match wheels. Easiest spot is the charging flap on the passenger-side front guard.

The engine is a conventional 1.6 petrol engine, but the orange wires give the game away that something’s special, with the parallel hybrid sandwiching in neatly between engine and gearbox.

Nothing to see here, in relative terms. Rear seat is roomy for a compact SUV, leather is available on both top-spec models.

Boot space varies depending on the model, with the Plug-in taking up a little more due to its extra battery under the floor, which removes about 10cm of depth.

It’s no slouch, with 0-100km/h in 10.8 seconds for the plug-in, or 11.5 seconds for the entry level HEV. The Niro also uses a simpler parallel hybrid system, similar to systems used by Hyundai and VW, which sandwiches the electric motor between the engine and gearbox, enabling a smaller, lighter and cheaper system, at the expense of long-distance efficiency. While driving, the system is effectively seamless and invisible. There are displays which show where power is being fed to/from, and a small green EV light when in electric mode either automatically (in the two HEV models) and/or manually in the plug-in PHEV. But while the PHEV may take the headlines, it’s the Hybrid HEV that will sell more, with early sales figures suggesting the Hybrid – in EX or LTD specs – outsells the $15,000 price-premium PHEV ten-to-one. And it’s easy to see why: the EX’s $39,990 is targeted right at the rapidly growing under-$40k compact SUV market, and is extremely well equipped with all the increasingly expected mod-cons such as Smart Cruise Control, reverse camera and a big touchscreen display. Its slick 0.29Cd helps

achieve 3.8l/100km, for up to 1200km per 45-litre tank. It uses one-third fewer batteries than the PHEV, and doesn’t need an external charger, but does get a little more boot space. Dimensionally, Niro’s 4.35m length is 12.5cm shorter than a Sportage, but its 2.7m wheelbase is 3cm longer, so there’s plenty of room inside, including the rear seats. Though it doesn’t get the EV-only mode, the HEV is easily the pick of the range, and with Kia offering a temporary introduction price of $34,990, that’s a very appealing compact SUV. Energy isn’t free, and even electric vehicles cost money to refill, but Kia has done a lot of permutations and calculated its PHEV costs $3 per 100km to run, which it says is a few dollars less than even the Tesla Model X SUV. Kia’s Niro represents another step forward in the feasibility of hybrid electric vehicles, and puts it all into a compact SUV. With a five-year warranty, and seven years on the battery, Kia’s Niro isn’t just the future of compact SUVs, it’s the right now.

SPEC CHECK 2018 Kia Niro Hybrid & PHEV www.kia.co.nz Engine

1.6-litre petrol four

Power/torque

77kW/147Nm (engine)

Motor

32kW Hybrid/45kW PHEV

Combined

104kW Hybrid/122kW PHEV

Gearbox

Six-speed DCT

Economy

3.8l/100km (Hybrid), 1.3l/100km (PHEV)

0-100km/h:

11.5sec/10.8sec

Price

$34,990(intro)/$55,990

Full specs

www.lcv.co.nz

Rating (/5) Verdict

Impressive, especially at the intro price

LCV | 9


FOX IN ’NOX

Story: Mike Stock

With a new nine-speed gearbox, technology, ride and handling, the Equinox may be feature packed, but the real surprise is its speed. MADE IN AMERICA, AT LEAST AS FAR as cars were concerned, used to mean acres of sheetmetal, dubious road manners, and marshmallow-soft suspension, often to the detriment of handling and driver-to-road connection. And when a US car does handle, its ride quality turns into a skateboard. So I approached Holden’s new Equinox

SUV with a few preconceptions about what I might find; but I was pleased to discover they were, in fact, misconceptions. The five-seat Equinox is the first of Holden’s two new American-designed SUVs to arrive here, and will be joined by the big, seven-seat Acadia later this year. It replaces the five-seat Korean-derived

Seven models offer choices of engines and spec; this is the top-spec LTZ-V with heated/cooled seats, smartphone mirroring, lane assist, reverse camera with cross-traffic alert and even a seat vibrator. Yes, you read right.

10 | LCV

Captiva, and to my eyes has far more pleasing lines. I say American designed because the Equinox is actually built in Mexico, to the south of President Trump’s still largely imaginary border wall. Equinox starts at $35,990 for the LS, in a seven-model range, but up two models is the LT, which sports the 2.0-litre petrol engine and nine-speed gearbox, right up to the selectable all-wheel drive LTZ-V for $56,990. The numbers are 188kW and 353Nm which endow Equinox with sparkling performance and vivid acceleration. We clocked 7.4 seconds to 100km/h, sprinting like a startled fox. Put that down to the engine running a high 20psi of turbo boost, and it certainly belies its 1800kg-withdriver weight. There’s a touch of torquesteer, and a whiff of wheelspin, but it’s easily moderated. For even more control, the LTZ-V model has semi-selectable allwheel drive. If it detects wheelspin, it will automatically direct up to 50 percent drive to the rear, but there’s also a switch on the console that activates AWD, which is ideal for fast but discrete getaways, especially in the wet. Like all current Holdens, regardless of their country of origin, the Equinox has benefitted from Holden Australia engineering input to fine-tune the chassis


Above: Not just keyless starting from inside, Equinox also allows remote starting via the keyfob, ideal for hot or cold mornings. Centre console has wireless inductive charging, though it requires a USB cable for replication on the screen, which also charges.

for Antipodean conditions and drivers’ tastes and expectations. The Australasian Equinox gets different suspension hardware to US and international versions of the car, and

mix of urban, state highway, motorway and winding country roads, the Equinox provided a great deal of driving pleasure. The overall handling feel is similar to a large, well-sorted sedan. On a

Holden quotes fuel economy of 8.2 litres/100km, and we saw 8.9 in real-world combined use. Road noise levels are low, especially on chip seal surfaces, and mechanical noise is

A switch activates AWD, which is ideal for fast but discrete getaways, especially in the wet. Holden has re-tuned the dampers and recalibrated the electrically-boosted power steering. The result is a sublime chassis with excellent balance. Combine that with the engine’s seamless power delivery, and the smooth and fast-shifting nine-speed auto and you have an engaging companion for rural open-road driving. Or city slicking. On my 200-kilometre test loop which takes in a variety of road surfaces and a

particularly tight and winding section, the Equinox proved nimble and precise, unfazed by constant changes of direction, and engendered a great deal of driver confidence. Holden has achieved the handling balance while retaining a supple ride and the Equinox is comfortable even on gnarly surfaces. Top models ride on 19-inch alloy wheels and 235/50 tyres, with no detrimental effect on ride quality.

well-suppressed. Holden’s active noisecancellation system does an effective job, using four microphones embedded in the headliner to detect hum, then activating an on-board frequency generator to send counteracting sound waves through the sound system’s speakers and sub-woofer. The standard HoldenEye package consists of Forward Collision Alert with head-up warning projected on to the windscreen, Autonomous Emergency

LCV | 11


Left: Reverse camera uses active turning – and long – guidelines and also cross-traffic alert on the upper models. Far left: Storage in the boot is big, with an underfloor compartment.

Braking, Lane Departure Warning, Rear Cross-traffic Alert, Blind Spot Alert, and a Following Distance Indicator. There is also automatic headlight high-beam dipping. Augmenting the audible warning, the driver’s seat vibrates with some of those warnings, decided by a suite of sensors and cameras. Parking assist programs and a good reversing camera with active guidelines displays on the eight-inch touch-screen, which make it easy to manoeuvre it into parking spaces – if only the turning circle was as agile, at a big and clumsy 12.7 metres; this is the same as Colorado, which itself is already larger than Ranger and Hilux.

Standard equipment upper-spec models include LED headlights and taillights to see and be seen, a hands-free power-operated tailgate that, once you’ve got the right kicking motion sussed, works great, rain-sensing windscreen wipers, wireless phone-charging, and a Bose premium audio system. The cabin has a quality feel about it, and delivers a pleasant environment for driver and passengers. Keyless entry is standard and – like the Colorado - the engine can be started remotely, or by dashboard-mounted pushbutton. Dual-zone AC is another nice touch. The MyLink infotainment system is Apple CarPlay/Android Auto-compatible,

and has Bluetooth capability, a USB port, an auxiliary input jack, and embedded satellite navigation, with lots of controls on the wheel, as expected, but the volume at the fingertips of the right hand – which proves more convenient than appears. The Equinox provides Holden with a very competitive entry in the mid-sized SUV segment. It feels more modern than the Captiva it replaces, has hot-hatch performance, well-sorted handling and a nine-speed gearbox that ensures the engine is always performing at close to maximum efficiency. I enjoyed the LTZ immensely, and it’s one of the best SUVs I’ve driven recently. Holden has a winner in the Equinox.

The only low point is the big and clumsy 12.7 metre turning circle, same as the Colorado ute

SPEC CHECK 2018 Holden Equinox LTZ-V www.holden.co.nz Engine

2.0-litre turbo petrol four

Power

188kW@5500rpm

Torque

353Nm@2500-4500rpm

Gearbox

Nine-speed auto

Economy

8.4l/100km (59l tank)

Weight

1732kg

0-60/100km/h

3.6sec/7.4sec

Price

$35,990-$56,990 (tested)

Full specs

www.lcv.co.nz

Rating (/5) Verdict

12 | LCV

Highly competent & equipped


I STEPPED INTO THE EQUINOX NOT really knowing much more than it was a replacement for the five-seat Captiva, which I quite liked. It’s easy to get immediately comfortable in the heated and cooled seat, and steering adjustment is spot-on – the Equinox actually feels a little smaller than it is. The sales trinkets are quite handy too, with the kick-to-open rear hatch, though I did feel overly conscious when learning the best action. And the ability to vary its opening height is a nice touch, especially in our lower-than-normal garage.

Everything in the cabin is very userfriendly, but on the motorway I found myself seated in a ‘flamingo’ position: the low left footrest is offset by a relatively high throttle pedal. It’s not uncomfortable, just takes a little getting used to. Or use cruise control… But the vibrating seat was also a mild surprise! For some warnings, such as when the parking sensors kick in, collision warning, or when the rear cross-traffic alert sounds, the seat base momentarily vibrates. I wonder if that’s being marketed to women enough?!

Dash warning is perfect for forgetful parents. Or quiet kids.

Rear passengers score in Equinox upper models, with heated and cooled seats, twin USB ports, 12v socket, 230v outlet and vents.

The rear seats have lots of room for the kids, and is well featured with vents, heated and cooled seats in upper models, flip-down headrests, a pair of USB ports, 12v socket and 230v inverter socket, bins in the doors and two cupholders in the fold-down centre armrest. That’s quite accommodating! The dash reminder to check the back seats after extinguishing the engine did give me a (sad) chuckle, that society has reached this point, though it’s easily deactivated. The kids loved the panoramic roof, but the turning circle is big and bad: 12.7 metres is just too big, and had me threepoint turning just to get into a school parking space. I did get a big surprise from the power and for the blind engine quiz, I guessed a 3.0 V6, so was very impressed to see a 2.0-litre turbo four-cylinder. It’s a jet in a straight line and isn’t afraid to wheelspin around town, which is both good (for the kids) and bad (for attracting attention). The on-demand AWD button was tried, but I’ll stick to front-drive and keep the lower fuel bills, somewhat aided by the idle stop-start that works a treat. The styling is conservative, especially in Son of a Gun Grey, but it’s probably the colour I’d choose anyway. Aside from the turning circle, Equinox is a thumbsup from me… though I’d probably lean towards the $43,990 LT model, lose a few creature comforts but save myself $13,000.

I liked the Equinox a lot, just not the ‘flamingo’ driving position induced by the low driver’s footrest, and raised accelerator pedal.

Plenty of head and legroom for rear car seats and adults alike.

Flip-down rear headrests are a joy, eliminating the need to remove and store headrests, allowing extra space for kid’s seats.

LCV | 13


Story: Dean Evans

KIA TO SUCCESS Kia’s seven-seat Sorento gets a freshen-up with smartphone connection and a new eight-speed transmission, but do the niggles detract from the added joy? TWO FACES LIT UP WITH EXCITEMENT as the white 2018 Kia Sorento pulled into the driveway. Not because daddy’s home, but because daughter one and two had been told about the imminent seven-seater. Nothing new

in Sorento world, but the novelty thrill of sitting in the third row is palpable for a five- and twoyear old. Partly because they’re close together and the two girls can hold hands; and partly because they’re a row further from mum and

dad, enabling discipline-free naughty-ness. At least that happiness spreads throughout the cabin, with the facelifted 2018 Sorento offering a few tweaks and updates to what has, and is, one of the best seven-seat SUVs on the market. Flagship to the Kia range, the heart of the Sorento is its 2.2-litre turbo diesel engine that, when launched in the mid-2000s, was a decade ahead of its time. It’s the same great engine in the 2018 model – 147kW and 441Nm – but it’s been mated with a new eight-speed automatic transmission that’s as discreet as it is efficient. Kia quotes “a slickshifting, more decisive drive, while improving economy and reducing emissions,” but a good automatic transmission is like a good referee: it simply does its job effectively without even realising it’s there. Smooth and efficient, the only clue is the number ‘8’ that appears on the dash in manual mode. There are also selectable modes for eco, comfort, sport and Left: Four spec levels offer features such as keyless entry, smartphone projection, but all have lots of practical storage spaces and bins.

A good automatic transmission is like a good referee: it simply does its job effectively without even realising it’s there. 14 | LCV


smart, that also affect the steering feel, but we left it in smart for the majority of the drive and like a worker ant, the new transmission just does its job without fuss or complaint. Other updates for 2018 include LED headand tail-lights, revised front and rear bumpers, grille and new alloy wheels. Better lumbar control, revised steering wheel, gauges, climate control LCD display and the addition of smartphone replication mark the key interior changes. Not that we had many complaints before.

time, but jumping into another car and back into the Sorento, the first quarter of brake pedal travel is disproportionately effective. Otherwise the drive time with Sorento is as sparkling as it’s always been, balancing power with practicality and economy. It’s swift for its 2000kg, with 0-100km/h in 9.5 seconds, but it enhances this with not just a great spread of urgency whatever the speed, but frugality reserved for cars half its size. Kia claims 7.2l/100km combined, and it’s not

Above: Sorento’s seven seats make it popular from the supermarket to the playground. Below left: Rear seats fold down, and third row makes Sorento a favourite. Below right: Plenty of power onboard, with front 12v sockets, aux and USB ports, plus rear sockets for USB and 12v.

Like a worker ant, the new transmission just does its job without fuss or complaint. Another addition is Kia’s Idle Stop & Go, which saves a few sips of fuel in heavy traffic. The engine restarts once the brake pedal is lifted, and while this technology is more than 10 years old, only over the past year or two has it become non-intrusive, ie fast enough to not hinder normal driving. Unfortunately the Sorento’s system still feels a couple of years old, because the time from lifting the brake pedal to moving away is more than 1.5 seconds: not a problem 80 percent of the time for normal, leisurely driving, but there are times where a faster response would be preferred. There’s also the carry-over complaint from the previous generation, a sensitive brake pedal. It’s easy enough to get used to over

LCV | 15


!!

!!

!!!!! ! !!!!!!! !

D

I

SZ

!W B

JO B!

3129 WpZD

KV

2018 THE YEAR OF THE DAILY

˟‫ࣺږ‬ग7"/

7"/0'5)&:&"3*/$)*/"

O!

