Issuu on Google+

WCS Technology Handbook 2012-2013 The philosophy and other practical bits of information relevant to the Wichita Collegiate School Technology Program. As this document will evolve with our program, the most current version can always be accessed online at: www.wcsks.com/edtech.asp

WCS Technology Handbook

1


Table of Contents How does Technology Integrate at WCS ............................................................................................................................... 3 Technology Mission Statement........................................................................................................................................... 3 Strategic Plan for Technology Integration .......................................................................................................................... 3 21st Century Collegiate Classroom ...................................................................................................................................... 3 1:1 Initiative Expectations ................................................................................................................................................... 3 Information About Tablet PCs ............................................................................................................................................... 5 Why Tablet PCs instead of Laptops? ................................................................................................................................... 4 Online information related to our Technology Program .................................................................................................... 5 What You are Getting............................................................................................................................................................. 6 Whom to Contact When You Need Help ............................................................................................................................... 7 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)........................................................................................................................................ 8 Classroom Integration Examples ......................................................................................................................................... 11 The 21st Century Collegiate Classroom ............................................................................................................................. 11 English ............................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Math .................................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Science .............................................................................................................................................................................. 15 History ............................................................................................................................................................................... 16 Foreign Language .............................................................................................................................................................. 17 Music ................................................................................................................................................................................. 19 Art & Film .......................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Other Middle & Upper School Enhancements.................................................................................................................. 22 Appendix I: Preparing Your Home Digital Learning Environment ...................................................................................... 25 Appendix II: DRAFT Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) ............................................................................................................... 26 Appendix III: Warranty Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) .............................................................................................. 29 Appendix IV: DRAFT Terms of Use & Equipment Issuance Agreement.............................................................................. 30

WCS Technology Handbook

2


How Does Technology Integrate at WCS? Technology Mission Statement Wichita Collegiate School provides a technologically integrated and innovative environment in which students connect, communicate, collaborate and create. This builds their skills, knowledge and self-confidence by adding the key component of digital literacy to their Collegiate education. Strategic Plan for Technology Integration Our 2009 WCS Strategic Plan committed to creating a technology friendly campus with convenient universal access and established a dynamic and effective technology plan. We created a position to support teacher education in the field of technology. This sparked intensive conversation and training on technology integration in the rigorous college preparatory curriculum at WCS. The result of this work is the 21st Century Collegiate Classroom. 21st Century Collegiate Classroom This is a classroom where:         

Appropriate technology is placed in the hands of every student to streamline workflow and maximize handson learning. A virtual binder organizes all your student's necessary documents. A teacher's prepared, annotated lessons and student notes can be accessed, replayed, and reviewed in realtime, any time. Student's misconceptions are discovered and corrected at the point of instruction. Students receive immediate feedback without a paper ever exchanging hands. Students collaborate not only with their peers, but also with experts all over the world. Digital tools are used to inspire creativity and facilitate personal expression. Students are highly engaged in relevant tasks which enhance their problem solving and critical thinking skills. Students can pursue their passions, find their voice, and unleash their potential!

1:1 Initiative Expectations Wichita Collegiate School will:       

Own all the equipment and will assign to enrolled students in August before school starts (parent must be present) Train the students in the proper care and use of the equipment Maintain the tablet through Help Desks in the Middle and Upper Schools Handle all repairs, warranty claims and insurance claims License all required software Provide spare tablet during repair so student always has access to a tablet Conduct parent training sessions in April on the protocol for the tablet program

The student will: 

Be responsible for the proper use and care of the tablet

WCS Technology Handbook

3


    

Be responsible for the safe storage of the tablet at all times, at school and at home Bring the tablet to school each day with a fully charged battery Be responsible to back up all created files, either on the cloud or on a storage service Contact the school administration immediately of any problems in the function or care of the equipment Have the availability of the tablet over the summer if enrolled for the fall semester

The parent will:      

Be sure that the tablet is fully charged before coming to school Attend the parent training sessions in April Accompany the student in August when the tablet is issued to the student Monitor the usage of the tablet by the student at home Provide internet service at home Be responsible for the cost to replace a lost stylus, AC adapter or the computer itself

WCS Technology Handbook

4


Information about Tablet PCs When the Technology Steering Committee was researching the device which would provide the most functionality for our WCS MS & US students, it was our desire to allow for the possibility of integration of the device throughout the entire curriculum. The capacity of the Tablet PC to “write” on any electronic document was what set it apart from other devices. Our students encounter many situations in their day when typing doesn’t meet the need. WCS students need to do things like solve complex math equations, record non-linear data or draw a diagram to convey an idea. The Tablet PC makes that all possible, while at the same time giving our students the ability to accomplish the rigorous task of writing a 25+ page Good Life paper. In addition to this, programs loaded on the computers like OneNote allow teachers to help students manage and archive resources and paper digitally, reducing stress and maximizing learning. Why Tablet PCs instead of laptops? 

 

The primary advantage of the tablet PC is that it is lighter than most laptops. They are also smaller in size, which means you can take them quite easily tucked under your arm from one place to another. Most laptops need to be lugged wherever you go. Tablet PCs score on account of their lightness of weight. The tablet PC can be laid flat on the working surface. This is ideal when you are in a conference. The laptop screen needs to be kept vertical and that might obstruct clear view of the person sitting in front of you. The tablet PCs take their input basically with the help of a special pen. Your handwriting is the input. That can be a good choice if you are doing something artistic. You can fine-tune your input better with a pen than with a mouse or a touchpad. Over time, you will learn to use the pen in the right manner, and even customize the pen to your tablet PC. There are different gestures that you can apply to the pen, which will produce different kinds of results. Eventually this will become easier for you than creating results with the keyboard and mouse. Finally, it must be said that a tablet PC becomes more personal to the user than a laptop. Since everyone has a different style of holding and using pens, the tablet PC will become unique to the user, and even the user will become unique to the pen. In fact, there are handwriting recognition applications that will train the tablet PC to understand your handwriting and convert it into text to up to 99% accuracy.

