Horizons quarterly // spring 2014

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HORI Z ON S LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESERVATION, RESTOR ATION , EDUCATION AN D RECRE ATION

QUARTERLY

spring 2014 VOLUME 23, ISSUE 2


2

5 more than

11

8 30,000 acres are

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

protected

by the lake county forest preserves .

A MESSAGE from

BOARD of COMMISSIONERS

ANN B. MAINE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESIDENT

Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire VICE PRESIDENT

Linda Pedersen, Antioch

It’s the beginning of a new year—traditionally a time for reflecting on accomplishments and thinking about our goals and the trail ahead. As many of you were setting resolutions, we too were making plans to help move us forward. In January, we completed the first half of a strategic planning process, defining an exciting 100-year vision based on core principles of leadership, conservation and people. To read our vision statement, visit LCFPD.org/Vision. Lake County’s landscape has changed dramatically from pre-settlement times. In 1833, the Treaty of Chicago was signed between the U.S. government and the Native American peoples for lands that included Lake County. A little over 100 years later, people were beginning to worry about the loss of open space as Lake County’s population neared 300,000. A groundswell of public support emerged, and in 1958, Lake County resident Ethel Untermyer petitioned for a referendum to create the Lake County Forest Preserve District, and it passed. Thanks to visionary people like Ethel, today we protect more than 30,000 acres of diverse natural lands and wildlife habitat, and provide educational, cultural and recreational opportunities to more than 700,000 residents. We take pride in how our forest preserves make our communities more livable, and the local economy more dynamic. As we think far ahead to the future, we’re constructing a plan that is cooperative and inclusive of others in the community and adaptable to changes in the environment. We want to lay the groundwork for our grandchildren so they may enjoy a healthy and resilient landscape of quality natural lands, waters, and cultural assets. In 100 years our vibrant communities will thrive, beneficiaries of the remarkable resources we’ve preserved and the desirable quality of life that they provide. This vision, along with the core principles, will guide us as we enter the second half of our strategic planning. The next phase involves defining more immediate goals and specific steps to achieve them, with a final plan anticipated this summer.

TREASURER

S. Michael Rummel, Lake Forest ASSISTANT TREASURER

Audrey H. Nixon, North Chicago Carol Calabresa, Libertyville Pat Carey, Grayslake Steve Carlson, Gurnee Bonnie Thomson Carter, Ingleside Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Bill Durkin, Waukegan Sandra Hart, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Aaron Lawlor, Vernon Hills Steven W. Mandel, Highland Park Diana O’Kelly, Mundelein Brent Paxton, Zion Nick Sauer, Lake Barrington David B. Stolman, Buffalo Grove Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Tom Weber, Lake Villa Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ty Kovach

HORIZONS VOLUME 23, ISSUE 2

Spring 2014

EDITOR

Kara Martin kmartin@LCFPD.org PHOTOGRAPHY

Julie Gidwitz, Kim Karpeles, Chip Williams

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335

Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.


a.

b.

g.

f. e.

c.

D

id you know that birding is the number one sport in the United States? According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, there are over 51 million birdwatchers or “birders� in the United States alone, and this number continues to grow. The same survey reports that nearly $24 billion is spent each year on birding equipment and supplies (such as binoculars, feeders and field guides), making birding a major economic driver. Most everyone has a story of a bird encounter that has impressed them in some way. Birds are fun to watch because they are often easy to spot, active and quite varied and numerous compared to many other animal groups. Given their prevalence, birds may seem ordinary, but there are complex aspects to their lives that make even the most common bird a thing of wonder.

d.

Birds seen in Lake County are either residents or migrants. Resident birds spend their entire lives here, never leaving the area. Our bird residents typically eat seeds, nuts or are carnivores that depend on insect larvae, mammals, or other birds for food. Birds that feed on fruit, nectar, or flying insects usually leave for the winter to find food farther south.

Visiting birds may pass through during migration or spend only a season here to nest or find food. To complicate matters of classification, some birds seen year-round, such as blue jays, are actually migrants. Jays that we see in the winter have come from the north, perhaps from central Wisconsin, while jays we see in the summer may spend the winter in southern Illinois.