PG !

U I F ! Z FB

S!

JO

!

BEING THE BEST IS A FAMILY BUSINESS ALL OVER THE WORLD

Whatever the road, the mission and the customer, the Daily family vehicles lead the way in both goods and people transpor t, thanks to their unmistakable DNA made of strength, quality, versatility, comfor t and safety. Wherever you are in the world, whatever you do, there’s already a Daily in the successful future of your business. NEW CHINA DAILY - VAN OF THE YEAR IN CHINA 2018 DAILY BLUE POWER - INTERNATIONAL VAN OF THE YEAR 2018

IVE261 IVE261.indd 1

27/03/18 2:54 PM


!!

!!

!!!!! ! !!!!!!! !

I

JO B!

"

It’s swift for 2000kg, with 0-100km/h in 9.5 seconds… and frugality reserved for cars half its size. just achievable, but easily bettered. It’s not uncommon to see 6s and even 5s appear on the trip computer on the motorway, while we still managed 7.9l/100km of mostly city driving. One other number to consider is 2000kg, which is the towing limit for Sorento, a little lower than expected, if that’s an issue. All aboard is made easy with keyless go in all but the bottom spec model, and comfort is king, with telescopic steering and plenty of seat adjustment making it easy for all sizes to be at ease. Though the spec level dictates wheel and tyres size, which dictates the ride quality to some extent, the 18-inch package on the EX we tested was spot on, though the 17s on the LX and the 19s on the Limited and Premium would each offer a slightly different experience.

On the whole, the minor complaints take half a star off what is a five-star SUV, but the Sorento is that good, nit-picking is all that’s left. We were impressed that the EX package we sampled, at $55,990 it is well equipped, but even the base model LX at $51,990 offers all the essentials. The $73,990 Premium, if you prefer, adds extras like autonomous emergency braking, around view monitor, a better sound system and power tail-gate, among others. At 4.8m long, it’s a big SUV, but unlike most leading utes, just managed to squeeze inside our home garage during our test time. With all its attributes, plus a fiveyear/100,000km warranty, a Kia Sorento could just find a permanent home in there, too. We know at least two faces who’d be very happy.

Above: At 4.2m, Sorento is long on the outside, but small enough to feel small enough from behind the wheel. Below left: Boot room still decent with third row raised.

2018 Kia Sorento www.kia.co.nz Engine

2.2-litre turbo diesel four

Power

147kW@3800rpm

Torque

441Nm@1750-2750rpm

Gearbox

Eight-speed auto

Economy

7.2l/100km (claim), 7.9l/100 (tested)

0-60/100km/h

4.3sec/9.5sec

Price

$59,990 EX ($55,990-$73,990)

Full specs

www.lcv.co.nz

Rating (/5) Verdict

Almost perfect all-round seven-seater

LCV | 17

IVE261 2:54 PM


THE SORENTO WAS PERFECTLY TIMED. With the recent news that we’re expecting a third child mid-year, we’ve already started looking at seven-seaters to replace our large but still-only-five-seat VW Touareg; because three kids across the rear is fine, but three kids’ seats is not. My parents previously owned a 2015 Sorento, so it’s good to see the highlights continue. I love the smooth power and the way it drives; it’s large but doesn’t feel that way. Vision is great all-around, and the turning circle is a handy 11.4m. We clipped in the ISOFIX seats and loaded up the kids in the second row, and they were more than happy with the centre vents, and the fold-down centre arm-rest, plus a few pockets in the doors. Plenty of leg room for them, too, even with both our six-foot-plus frames pushing the front seats back. In the second row, there’s both USB and 12v ports, though the fan controls and heated seats are reserved for the Premium model. Moving them into the third row wasn’t as easy as, however. The second-row seats only tilt forward or fold flat for access, neither which is particularly great for ingress, or trying to clip in their seat-belts. At least the task of moving and folding the seats is fantastic, with straps on the back of the third row to drop/raise them, and levers on

18 | LCV

the second row that are logical and large. If the second row flipped up/forward, it’d be perfect. Those complaints are offset, however, with the third row’s storage pockets, cup-holders and clips and elastic on each side to neatly stow the seatbelts and buckles. Back up front, the basic value of storage to place phones, wallets and keys in the pair of large centre pockets, plus the flip-up armrest can’t be overestimated either, and coupled with sliding security doors over them, and it’s things like these that make everyday life with the Sorento so appealing. I like the dash and look and feel of it all – it’s logical and clean without being gaudy. Though we drove the EX model, there wasn’t really anything I was longing for. I was very comfortable, very quickly, which simply says how good the cabin is. After some time passing through the stopstart of the city, I started reaching for the Idle Stop & Go deactivate button, as with the short stops, its delay to restart became more of a nuisance. Plus the engine’s that efficient, for our useage (not many stops), there isn’t much to be saved. And the brake pedal is just too sensitive around the 3050km/h speeds. We’ve already been smitten with the previous Sorento, and with this new model, the affair continues. It’s already on the short list.

This is as good as access to the third row gets, so it’s a slight struggle for passengers to get in, and for children, to reach in and strap in.

Above: Two ISOFIX mounts in the second row, plus a neat storage for unused buckles. Below left: Plenty of space for six in comfort, and seven if required. Spot the child without a smartphone or tablet… Below: Though not largest in class, there’s still a huge amount of cargo space with all the seats folded, certainly enough for a garage of kids vehicles.


Show us your ute, plus a few lines about what you like or dislike about it to our Facebook page facebook.com/NZLCVmag Owner: Danny Thompson Vehicle: 2008 Mitsubishi Triton Opinion: A bloody good wagon! 3.2-litre goes like a cut cat, it handles better with the bigger wheels rather than the factory alloys. Mitsi Rotorua does amazing aftersales service. Spent the summer holidays cruising around the top of the south island and it never missed a beat.

Owner: Mark Amer Vehicle: 2014 Ford Falcon Pursuit Opinion: My garage ornament! Only three of these V8 Falcon Pursuit utes were sold in NZ. I had the exhaust done, wheels and suspension and it rides OK, but it’s really low (legal, of course, lol) but you’ve got to be careful where you take it.

Owner: Douglas Middlemiss Vehicle: 2018 HSV Maloo R8 Opinion: Recently traded the Colorado 7 (SUV) in on the 2018 R8 Maloo. They’re totally different weapons, but I had a 2008 Maloo and nothing beats that V8 rumble when you press the go pedal. Colorado is a good car and heaps of grunt though. The bike is a KTM XCF350.

Owner: Warren Kendall, ViNZ Vehicle: Mitsubishi Triton Opinion: The Triton’s very good on fuel, with plenty of power, and the usual diesel lag. For the price, it has most features and the Bluetooth works well – although it only uses the passenger-side speaker, and this can’t be changed. We had some minor issues with seat wear and turbo noise, but were repaired under warranty. Servicing costs seem a little high, but vary quite a lot from dealer to dealer. I’d rate it a 7 out of 10 for value.

Owner: Kelvin Anderson Vehicle: 2017 Holden Colorado Opinion: I love Holden, so when this improved Colorado turned up at a really good price, it was an ideal replacement for our old BT-50. The bigger and nicer interior, the exterior styling and all the upgrades they’ve made over the previous model and its competitors are a bonus. I love driving to and from work and cruising around with my wee boy on the weekends - he loves our new ute.

Owner: Chris Bagrie Vehicle: 2017 VW Amarok V6 TDI Opinion: Awesome tow vehicle - even better than my last ute, a Nissan Navara STX 550. The only ute available with V6 diesel and over 550Nm, and awesome to drive. We found the back seats to be more comfortable than any other ute, too.

Grabasub

SEND UTES!

5 SUBSCRIBE EASY WAYS TO

1

$

ON

S

6

4

$

ONL

S

NEW ZEALAND’S LE

Post PO Box 112062 Penrose, Auckland 1642

Ph 09 5 Fax 09 5

Tick boxes NZ TRUCK & DRIVER 1 year (11 issues) for $80 incl. GST NZ LOGGER 1 year (11 issues) for $70 incl. GST Owner: Leighton Mabey Vehicle: 2016 Isuzu D-Max Opinion: Had it a couple of years now and never get sick of driving it. They’re a fun ute to drive and I love the fuel economy: seems to get better the more kilometres I do. It’s got a nudge bar and light bar (since the photo) and a few more lights here and there, plus a CB.

NZ TRUCKBODY & TRAILER 1 year (4 issues) for $30 incl. GST

Owner: Peter Hughes Vehicle: 2017 Ford Ranger Wildtrak Opinion: I bought a 2014 model brand new back then, and it treated us well for three years, so we replaced it with a new one. We tried the other brands to make the comparison fair, same as we did in 2014, but the Ranger was a long way ahead.

NZ LIGHT COMMERCIAL VEHICLE 1 year (6 issues) for $36 incl. GST 4 TITLES $172 incl. GST

Please tick appropriate magazine title box

MY DETAILS NAME: ADDRESS:

PHONE (day): EMAIL:

56 | LCV

Keep up to date with LCV magazine’s latest news and events at our Facebook page, the central hub for anything SUV, ute, van or light-truck related. Updates every week, almost every day, remember to Like, comment or share at least once every 30 days, to ensure Facebook’s algorithms are refreshed and you’re in the LCV loop for all our poll questions, surveys, videos, competitions and giveaways. Plus, show us your ute! Send in your ute photo and tell us what you like – or dislike – about it, and you could feature in Ute-opia, our reader page. And for the full specs of all the SUVs, utes, vans and light trucks sold in New Zealand, plus a vehicle comparison table, see www.LCV.co.nz. www.Facebook.com/NZlcvmag

SECURITY CODE:

Technology with Vision

BE SAFE BE SEEN

Install Safety DayLights™

YOUR COMPANY VEHICLE IS YOUR WORKPLACE Drivers Make Mistakes!

www.safetydaylights.com 0800 4 HELLA (0800 443 552) for your nearest HELLA stockist

Safety DayLights™ are forward facing Signal Lamps that significantly enhance the visibility of your vehicle during daylight hours to prevent vehicle crashes by ‘accidental oversight’.

Hella LCV SDL Law 185x131 2017.indd 1

VISA

MASTERCARD

CARD HOLDER NAME:

LCV28009

DO YOU LIKE US?

AP21327

PAYMENT

1/16/2017 3:20:50 PM

LCV | 19

AMEX

CHEQUE

EXPIRY DATE: SIGNATURE:


UTE-LYM P Story: Dean Evans Photos: Gerald Shacklock

They’re NZ’s most popular utes, but beyond brand loyalty, is one better than the rest? We put them to a decathalon of tests to find out the gold medal champion of champions.

20 | LCV


M PICS FORD RANGER, TOYOTA HILUX AND Holden Colorado have dominated sales charts over recent years. With such brand loyalty and fierce sales competition, in the wake of the Winter Olympics, we felt it was time to put together our own challenge: the Ute-lympics. Each of these utes has earned its right to compete, as the top spec of their respective models: the Ranger Wildtrak, Colorado Z71

series and the updated Hilux SR5 Cruiser. Like the quadrennial sporting event, we’ve gathered together the most elite in their class, all closely matched, and put them over a gruelling – well, at least challenging – decathalon of tests to find out their strengths and weaknesses, in a grab for gold, silver and bronze medals and points, across a series of eclectic tests mixing hard numbers with subjective opinion, to see who

wins which events, and who comes out on top. Each individually brilliant and beloved, it’s only when the best come together that the subtle nuances and differences can be assessed, highlighting strengths and weaknesses. So, as these top three look to reestablish themselves as the top sellers in 2018, we present the first LCV magazine Ute-lympics. Let the games begin!

LCV | 21


All closely matched, we put them over a challenging decathalon of tests in a grab for gold, silver and bronze. Round 1 – Price The first hurdle for almost any new vehicle buying decision begins with price. But if it were that simple for these three, Hilux SR5 Cruiser wins by a mile, being $7000 cheaper than Colorado Z71, and $11,500 cheaper than Ranger Wildtrak. But we’ve also considered their range siblings and price span, entry price and like-for-like comparisons. The choice of specification level across the three brands is vast: there are nine variations of Colorado, 14 of Hilux and 16 of Ranger. Cheapest of the lot is the Hilux 2WD cab chassis manual at $32,790, topping out at the $57,990 4WD SR5 Double Cab SR5

Cruiser auto, for a span of $25,200. Colorado starts with the LS single cab chassis 2WD manual at $39,990, up to the range-topping 4WD Crew Cab Z71 auto at $64,990 – a similar span of $25,000. The Ranger starts at $36,040 for the 2WD XL single cab chassis, topping out at $69,640 for the Wildtrak – a large $33,600 span covering the equally large 16 variations, and basically creating a Ranger price point for just about any buyer budget. On those figures, the Hilux jumps to an early win, not just for its cheapest entry point, but its value against its top-spec peers. That does come with compromise to some equipment, but that’s a separate test. Second place is a tough one. Colorado is a tighter choice, with a slightly cheaper entry

point, but through each models’ range, there are models that go head-to-head. But given the Colorado Z71 is $4650 cheaper than Wildtrack, that’s too hard to ignore.

Price 22 | LCV


Round 2 – Specification With price put aside, it’s simply an easy win for the Ranger. Its price does command a premium, but for that the Wildtrak offers technology like active cruise control, speed limiter, collision warning and lane-keep assist, auto lights and wipers, a fully configurable dash and gauge layout, offering everything from an LCD tacho to trip computer specs. Smartphone replication is offered (also Colorado), and the leather and stitching looks and feels quality, and with navigation and electric seats, Ranger’s price becomes apparent. It has the biggest engine, mated to a six-speed auto with a sequential shift oriented the ‘correct’ way, to flow with inertia (forward while braking to downshift). Dual zone climate control, heated seats… the list goes on and while the others aren’t short on some of this tech and spec, they don’t have it all. Second place isn’t as clear: Colorado just edges ahead, with heated seats, collision warning, lanekeeping, single-zone climate, smartphone replication and a large touchscreen that works well with the tactile buttons. Want the radio? Press the button. Wanting to change stations, then consult the touchscreen; then there’s the fail-safe home button. It’s loaded with tech, and leaves the feeling that it’s forgotten nothing – until compared to Wildtrak. And then there’s the Colorado’s neatest and very practical party trick: remote keyfob starting, perfect to get the AC or heater pumping, or to remotely activate all four windows. That leaves Hilux in third, but only by default. It’s the only one with proximity keyless entry and starting, and when jumping in and out multiple times a day, that’s quite appealing. Cruise control, climate control, heated seats are all there, along with an idle-up button. The large touch screen is very tabletlike, though lacking smartphone mirroring. There’s

Hilux interior gets a lot of good gear, including touchscreen, climate control, dual USBs and a power/eco mode that affects shifting and AC. It’s also the most practical.

Colorado is well equipped with heated seats, collision warning setting on the steering wheel, and a very good combination of buttons and touchscreen

Ranger interior is the nicest, due to its form-fitting seats, and most amount of equipment, including active cruise control and lane departure, though its price is indicative.

Wildtrak offers active cruise control, speed limiter, collision warning and lane-keep assist also eco and power mode buttons to tailor throttle mapping and air-con use. Price doesn’t always dictate spec, but for these three, it’s like three subtly different levels.