Online information related to our Technology Program 

The Always Connected Generation, Learning and Leading with Technology, International Society for Technology in Education, November 2010 http://www.iste.org/learn/publications/learning-and-leading/issues/Connected_Classroom_The_AlwaysConnected_Generation.aspx What Does the Research Say? Learning and Leading with Technology, International Society for Technology in Education, September/October 2011 http://www.iste.org/learn/publications/learning-andleading/issues/Research_Windows_What_Does_the_Research_Say.aspx Total Technology Immersion, Learning and Leading with Technology, International Society for Technology in Education, September/October 2010 http://www.iste.org/learn/publications/learning-and-leading/issues/Total_Technology_Immersion.aspx

WCS Technology Handbook

5


What You Are Getting: Lenovo ThinkPad x220 Included         

Multi-touch sensitive screen Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus DyKnow Classroom Management software Required grade level software for subject matter 3-year equipment warranty 3-year accidental damage insurance 24-hour repair service on-site WCS Help Desk staffed during the day in MS and US Help Desk stocked with loaner computers, spare styli & AC power cords

The ThinkPad X220 12.5" Notebook Computer from Lenovo is a thin and light notebook computer with a 12.1" LED backlit widescreen display. The system weighs only 3.3 pounds and can operate for up to 9.2 hours on a single battery charge, making it an ideal system for all-day on-the-go computing. It features a comfortable keyboard and Lenovo's UltraNav system for mousing. UltraNav combines a TrackPoint and a large multigesture TouchPad for precise cursor control. The device features 4GB of RAM, a 320GB 7200rpm hard drive, Intel GMA HD 3000 graphics, a card reader, a 720p webcam, Bluetooth 3.0+HS, and 802.11n Wi-Fi. Windows 7 Professional (64-bit) is the installed operating system.  Compact system that weighs only 3.3 pounds, making it easy to carry wherever you go  Features an 12 x 8.1" footprint, small enough to be used comfortably on planes, trains, and crowded tables  The computer's 6-cell Lithium-Ion battery can provide power for up to 9.2 hours between charges thanks to Lenovo's Power Manager  The computer's LED backlit 12.5" display features native support for 720p video, a 16:9 aspect ratio, 1366 x 768 native resolution, a 200cd/m² brightness rating, a 300:1 contrast ratio, and an antiglare finish  The computer is loaded with connectivity options, including USB, Ethernet, Bluetooth 3.0+HS, and 802.11n Wi-Fi  Loaded with Windows 7 Professional (64-bit)  Full-size spill-resistant keyboard allows you to type comfortably and protects the computer from damage caused by minor spills  ThinkVantage Active Protection System uses a shock-mounted hard drive to protect against data loss  Built-in 720p webcam and integrated microphone work together for high-quality video conferencing  Media card reader can download photos from popular memory card formats  Integrated stereo speakers produce impressive sound  Environmentally-minded system meets many regulatory certifications, including ENERGY STAR 5.0 and RoHS  LED backlit display is free of arsenic and mercury  Magnesium alloy and PCABS construction for enhanced durability

WCS Technology Handbook

6


Whom to Contact When You Need Help Educational Technology:    

Laura Cusick, Instructional Technology Facilitator: 771-2254 Bill Messamore, US Computer/US Help Desk: 771-2244 Corene Ramser, MS Computer/MS Help Desk: 771-2273 Kristy Hoffman, LS Computer/MS Help Desk: 771-2286

Help Desk:  

School Hours: 7:45am-4pm, Monday-Friday Summer Hours: Summer office hours will be set at the beginning of each season and published on our website based upon staff schedule

Trouble Shooting: ● www.wcsks.com/edtech.asp ● www.atomiclearning.com

WCS Technology Handbook

7


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Is my ten year old really responsible enough to handle a state-of–the-art computer all day at school and the rest of the time at home? Yes. In fact, what we’ve seen and learned has convinced us that the level of student responsibility increases when the student has his/her own computer. With the proper procedures and protocols we will put in place, your student will treat the computer with respect and learn to utilize its power for learning, organization, and personal pride. What is the loan period of the Tablet PC? Our student computers will be replaced on a three-year cycle. Who owns the computers? Wichita Collegiate School owns the student computers. The students are granted the use of a computer, a service which is covered in tuition. Students take the computers home at night, on weekends and vacations, and even in the summer if they are officially enrolled for the following school year. This begins in August of 2012 when the computers are issued. What additional charges can I expect related to the Tablet PC? Families will purchase their student’s case and 32G SD card. A stylus, extended life battery, and charging “brick” will be included with the computer at no additional cost. Families will pay to replace these items if any of these three items are lost or broken. What about the case for the computer? Middle school and upper school students will be required to purchase a specific computer case (Flak Jacket) designed for maximum protection of the school owned equipment. The Flak Jacket allows the computer to be locked in a locker when unattended and stored in a backpack when the student is travelling to and from school. There is a choice of colors.