KEY a) Kentucky warbler b) red-headed woodpecker c) Baltimore oriole d.) chestnut-sided warbler e) eastern bluebird f) wood duck g) scarlet tanager LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES 1


i.

j.

k. l.

h.

guide to lake county birds

Learn the best times and places to see different bird groups in Lake County.

ducks Northern migration: February–May; Southern migration: October–November. Some ducks are winter visitors to Lake County. almond marsh cuba marsh des plaines river* fort sheridan

rollins savanna* van patten woods (sterling lake)

neo-tropical migrants Spring is a great time to look for members of this group including warblers, vireos, hummingbirds, wrens, thrushes and more. des plaines river* grant woods macarthur woods*

v.

ryerson woods* wright woods*

sparrows The first to arrive (late March) are song sparrows and white-throated sparrows passing through on their journeys farther north.

almond marsh buffalo creek grassy lake independence grove old school ryerson woods* singing hills

cranes, herons, egrets Can be seen in wetlands countywide March–November. Look in preserves with wetlands: almond marsh cuba marsh des plaines river* fourth lake fox river lakewood

blackbirds Male red-winged blackbirds are true harbingers of spring. Other members of this group, such as grackles and cowbirds, follow in April.

Great-horned and eastern screech owls seek wooded preserves. Barred owls are found in floodplains:

Red-winged blackbirds are found near marshy areas. Look on the edge of wooded areas for cowbirds. Yellow-headed blackbirds:

macarthur woods ryerson woods*

shorebirds Kildeer: early March; other shorebirds return April–May. Many visiting shorebirds pass by on their trips farther north. This group is hard to spot during dry seasons. almond marsh cuba marsh des plaines river* fort sheridan

middlefork savanna* rollins savanna* van patten woods (sterling lake)

woodpeckers Year-round: northern flickers and downy, hairy, red-bellied and red-headed; spring: pileated (rare); spring & fall: yellow-bellied sapsuckers. Look in wooded preserves: fort sheridan macarthur woods*

fort sheridan

Bald eagles:

des plaines river* fox river independence grove

q.

**Please limit birding at this site to the closed road that goes through the preserve. Parking can be found 1/4 mile east at North Point Marina.

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s.

fort sheridan spring bluff**

Long-eared and saw-whet owls prefer evergreens: lyons woods pine dunes

0.

Hawks are seen countywide. Northern harrier: rollins savanna*

p.

middlefork savanna* rollins savanna* ryerson woods*

* Rollins Savanna Forest Preserve, and the upper Des Plaines River Corridor (including Cahokia Flatwoods, Captain Daniel Wright Woods, southern portions of the Des Plaines River Trail and Greenway, Grainger Woods Conservation Preserve, Half Day, MacArthur Woods, and Ryerson Conservation Area) have been designated as Important Bird Areas by National Audubon for providing critical bird habitat.

n.

Snowy owls can be seen along Lake Michigan:

ospreys, harriers, hawks, eagles Southern migration: September–October yields the most variety, especially along Lake Michigan—watch for bald eagle, broad-winged hawk, Cooper’s hawk, northern harrier, osprey, red-shouldered hawk and red-tailed hawk. Southern migration:

m.

middlefork savanna* nippersink rollins savanna* sedge meadow singing hills van patten woods wright woods*

owls Year-round residents: barred, eastern screech, and great-horned owls. Winter visitors: longeared, saw-whet, short-eared and snowy owls.

middlefork savanna* rollins savanna*

t.

Bluebirds are found on the edge of wooded areas:

Sparrows can be seen countywide. Nesting sparrows: middlefork savanna* rollins savanna*

u.

bluebirds May be seen year-round, although March– November yields the most sightings.