Specification

Above, left to right: Colorado’s remote key start is brilliant, and its can coolers are removable. Hilux is only one with keyless push-button start.

LCV | 23


Round 3 – Practicality Basic usability and practicality is the ability to simply get in and use day-to-day. Things like seat comfort and adjustability, driving position, number of pockets, cup-holders and bins, phone connectivity and rear seat accommodation, with consideration to some practical driving aspects and related specifications. All three are remarkably similar, with the Colorado’s driving position slightly higher. Only Hilux offers adjustable reach for the

steering, which prevents long-arm fatigue. Hilux also wins the storage contest: along with a pair of cupholders in front of the shifter plus a small practical storage bin in front of them, there’s another phone/wallet sized pocket between the seats and even shopping hooks on the rear of the front seats. Ranger is next best, with bins and pockets and storage dotted around the cabin. Colorado’s shallow storage pockets are OK – including neat little leather pockets

on the front of the front seat bases – but just not quite up with the others for day-to-day usability and practicality. A pair of removable cup-holders in front of each vent is a nice touch, though Hilux betters this idea by making them integrated into the dash, and stowable. Both Ranger and Hilux also get invertor 230v sockets, while Ranger also gets an air-conditioned centre console. Across the rear seat, they’re all fairly similar, in slightly different ways. Loaded up with three boofy blokes to really test the comfort level, the Colorado stands out with its high centre seat, and Hilux is slightly more of a squeeze, particularly for foot room, but all are remarkably comfortable with just two in the rear seat. Externally, size could be an issue with some garages or underground areas: Ranger is longest at 5351mm, excluding tow bar; Hilux is 5335mm and Colorado 5347mm, but Colorado is also widest at 1882mm, vs Ranger 1860mm and Hilux 1855mm. Ranger is also 68mm taller than Colorado, at 1.85 metres, which may be an issue in some low spaces. Another small victory for Hilux is the turning circle, which at 12.2m is tighter than the Ranger’s 12.4m, a result that’s equally impressive for the Ranger given its much longer wheelbase of 3220mm (vs Hilux 3090mm). Colorado’s three-point-turn inducing 12.7m turning circle is at odds

We loaded up the rear seats with three boofy blokes to really test the comfort levels. It’s just a simple plastic holder, but it’s enough to help make Hilux the most practical inside.

with its short wheelbase (3096mm), also hampering its agility in parking spaces. Considering off-road practicality, we put a slight slant towards approach/departure angles, then wading depth. Hilux has the best angles of 31/26 degrees, with 700mm wading, just ahead of Ranger with 29/28 degrees, and 800mm wading, while Colorado manages 28/22 degrees and 600mm.

Practicality 24 | LCV


COP THIS COLORADO Getting arrested in Victoria, Australia just became a little nicer, with the addition of 290 Holden Colorados to the State’s divisional (aka divvy) vans fleet. Over a two-year roll-out, 250 two-door 4x2s will features a fully self-contained pod for secure two-person transport, 360-degree camera and well as air-conditioning, lacking from the current plastic hot-boxes. Holden will also be supplying 40 custom 4x4, four-door divisional vans equipped with bull-bars and winches to be deployed to regional Victoria for off-road work. If you’d like to see inside the back, our strong advice is to just ask a Victorian police officer - it’ll be much nicer than being forced in!

We’re starting to see a pattern forming; often one ute stands out against the others Round 4 – Safety All three vehicles get five-star ANCAP crash ratings, reversing cameras and an array of airbags - to some extent, the prices reflect the safety equipment. Along with the usuals, Ranger Wildtrak scores adaptive cruise control, speed limiter, collision mitigation with distance alert, lane departure, hill assist and descent controls, load-adaptive control and trailer sway control. Colorado is equally equipped with

forward collision alert, lane departure warning, roll-over mitigation, hill-start and descent control, and trailer sway control. Hilux isn’t short on features either, with trailer sway control, hill-start ascent and descent control, and an emergency stop signal. Neither the Z71 nor Hilux are in any way less safe, it’s just that in the Wildtrak, the higher price brings with it a few extras, and price-for-features, they rank where their dollars suggest.

Safety

LCV | 25


Round 5 – The Drive The drive is vital, and for this test, we’re starting to see a pattern forming; often one ute stands out against the others, and it was certainly the case with our 20km drive loop, taken consecutively with each ute, over the same conditions, each loaded up with the same people, for driver and passenger opinion. Then it was driver-only, all sections evaluating engine performance, ride, steering and handling. Both Ranger and Colorado offer very similar driving experiences, each with solid steering, very capable handling and good power. But the Colorado’s engine bumps it up another level, always eager to shoot the ute down the road like an excited Alsatian on its first walk in a week. The Ranger does it in a totally different way, with its 12 percent larger 3.2-litre engine. In a way, the Ford has larger muscles, but Colorado uses better steroids, via higher (18psi) turbo boost. From an aural sense, the Ranger sounds fantastic, almost devoid of any diesel rattle, and in its place a distinctive five-cylinder warble full of character. On top of that, it’s also the quietest cabin, by a noticeable margin. And for those elements, it just edges ahead. The Hilux is the standout here, but mainly for its ride-quality: saving the newest for last, we were all a little surprised to discover how firm and jittery the Hilux’s ride quality is, especially over slight corrugations, but even over smooth road. It’s noticeably firmer, which would pay off for heavy duty work, but with passengers aboard – either driver or four-up – the Hilux wasn’t as compliant. Hilux’s 2.8-litre engine is similarly capable – despite lacking either the character or torque of

Ford Ranger has larger muscles, but Colorado uses better steroids. the Ford, or instant urgency of the Holden – and the gearbox and steering every bit as good as the others. But in a round where all are so similarly matched, where we even have a tie for gold, it’s the little things we have to isolate to find the finishing order.

The Drive 26 | LCV


COUNTERPOINT Hilux – new for 2018 Poor ride quality was the weakest point of the all-new Toyota Hilux when it arrived at the end of 2015. I suspect that its lumpy ride was a major factor in the Hilux’s failure to get on even sales terms with the marketdominating Ford Ranger. Ford had achieved a compromise between ruggedness and comfort that gave the Ranger a ride quality that made it the popular choice for buyers wanting a ute cum family transport. But the then-new Hilux’s ride was decidedly old-school, biased more towards farm tracks and rugged off-road work than slinking through the suburbs. Unless it had four adults on-board, a heavy load, or was towing, the Hilux rode too harshly, I feel, to make it appealing family transport for city dwellers. Toyota launched a revised Hilux in December 2017, stating it had “spent considerable time working with the factory to ensure the ride quality delivers greater levels of comfort.” That sounded promising, so I was eager

to find out if the Hilux now had a ride to complement its smooth engine, good noise suppression and excellent six-speed manual and automatic gearboxes. We ran the test SR5 Manual 4x4 over our regular route which includes some very bumpy open road and city terrain. The red Hilux’s ride I tested still felt rugged and the suspension capable of coping with the worst that could be thrown at it, but it was nowhere near as harsh as its predecessors. Toyota’s softened the hard edges, and though the ride remains firm, it’s no longer so harsh that it’s irritatingly uncomfortable when unladen or running just two-up. For me, especially in the SR5 4x4, the ride quality has improved to the point where it’s no longer a deal-breaker, as it was in the previous model. My regular passenger, who was extremely critical of the old model’s ride (it always seems harsher when you’re not actually driving a vehicle) thought the revisions had made the Hilux much more comfortable and passenger-friendly. If I wanted a ute that was to be used

primarily in the city, and intended to double as family transport, I’d still choose the Ranger. However, the ride quality improvements Toyota has made have delivered a Hilux that is now a more viable contender. Mike Stock

MCM RANGER One of the world’s most popular automotive YouTube channels is Aussiebased Might Car Mods, fronted by hosts and car-nuts Marty & Moog. The pair travelled to Minaret Station near Wanaka to film this epic 26-minute adventure, starring Ford’s Ranger Wildtrak. Set aside 26 mins and prepare for stupdity and a few laughs as the boys hunt for freshwater Marlin, amongst other adventures. https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=Ib4SM6CJUbs

HILUX TOUGH Arguably the world’s most famous Toyota Hilux, and easily its most punished, is the 1988 Hilux diesel featured on Top Gear UK season three, where Clarkson, Hammond and May attempted to kill the Hilux by driving it into a tree, drowning it, hit with a wrecking ball, burnt, and dropped atop a demolishing building. And still it managed to start and drive. The story was backed up when a customised Hilux was driven to the North Pole, and then later to the centre of Eyjafjallajökull, the unpronouncable volcano that erupted in 2010. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnWKz7Cthkk

LCV | 27


into the Ranger, with VBOX timing gear. With the throttle and brake loaded a little to take away drivetrain slack, the Ranger raises the nose and just gets on with it, doing it all rather effortlessly. Zero to 60km/h and 100km/h times flash up and set the markers for the other to beat: 4.7 and 11.5 seconds respectively, on its way to a 17.7 second quarter-mile. Will that be enough? Into the Hilux… We have to give the Toyota some latitude here, as this SR5 Cruiser was registered just for us, for this test, with just 250km on the clock. Being 15 percent smaller engine capacity than the Ranger, it’s already facing two challenges. Impressively, however, the Hilux jumps to 60km/h on its first run, with a very quick 0-20km/h leap, before tapering off a little and equalling the Ranger at 4.7 seconds, and betters it on the second run to 4.6 seconds. Beyond 60, however, Hilux still feels tight, and with 0-100km/h times of 12.3 and 12.1 seconds, it was actually

Round 6 - Performance The 100m dash is the blue riband event at the Olympics, and while performance times and 0-100km/h may not be vital statistics for utes, they do reflect an ability to get itself out of trouble, rather than in it. Overtaking, hillclimbs and the daily dash are all factors, whether it’s lugging around the tools or the family. And of course there’s the all-important mine’s-fasterthan-yours bragging rights. So with that in mind, we found ourselves at the home of NZ drag racing, the Fram Autolite Dragway, also known as Meremere drags, and its strip of sticky quarter-mile. That’s the theory, with today’s rain normally cancelling the party. But in 4x4 utes, in 4H mode, grip simply isn’t affected – we even tested the utes in 2WD the day after in the dry, and the times were identical. So on a trivially wet track, we slipped

SPRINT

0-60km/h 0-100km/h 402m

getting a little freer and faster with each run, but two more runs also netted the same 12.1. Similar story over the quarter-mile, initially running 18.2, then a pair of 18.0s, a fraction slower than Ranger with 121km/h. Give it another 1000km and a looser engine, and we’re sure the noticeably new Hilux would pick up a bit of speed, but we don’t think it’d be able to match or better Ranger on all markers. Then the Colorado ambled in, with a glint in its eye and a wicked reputation. We’d previously tested a black Z71 and broke under both the 4.0 and 10.0 second barriers, but this newer white version was a fraction off. Not that it mattered: the Colorado still hauled its way down the strip. It jumps to 60km/h in 4.1 seconds, 0.6 faster than the other two, extending the gap to 1.3 seconds to 100km/h, before crossing the 402m finish line not just 0.6 faster than the Ranger, but at a faster 127km/h. So the Usain Bolt trophy goes to Colorado, with the Ranger just managing to hold off the new, tight Hilux, for a close second-third finish. With thanks to: Memere Dragway www.framautolitedragway.co.nz

4.1 10.2 17.1@127km/h 4.7 11.5 17.7@122km/h 4.6 12.1 18.0@121km/h *Hilux tested with 250km on odo

28 | LCV

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Performance


Round 7 – Towing Utes tow, that’s a real strength, so we need to break down the differences here on spec and practically. They’re all tow-rated to 750kg unbraked/3500kg braked, but there’s also fine print. Ranger is same across the range, except a special-order 2WD entry level model rated to 2500kg. Payload is 950kg. Colorado has the same 3500kg capacity across the range, but its class-leading 500Nm is only offered when coupled with the auto: a manual gearbox drops torque to 440Nm. Payload varies a little, but in Z71, it’s 1007kg. Hilux has the most anomalies from 3500kg, with three of the four entry level models rated to 2500kg. It also has the lightest payload, at 925kg. We found our way back to Kennards Hire, Hamilton, where we hooked up three identical enclosed trailers, each loaded up with ballast to tip the scales at 1000kg. Not a huge challenge for these three, but at least typical and identical, given that manufacturers claim most owners tow between 1-1.5 tonne. With all three utes taking the same loop, the differences are subtle. We challenged them to another 0-60km/h drag race, with Ranger feeling strong against the extra weight, clocking 6.4 seconds (against its unladen 4.7), a 1.7 second and 36 percent increase. Hilux benefited most from the towing test, the extra weight settling down the firm rear end and making it more compliant. Our blue SR5 Cruiser was so new, Toyota didn’t get a chance to fit a tow bar, so we did the same loop a few days later with another identical tow-barred white SR5 Cruiser, and managed a 0-60km/h towing time of 6.6 seconds after

Kennards Hire Hamilton looked after us for our tow test, with three identical enclosed trailers, loaded with the same ballast, to be around 1000kg. Though Hilux would have to be tested a few days later.

three attempts, just off the larger-engined Ranger, but 2.0 seconds and 40 percent slower than its unladen time of 4.6 seconds. Proving big boost is best, Colorado was least resistant to the towing ballast, clocking just 5.4 seconds for 0-60km/h, just 0.7 slower than the other two’s unladen times! And just 1.3 seconds and 31 percent slower than its own unladen time. Ranger does it so effortlessly, and uses its engine capacity rather than turbo boost to haul the weight. But towing isn’t about speed and tenths of a second, it’s about torque and fuel use and feel. Colorado grunts out 500Nm at a low 2000rpm, but Ranger does basically the same job using less fuel and what ‘feels’ like less effort. It’s another case of three vehicles, let-alone two, being so closely matched, it’s difficult to

split. So in this case, we won’t for the gold. Hilux’s towing capability in reality is just as good, if not better suited, but when we’re trying to split them, it’s just the numbers that aren’t as good, as it could quite easily be a three-way tie.

Towing

LCV | 29


Round 8 – Economy Power and performance often comes at a price, and it’s the fuel economy that sometimes suffers, and the ability to be both fast and frugal is a rare delight. So we reset our trio’s fuel meters before our test loops, encompassing all our days’ testing over near 500km. For a fairer evaluation, we also cross-referenced our test archives for fuel usage during longer terms with each vehicle. Manufacturer claims are a good starting point, and we’ve used those to calculate a theoretical range from each tank.

We’ve also included the fuel use from the towing tests into the final analysis, and though our Hilux’s numbers were high on test, we’ve considered the less-than-500km engine, and taken into account separate fuel results from previous long-term tests. The overall result is hard to ignore, its smaller capacity engine and lower boost (than Colorado) being two combinations that really score well for economy, coupled with its 80-litre tank offering the largest theoretical range of 941km. Colorado and Ranger were harder to split, with strengths in different areas. Though its engine is 12 percent larger, Ranger’s claim

uses just two-percent more fuel; it is a grunty beast while towing, doing it with less effort and fuel use than Colorado. Its 80-litre tank, versus the Holden’s 76-litre offers a fraction more theoretical range, but in our testing, we’ve seen the Ranger is a little more thirsty, and it used almost 15 percent more fuel than Colorado during this test, and over a longer term. For all its power and performance, the Colorado does a great job, and if not for the Hilux’s larger tank and longer range, Colorado could have been a winner here, too.