Can my student decorate his/her computer? Students may decorate their computer cases. The computer itself may not be changed in any permanent way. The computer must be completely clean when it is checked back in at graduation, upon leaving the school for any reason, or at the end of the three-year cycle. The school will show students safe ways to personalize their computers with easily removable skins. What do parents need to be aware of when the computer comes home? There will be two additional meetings that will help prepare parents for the big questions about home use. One meeting will be held in the April/May time frame to consider internet safety, home wireless, file storage plans, and parent responsibilities. The other meeting will be the August boot-up camp where students are given their computers, handbooks, and basic instructions. A parent must be present with each student for that session. What happens if the computer breaks? A help desk will be manned daily from 7:45-4:00 daily in both Middle School and Upper School to help students trouble shoot problems with their computers. If the help desk personnel can’t fix the problem quickly, a loaner computer will be issued to the student while the computer is sent away for repairs. These repairs would likely be covered in the warranty. Students who lose their stylus or power cord will be able to purchase new ones at the help desk.

WCS Technology Handbook

8


What happens if the computer gets a virus, crashes, or has to be re-imaged? That can be handled at school. In that case, the computer would be wiped clean and re-imaged to be exactly what it was on day one, so the student’s personal information would be lost. That is why it is critical that families have a storage system in place What happens if the battery dies during class? Classrooms will be equipped with power strips. The student will need to have his/her power cord in its case so that he/she can plug in. If my student misplaces his computer at school, how will it be identified? Each computer has a unique serial number. We will be able to identify the computer. What software will be provided on the computer? The basic list is included on the enclosed computer spec sheet. Will the school back up my students’ files? Some files will be backed up – the students’ Dyknow lesson files will be archived after each class. We will provide Google Docs for students. OneNote will be preserved automatically. Other files will need to be backed up at home; this includes Word documents, media files, Power Point files, etc. Special instructions concerning back-up possibilities will be provided to families. Can my child put his/her personal files (media, video, photos, music, and games) on this computer? Anything that is legally obtained can be downloaded to this computer. Illegally downloaded files violate school policy. If the computer crashes or needs to be re-imaged, these personal files will be lost. Again, a system for backing up the computer will need to be established at home. Are the teachers prepared to manage and teach the classrooms with student computers? We have spent three years preparing for this transition. The teachers are trained and ready. We will be using Dyknow, a software program that puts teachers in charge of student computers during class. We are developing clear procedures, rules, responsibilities, and guidelines for teachers, students, and parents. We have visited other independent, college prep schools that use tablet computers. They are not just ready; they are very excited!

How will discipline problems such as damage or mischief to other students’ computers or cyber bullying be handled? The regular school rules and policies will be enforced. Students will be reminded how those affect the use or abuse of computers. In addition the school is updating our digital citizenship curriculum and will be teaching that in middle and upper school. We think this is one of the great benefits of this program since all students and adults now live in a digital world. Will my student use the computer every day in every class? We will still expect the WCS teachers to use the best method for teaching every day. So each day your student will continue to experience the broad range of activities and lessons that you value which will often, but not always, involve the computer. The constant availability of the student computer will make a daily impact at school. Now that each student will have a computer, will the teachers be available 24/7? No. We will still run regular school and tutorial hours. However, both students and teachers may find ways to

WCS Technology Handbook

9


connect outside regular hours based on teacher plans. We will still protect family time for both teachers and students. Will students be expected to have a school day at home via computer when WCS is having a snow day? No. There may be times when we will be able to use the technology to help students who would otherwise be at a disadvantage if we have too many snow days. Teachers will be able to send home assignments or change test schedules or some other process that would be to students’ advantage; but a snow day will still be a snow day. Now, if we have days and days of snow days, you may find us willing to give you and your students your money’s worth by getting together digitally. The technology program gives us the tools to make this possible. Will the school be able to monitor my student at home? No. We will be using Dyknow which is an interactive program during class time. Once the teacher and student log off the session, that interactive use is disabled. Students who are home during school can log into a class session, but the teacher/class will not be able to see or talk to them. If my student has computer problems at night, what will happen? In the summer? The student should try to find another way to fulfill the assignment and get to the help desk before school in the morning. The electronic learning office will have regularly-scheduled summer hours to take care of computer problems.

WCS Technology Handbook

10


Classroom Integration Examples The 21st Century Collegiate Classroom Technology is changing everything. The way we live, work, compete in the world, and, perhaps most importantly of all, the way we learn. Students at WCS will continue to have the benefit of our rigorous college preparatory curriculum. But now our faculty has the ability to teach the way students learn. The Tablet PC becomes a mind tool, allowing the faculty to not only instruct, but to instantly tutor and engage students in innovative ways. The 21st Century Collegiate Classroom combines new technology and traditional academic excellence to provide an environment of age-appropriate development and intellectual stimulation. The addition of instantaneous access to information via the Internet and amazing web-based applications significantly impact the lives of the students we teach, providing teachers a creative and critical tool to engage students at a previously unattainable level. We are replacing the traditional classroom with a connected, collaborative, relevant environment which allows our students to problem-solve, create, and learn.

English Example In English, the integration of Tablet PCs enables students to take a more active role in the learning process. Tablets increase student engagement by facilitating note-taking and writing skills. Students can create expository essays, poems and/or PowerPoints for visual presentations. OneNote is a primary resource for storing notes and files, and Google Docs may also be a tool used for student collaboration and sharing. Digital storytelling allows students to combine images, music, sound bites and narration in a multimedia video to convey their point of view on events in a novel. ● Students in a sixth grade Literature class create a blog from the point of view of a mythological character. Web 2.0 applications enhance content in the blog. ● Students in sophomore English class utilize Crocodoc for peer editing and receiving teacher feedback on their essays and writing assignments. ● Students in middle and high school classes work collaboratively in Dyknow to analyze quotations and discuss their significance in a specific work of literature. Why 1:1 Matters in English In the English classroom, where conversation is a critical part of the experience, the Tablet PC brings all students into the discussion. Students may choose different modes of expression--digital ink, keyboard, and audio-recording--to individualize participation. The tablet empowers students and teachers to organize and share English work digitally while providing permanent storage of the individual’s work over time. With this technology every student has creative opportunities to build and demonstrate analytical skills in reading and writing. At the same time, teachers have the ability to assess student progress while students are working in the classroom, and teachers can use this information immediately to improve student learning.