Most people think of migration as a spring and fall phenomenon. In actuality, birds are migrating yearround, some in every season, some for long distances and others for short stretches. Migration is traveling to the right habitat for survival with food being the primary motivation. Photoperiod, the interval in a 24-hour period during which a plant or animal is exposed to light, is the biggest trigger for migration of birds. Since a bird cannot predict the weather hundreds of miles away, the consistent input of photoperiod ensures that seasonal events such as migration happen at the right time. Day-length, and the resulting knowledge of the season, is significant to most animals. In birds, photoperiod not only predicts migration but can provoke changes in feather color, molting, nesting, and even a bird’s song repertoire. Some birds have specific habitat requirements for breeding and nesting. We take note of these birds because they are good indicators of an ecosystem’s overall health. Red-headed woodpeckers, for example, are very choosy and only nest when tree spacing meets their nesting needs. This species is considered in critical decline and in greatest need of conservation. Restoration efforts such as the Woodland Habitat Restoration Project will benefit this species by providing proper nesting habitat. To learn more, visit LCFPD.org/woodlands. Literally millions of birds migrate through our region in the spring and fall along the Mississippi Flyway, which is part of a larger migration route called the Mackenzie Valley-Great LakesMississippi River Valley. The Lake Michigan shoreline is acknowledged as

one of the most important migration routes in the United States for songbirds, but it is simply one section of the greater Mississippi Flyway. Flyways are historic migration routes that provide food, shelter, and a visual north-south orientation. In Lake County, nearly 200 inland lakes and the Des Plaines River Greenway also provide important migratory stops. Chances are, there is a fantastic birding spot in a forest preserve near you. For the biggest bang for your birding buck, we recommend Wright Woods (Mettawa), Des Plaines River Trail and Greenway (countywide), Ryerson Woods (Riverwoods), Fort Sheridan (Lake Forest), Independence Grove (Libertyville), Lyons Woods (Waukegan), Middlefork Savanna (Lake Forest), and Rollins Savanna (Grayslake). The chart (facing, left) is a good starting point for birding your forest preserves.

FOR THE BIRDS Providing food for wild birds can be an enjoyable way to welcome wildlife into your yard. Regularly cleaning your feeders will prevent the spread of disease and keep unwanted visitors such as coyotes away. Place hawk silhouettes in nearby windows to deter birds from colliding with reflective glass (download a silhouette at LCFPD.org/hawkshadow). Planting native species of trees, shrubs and wildflowers provides natural food sources best suited to native birds. Visit our annual Native Plant Sale this May to get started—see page 13 for details.

MISSISSIPPI FLYWAY

Major Flyway Principle Routes Merging Routes

KEY: h) red-eyed vireo i) belted kingfisher j) red-winged blackbird k) blue-winged teal l) dark-eyed junco m) eastern screech owl n) tree swallow 0) blackburnian warbler p) great blue heron q) kildeer r) green heron s) American woodcock t) ruby-throated hummingbird u) American goldfinch v) cardinal LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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PRESERVENEWS

BOARD APPROVES 100-YEAR VISION

The Lake County Forest Preserve Board unanimously approved a sweeping “100-year Vision for Lake County” this January. The strategic planning process began in August 2013 and was initiated by our newly hired Executive Director Alex Ty Kovach. During the first phase of the planning process, Forest Preserve Board, staff and key partners described their longterm vision. The vision’s core principles of leadership, conservation and people will guide strategic decision-making as we preserve and restore lands, ensuring a healthy landscape that benefits our communities and the local economy for the long-term. The second phase will lay out specific and more immediate goals for how we will achieve that vision, with a final plan anticipated in June 2014. Read the statement at LCFPD.org/Vision. FACEBOOK FUN

TRAIL TALES COMING THIS SUMMER

Visit us on Facebook at facebook.com/LCFPD to play our weekly visual puzzle on What?! Wednesday. Every Wednesday, we’ll post a photo taken here in Lake County. Because some of these are brain-benders, you’ll look at the photo and shout, “What?!” Enter your answer in the comments section, and check our post Thursday morning to see if you were right. Also, watch for our featured preserve once a month. From landscapes to insect life, take a virtual tour and see what’s going on in a forest preserve near you, before heading out on your own adventure.

A new program coming this summer to Greenbelt Forest Preserve (Waukegan) incorporates outdoor hikes with beloved children’s books. Coordinated in partnership with Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods and Waukegan Public Library, this concept links literacy and nature for children ages 2–6. Around one dozen story panels will be displayed along a half-mile trail, each with an accompanying naturerelated activity. A small library will be stocked with books in English and Spanish. Check LCFPD.org for details.