*Hilux tested with 250km on odo

FUEL USE (l/100km)

claim

Long-term

On Test

Towing

Tank/Range

Toyota

8.5

9.1

11.6*

17.8

80l/941km

Holden

8.7

9.6

10.3

18.0

76l/873k

Ford

8.9

9.7

11.8

17.4

80l/898km

30 | LCV

Economy


Round 9 – She Said Though not part of the direct comparison, I was able to drive each ute over three different nights during our time with each model, and for me, as a female consumer who represents a part (some say a large part) of the buying decision, as presented, I liked the Hilux SR5 in its black and blue hue. The rugged, masculine reputation is softened a lot inside, where it’s really modern and I liked the look and feel and drive. On its own, I didn’t notice the firm ride discussed earlier, but I was driving mostly over smooth roads. Value for money, it’s hard to go past the Hilux. There’s something about the Colorado I also like: it’s my favourite looking of the three, and the high seating position offers a good view. Storage is a mild pain, when jumping in a finding an easy spot for a purse and phone, but the response from that engine is just fantastic. But there are so many appealing things

about the Ranger, from the car-like cabin feel and cushy seat, to the quiet cabin devoid of almost any rattly diesel truck sound. Picking an order is like picking favourite children, as they each appeal to me in different ways. As much as I love it, Hilux is third only because the rear door aperture is quite short, making access to the rear tight, especially if reaching for kids’ seatbelt buckles. And I feel a bit bad about ranking it on that, but it’s that tight. So the choice between Colorado and Ranger comes down to price. If it’s hubby’s money, it’s Ranger hands-down. If it’s mine,

then Colorado. But I’d still long for the Ranger after I’d forgotten the price, so that probably answers it for me.

She Said

I love the Hilux, but picking an order is like picking favourite children Round 10 – After-sales Warranty and servicing and after-sales support is also an important aspect of any new vehicle, with Holden offering Complete Care, its three-years/100,000km of free servicing, which also covers it warranty terms. There’s also 24/7 roadside assist, and 56 service centres nationwide. Ford offers the same three-year/100,000km warranty, plus free roadside assistance, and free navigation map updates with every service, scheduled every 15,000km. Toyota offers the same threeyear/100,000km with a paid optional fiveyears/150,000km, plus a pre-paid servicing option that can be configured into a finance or lease package. For our money, pun intended, Holden’s Complete Care gives it the win, with Ford’s roadside assistance putting it ahead of the optional paid extras for Hilux.

After-sales LCV | 31


2018 Ford Ranger Wildtrak www.ford.co.nz

2018 Holden Colorado Z71 www.holden.co.nz

2018 Toyota Hilux SR5 Cruiser www.toyota.co.nz

Engine

3.2-litre turbo diesel five

Engine

2.8-litre turbo diesel four

Engine

2.8-litre turbo diesel four

Power

147kW@3000rpm

Power

147kW@3600rpm

Power

130kW@3400rpm

Torque

470Nm@1500-2750rpm

Torque

500Nm@2000rpm

Torque

450Nm@1600-2400rpm

Gearbox

Six-speed auto

Gearbox

Six-speed auto

Gearbox

Six-speed auto

Economy

8.9l/100km

Economy

8.7l/100km

Economy

8.5l/100km

Weight

2250kg

Weight

2163kg

Weight

2065kg (est)

Power/Weight

15.3kW/kg

Power/Weight

15.3kW/kg

Power/Weight

15.9kW/kg

Price

$69,640

Price

$64,990

Price

$57,990

Putting aside cost, Ranger manages to equal or better its rivals more times than not. CONCLUSION Like any Olympian, there are no losers in this comparo. They’ve already proven their mettle in showrooms and sales figures before meeting, and it takes an overly critical eye to separate them. What we found is which model is best suited to which application. Many hairs were split, and there is no perfect ute, but we’ve scored them and ranked them for a final result. The real lesson here is that with utes like Ranger, Hilux and Colorado, we’re truly spoilt for choice, and the buyer is the ultimate winner.So with a medal count based on points system, our epic adventure arrives at the final podium. We really wanted the Toyota Hilux SR5 Cruiser to perform well. The newest model here, we thought its 2018 updates and facelift would firmly hit back at Ranger and show why it was sales leader for three decades. Its price is sharp, it’s well equipped, it has the toughest reputation and it’s the beloved brand favourite – it won three tests, but curiously finished either first or third, without a single silver medal. In this company, doing a very good job is sometimes eclipsed by a great job, despite winning three of the ten tests. We love the Hilux, it’s the least expensive in this group, but

32 | LCV

for this challenge, it earns a bronze medal. Holden’s Colorado Z71 was our favourite ute of 2017, and still holds solid. Its supreme performance, price, economy and after-sales all add up to an amazing package. Half of us would happily drive away in the Z71, reinforced by it winning just one less gold than Ranger, and drawing with it over one other. It’s the best value-for-money package here. But then there is the Ford Ranger Wildtrak. Its higher price may help boost its equipment, safety and specification, and there are a few areas where it’s bettered by both Colorado

FINAL MEDAL COUNT FORD RANGER HOLDEN COLORADO TOYOTA HILUX

GOLD 5 3 3

GOLD = 3PTS, SILVER = 2PTS, BRONZE =1PT

and Hilux, but even putting aside cost, Ranger manages to equal or better its rivals more times than not. From the seats, to the equipment, the towing ability to the look and feel and even sound of the interior, inside and out, Ranger is our Ute-lympics champion. Let the flags fly and the national anthem begin. Thanks to: Meremere Dragway www.framautolitedragway.co.nz Kennards Hire Hamilton www.kennardshire.co.nz

SILVER 3 6 0

BRONZE 2 1 7

TOTAL 23PTS 22PTS 16PTS


the auto accessory specialists 2

8

2

5

With central locking Canopy SUV SteelTop™

Canopy SteelTop™ Commercial

3

Side Step – SS or Black

8

3

Sports Bar

4

Side Step - Alloy

Hard Lid

3

Roof Racks

1

Weathershield

10

Tonneau Cover (no drill)

6

Headlight Cover

Slide N Lock

Tailgate GapShield

TO SUIT:

5 2

6

4

3

7

1

9 10

11

8

1

1

12

Alloy Lid - Load Rated

Cargo Bar

1

1

LCV28005

Bed Liner

9

Bonnet Guard

Nudge Bar – SS or Black

7 ESC COMPATIBLE

12

• Hilux • Navara • Triton • Great Wall • D-Max • BT50 • Ranger • Rodeo • Colorado • Amarok • Foton • Mercedes • LDV T60 • and More!!

11 Black & Chrome Trim

Fog Lamp

Towbar & Wiring

www.airplex.co.nz

Airplex Industries Ltd

21 Saleyards Road, Otahuhu, Auckland Phone: +64 9 276 9826 Toll Free: NZ 0800AIRPLEX Fax: +64 9 276 9836 Email: info@airplex.co.nz


BEST BARS. BY FAR. FOCUS ON TOWING –

SSANGYONG REXTON

TOW NAILED

Story & photos: Dean Evans

SsangYong’s Rexton certainly impresses as a seven-seat SUV, and with a tow rating of 3500kg, can it cut the mustard towing, too? SSANGYONG’S REXTON ALREADY MADE a lasting impression with us last issue. We raved about its equipment, ride quality and looks, with a price starting at $59,990 for the Sport, up to $67,990 for the top-spec SPR. The seven-seat Rexton is one of the best SUVs money can buy, and with a 2.2-litre turbo diesel producing 133kW and 440Nm, it really only left us with one unanswered question: can it tow? So a visit to our friends at the recently opened Kennards Hire, Hamilton, had us sorted with some towing ballast to really give the Rexton a workout. Rated to Guidelines and a big screen make lining up the towing hitch safe and easy.

3500kg thanks to a solid rear axle – the industry standard amongst the workhorse utes from Ford, Holden and Toyota – the Rexton’s abilities are well beyond what most are likely to use it for, but with a seven-speed auto, hill-start assist and hill descent control, we wanted to challenge it a little more than just a box trailer and furniture. So Kennards supplied one of its portable power generators, weighing 2000kg including trailer. With two drivers and some gear, we’re closer to 2300kg, which represents around 65 percent of its standard towing capacity. We toured our standard loop, from Hamilton to Raglan return, mixing motorway, with urban, B-roads, hills and some sharp twists and turns. Hooking up the trailer came with a slight oddity: with the Rexton SPR’s presence sensor recognising the keyfob was close, it would automatically open the power tailgate. We had to shut it a few times while hooking up the hitch, at least before moving

CONVERT-A-BALL

®

The Ultimate Towing Accessory.

the key to the front seat. Same happens when refuelling. It’s a good system, though the wait time is often a few seconds, and for the amount of times that’s useful – handfuls of shopping or loading up armfuls of gear – it’s often faster to simply press a button. The automatic system is easily disabled, but that’s somewhat defeating the purpose and feature. The large touchscreen with guidelines makes reversing easy and safe and we’re quickly away and powering down the motorway, marvelling at the Rexton’s pulling power. 3500kg towing capacity from Rexton is partly thanks to its solid rear axle.

NZ’s superior stainless steel interchangeable tow ball solution. Available through leading new vehicle dealers & agents nationwide. Exclusive to Best Bars. 0800 BEST BARS | info@bestbars.co.nz


n.

Towing Solutions & Auto Accessories 0800 BEST BARS | www.bestbars.co.nz | info@bestbars.co.nz

It does such a good job that it barely needs any effort, just requiring a little deeper push of the throttle to produce the same kind of acceleration that gets it around town every day. Stability is rock-solid, with almost no affect – and certainly no ill-affect – to steering, with the well positioned trailer not sagging the rear suspension, or lightening the steering feel, the Rexton’s similarly loaded-up weight also helping the car and trailer act like a cohesive unit. Approaching the long straights heading west, the Rexton kicks down a gear to keep it in the meat of its torqueband – a 1000rpm window between 1600-2600rpm – and it powers up the hills like there’s nothing attached, with little more than a spike in the fuel consumption.

2000kg had the SsangYong rolling its eyes and yawning at the challenge. Downhill, the solid brakes keep everything in check and make for what is becoming a somewhat predictable and boring story… and that’s a good thing: Rexton is so capable, this 2000kg power generator trailer had the SsangYong rolling its eyes and yawning at the challenge, easily able to handle anything and everything we threw at it, from the slow-and-go tight twists, to the steep ascents and descents. It’s one of those vehicles that’s so competent, that when straying off into a cabin conversation, a glance in the mirror

comes as a slight surprise, and a reminder that something hefty is being towed. We roll into Raglan, stop for a quick lunch and head straight back again, and the Rexton eats up the climbs and powers through the open roads supremely competently and confidently, leaving us with few criticisms to balance out the praise. Of course the price for towing comes at the fuel bowser, and with SsangYong claiming the G4 Rexton manages 8.3l/100km combined, or 10.4 around town, for our 200km tow test loop, we saw around 15.6l/100km, which is near enough to identical to the fuel figures produced by the leading utes during their similar tow tests. Though the utes were towing heavier loads (around three-tonne), and the Rexton’s smaller 2.2-litre engine is working relatively harder, it’s still an admirable effort for an SUV that’s designed primarily to move a family up to seven around, and

occasionally tow a boat, caravan or trailer full of leisure time. We tried some 0-60km/h times before and after the trailer was attached and recorded 4.1 and 8.7 seconds respectively, times that match the fastest utes. For the record, zero to 100km/h arrives in 10.9 seconds, unladen, which also ranks it faster than Ranger and Hilux! As we roll back into Kennards Hamilton, and the guys helpfully unhook the chains, cable and hitch, there’s really not much to complain about; a job very well done. All this performance from just 2.2-litres, it’s the little four-cylinder that could.


BEST BARS. BY FAR. FOCUS ON TOWING –

SSANGYONG REXTON

TOW TALLY 2018 SsangYong Rexton SPR www.ssangyong.co.nz Engine

2.2-litre four-cyl. turbo diesel

Power/torque

133kW/420Nm

Gearbox

Seven-speed auto

Tow limits

750kg/3500kg (unbraked/braked)

Economy

Claim: 8.3l/100km (unladen), 15.5l/100km (towing)

Price

$67,990

Tow Rating (/5) Verdict

Another feather in Rexton’s cap of honour

We saw 15.6l/100km – the same as the leading utes – from Rexton’s 2.2-litre. Accept the badge and there’s a supremely capable package that’s rewarding to drive, comfortable and well-equipped. In the same way that Kia and Hyundai have pushed not just the value-for-money side, but quality and performance, the G4 Rexton is

doing the same for SsangYong, and its towing ability is just another talent nailed. Thanks to: Kennards Hire Hamilton, www.kennardshire.co.nz

Watch the video summary of this test at our Facebook page www.facebook.com/NZLCVmag.

CONVERT-A-BALL

®

The Ultimate Towing Accessory.

NZ’s superior stainless steel interchangeable tow ball solution. Available through leading new vehicle dealers & agents nationwide. Exclusive to Best Bars. 0800 BEST BARS | info@bestbars.co.nz


on.

Towing Solutions & Auto Accessories 0800 BEST BARS | www.bestbars.co.nz | info@bestbars.co.nz

Even with third row up, still enough space for a golf bag... or other bags.

WITH SEVEN SEATS, THE SSANGYONG Rexton was already on my like list, and it took just a few moments to agree with all the awards and praise that’s been heaped on this model. It’s a reasonably high climb into the cabin, not just for the kids, but for me, and I’m 188cm. But the reward is an over-lording, commanding view of the road – and almost everyone else. In the top-spec model, there’s lots to appreciate, including the heated and cooled seats, perfect for the hot Summer days. The climate control is logical and easy to use, and the 220v power socket comes in handy for charging laptops. Seats are great and with electric adjustment, the memory switches on the doors make it easy for hubby and me to swap between preferred settings, even if they are marginally different. And the dash is great, with a choice of screens.

Dash console RR button activates rear AC.

Rear vents and fan control.

Second row tilts and folds for easy third-row access.

The engine is nice and quiet, the ISOFIX mounting points easy to access, and there are lots of straps and handles that make folding the middle row of seats away for easy access to the third row. Plus each row also gets a vent - even the third row gets storage each side, and a fan speed dial and two directional vents on the right side. Our young girls were very happy with that feature, in a row that often sweats under the sun of the rear glass. A removable floor panel in the boot allows the cargo area to fold flat, but I’d remove it, for the extra space it offers. Vision is great, except the C-pillars which are quiet thick, but with the big mirrors adjusted to avoid blind spots, I never felt like it was a problem – though young/ shorter kids won’t see much out the sides from the third row. The automatic opening tailgate is slow to respond, but otherwise well-liked. Loved the engine and I could barely

tell it’s a diesel with the windows up, and a slight rattle when lowered, and there’s plenty of speed on tap. Despite its immense almost-five-metre length (longer than Sorento, Sante Fe and Prado), the overall driving experience is potentially intimidating but actually not. It has the size without the bulk, and that’s handy when needing something this big. The biggest bugbear I had was during three-point turns: with the tight 11m turning circle, admittedly it wasn’t often, but when shifting between D and R, it was very slow to respond, taking up to 2-3 seconds to respond after shifting and accelerating, which wasn’t great when trying to sneak in a quick turn on a tight street. I’m no badge snob, so my time in the Rexton was right up there with the other aforementioned seven seaters. SsangYong may not have a prestige cache, but with models like the G4 Rexton, it’s the ideal way to form one. Happy faces in the third row, especailly with storage and AC fan controls.