WCS Technology Handbook

11


See It 

The 9th grade English blog where students have access to ALL course content:



5th graders learning about metaphors by planning poetry on Dyknow:

WCS Technology Handbook

12


12th Grade essays being graded digitally on www.crocodoc.com:

Mathematics Examples ● Monitor student understanding of mathematical concepts using Dyknow ● Students can be more organized using One Note ● Teacher can send and receive files (such as homework) and can grade the homework and return it to the students One Note folder. (No paper lost)  Launch simulation web sites during class for the entire class to examine  Students can easily work in groups to enhance their grasp of concepts  Students can let the teacher know when they are having trouble using the chat feature Why 1:1 Matters in Math ● Immediate Feedback-polls ● Every student answers every question ● Reduced reliance on paper ● Increases individual responsibility ● Increases relevance and motivation for students-more students engaged ● Can see student's thought process through Dyknow. Replay slides ● Can replay / watch teacher work problem-re teach ● Tools readily available for teacher and student (calculator, graph paper) ● Absent students have access to instruction ● Reduce individual anxiety ● Individualize instruction-send tutorial to a student ● Help students stay organized-OneNote

WCS Technology Handbook

13


â—? Students have option to write or type â—? Reaching multiple intelligences / students with different leaning styles

WCS Technology Handbook

14


Science Examples ● Moodle is an integral part of the Science Department. The teachers utilize Moodle to post homework, pre-labs, and supplemental materials like YouTube videos or other online resources. The teachers have the ability to quiz students on Moodle and track how much time they spend using the Moodle content. Moodle is a fantastic learning tool for the Science Department. ● During many labs, students use Vernier Probeware which can be plugged into their computers to gather and manipulate data. For example, a temperature probe put into a beaker of cold water as it is heated to boiling, instantly graphs the temperature change as it occurs. This allows the students to focus on the data rather than spending so much time focusing on the gathering of the data. Many types of probes are used in the Upper School science classes Why 1:1 Matters in Science With so many resources available to teachers online, 1:1 brings the kind of power to the teacher that the Science Department has longed for. Online applications like simulations, satellite telescopes and live webcams make the science classroom 3 dimensional. We can now show students difficult concepts rather than read about them. The 1:1 environment gives the science student their own personal window to the universe. The tablet PC becomes an invaluable tool that creates powerful access.

See It 

The following is an example of the Chemistry I Moodle Site where WCS science students can access all types of science content digitally:

These are the Vernier probes that are used in the science labs in action:

WCS Technology Handbook

15


History Examples ● Interactive maps ● Record group discussions; iPro Recorder ● Have slides without going to blog, with teacher and student annotations ● Less paper through use of OneNote ● Crocodoc - upload docs to teacher folder to share, grade, comment ● Access to real-time research, primary sources, images, current events, video clips ● Video creation; shared document creation ● Digital textbooks ● Populus Romanus - Roman faux-Facebook with interacting personas ● Skype; collaborative research with distance partners ● Google Earth ● Access to electronic primary resources such as Library of Congress ● Podcasts ● United Video Streaming Why 1:1 Matters in History Bringing tech to history showing students how to use internet and tech for the subject matter, making information more accessible; allows kids to manipulate info; maps, sources; level of engagement; learning from best examples from classmates, best practices; timelines; personal viewpoint of info on the computer; allows instruction to be more personal; differentiated instruction; Portability; See It 

The following is an example of a blog a student created during the 8th grade Populus Romanus Roman research project. The students were each assigned a secret Roman identity for which they had to create a faux-Facebook page. The goal of the project is to interact with the entire virtual Populus Romanus world on events and issues facing the Roman civilization from their character’s perspective. It is an amazing research project that requires students to cite the resources they use to formulate their character’s response to other “Romans” as well as the issues and situations facing them in their daily lives.

WCS Technology Handbook

16


Foreign Languages Examples

● We are currently using Quia and the text book websites very often. These provide extensive concept and vocabulary practice as well as translation, listening and grammar activities. Paradigm practice for all noun and verb endings can also be used by the students any time of day. These sites, which provide practice for a variety of levels, are ideal for differentiated instruction. ● We are using the Internet to find international news items that are relevant, unusual or just entertaining. The sources are always in the target language, so when students present and discuss the content, they develop their speaking skills and are also exposed to vocabulary, colloquial expressions and culture content that are not always present in the textbook. This exercise can be done daily without getting redundant. It has also proven to be a really good way to expose students to current international events. ● We also currently use PowerPoint very extensively in all target languages. PowerPoint allows the use of pictures, visual cues, videos, as well as spacing to help students learn the complexities of a foreign language. Why 1:1 Matters in Foreign Language Tablet computers will encourage all students to express themselves in a safe environment. Using programs like “Audacity” will give them opportunities inside and outside the classroom to practice their speaking skills in the target language. All students will be able to work on their skills at their own level engaging them individually. Likewise, imagination and creativity can be used to practice vocabulary by creating short movie clips or PowerPoint slides with voice. Tablets will also be a great resource for cultural awareness and comparisons. Online resources will allow research of open ended questions or concepts that allow students to find their own answers online. One of the most exciting aspects of a one to one school is the availability of instant assessment

WCS Technology Handbook

17


every moment of the class. Tablets provide a much quicker and clearer picture of the progress of the students in the classroom. See It 

Students create cartoons using the website Toondoo to practice and create with grammatical concepts and vocabulary.