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PRESERVATION FOUNDATION SPECIAL EVENTS

Supporters and friends of the Preservation Foundation receive invitations to special Forest Preserve hikes and tours throughout the year. If you are interested in joining us in 2014 for behind-the-scenes tours, bird walks, offtrail science hikes and more, subscribe to the Preservation Foundation’s e-newsletter. All events are free and ideal for families. Invitations are sent via email only, so send an email to preservationfoundation@LCFPD.org and include “subscribe” in the subject line or contact Gina at 847-968-3447. Your email address will never be sold or shared, and you will receive no more than two messages per month. INDEPENDENCE GROVE BEACH PASSES

New this year—unlimited passes to the beach at Independence Grove (Libertyville) are now available to Lake County residents. Introductory rates: $49 for one, $75 for two, $105 for three, $129 for four, $150 for five. All users must reside in the same household. Save 10% before May 1—purchase at the preserve’s Visitors Center or visit LCFPD.org/beach for more info.

WHY ROVER SHOULDN’T ROAM FREE

Leashing your dog while in the preserves protects your pet, other trail users and our native wildlife. By limiting your dog’s leeway, you’ll keep them safe from harm. Off-leash dogs are easily distracted and could bolt into traffic, poison ivy or bur-and-tick-filled brush. Wildlife that fall prey to dogs are removed from the local food chain—which means less food for native species. Even without direct contact, a dog’s scent causes defensive reactions in wildlife. This drains an animal’s energy, putting it at risk for malnutrition and predation. Finally, leashing demonstrates respect for fellow preserve visitors. Many people don’t welcome advances by unfamiliar dogs. You may know your dog is friendly, but others don’t. A daily or annual permit allows you and your canine companion access to four off-leash dog parks—learn more at LCFPD.org/dog. Please note: dogs are not allowed at Ryerson Conservation Area (Riverwoods) or Independence Grove Forest Preserve (Libertyville). LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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ALMOND MARSH HERON ROOKERY OPEN HOURS

Welcome herons and cormorants back to Lake County at Almond Marsh heron rookery (Grayslake). Almond Marsh is open Saturdays, April–June, 8 am–noon (except Memorial Day weekend) for observation. Lake County Audubon will be on hand April 5 with binoculars to lend and refreshments while supplies last. TRAIL ALERTS

Although spring brings warmer trailgoing weather, it also brings increased rain fall and snow melt, putting trails at greater risk for flooding. After submerged sections dry, maintenance crews are quick to regrade and repair any water damage. For trail closings, visit LCFPD.org or follow us on facebook.com/LCFPD. BURN SEASON

Fire is the most efficient and economical tool available for managing Lake County’s natural communities. Controlled burns mimic fires that occurred naturally for thousands of years, improving habitat by decreasing invasive plants, removing excess leaf litter and exposing the seedbed to the sun’s rays. This spring, after snow melts and grass is dry enough to burn, specially trained staff and volunteers will conduct controlled burns, selecting sites based on wind and weather conditions. For updates, visit LCFPD.org/burninfo. 6 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 01 4

SPRING BLUFF RECEIVES HIGHEST ACCREDITATION

Last November, Chicago Wilderness awarded Spring Bluff Nature Preserve (Winthrop Harbor) with Platinum accreditation, the highest possible designation in the Excellence in Ecological Restoration Program. Assessments are based on a rigorous set of science-based standards that recognize best practices in natural resource management. Together, Spring Bluff and neighboring Illinois Beach State Park, Chiwaukee Prairie and Kenosha Dunes are home to a wide diversity of species and rare habitats. They provide opportunities for recreation, as well as clean air and water, flood protection and many more benefits. Yet, these areas are threatened by fragmentation, invasive species, pollution and the impacts of climate change. Platinum accreditation recognizes the leadership and expertise combatting such threats—efforts that ensure our natural heritage remains vibrant for generations.