Manufacturers suggest that modern utes drive like cars. Mike thinks ‘yeah right’… NOW THAT FOUR-DOOR DOUBLE-CAB utes are increasingly the family vehicle of choice for city dwellers, many car companies – and owners – will tell you they drive just like cars. But from me, the claim triggers a Tui’s Ale “yeah, right” response. Anyone who’s driven a post-2015 Hilux will know that car-like certainly doesn’t apply to its ride. The Hilux is downright rough- riding; not Wild West Conestoga-covered-wagon-rough, but way rougher than most cars. And Ford’s Ranger isn’t immune to similar criticism, either. In fact neither are most double-cab utes. The closest to the mark that I’ve experienced in this genre is Holden’s 2WD Colorado, which has handling not far from the last Aussie-designed Commodore sedan’s. Modern double-cabs, especially higher up the model range, have lots of convenience and connectivity features also found in cars; and they’re being increasingly fitted with plusher, more car-like interiors, seating and tech. But at the end of the day, they’re still light trucks, with suspension able to carry a one-tonne payload and tow up to 3.5 tonnes. Some manufacturers achieve a ride and handling compromise that makes its utes comfortable enough for urban family transport, but for those looking for a ute that really rides and handles like a car, it needs a haunt through used car lots that stock big Aussie sixes and V8s, for the

38 | LCV

Holden Commodore ute/HSV Maloo and Ford Falcon ute/FPV products – all now out of production – really do behave like cars. Because, let’s face it, that’s really what they are, with the rear cabin chopped off and a sub-chassis and wellside or flatdeck cargo tray grafted on. The Aussies are specialists at building utes based on cars, and whether we Kiwis like it or not, we’ve got to give them the credit for inventing the car-based utility truck. It happened in the early 1930s when Ford Australia’s only designer, 23-yearold Lew Bandt, devised the genre after a farmer’s wife made an urgent plea to the company: “My husband and I can’t afford a car and a truck but we need a car to go to church on Sunday and a truck to take the pigs to market on Monday. Can you help?” she wrote. Bandt took a Ford Model 40 V8-engined five-window coupe and replaced the car’s luggage boot with a wooden-framed cargo section clad with steel outer panels. He completed the design in October, 1933, and the following year, Ford began building the Ford coupe-utility, as Bandt christened it. Holden’s first Australian-designed car, the 48-215 (popularly known as the FX), was also available as a two-door, wellside ute, and car-based utes were part of Holden’s range until it stopped making cars in Australia last October.

Ford built some memorable Falcon utes, such as the early-1990s XF Falcon XR6, a real beast with a muscle car feel that was challenging to drive. It would tramline and kick out its tail at the drop of a hat; it was an absolute hoot to drive. Then came the V8 XR8, upping the excitement even further. Late model XRs drove like their sedan counterparts, even though they retained a solid rear axle where the Holdens had an independent set-up. Ford, of course, knew a lot about getting those live-axles to work, with the late Howard Marsden developing the XB Falcon into a Bathurst dominator. But to me, the greatest Falcon ute was the XR6 Turbo, a potent performer and sublime handler – and a car I chose when asked by a car company exec what car we we’d buy if the choice was open, accompanied by some open laughter from colleagues. For me, nominating the XR6 ute was a no-brainer: it had everything I’d wanted in a vehicle, even if some friends thought I’d lost my marbles. So for a ute that ‘really’ drives like a car, there are only two basic choices: a Commodore or a Falcon… which means a used two-door car. As far as ‘driving just like cars’, yes, they’re substantially better than they’ve been, but the current crop of double-cab utes drive just like, well, double-cab utes.

Mike Stock


Lamborghini Urus

It’s a big year for SUVs and utes, with the calendar looking very busy and filling all the time. Let’s take a quick look at what’s in store for the rest of 2018.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

MARCH Jeep Compass Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk Kia Niro Nissan Navara Subaru Outback

Ford Ranger Raptor

APRIL Kia Picanto X-Line Lamborghini Urus M-Benz X-Class Mitsubishi EclipseCross AWD Skoda Karoq

Skoda Karoq

MAY Ford Endura (Edge) Hyundai Tucson

Rest of 2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Audi Q8 Chevrolet Silverado Citroen C3 Aircross Ford Ranger Raptor Ford EcoSport HSV SportsCat Holden Acadia Holden Trailblazer Hyundai Sante Fe Infiniti QX50

Jeep Wrangler Lexus RX 350L and 450hL Maserati Levante S Mazda CX-8 Mercedes-AMG GLC 63 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Mitsubishi Outlander Mitsubishi Triton Huntaway Ram 1500 Range Rover Sport Range Rover SV

Seat Arona SsangYong Rexton petrol SsangYong Musso Toyota C-HR Toyota Hilux Gladiator Toyota RAV4 Volvo XC40 VW Tiguan Allspace VW Touareg

LCV | 39


SALES MOVERS AND MARKET SHIFTS IN THE SUV AND UTE SECTORS.

T

HE SHIFT IN UTE SALES OVER RECENT YEARS HAS been quite remarkable, and 2018 has basically started where 2017 left off, at least for utes. Ranger claimed its third successive year of sales victory, but with the new Hilux launched in December, the big question is will the sales race even out for 2018, and even tip back in favour of Hilux – who last claimed the best-selling vehicle title in 2013, which was – incredibly – a title it held for 32 years!

40 | LCV

So far, still, Ranger is holding a margin, and the two companies push their respective products with not just a wide range and competitive pricing, but special limited edition models, that are heavily marketed. Anyone who’s Googled anything about a ute might also be amazed/interested by targeted ads in the Facebook feed, promoting the latest Hilux, Colorado or D-Max special editions. Looking over the past three years of ute sales, 2017 was a good


TOP 10 UTES

YTD Feb

Market Share

TOP 10 SUVs

YTD Feb

Market Share

Ford Ranger

1447

24.0%

Toyota RAV4

624

14.5%

Toyota Hilux

1338

22.2%

Mazda CX-5

579

13.5%

Holden Colorado

738

12.2%

Toyota Highlander

554

12.9%

Mitsubishi Triton

685

11.4%

Kia Sportage

536

12.5%

Nissan Navara

664

11.0%

Mitsubishi Outlander

367

8.5%

Isuzu D-Max

385

6.4%

Honda CR-V

335

7.8%

Mazda BT-50

341

5.7%

Hyundai Kona

329

7.7%

Volkswagen Amarok

174

2.9%

Toyota Landcruiser

326

7.6%

SsangYong Actyon

157

2.6%

Holden Captiva

323

7.5%

Foton Tunland

106

1.8%

Ford Escape

321

7.5

year for Hilux, clawing back a lot of the market share it lost to Ranger in 2016, when Hilux sales remained the same as 2015, no doubt affected by the new Ranger’s success. Colorado has been solid in third place, despite never challenging the top two in sales, however impressive it is, including its strong results in this issue’s cover comparison story. Mitsubishi’s Triton sits in fourth, and has overtaken Navara over recent years, so with the new Nissan just launched and clawing back, the sales split of just 20 cars should see the trend of Navara swapping places with Triton and claiming fourth. The fact that Navara – currently fifth best-selling ute – is still the sixth bestselling vehicle underlines how popular the ute market remains. Kiwis seem to love a ute even more than Aussies, with five out of the top six vehicles sold in NZ being a ute. But we also love an SUV, and when all classes are combined, 18 of the top 25 vehicles sold in NZ are utes or SUVs. The shift towards these vehicles was underlined with the fastest growing market being the under-$40k compact SUV market, showing that SUVs have and are displacing conventional hatches and wagons as the go-to vehicle. Toyota’s Corolla however, is fighting that trend, and while 2016 showed a 10 percent sales reduction, it regained all those lost sales, putting it back on 2015’s strong sales pace. But Toyota’s RAV4 has been the SUV hero, both at the start of 2018, and the past three years, holding off Kia’s Sportage and

TOP 10 COMBINED

YTD Feb

Market Share

Ford Ranger

1447

17.2%

Toyota Hilux

1338

15.9%

Toyota Corolla

1215

14.5%

Holden Colorado

738

8.8%

Mitsubishi Triton

685

8.2%

Nissan Navara

664

7.9%

Toyota RAV4

624

7.4%

Mazda CX-5

579

6.9%

Toyota Highlander

554

6.6%

Suzuki Swift

548

6.5%

Mazda’s CX5. The Mazda has been a strong player over recent years, with Sportage’s value-for-money equation and facelift gave it a massive boost in 2016, and it’s continued the pattern, tapering off a little in 2018 only due to supply issues, contributing to it slipping to fourth place at the end of February. With Highlander boosting to third place, it’s a tight race for 2nd-3rd-4th, the three – CX-5, Highlander and Sportage – separated by just one-percent of market share. As we head into the peak sales times for SUVs and utes, boosted and buoyed by Fieldays in June, look for specials, special editions and new launches, including Skoda Karoq and Hyundai Santa Fe.

LCV | 41


New six-speed automatic transmission changes Transit’s game, being smooth, easy and all around better. Pocket above the shifter is made for smartphones.

AUTO TRADER Story & photos: Dean Evans

Ford gives its much-loved Transit Custom a boost with a muchdesired automatic transmission. Is it now the automatic choice?

F

ORD’S TRANSIT VAN IS THE second-most popular van in New Zealand for good reason. Practical, versatile, well equipped and economical,

to claw back the sales deficit, with a new sixspeed automatic coupled to a new 2.0-litre turbo diesel. The new engine and gearbox pairing is a

shifter naturally frees up floor space. A carlike dash places the shifter close to hand, with the choice of conventional D for drive mode, or M for manual. The best part is

With the auto, Transit jumps to 60km/h in 4.4 seconds – that’s faster than Ranger’s 4.7 secs! one thing it hasn’t enjoyed is the option of an automatic transmission. As users of the Transit will understand, the manual-only transmission choice has often been a reason for choosing the Hiace, but now Ford wants

From the driver’s seat, the dash is clean and functional. Reverse camera is on the small side, but helped by sensors. And storage above the gauges reveals a second 12v port and USB.

42 | LCV

sweet combination, and gives the Transit a new level of performance and practicality. The ability to start the engine with just the key – no need to depress the brake – helps in some situations, and the dash-mounted

Still seats three, with a fold-down centre arm-rest if it’s just two. Drivers’ seat also gets a fold-down armrest.

that even in D mode, buttons on the side of the shifter allow manual gear selection, particularly handy for downshifting. Holding the button down for a few seconds reverts it to full auto-mode again, as does cruising for

Cargo area has eight tie downs, and a magnetic door that allows for another half-metre of length. Another 12v socket is near the taillight.


a few seconds – all very smart and helpful. The shifts are quick, smooth and shift with the greater/tighter gear ratios endowing Transit with a lift in sprinting ability. Unloaded, the van jumps away, and 0-60km/h arrives in a swift 4.4 seconds – that’s faster than the 3.2-litre Ranger’s 4.7! Lots of cupholders, a smart phone holder, seats for three with storage underneath, a fold-down centre arm-rest, plus driver’s armrest – now a practical addition – make life inside the cab much nicer, with a few cubby holes dotted around the place, and 3.5mm/12v/USB sockets semi-hidden in the storage bin above the gauges. There’s Ford’s SYNC infotainment system and cruise control, and a very impressive idle start-stop system that’s not only super-fast to respond (almost immediately), it holds its memory position – active or deactive – even after the engine is shut off. There are few better idle start-stop systems, in either van or car. Downsides are few and minimal. The brake pedal is a touch high for my liking,

There are few better idle start-stop systems found in either van or car. and even with the seat back, it’s quite a toes-up position on the brake. And the fuel consumption also rises a little with the auto, from 6.5l/100km in the manual, to 7.1l/100km. This still offers over 1000km range from its 80-litre tank, though we experienced closer to 800km of aroundtown use. And of course there’s the $2000 premium for the auto. Behind the bulkhead, the Transit puts out equally impressive figures with its 1406mm high by 2555mm long cargo area, supplemented a further 53cm by a trap-door

extension through the bulkhead, for loads up to 3.4m long. There’s 1390mm between the wheelarches, bulging out to 1775mm between the walls, which are lined to improve NVH, and eight solid tie-down points. Up top are pop-up roof-racks. Out back is a 2800kg towing capacity, with trailer sway control, along with associated tech including load adaptive control and roll-mitigation control. All around improved, the Transit choice now seems automatic.

SPEC CHECK 2018 Ford Transit Custom SWB auto www.ford.co.nz Engine

2.0-litre turbo diesel four

Power

125kW@3500rpm

Torque

405Nm@1750-2500rpm

Gearbox

Six-speed auto

Economy

7.1l/100km

0-60/100km/h:

4.4sec/11.0sec

Price

$53,990

Full specs

www.lcv.co.nz

Rating (/5) Verdict

Very welcome (if overdue) addition to Transit range

LCV | 43


By Mike Stock

DINO-VAN CONTINUES SALES REIGN N

EW ZEALAND 2018, THE HOME of the dinosaurs; one is a real dinosaur, the Tuatara, the other is an automotive throwback that continues to see off much more modern opposition. And like the Tuatara’s ancestors, our automotive dinosaur rules the earth – well, the roads anyway. Our four-wheel dino is Toyota’s Hiace van which has topped the NZ market for more than 20 years; but unlike the dinosaurs of yore which failed to change and died out, the Toyota has evolved to meet changing market conditions. Doubtless, rival brands would like to see the Hiace go the way of the T-Rex and Brontosaurus, but even the introduction of mandatory electronic stability control (ESC) didn’t mean the end of the Toyota. At a time when there was talk of discontinuing the Hiace due to the need to meet increased safety parameters, the company’s engineers simply did what pundits reckoned they couldn’t, and developed an ESC system for a truck that

44 | LCV

was designed long before such technology became mainstream. Since it got stability control, Hiace sales have boomed – it’s no sonic boom, but there’s been a steady increase. New vehicle industry organisation the MIA says Toyota shifted 210 in February, a lift of 14 over the same month of 2017. And though January 1 to February 28 sales were 90 down on the same period last year, at 342 they were almost three times those of the second-placed Hyundai iLoad. Though it’s a little down on cargo capacity – 4.4 cubic metres when most mid-sized vans are six – the iLoad has struck a chord with tradespeople and service fleets that don’t need the extra capacity. Kiwis bought 124 in the first two months of this year, to put the iLoad into second spot, displacing the perennial bridesmaid, Ford’s twin-model Transit range, by just two sales. Transit sales have been hit by stock shortages (see separate story), but when full supply is available, look for the Ford to show

a serious sales rise. Chinese automotive giant SAIC’s British (LDV) and Korean (Daewoo) developed LDV V80 sat in fourth place at the end of February with 85 sales. Sold in multiple variations of the same basic van – and a cab/chassis – the V80 provides a lot of ability and practicality at a very sharp price. Sales in February suffered because some sold stock was held up on the Tokyo Ace ship which was infected with the stink bug, and was refused entry to New Zealand. LDV’s other van, the smaller G10 – rearwheel drive where the V80 is a front-driver – was in fifth spot. Offered in both petrol and diesel variants, the G10 has a 5.2 cubic metre cargo capacity, plenty of performance (aside from the non-turbo 2.4-litre petrol version), and good road manners. It provides another option for operators who don’t need a full six-cubic-metre van. The rest of the top 10 vans in the first two months of 2018 were all European – five from Germany, one from France.