The following is an example of a practice speaking activity that can easily be done inside or outside the classroom when all students have a tablet PC.

WCS Technology Handbook

18


Music Examples

● Usual day to day classroom activities do not include Dyknow lessons, as rehearsal time is precious. ● Occasionally, lessons on music history, music theory, and audio listening can be implemented through Dyknow. ● WCS Band currently utilizes other technology in these ways: **Personal goals recorded through audio or video. (See it below) **YouTube examples of group pieces being played and “Artist of the Week” examples, along with PowerPoint. **Concerts and rehearsals are recorded, uploaded, and shared in Google Docs for listening, reviewing, and in the future could be passed on to students for portfolio purposes. **Sibelius music program helps arrange songs for varied performances.

WCS Choir currently utilizes technology in these ways: **Bri-lee publisher allows immediate accompaniment and playback during rehearsals and demonstrates section singing. **Sibelius music program helps arrange songs for varied performances. (See it below) **YouTube examples weekly, demonstrating great choral performances.

Why 1:1 Matters in Music 1:1 technology adds emphasis to musical lessons occasionally. The implementation of technology resources will be quite helpful outside of the music classroom. Students can record, practice, listen, and learn through several programs: Sibelius, Bri-lee and YouTube to name a few. See It

Practice Video example of a band student playing a personal goal for Band Class recorded with a webcam for her instructor:

https://docs.google.com/a/wcsks.com/leaf?id=0B6ilt0i3nQZLMTdiNWZmZDMtNTI4OS00OWQxLWI3YmUtNzJmZj

WCS Technology Handbook

19


NiMWJhMGRj 

Music Example that was arranged by Choir Director Steve Bixler in Music Notation Software Sibelius

Art & Film Examples

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Internet to communicate artistic concepts and for research Document camera Blogging Skype generates a global audience PowerPoint slides Create e-portfolios for visual storage of student work Published films, art portfolios Art competitions and virtual shows

Why 1:1 Matters in Art & Film The 1:1 environment allows students to work on their projects anytime, anywhere, while generating an instant audience. Having computers/technology accessible in the classroom, cuts time and allows students to experience art concepts and information in the moment.

WCS Technology Handbook

20


See It

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfDC3oXRgeM&feature=related

WCS Technology Handbook

21


Other Middle & Upper School Enhancements Examples

● Physical Education: Show short videos of games, drills, exercises. Show how a game or activity is played. Could

● ● ● ● ●  

  

use it to monitor fitness levels/activities (show scores and track progress throughout the year.) Use it to show the rules of a game. Instead of having them sit and just listen, they could follow along. Students could view presentations of how to perform new speed and agility drills. Students could customize their daily work-out. Students could record their own fitness scores through-out the year Entrepreneurship: Online Stock Market Game, create business cards and flyers Old and New Testament: Use blog for posting comments about verses or topics Computer: Use Quia to access student understanding of the programs we have done projects in to help them fully understand the different aspects of the program as well as everyday uses. Problem Solving: Use Mindview to create mind maps. Music Explorations: Research on composers, styles of music, videos/recordings of specific songs, Garage Band/ Music Tech Unit, retrieve accompaniment tracks so we can sing songs THEY want to sing Art: Research on artists, cultures, fine art examples in various media, techniques to try, art events in Wichita area, art sites that have creative abilities like painting, drawing, designing, architecture, etc. Transitions: Research on illegal drugs, information on healthy lifestyle, current articles about drug use, long and short-term effects of drug use, information on the brain and how to keep it healthy, skills, i.e. organizational, social, conflict resolution, etc., surveys about lifestyle, character, likes/dislikes, study character profiles of successful people, Values in Action: Notes on projects, blogging questions, finding quotes, sharing pictures, PowerPoints on projects, information updates on project status, classroom discussions via chat, voting on Quote of the Semester, finding songs, etc. US Counseling: Parent education curriculum from Common Sense Media MS Handbook: Being able to emphasize a topic through emails and start discussions about important MS topics, respectful relationships etc.

Why 1:1 Matters in MS Enhancements Instead of technology for “technology’s sake”, we can make sure the results are BETTER than without the technology. We can do this by gauging student understanding in class (instant feedback), which makes us more efficient teachers, and avoids frustration in the student. We still would do regular evaluation of their comprehension and knowledge, but often in less threatening means than a test. This could be through a blog, a creation of their own (website, video, music, etc...), which amounts to “ownership” of the concept. Overall...they are more ENGAGED with what they are learning. They develop collaborative and creative skills, which benefit them FOR LIFE-in whatever jobs or life situations they head toward! ● MS Dean: Organization of student life will be easier and more relevant to our students. ● US Counseling: Less “stuff” for the disorganized to deal with; notes, assignments, etc. in one place; get rid of the cassette recorders--Audacity, flash drives, and headphones with microphones--for 21st century accommodated testing ● MS Counseling: Accommodated students will be able to keep better organized with OneNote and the testing can be done with the computer. Audacity used to record and playback answers for clarification. Review with recording the entire class and playback at home for repetition. Practice using different ways of getting info and storing that information. ● MS PE: Would allow for those students who are visual learners to pick up on new activities, etc... It would allow for the students to keep track of their fitness progress which should be more efficient. It would allow for the