GARLIC MUSTARD MONOCULTURE

A DIVERSITY OF NATIVE WOODLAND WILDFLOWERS

WOODLAND RESTORATION VOLUNTEERS

Garlic mustard is an invasive species that affects woodland habitats. It has no natural enemies in our area and spreads rapidly. Invasive species such as garlic mustard destroy biodiversity by creating monocultures, or widespread areas of a single species. Garlic mustard monocultures can completely dominate a forest floor in five to seven years, crowding out native woodland wildflowers and other vegetation that our wildlife needs to survive. It is possible to prevent this by catching the growth early and removing it. Help lend a hand in preserving our highest quality woodland habitats by volunteering this spring. Many hands are needed: corporate groups, scouts, and individual volunteers are invited to help—visit LCFPD.org/volunteer. LETHAL DISEASE CONFIRMED IN ILLINOIS BATS

INVASIVE SPECIES MONTH: TROUBLESOME TRIO

Last year, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) confirmed the presence of white-nose syndrome (WNS) in Illinois. WNS is not known to affect people, pets or livestock, but it is harmful or lethal to hibernating bats. This devastating disease has killed millions of North American bats since its appearance in 2007. Spores of Geomyces destructans, the non-native, cold-loving fungus that causes WNS, may be inadvertently spread by humans. In an attempt to slow the spread of WNS, IDNR has closed all IDNR owned/ managed caves for the foreseeable future.

May is Invasive Species Month—a statewide effort to spread awareness of invasive species in Illinois. Three new invaders to watch for are Asian bittersweet (1, below), cut-leaved teasel (2), and Japanese hedge parsley (3). To learn more about Invasive Species Month, visit invasive.org/Illinois.

1

2

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Featured Preserve

HASTINGS LAKE The highly anticipated

GR

GELDEN ROAD

S AS LA KE A RO

reopening of Hastings Lake

D

Forest Preserve in Lake Villa is complete, following extensive public access improvements

CROOKED LAKE

HASTINGS LAKE

and restoration of natural areas

MUNN ROAD

within the 270-acre preserve.

HASTINGS LAKE FOREST PRESERVE 270 ACRES | LAKE VILLA

PRESERVE AREA

WATER

PRESERVE TRAILS

H MAIN ENTRANCE P

PARKING

P

CARTOP BOAT LAUNCH PARKING

The preserve was established in 2003 and named for Hastings Lake YMCA, a camp which previously had occupied the property from 1923–2002. Four miles of paved and gravel trails wind through open fields and meadows, woodlands of stately trees, and wetlands.

Trails are open to bicycling, hiking, and cross-country skiing, and in-line skating on paved trails. Two trail spurs provide access to the preserve from the Seven Hills and Mallard Ridge subdivisions. A trail connection to Grass Lake Road on the east side of the lake is also available. Other amenities include three picnic shelters, a large playground, three scenic overlooks, boardwalks, lake access for cartop boats, and two wheelchair accessible fishing piers. The preserve’s main entrance is located on Gelden Road southwest of Grass Lake Road in Lake Villa. A second entrance is located on Munn Road north of Grand Avenue (Route 132). Hastings Lake is open daily from 6:30 am to sunset, unless otherwise posted.

SHELTER PLAYGROUND OVERLOOK

FISHING PIER

FISHING

ACTIVITIES & AMENITIES BICYCLING LAKE ACCESS FOR CARTOP BOATS CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING FISHING HIKING IN-LINE SKATING

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE ALL-SEASON CELEBRATIONS

A 2-mile paved trail loops around

Unique to the site—a large shelter offers a stone fireplace,

Hastings Lake and offers scenic

heated restrooms, drinking water, electricity, a large patio

overlooks, boardwalks and fishing

area with a grill, picnic tables, and convenient parking near

piers along the way. Bluegill,

the preserve’s main entrance on Gelden Road. Seasonally,

largemouth bass, carp, and other

tented walls enclose the shelter allowing for cozy

species can be found in the 80-acre

celebrations even during colder months. For rentals, use our

lake (state fishing regulations

online system at

LCFPD.org/picnics, or call 847-367-6640.

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apply). Two family-size shelters for groups of up to 25 are available for use on a first-come, first-served basis and are not reservable. A large playground* includes a “pond” with frogs, stepping stones and lily pads, a beaver lodge, and native species such as turtles and oaks—as well as more traditional equipment. *Our playgrounds are now smoke-free environments. Smoking is prohibited within 15 feet of playgrounds.