Renault’s sales enigma

I

T’S EUROPE’S BIGGEST-SELLING VAN RANGE, but in New Zealand Renault struggles for sales. That’s despite the fact that in its line-up is the best-driving and in many ways most-configurable van on the market, the Trafic. This mid-sizer has been hampered by being available only with a manual gearbox in a market where autos are the favoured choice. It may also be hampered by being long-wheelbase – a necessity to achieve the desired six cubic metre cargo capacity – and by perhaps polarising styling. But once you’re at the wheel, the latter ceases to matter anyway. It soon reveals itself as a superb van, arguably the best-to-drive of any on the market.

Renault Trafic is a sales enigma, finding few buyers.

There’s also the Kiwi aversion to French vehicles which admittedly can be quirky; but looks-aside there’s not much that’s quirky about the Trafic, However, incredibly, Renault sold only three to February 28. It deserves a lot more. Faring much better was the big Master which attracted eight buyers – three more than it did in the same period of 2017. Two sales behind was the brand’s city van the Kangoo which doubled its 2017 performance for the same period. The availability of a diesel option seems to be spurring sales. As the end of the financial year comes and goes, it should be interesting to see the van tides shift.

Chinese Daily Takes Away Award

T

HE IVECO ‘NEW CHINA DAILY’ WAS VOTED VAN OF the Year China 2018 by a panel of senior commercial vehicle journalists, industry users and third-party testing organizations. Pierre Lahutte, IVECO Brand President, commented: “We are very proud of this prestigious title that has come to enrich the Daily’s trophy cabinet. The Daily has reaped awards across the world, and in particular has received recognition from the International Van of the Year jury several times, including the 2015 title and most recently with the 2018 award for the sustainable “Daily Blue Power” range. Yu Jing, Chairman of the Van of the Year China jury said: “We sincerely hope that through this activity, we will trustfully assess the standards of van vehicles in China, promoting technology and performance to provide Chinese users with smarter, safer, more comfortable and more economically sustainable solutions”. Manufactured by NAVECO (IVECO’s joint venture in China) in the new world-class plant in Qiaolin (Nanjing), the ‘New China Daily’ is inspired by the ‘New Daily’ produced in Europe and winner of the prestigious ‘International Van of the Year 2015’ award. The vehicle is tailor-made for the needs of Chinese and Asian customers and brings the Chinese light commercial vehicles to a new dimension, where carrying capabilities, fuel economy and safety are coupled with excellent maneuverability, up-to-date connectivity and modern looks. The New China Daily covers efficiently the needs of all customer missions, from goods and people transport to special applications. This extreme versatility and flexibility is possible thanks to the completely new vehicle architecture with four different chassis and 27 types of body that preserve IVECO’s exclusive body-on-frame structure. It features the latest powertrain system in Europe using the F1 engine family, (2.3l and 3.0l), which, together with smart energysaving features and improved aerodynamics, optimise the trade-off between fuel consumption and performance. The ‘New China Daily’ also stands out for the high standards of comfort and safety. The car-like driving position and the completely redesigned dash provide improved ergonomics, for a comfortable and safe drive. The Van of the Year China jury based their evaluation on the International Van of the Year standard test system and carried out a three-day dynamic and static assessment of the vehicle. This included projections of 0-to-100 km/h start and shift acceleration, 60km/h acceleration, dry road emergency brake and vehicle noise test. Technological innovation, safety, comfort, handling, economy and versatility were also part of the assessment criteria.

www.

.co.nz

37 Kaimiro street, Hamilton | sales@actionmanufacturing.co.nz | 07 850 2410

LCV | 45


1

6 Brand

Sales

Brand

Sales

Toyota Hiace

342

VW Transporter T6

47

2

7 Brand

Sales

Brand

Sales

Hyundai iLoad

124

Mercedes-Benz Sprinter

38

3

8 Brand

Sales

Brand

Sales

Ford Transit

122

VW Caddy

25

Brand

Sales

Brand

Sales

LDV V80

85

VW Crafter

14

Brand

Sales

Brand

Sales

LDV G10

74

Renault Master

8

4

9

5

10

Ford’s Transit delivery van is great. Now if they could just deliver them!

Supply Hampers Transit Demand

T

HE FOLKS AT FORD NEW Zealand are frustrated. At last they have an automatic gearbox option for the Transit van – both models, the mid-sized Custom and the big Cargo. But global demand means the numbers of self-shifting Transits arriving in Aotearoa, a market

46 | LCV

where the automatic gearbox rules, are small. Which means Ford NZ is unsure about the model mix, though its gut feeling is that the auto will dominate – to the extent that it will phase out manual Transits this year. However, until it gets supply right, and with limited numbers of autos coming in,

the sales ratio is reportedly about 60 to 70 percent automatic over manual. “We know the demand is overwhelming for automatics,” says a Ford spokesman. If Ford could just get hold of them! Watch Ford’s Transit sales jump again when it finally can.


O R U D N E D E R E V O C N U

k e Stoc By Mik Fuso NZ launched the allnew nine-model Enduro workhorse range in March.

Fuso launches Enduro range in NZ

F

USO NEW ZEALAND HAS CHOSEN THE name Enduro for its new, nine-model workhorse truck range which went on sale in March. Fuso says the Enduro name embodies the new trucks’ fundamental characteristics of toughness, endurance and durability. Daimler builds the Enduro range at its state-of-the-art factory in Chennai, India. Prices range from $44,850 to $119,850 across 4x2, 6x2, 6x4 and 8x4 configurations, and complement its premium Canter, Fighter and HD models and allow more operators to get into a new Fuso. “Enduro fills gaps in our existing line-up and allows us to reach new customers,” said Fuso NZ managing director Kurtis Andrews. “Our evaluation process showed that these units are well-suited to demanding short and medium-haul applications, and businesses where a truck is required but where transport is not the core focus, such as excavation, contracting, scaffolders and STMS.” Andrews said he believes the range will also appeal to operators who might usually buy second-hand trucks, but will be attracted by the benefits of a brand-new truck and a 36-month manufacturer’s warranty “all for a relatively comparable price.” With GVM figures of nine to 40 tonnes, the Enduro covers the middleweight truck spectrum. The smaller FA and FI models run a Canter drivetrain on a Fighter chassis, and the FJ, FO and FZ models have a MercedesBenz Axor drivetrain and chassis at their core. Two factory-built tipper units (the 4x2 FI1217 and 6x4 FJ2528) can be put to work straight off the yard.

FIT FOR

PURPOSE

BUILT TO LAST

Jackson Van Interiors can take your fleet from ordinary to extraordinary. We do more than install, we construct interiors that work hard for your business and choice of vehicle. Quality, experience and consistent service that’s on-time and on-budget.

PUT YOUR FLEET IN OUR CARE

www.jel.co.nz

0800 274427 info@jel.co.nz

LCV | 47


Taylor Bros Transport managing director Andrew Taylor says he was “blown away” by the 8x4 Enduro FO3128.

The entire Enduro range features an easy-to-clean vinyl interior, and every model has full air brakes, ABS, central door-locking, radio with USB and auxiliary inputs, and a spring-park brake on the rear axle as standard, plus 15,000km service intervals. Fuso NZ stocks 2000 Enduro parts lines as well as a range of accessories, including weathershields, headlight covers, air deflectors, stone guards and floor mats.

TRANS-TEX 220 NZ’s MOST TRUSTED TrUCK & TRAILER DECKS

SIZED TO FIT ALL SPECIFICATIONS

Certified European Birch Plywood // Competitive Cost

Not all truck and trailer decking was created equal. At Stowtec we only use the best. We insist on Plytech Trans-Tex. It's fit for purpose, more durable than the others and comes with great service and support from the guys at Plytech. Hayden Fugle Managing Director STOWTEC

0800 900 905 www.plytech.co.nz/transtex220

48 | LCV

To ensure that the Enduro trucks can withstand New Zealand’s demanding roads, Fuso NZ carried out a real-world six-month evaluation with several Kiwi operators, many of whom subsequently bought the truck they had on trial. “We acted on our customers’ feedback to ensure these units are up to the job,” said Andrews. “It was a robust process, which has validated our confidence in these trucks.” Tauranga-based Taylor Bros Transport used an 8x4 FO3128 to cart bulk materials to construction sites around the Bay of Plenty. Managing director Andrew Taylor said he wasn’t sure what to expect, but was “absolutely blown away” by the truck. “I thought ‘we’ve got to have one of these’.” Taylor said he was immediately impressed by the Enduro’s height off the ground, providing excellent clearance at both ends of the truck. His driver was happy too. “It’s very stable on the road and rides through corners well. The cab layout is comfortable and functional, and the upright seat gives you a good view of the road. It’s got all the basics and that’s what you want for a working man’s truck.” The 280hp 31T GVM truck is built for hard work with few ‘frills’ but is pretty much ‘perfect’ for the job, Taylor added. Fuso NZ will show the Enduro range on its stand at the National Fieldays in Hamilton this June. Dannevirke Carriers managing director Alan Castles says he was so impressed after evaluating an Enduro FA917 that he decided to buy it.


Fierce fight for light-duty sales.

I

SUZU AND FUSO ARE fighting tooth-and-nail for sales supremacy in the 2018 New Zealand light-duty truck market. Motor Industry Association figures show the two models sold in almost identical numbers in the first two months of the year, with the Isuzu N-series leading the Fuso Canter by just two sales. The MIA says Isuzu sold 62 N-series, and Fuso sold 60 Canters. Fuso had started the year on top of the ladder – the same spot in which it finished 2017 when it sold 565 Canters to Isuzu’s

516 N-series. In January 32 Canters were retailed, and 22 N-series; those placings were reversed in February, with 40 Isuzus sold and 28 Fusos. Year-on-year for the January/February period, sales of both truck models were ballpark with their 2017 performance. Last year Fuso sold 64 Canters and Isuzu 62 N-series. A distant third in the year-to-date to February 28 was the Hino 300, with 35 sales, 18 of them achieved in February. Hino’s result was two sales up on its 2017

performance in the same period showing a consistently strong and reliable result. Only two other truck brands posted sales in the first two month of 2018. Hamilton-based Foton New Zealand retailed six Chinese-built Aumarks – three in each month – and Korean brand Hyundai registered four Mightys, three of them in February. Neither model was on the market in early 2017. The Mighty was launched at the THE Expo in March, and Foton relaunched the Aumark at the 2017 Fieldays in June.

1 Brand

Sales

Isuzu N-series

62

2 Brand

Sales

Fuso Canter

60

Brand

Sales

Hino 300

35

Brand

Sales

Foton Aumark

6

Brand

Sales

Hyundai Mighty

4

3

4

VERSATILE COMPOSITE PANEL

DRIVEN BY PERFORMANCE LIGHT WEIGHT

WATER RESISTANT

PRECISION CUT

THERMALLY INSULATING

STRONG

CUSTOMISABLE

The advanced composite panel developed to provide high strength and insulation without the weight.

5 +64 7 850 2410 PRODUCED BY ACTION MANUFACTURING

www.omnipanel.co.nz enquiries@omnipanel.co.nz

LCV | 49


SHOWROOM | SUV

Manufacturer Audi Q2 Audi Q3 Audi Q5 Audi Q7

Website audi.co.nz audi.co.nz audi.co.nz audi.co.nz

Manufacturer Bentley Bentayga

Manufacturer BMW X1 BMW X2 BMW X3 BMW X4 BMW X5/M BMW X6/M

Price Range $54,900-$63,400 $62,400-$73,900 $92,900-$109,900 $113,900-$141,100

Website bentleymotors.com

Price Range $398,000+

Website bmw.co.nz bmw.co.nz bmw.co.nz bmw.co.nz bmw.co.nz bmw.co.nz

Trans A A A A

Trans A

Price Range $59,900+ $60,900-$70,900 $59,900-$69,200 $96,700-$130,400 $111,950-$206,700 $144,500-$236,100

Fuel P P P P

Fuel P/D

Trans A A A A A A

Cyl/CC 4/1395-4/1984 4/1395-4/1984 4/1750-V6/1500 V6/2967

Fuel P P P P P/D/Hybrid P

Cyl/CC W12/6000

Cyl/CC 4/1995-4/1998 4/1968-4/2967 4/1995-V6/2993 V8/4395 V6/2979-V8/4395

kW

Nm

110-140 110-132 140-210 160-200

250-320 250-320 400-620 500-600

kW 320-447

Nm 900

kW

Nm

110-170 100-141 100-141 140-230 170-330 190-330

220-450 220-280 220-280 500 500-740 400-740

L/100km

Safety

5.5-6.4 5.9-6.7 5.1-7.1 5.8-5.9

5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 4 Star

L/100km

Safety

8-13.1

5 Star

L/100km

Safety

4.1-6.6

5 Star

5.6-5.9 5.2-6 3.4-9.6 6-9.7

5 Star 5 Star

4 Star

In Duisburg, Germany, Mercedes-Benz Vans revealed the new Sprinter complete with new design, high-quality safety features, costeffectiveness, and a connectivity package including infotainment systems and telematics applications. The new Sprinter will feature a new transmission system, adaptable variant options, high-load carrying capacity, and new and improved safety features such as brake assist, active lane keeping assist and attention assist

Manufacturer Citroen C4 Aircross

Manufacturer Dodge Journey

Manufacturer Ford EcoSport Ford Escape Ford Everest

Manufacturer Haval H2 Haval H6 Haval H9

Manufacturer Holden Captiva Holden Equinox Holden Trailblazer Holden Trax

Manufacturer Honda CR-V Honda HR-V

Manufacturer Hyundai Kona Hyundai Santa Fe Hyundai Tucson

Website citroen.co.nz

Price Range $31,990-$35,990

Website dodge.co.nz

Price Range $44,990-$59,990

Website ford.co.nz ford.co.nz ford.co.nz

Website holden.co.nz holden.co.nz holden.co.nz holden.co.nz

Website hyundai.co.nz hyundai.co.nz hyundai.co.nz

Price Range $31,990-$41,990 $60,990-$73,990 $39,990-$63,990

The 2018 Ford Ranger Raptor has been revealed in Thailand, ahead of a local launch later this year. The Ranger Raptor’s new 2.0-litre biturbo diesel engine delivers 157kW of power and 500Nm of torque. The Ford-designed and Ford-built 10-speed automatic transmission is shared with the F-150 Raptor and has been created with high-strength steel, aluminium alloys and composites to optimise durability and weight.