WCS Technology Handbook

22


students to know what will be done in class and where the PE class will be since we have multiple classrooms. The use of videos are a way of letting kids see what they are doing correctly and incorrectly in class when it comes to fitness activities or skills. Students could customize their daily work-out plan and record their progress and improvements. This is a great tool for visual learners. � Computer: The 1:1 environment is already available in the lab. Outside the classroom, however, students will be able to work on projects easier at home if they do not have time to complete projects in class. Learning file management is often difficult for students and they will have more practice at this to ensure everything is where it should be. A blog is used to inform students of what happens in class daily. Students will be more likely to check it when absent because they will be on their computer at home already for other classes. The computer lab plans to use more screen casts to use as lessons for those that miss so that they can be caught up when they return and do not miss the teaching and discussion times. � Values: I think in the world our students are entering, everything is centered on electronics, from communication to friendships to completing their work. These methods are constantly changing and updating. To properly prepare them for the world, and to teach them with all the available resources, 1:1 will be invaluable. The difficulties will be in keeping pace with the technology, though harder for the instructors. For these students, it has always been a part of their life to update their electronic knowledge on a continual basis. What hasn’t been a part of their world, and desperately needs to be, is the teaching of the morals and ethical considerations in an electronic world. See It

WCS Technology Handbook

23


WCS Technology Handbook

24


Appendix I: Preparing Your Home Digital Learning Environment Internet Filtering and Security at Home. You may not install any internet filter software, security software, or anti-virus software of any kind on a computer owned by the school. The addition of such software will interfere with operation of the computer and activities while at school. The school network provides the necessary protection while at school. However, below is a list of wireless routers for home use that can provide you with filtering and security features without having to install software on the computer that the school has assigned to your student. The following are examples of home wireless routers that include Parental Controls and Internet filtering features. There are other makes and models available on the market with similar features. We do not endorse or recommend any one device over another. You should take into consideration your personal needs and preferences when selecting such a device.

Wireless Routers A wireless router in your home is the device that makes it possible for your computers to connect wirelessly to the internet through the modem in your house. The modem is the device to which your Cox internet cable or AT&T internet line is attached.     

Cyberoam NetGenie Home Wireless Router iBoss Home Parental Control Wireless-N router Asus Black Diamond Dual Band Wireless-N 600 SOHO Router Cisco Valet M10 300Mbps Wireless N Router with Parental controls Cisco Linksys Wireless Router with Parental Controls E222056

The following web links contain useful information on Internet Safety and Parental Controls: 

8 Ways to Kid-proof Your Internet Parental Controls

http://netsecurity.about.com/od/security101/a/8-Ways-To-Kid-Proof-Your-Internet-ParentalControls.htm 

NETGEAR Live Parental Controls

http://countries.netgear.com/lpc 

7 Ways To Protect Your Kids on the Internet

http://www.ivillage.com/7-ways-protect-your-kids-internet/6-a-128701 

Prtotecting Kids’ Privacy and The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/tech/tec08.shtm 

Internet Safety Resources

http://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/protecting_your_family/articles/family_safety_resource s.aspx 

Safety & Security Center

http://www.microsoft.com/security/family-safety/default.aspx#Overview

WCS Technology Handbook

25


Appendix II: DRAFT Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) PHILOSOPHY WCS believes that technology can be effective tool that complements the curriculum while expanding our students’ learning opportunities. As with any tool, however, it can be used with responsible stewardship and irresponsible stewardship. Use of the WCS network and its related computer facilities or the use of a personal computer at school is a privilege afforded to members of the school community. All policies of the school apply when using technology. Computers are to be used for educational purposes only during school. The School reserves the right to monitor the use of computers. The student should NOT have an expectation of privacy when using a computer at school. PERSONAL ELECTRONICS Personal electronics other than the school issued tablet PC, including cell phones, are not permitted in Middle School unless consent has been given by the division head. In the Upper School, cell phones and personal electronics are permitted according to established procedures of the division. Learning different students with accommodations will be granted permission to use the devices recommended in their learning plan. Students who bring personal electronics other than school computers to school with permission are responsible for these items. Students should use other personal electronic devices with the permission should secure them in student lockers when not in use. If lockers are not operating properly, it is the student’s responsibility to notify the Dean of Students. SOCIAL NETWORKING/CHATTING During class, students may not use any chat to communicate with others unless a teacher or administrator expressly authorizes them to do so. This prohibition includes but is not limited to the use of Facebook, Twitter, Google Chat, Email and Instant Message during class time. GAMES Games should never be played on any computer during the academic day unless directed by the teacher. VIDEO AND PHOTOS Video and photos obtained during the school day must be under the guidance of a WCS teacher so that privacy issues and procedures can be properly addressed. Teachers must approve the use of the computer’s camera and audio features during class time. NETWORK ACCESS Students are never permitted to use a faculty member’s computer. Students may not access information on any of the school’s non-public servers without permission of the administration. No student may change school information or portray himself or herself as another person over the Internet, e-mail, or Instant Message. Any use that unnecessarily slows other’s access to the network, wastes storage, or wastes other technology resources is forbidden. DISTRIBUTING AND DOWNLOADING Wichita Collegiate School is the owner of record for the student tablet PCs. Once issued, students have sole responsibility and have rights of use only for that device. Any student found vandalizing or tampering with another’s computer, files, software, system performance or other network equipment will face disciplinary action. All students and parents have signed an Acceptable Use Policy which requires legal use of that device. This extends to distributing and downloading files. All use of the computers and the Internet must be within the law. Copyright laws must be obeyed. Software licensed to the school may not be removed from school computers. Students are allowed to