SPRING CALENDAR Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

MARCH

Impromptu Program Announcements

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive notice of special impromptu programs. Explore with us as nature comes alive in this season of change. Take a walk to find out what’s blooming in the woodlands, hear frogs singing in the evening, or view the odd courtship flight of the male woodcock, a fascinating bird of Lake County. When the weather is just right, meet us for a beautiful sunrise or sunset paddle.

facebook.com/LCFPD | twitter.com/LCFPD |

Subscribe to our e-news: LCFPD.org/signup

Caring Leads to Conservation The story of the once profuse passenger pigeon is a potent reminder of how quickly a species can slip into extinction due to human activity. The centennial anniversary of their extinction is an opportunity for us to explore the connections between humans and the natural world, consider current issues related to extinction, and inspire people to become more involved in building a sustainable relationship with our world. Look for the icon for related programs. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Forest Fitness One hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

1 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Lakewood. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents.

1-2, 8-9, 15-16 Maple Syrup Hikes

Learn how trees work and about the sweet sap of sugar maples. Ryerson Woods is one of the few places where climate conditions are right for maple syrup production, and where trees grow to a diameter and height that allows for tapping. Everyone gets a taste. Program also available as a school or scout field trip, call 847-968-3321 for details. First three weekends in March. Hikes every half-hour from 12:30-2:30 pm. Ryerson Woods. All ages. $6. Children 3 and under, FREE. Hikes fill fast, so register soon. 11 Hikin’ Tykes—Salamanders Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

12 Small Discoveries—Woolly Mammoths & Mighty Mastodons Explore the mysterious megafauna (giant animals) of the Ice Age—many of which lived right here in Lake County.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

12 Ryerson Reads—“On Extinction” Discuss award-winning writer Melanie Challenger’s book about her travels around the globe in search of the history that led to humankind’s estrangement from the natural world.

Wednesday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods­—Brushwood. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $15 ($10 Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods members).

13 Healthy, Happy Kids in Nature Kids play in nature, while adults learn about the health benefits of playing outdoors. New activities and topics every month.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 1-8, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

15 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—St. Patrick’s Day Fun Explore what’s found at the end of the rainbow. We’ll make our own four leaf clover, and maybe even leave with a pot of gold.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3-5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

15 “Snapper”—Book Talk with Brian Kimberling Kimberling discusses his new book “Snapper.” Books will be available for purchase and signing.

Saturday, 2–3 pm, Ryerson Woods­—Brushwood. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. FREE. No registration required. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

MARCH (continued) 19 Stroller Tours—Luminaries of the 20th Century Enjoy guided tours of current Museum exhibitions with your little ones in tow.

Wednesday, 10:30–11:15 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Parents and caregivers with children 18 months and younger. $6, includes Museum admission. Children FREE.

20 The Anti-Slavery Movement in Black & White Explore the history behind the anti-slavery movement in Northern Illinois with historian Jeanne Schultz Angel.

Thursday, 6–8 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $9 residents, $11 nonresidents. CPDUs available.

23 Look, Learn, Create—Portrait of the Artist View the portraits by photographer Arnold Newman and create a self-portrait inspired by the work of famous artists he photographed.

Sunday, 1:30–2:30 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 4–12, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

24–28 Spring Break Fun Stop by the Lake County Discovery Museum during spring break for an afternoon of special activities and crafts.

Monday–Friday, 12–2 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 3–12, with an adult. FREE with Museum admission. No registration required.

25–27 Spring Break Camp Visit different forest preserves for a variety of engaging nature explorations including animal tracking, survival skills, bird-watching, exploring, stewardship, and games. Join us for one or all days.

Tuesday–Thursday, 9 am–3 pm, Independence Grove Visitors Center. Children ages 8-11. $42/day residents, $59/day nonresidents. Fee includes transportation to other sites.

25 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Tuesday, 2:15 pm, Lakewood—Shelter C. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

26 Small Discoveries—Spring Celebration Celebrate the arrival of spring with stories, crafts and more.

Weds 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

27 Experience Nature at Night Your senses come to life as we explore nature’s mysteries at night. Enjoy a cup of hot chocolate after this sensory night hike.