50 | LCV

Fuel

Trans

Trans A A A A

Fuel P P P

Fuel

Trans

Fuel P/D P

Trans A A A/M

Fuel P/D P/D P/D

kW 110

kW 206

Nm 197

Nm 342

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

4/1498-4/1498 4/1498-4/1999 5/3198

82 132-178 143

140 240-400 470

Cyl/CC 4/1500 4/1998 4/1998

P/D P P/D P

A A

Cyl/CC V6/3604

P P/D D

A A/M A/M

Price Range $37,900-$47,900 $29,990-$42,600

Fuel

Trans

Cyl/CC 4/1998-4/1998

P

A A A

Price Range $40,990-$56,990 $43,990-$59,990 $62,990 $32,990-$36,990

Website honda.co.nz honda.co.nz

Trans

Price Range $25,990-$27,990 $30,990-$34,990 $43,990+

Fuel P

A

Price Range $29,990-$32,990 $37,990-$54,990 $75,990

Website haval.co.nz haval.co.nz haval.co.nz

Trans A

Cyl/CC 4/2231-V6/2997 4/1998 4/2776 4/1364-4/1364

kW 110 145 180

Nm 210 315 350

kW

Nm

123-190 100-188 147 103

230-400 320-353 500 200

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

4/1496 4/1800-4/1800

140 96-105

8240 155-172

Cyl/CC 4/1591-4/1999 4/2199-V6/3342 4/1591-4/1999

kW

Nm

110-130 138-199 121-136

180-265 241-440 203-400

L/100km

Safety

8.1

5 Star

L/100km

Safety

10.4

L/100km

Safety

6.5 5.4-8.6 8.5

5 Star 4 Star

L/100km

Safety

8.2 9.8 10.9

L/100km

Safety

8.5-10.7 5.7-8.4 8.6 6.7

5 Star 5 Star

L/100km

Safety

7.3-7.4 5.3-6.9

5 Star

L/100km

Safety

6.7-7.2 7.7-9.4 6.4-7.9

5 Star 4 Star


SHOWROOM | SUV

Manufacturer Isuzu MU-X

Manufacturer Jaguar E-Pace Jaguar F-Pace

Manufacturer Holden Captiva Holden Equinox Holden Trailblazer Holden Trax

Manufacturer Kia Niro Kia Sorento Kia Soul Kia Sportage

Manufacturer Lamborghini Urus

Manufacturer Land Rover Discovery

Manufacturer Lexus LX Lexus NX Lexus RX

Manufacturer Mahindra XUV500

Manufacturer Maserati Levante

Website isuzu.co.nz

Website jaguar.co.nz jaguar.co.nz

Website holden.co.nz holden.co.nz holden.co.nz holden.co.nz

Website kia.co.nz kia.co.nz kia.co.nz kia.co.nz

Website lamborghini.co.nz

Website landrover.co.nz

Website lexus.co.nz lexus.co.nz lexus.co.nz

Website mahindra.co.nz

Website maserati.com/maserati/nz/en

Price Range

Trans

$65,990

A

Price Range

Fuel D

Trans

$50,744+ $95,000-$130,000

A/M A

Price Range

Fuel P/D P/D

Trans

$40,990-$56,990 $43,990-$59,990 $62,990 $32,990-$36,990

A A A A

Price Range

Fuel P/D P P/D P

Trans

$34,990-$55,990 $55,990-$73,990 $32,490+ $35,990-$54,990

A A

Price Range

Fuel P/Hybrid D P P

A

Trans

$350,000+

A

Price Range

Fuel P

Trans

$115,900-$139,900

A

Price Range A A A

Price Range

Fuel

A

Price Range A

Cyl/CC

Nm 380

kW

Nm

150-300 132-280

380-500 365-700

kW

Nm

123-190 100-188 147 103

230-400 320-353 500 200

kW

Nm

Safety

L/100km

Safety

8.5-10.7 5.7-8.4 8.6 6.7

5 Star

L/100km

5 Star

Safety

1.3-3.8 6.5

4/1995-4/2359

114-136

192-400

6.4-8.5

5 Star 5 Star 5 Star

L/100km

Safety

Cyl/CC

Cyl/CC V6/1999-V6/2995

kW 478

Nm 850

kW

Nm

132-250

430-600

kW

Nm

200-270 114-175 193-221

530-650 210-350 335-370

Cyl/CC 4/2179

Fuel

L/100km 4.7-8.0 5.3-8.9

147 441

Cyl/CC

P/D

Safety 5 Star

104 147

V8/4461 4/1998-4/2494 V6/3456

Fuel

L/100km 8.3

1580 4/2199

Fuel

D

Trans

$136,990+

Cyl/CC 4/2231-V6/2997 4/1998 4/2776 4/1364-4/1364

kW 130

D P/Hybrid P/Hybrid

Trans

$29,990-$36,990

Cyl/CC 4/1998-4/1999 4/1999-V6/2995

V8/3996

P/D

Trans

$160,100-$179,990 $82,400-$96,000 $95,990-$126,400

Cyl/CC 4/2999

Cyl/CC V6/2979

kW 103-129

Nm 330

kW

Nm

202-316

500-600

9.7

L/100km

Safety

7.5-10.9

4 Star

L/100km

Safety

8.5-20.2 5.6-9.5 5.9-6.9

L/100km

Safety

7.4-8.1

4 Star

L/100km

Safety

The Kia Sportage has achieved five million in sales on the year of its 25th anniversary. The latest model, launched in 2016 had reached average global sales of 38,000 units per month in 2017. The Sportage made its first appearance at the 1991 Tokyo Motor Show and set the blueprint for a compact, practical SUV, suitable for use in a variety of environments. This first generation Sportage recorded total lifetime sales of over 500,000 units.

Manufacturer Mazda CX-3 Mazda CX-5 Mazda CX-9

Manufacturer Mercedes-Benz G-Class Mercedes-Benz GLA

Manufacturer Mini Countryman

Manufacturer Mitsubishi ASX Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross Mitsubishi Outlander Mitsubishi Pajero Sport

Manufacturer Nissan Juke Nissan Pathfinder Nissan Patro Nissan Qashqai Nissan X-Trail

Website mazda.co.nz mazda.co.nz mazda.co.nz

Website mercedes-benz.co.nz mercedes-benz.co.nz

Website mini.co.nz

Website mmnz.co.nz mmnz.co.nz mmnz.co.nz mmnz.co.nz

Website nissan.co.nz nissan.co.nz nissan.co.nz nissan.co.nz nissan.co.nz

Price Range

Trans

$31,395-$40,195 $39,995-$57,495 $54,995-$64,995

A A A

Price Range $186,500-$253,900 $60,900-$67,900

Trans A A

Trans A

Price Range $36,690-$45,990 $41,690-$45,590 $39,990-$56,995 $61,990-$66,990

Price Range $39,990 $55,490-$69,990 $107,500-$127,500 $35,590-$43,995 $39,990-$53,490

Fuel D P/D

Price Range $45,750-$71,990

Fuel P P/D P

Trans A A A A

Trans

kW

Nm

109 114-140 170

192 200-420 420

Cyl/CC V6/2987-V8/5461 4/1595-4/2143

kW

Nm

180-420 90-130

600-760 250-350

Fuel

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

P/Hybrid

3/1499-4/2000

100-170

220-385

Fuel P/D P P/D D

A A A/M A A

Cyl/CC 4/1998-4/1998 4/1998-4/2488 4/2488

Fuel P P P P/D P

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

4/1998-4/2268 4/1499-4/1499 4/1998-4/2360 4/2442

112 112 112-126 135

200-366 254 193-366 437

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

4/1618 V6/3498 V8/5552 4/1598-4/1997 4/2488

140 202 298 96-106 126

240 340 560 200-320 226

L/100km

Safety

6.1-6.7 6.0-7.5 8.4-8.8

5 Star 5 Star

L/100km

Safety

9.9-13.8 4.5-5.7

4.5-5.7

L/100km

Safety

2.3-7.4

4 Star

L/100km

Safety

6.0-7.6 7.3 6.2-7.2 8

5 Star 5 Star 5 Star

L/100km

Safety

7.4 9.9-10.1 14.5 4.9-6.9 8.1-8.3

5 Star 5 Star 3 Star 5 Star 5 Star

LCV | 51


SHOWROOM | SUV

The Škoda Vision X is a vision of a compact crossover that will soon be joining the Karoq and Kodiaq to become the third pillar of Škoda’s SUV range. “The concept is well moulded, a wonderful game of light and shadow dances on the athletically modelled surfaces, and the car comes across as a dynamic sculpture,” says Vision X designer Dalibor Pantůček.

Manufacturer Peugeot 2008 Peugeot 3008 Peugeot 5008

Website

Price Range

peugeot-newzealand.co.nz peugeot-newzealand.co.nz peugeot-newzealand.co.nz

$32,990-$34,990 $39,990-$54,990 $47,990-$57,990

Manufacturer

Website

Porsche Cayenne Porsche Cayenne S Porsche Macan

porsche.com/australia/_newzealand_/ porsche.com/australia/_newzealand_/ porsche.com/australia/_newzealand_/

Manufacturer Range Rover Evoque Range Rover Sport Range Rover Velar

Website

Website

Website

Website

Website

Website

Trans

Price Range $31,990-$38,990 $18,990-$22, 500 $19,990-$24,500 $29,990-$33, 990 $27,990-$37,990

Website

Price Range $151,000-$210,700

Website

$37,990-$39,990 $65,990-$70,790 $64,890-$81,490 $70,890-$91,790 $120,190-$134,190 $37,990-$61,690

Nm 190 226-380

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

3/999 4/1395-4/1968

85 110-140

200 250-400

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

1498-1968 4/1395-4/1984

110 110-140

250-340 251-400

Cyl/CC

Fuel

Trans

Fuel

Trans

Trans

Nm 235-350 235-350 196

kW

Nm

122 66 110 88-103 86-103

225 120 110 156-220 156-220

Cyl/CC N/A

P D P D D P/D

kW 126-177 129-191 115

Cyl/CC

Fuel

A A A A A A

Nm 197-360 420 160

4/2393 4/1242 4/1328 4/1373-4/1586 4/1373-4/1586

Fuel Electric

kW 109-129 133 94

Cyl/CC H4/1998-H4/2498 H4/2498-H6/3630 4/1995

P P P P P

A

Price Range

toyota.co.nz toyota.co.nz toyota.co.nz toyota.co.nz toyota.co.nz toyota.co.nz

kW

4/1998 4/2157 4/1597

P P P

A/M A/M A/M A A/M

Nm 380-430 450-700 430-700

88 126-130

Fuel P/D D P

A A A

tesla.com/en_NZ/

Manufacturer Toyota C-HR Toyota Fortuner Toyota Highlander Toyota Landcruiser Prado Toyota Land Cruiser 200 Toyota RAV4

$39,990-$54,990 $44,990-$59,990 $34,990-$39,990

suzuki.co.nz suzuki.co.nz suzuki.co.nz suzuki.co.nz suzuki.co.nz

Manufacturer Tesla Model X

Trans

kW 110-213 177-405 180-300

Cyl/CC

Fuel P/D P/D

A A A/M

Price Range

subaru.co.nz subaru.co.nz subaru.co.nz

P P/D

Nm 450 550

4/1197 4/1995-4/2488

Fuel

Trans

kW 250 324 185-250

Cyl/CC

Fuel

Trans

Price Range $32,990-$43,990 $59,990-$67,990 $25,990-$34,990

Cyl/CC

4/1998-4/1999 4/1999-V8/4999 4/1999-V6/2993

P P/D

A A

Nm 205 240-400

Fuel

Trans

Price Range

kW 81 88-133 121-133

V6/2996 V6/2894 4/1984-V6/2997

P/D P/D P/D

A A

$38,990-$48-490 $42,990-$58,290

ssangyong.co.nz ssangyong.co.nz ssangyong.co.nz

Manufacturer Suzuki Grand Vitara Suzuki Ignis Suzuki Jimny Suzuki S-Cross Suzuki Vitara

$29,900+ $38,900-$52,900

skoda.co.nz skoda.co.nz

Manufacturer Subaru Forester Subaru Outback Subaru XV

Trans

A A

Cyl/CC 3/1200-3/1200 4/1598-4/1997 4/1598-4/1997

Fuel P/Hybrid P/Hybrid P

A/M A

Price Range

seat.co.nz seat.co.nz

Manufacturer SsangYong Korando SsangYong Rexton G4 SsangYong Tivoli

Trans

Price Range $35,990 $44,990-$59,990

Fuel P P/D P/D

A A A

Price Range

Website

Manufacturer Skoda Karoq Skoda Kodiaq

$147,800+ $187,800+ $113,600-$184,300 $81,000-$118,000 $128,000-$233,000 $134,900-$157,850

renault.co.nz renault.co.nz

Manufacturer Seat Arona Seat Ateca

Price Range

landrover.co.nz landrover.co.nz landrover.co.nz

Manufacturer Renault Captur Renault Koleos

Trans A A A

kW

Nm

193-375

249-649

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

I4/1200 4/2755 V6/3456 4/2800 V8/4500 4/1987-4/2494

85 130 218 130 200-270 107-132

185 420 350-440 450 650 187-340

L/100km

Safety

4.8 4.4-7.0

5 Star 5 Star 5 Star

L/100km

Safety

9.2 9.4 7.4-9.7

L/100km

Safety

4.2-7.6 6.2-12.8 5.4-6.4

L/100km

Safety

5.4 6.1-8.3

5 Star

L/100km

Safety

5.3-7.0

L/100km

Safety

N/A 5.7-7.4

L/100km

Safety

7.5-8.0 8.3 6.6-7.2

L/100km

Safety

8.1-8.5 7.3-9.9 7

5 Star 5 Star 5 Star

L/100km

Safety

8.8-9.9 4.7-4.9 7.1-7.4 5.9-6.3 5.8-6.3

4 Star

L/100km

Safety

0

L/100km

Safety

6.4-6.5 8.6 9.5 8 9.5 6.6-8.5

5 Star 5 Star 5 Star 5 Star

5

A limited run of 100 Holden Colorado Graphite Editions are now available, with $10k worth of extras, to cater for the growing 4x2 sector which has tripled in the past five years. The Graphite uses the 4x2 LTZ Crew Cab as a base, with the same 2.8-litre Duramax 2 diesel engine with 500Nm and 3.5-tonne towing capacity.

Manufacturer Volkswagen Tiguan Volkswagen Touareg

Manufacturer Volvo XC40 Volvo XC60 Volvo XC90

52 | LCV

Website

Price Range

volkswagen.co.nz volkswagen.co.nz

Website volvo.co.nz volvo.co.nz volvo.co.nz

$41,990-$66,990 $89,990-$135,990

Price Range $75,900-$86,900 $99,900-$138,900

Trans A A

Trans A A

Fuel P/D D

Fuel P/D P/D/Hybrid

Cyl/CC 4/1395-4/1984 V6/2967-V8/4134

Cyl/CC 4/1969-5/2400 4/1969

kW

Nm

L/100km

Safety

110-162 150-250

250-350 450-800

5.7-7.8 7.4-9.1

5 Star 5 Star

Nm

L/100km

Safety

5.7-7.7 2.1-8.6

5 Star 5 Star

kW 162-225 P235/E65-235

350-440 P400/E240-480

AP21327

The Holden Colorado Graphite is available now at authorised Holden dealerships across NZ, at $43,990+GST.