WCS Technology Handbook

26


download legally obtained software and files for their personal use as long as those files do not interfere with efficient functioning of the computer at school. Copyrighted materials cannot be sent or received from school computers without written permission and/or proper documentation of the copyright owner. No computer programs, MP3’s, pornography, or copyrighted material may be distributed at any time. The use of virus and “spy”- ware or malware programs or any other intentionally harmful programs is prohibited and will be dealt with seriously as will any hacking of school management resources. The school has already equipped the computer with appropriate and effective anti-virus protection. Students and/or parents should not download additional anti-virus programs. HARDWARE Students are not allowed to access the internal workings of the school issued tablet PC. The help desk will be open and available before, during and after school for your maintenance and repair needs. Partitioning of the hard drive and/or downloading and running alternate operating systems is prohibited. INTERNET USE The Internet is to be used exclusively for educational and appropriate purposes at school. The Internet offers access to inappropriate sites such as those that are racist, pornographic, militant, violent, extremist, and gambling-related. Students should not access any information of this kind at any time. Since websites may be created by anyone, no information or content should be taken at face value. Students need to carefully examine the source before using it. Finally, students should be very cautious about disclosing any personal information over the Internet. No student should ever disclose personal information about ANY member of the WCS community. Using personal websites, “livejournals,” and “blogs” are not to be used on school computers or while at school unless directed by the teacher. E-MAIL WCS will teach our students proper “netiquette.” A good rule of thumb is to never say anything through computer usage (e-mail, Instant Message, ���live journals,” etc.) that he/she would not say in person. Simply said, highly charged, delicate or difficult personal computer communication should be addressed in person. In addition, students must be sensitive to the beliefs of others when using email. Chain and anonymous e-mail is not allowed. Computer communication should always be courteous, respectful and appropriate. Wichita Collegiate teachers will be using school issued email accounts as a means of communication and sharing assignments. Therefore students must check their school email account daily. “I didn’t read my email” is not an acceptable excuse for being uninformed or unprepared. These accounts are archived and available to school personnel. Use of school email accounts for solicitation is not allowed. Students must never access someone else’s email account. SLANDEROUS / DISRESPECTFUL PERSONAL COMPUTER USAGE Any student, who inadvertently accesses inappropriate material on the internet, receives harassing, threatening or inappropriate via email or on the internet must immediately report the concern to their advisor, teacher, or division administration so it can be investigated and addressed properly. In addition to the aforementioned policies that govern usage of the school’s service, network, or computers, students are not to use personal computers in any way that could be construed as slanderous, mean-spirited, inappropriate, or disrespectful to fellow students, faculty, or the School itself. WCS reserves the right to address and administer appropriate consequences to students found violating this expectation.

WCS Technology Handbook

27


PROPERTY - DAMAGES AND THEFT As noted in the student expectations, all students are expected to display respect for their own property, school property (including the Tablet PC), and the property of others. Any property that is willfully damaged or stolen by a student will be repaired or replaced at the student’s expense. Misusing textbooks and equipment, writing on desks, lockers or walls can incur similar liability. In addition vandals will be subject to strict disciplinary measure. Accidental damage to property belonging to Wichita Collegiate School or to an individual will require restitution from persons responsible for such damage and may also result in disciplinary action. Acts of theft are not tolerated and detection of theft or the possession of stolen property is considered cause for suspension or dismissal. GRAPHING CALCULATORS (MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOL) Graphing calculators are required of all Upper School students and are used within the Middle School math and science programs. The use of appropriate technology for analysis and problem solving is an important component of the mathematics education at Wichita Collegiate School and is beginning to extend into other curricular areas as well. These devices have evolved into a tool that spans the curriculum. Study card programs and text editors allow students to use the calculator for vocabulary review in any language, drill major concepts in technical areas, store useful formulas for reference, and other educationally valid activities. While these features expand the utility of the calculator as a study device, the availability of these features demand a more formal understanding between the student and teacher as to what is acceptable and what is not acceptable in terms of their use. Therefore it is important that all students and their parents read and understand the following policy. CLASSROOM CALCULATOR POLICY: Prior to any in-class work, such as quizzes and exams, the student is responsible for removing from the calculator any previously stored information or programs relevant to the class. Failure to do so will constitute a violation of the Technology Code of Conduct. Exceptions to this policy, for educational reasons, must be specifically granted by the classroom instructor in the course syllabus provided at the beginning of the course. Any violations of the school’s Technology Code of Conduct will be addressed by the Dean of Students, School Counselor, and Division Head.

The school reserves the right to withhold WCS Internet access, access to the school computer network, and/or the use of computers at school to any student who is found to be using the service, network, or computers in an inappropriate manner.

Signature of Student

Date

Signature of Parent

Date

WCS Technology Handbook

28


Appendix III: Warranty Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Q: Is ThinkPad Protection transferable? A: YES, ThinkPad Protection is transferable as it is tied to the warranty term and the system you purchased. It does not follow the purchaser/customer.

Q: Is there a limit to the number of times a screen can be repaired under ThinkPad Protection? A: No. There is no limit on screen repairs. The Screen will continue to be replaced as long as the entire unit itself does not need to be replaced. Should the full system need replacement, the customer must purchase ThinkPad Protection with the new system. The agreement does not cover bad pixels, but bad pixels are uncommon in new systems. The base warranty does not cover bad pixels either.

Q: When replacing a notebook, how do the ThinkPad Protection terms tie to the new unit? A: the ThinkPad Protection terms will always tie to the base warranty terms on a notebook. The base warranty always ties back to the invoice of the date of purchase for the notebook. Therefore, ThinkPad Protection will match this term. For Example: If the customer purchases a 3-yr warranty with a 3-yr ThinkPad Protection and must replace the unit after 1 year due to accidental damage, then the notebook has effectively 2 years of warranty remaining. After the replacement the customer would have to repurchase ThinkPad Protection if they want coverage for accidental damage. They would purchase the 3-yr accidental damage but effectively get 2 years since there are 2 years remaining on the base warranty for the notebook from the original agreement.

Q: What constitutes normal operating conditions and handling? A: Everyday usage of the system. Not in a pool while on a raft, or under conditions that unreasonably heighten the chance of damage.

Q: What constitutes misuse? A: This is a broad definition for situations where there is physical evidence that the damage was intentional.

Q: What is cosmetic damage? A: Damage (aside from a crack in the LCD) that does not impact the machines’ ability to function to factory specifications. Examples are scratches on the external case (when lid is closed), chips on the external casing such on the corners, paint rubbing off the palm rest, etc. Keep in mind, however, that in practice, we review each customer sat situation on a by-case basis and decide the best course of action.

Q: Why does ThinkPad Protection have to be repaired through WCS? A: In order for the warranty to be valid, repairs MUST be made through WCS. Unauthorized, outside repairs will void the ThinkPad Protection Plan.

WCS Technology Handbook

29


Appendix IV: DRAFT Terms of Use and Equipment Issuance Agreement 1. Equipment: Wichita Collegiate School will provide the following Equipment: One (1) Lenovo x220 Tablet PC and related hardware and software ("Equipment”). WCS provides to each student properly enrolled in the 5th through 12th grade the Equipment and related software so that all students and faculty have the same technology. The Equipment is intended to be used through the 2014-15 school year. The student to whom the Equipment is issued is to be the only authorized user of that computer. Each student is responsible for the care and use of the issued Equipment. 2. Risk of Loss or Theft: The Parent/Guardian assumes all risks of loss of the Equipment. WCS's casualty insurance covers theft but NOT loss. In case of loss, WCS will loan the student a loaner Tablet PC to use and the Parent/Guardian will be responsible for its replacement cost. In the event of theft, a police report must be filed and a copy provided to WCS Business Office. Once a police report is completed, the Equipment is insured by WCS's insurance and the Equipment will be replaced. In this case, cost to the parent will be $1,000 for the deductible or less if the actual replacement cost is less than that amount. Parents/Guardians are responsible for obtaining a Police Report. 3. Property Insurance/Homeowner's Insurance Rider: Parents are strongly encouraged to add a rider to their home insurance policy for the replacement cost of the Equipment (estimated value of $1,600). WCS provides no property insurance to you and reminds you that you are responsible for carrying adequate property insurance for the Equipment (in case of a natural disaster at your home, for example.) 4. Maintenance and Repair: WCS maintains ownership of the Equipment and management of all hardware repairs and software updates. The Parent/Guardian shall maintain the Equipment in good repair and operating condition, allowing for reasonable wear and tear. In the event of damage to the computer, students should first go to the Help Desk, where they will receive a loaner Tablet PC. If the Help Desk deems it necessary, the Tablet PC will be mailed to the manufacturer, where they will determine if the damage is covered under warranty or accidental damage insurance. 5. Warranty and Accidental Damage Insurance: WCS will manage the replacement of any software or hardware on the Equipment that is covered by manufacturer warranty or the accidental damage policy. The following are some examples (but not an exhaustive list) which are not covered:  Scratched (cosmetic) parts.  Cracked or broken plastic parts, broken latches, broken pins, or broken connectors caused by excessive force.  Damage caused by the improper insertion of a PC Card or the installation of an incompatible card.  Damage to the stylus or the stylus housing due to improper use and insertion.  Missing styluses.  Damage caused by foreign material in the hard drive (food, drinks, etc.)  Battery replacement after one year.  Other damage caused by intentional misuse or modification of the Equipment 6. Software Licenses: WCS owns the licenses for the software installed on each Tablet PC. Under no circumstances may any of this software be transferred to any other computer except under the direction of the WCS Electronic Learning Department. 7. Return Condition: If the student leaves WCS within the 3-year equipment cycle, the Parent/Guardian agrees to return the Equipment to WCS in good working order, with the exception of normal wear and tear. Any missing parts

WCS Technology Handbook

30


(e.g., charger and/or stylus) will be charged to the student's account. 8. Care and Operation of Equipment: The Equipment is intended to be used only by the student to whom it is issued and may only be used and operated in a careful and proper manner, and in accordance with the School's WCS Technology Handbook, which is updated annually and posted on WCS's website. Its use must comply with all laws, ordinances, and regulations relating to the possession, use, or maintenance of the Equipment. The Parent/Guardian shall be responsible for the student's strict adherence to the School's WCS Technology Handbook and to any future updates to the WCS Technology Handbook. 9. WCS's Right of Inspection: WCS shall have the right to inspect the Equipment at any time during the equipment cycle period. 10. Ownership of Equipment: WCS owns the Equipment. 11. Liability and Indemnity: Liability for injury, disability, and/or injuries to other people, caused by operating, handling, or transporting the Equipment is the obligation of the Parent/Guardian, and the Parent/Guardian shall indemnify and hold WCS harmless from and against all such liability. In other words, if the students hurt themselves or someone else with the Equipment, the school is not responsible. 12. Consumable Parts: Replacement or upgrade of consumable parts is not covered by WCS. Consumable parts include the battery, stylus, and power adapter. 13. Disclosures: Students will be responsible for strict compliance with the School’s WCS Technology Handbook, which will be published and updated annually, and found on WCS’s website. The Parent/Guardian has read this agreement and signified such by signing below.

Parent/Guardian Responsible for Equipment:

______________________________________________________________________ Date: ______________________ (Print Name) 

Parent/Guardian:

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ (Signature) 

Print Student Name and Grade:

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

WCS Technology Handbook

31


WCS Technology Handbook