Grabasub 5 SUBSCRIBE EASY WAYS TO

11 ISSUES

11 ISSUES $ 20

79. $70

93.50

$

ONLY

$80

ONLY

INCL. GST

INCL. GST

Saving $13.50

Saving $9.80

(INCLUDES EQUIPMENT GUIDE)

(INCLUDES EQUIPMENT GUIDE)

13%

14%

6 ISSUES

4 ISSUES

45.00

$

32.00

$

$36

ONLY

$30

ONLY

INCL. GST

INCL. GST

Saving $9.00

Saving $2.00

20%

6%

SUBSCRIBE TO ALL 4 MAGAZINES

$172

for Saving $44 – 20% GET YOUR COPIES EVERY MONTH! SUBSCRIBE NOW!

NEW ZEALAND’S LEADING INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS

Post PO Box 112062 Penrose, Auckland 1642

Ph 09 571 3544 Fax 09 571 3549

Email accounts@trucker.co.nz

www.alliedpublications.co.nz

Tick boxes NZ TRUCK & DRIVER 1 year (11 issues) for $80 incl. GST NZ LOGGER 1 year (11 issues) for $70 incl. GST

FOR ME

A GIFT

Renewal of current subscription:

No.

NZ TRUCKBODY & TRAILER 1 year (4 issues) for $30 incl. GST

RECIPIENT DETAILS FOR GIFT SUBSCRIPTION NAME:

NZ LIGHT COMMERCIAL VEHICLE 1 year (6 issues) for $36 incl. GST

ADDRESS:

4 TITLES $172 incl. GST

Please tick appropriate magazine title box

MY DETAILS NAME:

PHONE (day): EMAIL:

ADDRESS:

SEND A GIFTCARD TO (tick one):

TO ME

TO RECIPIENT

PHONE (day): EMAIL:

AP21327

PAYMENT

VISA

MASTERCARD

CARD HOLDER NAME: SECURITY CODE:

AMEX

CHEQUE

EXPIRY DATE: SIGNATURE:

Terms and conditions: Subscription rates and a free copy of Equipment Guide are for NZ orders only and only for NZ Truck and Driver and NZ Logger subscriptions. Rates include GST and postage. For overseas prices please enquire.


SHOWROOM | LIGHT Manufacturer

Website

Foton Aumark

foton.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range

Website

Fuso Canter Fuso Fighter

Trans

$29,995 +

Manual

Price Range

Trans

fuso.co.nz fuso.co.nz

Manufacturer

Auto/Manual Manual

Website

Hino 300

Price Range

Trans

hino.co.nz

Manufacturer

Manual

Website

UD Trucks MK UD Trucks PK

Price Range

Trans

udtrucks.co.nz udtrucks.co.nz

Manufacturer

Auto/Manual Manual

Website

Hyundai Mighty

Price Range

Trans

hyundai.co.nz

Manufacturer

Manual

Website

Isuzu N Series Isuzu F Series

Price Range

Trans

Fuel Diesel

Cyl/CC 12/2780-17/3760

Fuel Diesel Diesel

Fuel

kW

Nm

110-129 184-207

370-430 761-802

Cyl/CC

Fuel

kW

Nm

110-121

420-550

Cyl/CC 4/7013 4/7013

Fuel Diesel

Nm 360-500

Cyl/CC 4/2998 6/7545

Diesel

Diesel Diesel

kW 110-115

kW

Nm

180-206 180-206

716-883 716-883

Cyl/CC 4/3933

Fuel

kW

Nm

102-125

289-608

kW

Nm

Cyl/CC

isuzu.co.nz isuzu.co.nz

L/100km

Safety

8-13.1

5 Star

L/100km

Safety

L/100km

Safety

L/100km

Safety

L/100km

Safety

L/100km

Safety

110-139 151-257

SHOWROOM | UTE Manufacturer

Website

Mercedes-Benz G-Class Professional

Manufacturer Ford Ranger

Manufacturer Foton Tunland

Manufacturer Great Wall Steed

Manufacturer Holden Colorado

Manufacturer Isuzu D-MAX

Manufacturer LDV T60

Manufacturer Mahindra Genio

Manufacturer Mazda BT-50

mercedes-benz.co.nz

Website ford.co.nz

Website foton.co.nz

Website greatwall.co.nz

Website holden.co.nz

Website isuzu.co.nz

Website ldv.co.nz

Website mahindra.co.nz

Website mazda.co.nz

Price Range

Trans

Fuel

$129,900+

Auto

Diesel

Price Range $42,640-$69,640

Price Range $29,990-$ 36,990

Price Range $26,990-$31,990

Price Range $39,990-$66,990

Price Range $39,890-$61,990

Price Range $33,338-$40,238

Price Range $22, 989-$30,990

Price Range $35,295-$59,795

Trans Auto/Manual

Trans Manual

Trans Manual

Trans Auto/Manual

Trans Auto/Manual

Trans Auto/Manual

Trans Manual

Trans Auto/Manual

Fuel Diesel

Fuel Diesel

Cyl/CC V6/2987

kW 135

Cyl/CC 5/3198

kW 147

Cyl/CC 4/2776

kW 130

Nm

Nm 470

Nm 365

Fuel

Cyl/CC

kW

Nm

Petrol/Diesel

4/1998 - 4/2378

100 - 110

205 - 310

Fuel Diesel

Fuel Diesel

Fuel Diesel

Fuel Diesel

Fuel Diesel

Cyl/CC 4/2766

kW 147

Cyl/CC 4/2999

kW 130

Cyl/CC 4/2766

kW 110

Cyl/CC 4/2179

Cyl/CC 5/3198

kW 89

Nm 440 - 500

Nm 430

Nm 360

Nm 280

kW 147

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Nm 470

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

8.1-8.9

5 Star

Economy (avg. L/100km) 8.7

Economy (avg. L/100km) 8.1

Safety 2 Star

Economy (avg. L/100km) 7.9-8.6

Safety 5 Star

Economy (avg. L/100km) 7.7-7.8

Safety 5 Star

Economy (avg. L/100km) 8.6-9.6

Safety 5 Star

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

8.6-9.6

Economy (avg. L/100km) 8.9-10.0

✓ Kayak Carriers ✓ Boat Loaders ✓ Fishing Rod Holders

Safety 5 Star

✓ Luggage Boxes ✓ Awnings ✓ Ladder Loaders

www.rhinorack.co.nz Ph: 0800 866322

54 | LCV

Safety 3 Star

Recreational and commercial roof rack systems to fit all vehicles and a huge range of accessories including:

The World’s Most USEFUL Roof Rack Systems

Safety

400

Contact sales@rhinorack.co.nz for more information or visit your local Rhino-Rack dealer


The all-new Nissan Terra frame-based SUV will be the first vehicle from Nissan’s frame and LCV division to launch under the company’s midterm plan, Nissan M.O.V.E to 2022, when the vehicle premieres in China this year. One in every six Nissan vehicles sold globally is a frame-based vehicle or an LCV, and the company is focused on capturing this division’s full potential. This rugged SUV is practical, authentic, and designed to go anywhere.

Manufacturer

Website

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

mercedes-benz.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $56,500-$69,000

Website

Mitsubishi Triton

mitubishi.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $36,790-$62,990

Website

Nissan Nivara

nissan.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $37,990-$63,990

Website

RAM Laramie

ramtrucks.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $149,990-$169,990

Website

SsangYong Actyon

ssangyong.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $31,990-$42,990

Website

Toyota Hilux

toyota.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $36,390-$54,990

Website

Volkswagen Amarok

vokswagen.co.nz

Price Range $52,990-$82,990

Trans

Fuel

Auto/Manual

Diesel

Trans Auto/Manual

Fuel Diesel

Trans Auto/Manual

Fuel Diesel

Trans Auto

Fuel

Trans

Fuel

Trans Auto/Manual

Cyl/CC

Cyl/CC

Cyl/CC 4/1198

Fuel Diesel

Trans Auto/Manual

Cyl/CC 4/2422

I-6/6690

Diesel

Fuel

kW 135

kW 120-140

kW 276

kW 114-131

Cyl/CC 4/2775

Diesel

kW 120-140

4/2298

Diesel

Auto/Manual

Cyl/CC 4/2998

kW 123-130

CYL/CC 4/1968

kW 132-165

Nm 450

Nm 437

Nm 450

Nm

Economy (avg. L/100km) 6.6-7.0

Economy (avg. L/100km) 7.2-7.6

Economy (avg. L/100km) 6.1-7.0

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety 5 Star

Safety 5 Star

Safety 5 Star

Safety

1084

Nm 360-400

Nm 34 -450

Nm 420-550

Economy (avg. L/100km) 7.4-7.9

Economy (avg. L/100km) 7.3-9.0

Economy (avg. L/100km) 8.0-9.0

Safety 5 Star

Safety 5 Star

Safety 5 Star

SHOWROOM | VAN Manufacturer

Website

Fiat Ducato

fiat.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $54,990-$67,990

Website

Ford Transit Cargo Ford Transit Custom

ford.co.nz ford.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $61,640-$72,340 $51,990-$60,990

Website

Hyundai iLoad/iMax

hyundai.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $42,990-$59,990

Website

Iveco Daily

iveco.co.nz

Manufacturer

Price Range $65,366-$112,918

Website

LDV G10 LDV V80

ldv.co.nz ldv.co.nz

Price Range $25,990-$53,900 $32,190-$53,900

Manufacturer

Website

Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Mercedes-Benz Vita

mercedez-benz.co.nz mercedez-benz.co.nz

Manufacturer Peugeot Partner

Price Range $33,338-$40,238 $51,120-$73,850

Website

Price Range

peugeot-newzealand.co.nz

Manufacturer Toyota Hiace

Manufacturer Renault Kangoo Renault Master Renault Trafic

Website toyota.co.nz

Website renault.co.nz renault.co.nz renault.co.nz

Manufacturer

Website

Volkswagen Caddy Volkswagen Crafter Volkswagen Multivan Volkswagen Transporter Volkswagen California

volkswagen.co.nz volkswagen.co.nz volkswagen.co.nz volkswagen.co.nz volkswagen.co.nz

$26,990

Price Range $45,780-$65,880

Price Range $31,990-$35,990 $59,990-$74,990 $52,990

Price Range $29,990-$61,490 $57,490 = $92,190 $73,490-$94,990 $39,990-69,490 $137,000

Trans Auto/Manual

Fuel Diesel

Trans Auto/Manual Auto/Manual

Fuel Diesel Diesel

Trans Auto/Manual

Fuel

Fuel

Trans

Fuel Diesel Petrol/Diesel

Trans

Fuel

Auto/Manual Auto/Manual

Trans Manual

Diesel Diesel

Fuel Diesel

Trans

Fuel

Auto/Manual

Petrol/Diesel

Trans Auto/Manual Auto/Manual Auto

Trans Auto/Manual Auto/Manual Auto/Manual Auto/Manual Auto

Fuel Diesel Diesel Diesel

Fuel Petrol Diesel Diesel Diesel Petrol

kW 100-125

Cyl/CC 4/2300-4/3000

Auto/Manual Auto/Manual

kW 114-125 125

Cyl/CC i/2497

Diesel

kW 130

Cyl/CC i4/1995-4/2198 i4/1995

Diesel

Trans Manual

Cyl/CC I4/2999

kW 93-125

Cyl/CC i4/1890-i4/2499

kW 100-165

Cyl/CC 4/2766 i/1598-i4=2987

kW 110 100-140

Cyl/CC i4/1560

Cyl/CC i4/2694-i4/2987

Cyl/CC i4/1197-i4/1461 i4/2299 i4/1598

Cyl/CC i4/1197-i4/1395 i4/1968 i4/1968 i4/1968 4/1968

kW 66

Nm

kW

kW 81-84 120-140 103-129

kW 62-92 90-130 132 75-150 150

Safety

Nm

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

385-405 405

Nm 343-441

Nm 320-430

Nm 200-330

Nm 360 270-440

Nm 215

100-118

Economy (avg. L/100km)

400

Nm 3243-300

Nm

8.6 - 9.6

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

8.6 - 9.6

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

Economy (avg. L/100km)

Safety

190-240 360-400 340

Nm 160-220 340-410 400 250-450 450

LCV | 55


SEND UTES! Show us your ute, plus a few lines about what you like or dislike about it to our Facebook page facebook.com/NZLCVmag Owner: Danny Thompson Vehicle: 2008 Mitsubishi Triton Opinion: A bloody good wagon! 3.2-litre goes like a cut cat, it handles better with the bigger wheels rather than the factory alloys. Mitsi Rotorua does amazing aftersales service. Spent the summer holidays cruising around the top of the south island and it never missed a beat.

Owner: Mark Amer Vehicle: 2014 Ford Falcon Pursuit Opinion: My garage ornament! Only three of these V8 Falcon Pursuit utes were sold in NZ. I had the exhaust done, wheels and suspension and it rides OK, but it’s really low (legal, of course, lol) but you’ve got to be careful where you take it.

Owner: Douglas Middlemiss Vehicle: 2018 HSV Maloo R8 Opinion: Recently traded the Colorado 7 (SUV) in on the 2018 R8 Maloo. They’re totally different weapons, but I had a 2008 Maloo and nothing beats that V8 rumble when you press the go pedal. Colorado is a good car and heaps of grunt though. The bike is a KTM XCF350.

Owner: Warren Kendall, ViNZ Vehicle: Mitsubishi Triton Opinion: The Triton’s very good on fuel, with plenty of power, and the usual diesel lag. For the price, it has most features and the Bluetooth works well – although it only uses the passenger-side speaker, and this can’t be changed. We had some minor issues with seat wear and turbo noise, but were repaired under warranty. Servicing costs seem a little high, but vary quite a lot from dealer to dealer. I’d rate it a 7 out of 10 for value.

Owner: Kelvin Anderson Vehicle: 2017 Holden Colorado Opinion: I love Holden, so when this improved Colorado turned up at a really good price, it was an ideal replacement for our old BT-50. The bigger and nicer interior, the exterior styling and all the upgrades they’ve made over the previous model and its competitors are a bonus. I love driving to and from work and cruising around with my wee boy on the weekends - he loves our new ute.

Owner: Chris Bagrie Vehicle: 2017 VW Amarok V6 TDI Opinion: Awesome tow vehicle - even better than my last ute, a Nissan Navara STX 550. The only ute available with V6 diesel and over 550Nm, and awesome to drive. We found the back seats to be more comfortable than any other ute, too.

Owner: Leighton Mabey Vehicle: 2016 Isuzu D-Max Opinion: Had it a couple of years now and never get sick of driving it. They’re a fun ute to drive and I love the fuel economy: seems to get better the more kilometres I do. It’s got a nudge bar and light bar (since the photo) and a few more lights here and there, plus a CB.

Owner: Peter Hughes Vehicle: 2017 Ford Ranger Wildtrak Opinion: I bought a 2014 model brand new back then, and it treated us well for three years, so we replaced it with a new one. We tried the other brands to make the comparison fair, same as we did in 2014, but the Ranger was a long way ahead.

AP21327

56 | LCV

5


Don’t suffer from Fear Of Missing Out! Book into LCV magazine to reach the core target readers of SUV and ute buyers for families and fleet. Get in on the rapidly expanding market, and the new evolution of LCV magazine and digital media.

Contact Trish on 09 571 3544 or 021 925 600 or lcv@trucker.co.nz

LCV28011

NZ’s only magazine targeting and catering for the SUV and UTE market.


RANGER

FOR 5402 Ranger 297x210 vf.indd 1

20/02/18 10:46 AM

Profile for lcvnz

LCV May/June 2018  

LCV May/June 2018  

Profile for lcvnz