Thursday, 7 pm, meet at Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

29 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Portrait Party In conjunction with the Luminaries of the 20th Century exhibition, create portraits of favorite people filled with things we love about them.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3-5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

29 “Kennedy and Reagan: Why their Legacies Endure” Hear author Scott Farris speak on the topic of his new book “Kennedy and Reagan: Why their Legacies Endure,” followed by a guided gallery tour of the exhibition Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the 20th Century in Art, Politics and Culture.

Saturday, 2–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $7 residents, $9 nonresidents.

APRIL 5, 12, 19, 26 Forest Fitness One hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

2 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore some of the many habitats found in Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10 am, Middlefork Savanna. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

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Turtles are on the move during May and June, as females search for a spot to lay their eggs, and later as hatchlings migrate back to aquatic habitats. Be alert when driving near ponds, lakes or wetlands.

APRIL

EARTH WEEK A week of free nature programs in honor of Earth Day (April 22). Celebrate spring, learn about ecology, join a nature walk or lend a hand to help save the planet by joining a special volunteer workday. All programs are FREE. All ages. No registration required.

SUN 20 Meet and Greet Education Animals Visit with live education animals, and feel furs, feathers and scales of local wildlife on our touch table.

TUE 22 Acoustic Bat Monitoring Bats use echolocation to hunt. Learn why bats are beneficial, how we can help them, and what species live here by detecting their sonar frequency on a night hike.

FRI 25 Experience Nature at Night Your senses come alive as we explore nature’s mysteries at night. Discover distinctly different experiences while hiking through a variety of habitats.

1–3 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center.

7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center.

7:30–9:30 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center.

MON 21 Rookery Watch Get a close-up view of nesting herons, cormorants, and waterfowl. Play bird bingo and make a flying craft to take home.

WED 23 A Fishy Tale Learn about the exciting life of fish, how they came to Independence Grove, and what we can do to help them year-round.

4–5 pm, Almond Marsh.

4–5 pm, Independence Grove Visitors Center.

TUE 22 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

THU 24 Pond Scooping Meet the critters that live in Hastings Lake and discover what they can tell us about the health of the lake.

SAT 26 Instilling a Land Ethic— Come High Water River Clean Up Clean up the Des Plaines River bank along with the Des Plaines River Stewards. Consider other uses for objects salvaged from the river. Wear clothes and gloves that can get muddy and wet. Closed toe shoes required.

4–5 pm, Fox River—meet at the large pavilion.

4–5 pm, Hastings Lake—meet at the boat launch.

9:30–11:30 am, Sedge Meadow—meet at the canoe launch.

2 Homeschool Companion­—Animal Colors Why are some animals bright and colorful while others are camouflaged? Learn what effects animal colorations and go for a hike to see them in action.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. Children ages 5–12. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

5 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, MacArthur Woods. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents.

8 Hikin’ Tykes—Sandhill Cranes Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

9 Small Discoveries—Colorful Collage Discover the art of collage. Make colorful collages using a variety of materials and techniques.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

10 Healthy, Happy Kids in Nature Kids play in nature, while adults learn about the health benefits of playing outdoors. New activities and topics every month.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 1-8, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

12 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Springtime Stories Join us for stories and activities to celebrate the arrival of spring.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3-5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

13, 20 Free Bird Walks Join us for staff and Audubon Society-led walks to see migratory songbirds. No experience necessary. Binoculars recommended.

Sundays. 13: 7 am, Middlefork Savanna; 20: 8 am, Fort Sheridan. Follow the signs. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

APRIL (continued) 13 Look, Learn, Create—Postcards: Art to Go Look at postcards from a new perspective and create postcardsized works of art.

Sunday, 1:30–2:30 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 4–12, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

15 Full Moon Paddle Watch the sunset and moonrise from your canoe or kayak. Previous paddling experience required.

Tuesday, 7–9:30 pm, Hastings Lake. Adults, familiies with children ages 12 and up. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

16 Stroller Tours—Luminaries of the 20th Century Enjoy guided tours of current Museum exhibitions with your little ones in tow.

Wednesday, 10:30–11:15 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Parents and caregivers with children 18 months and younger. $6, includes Museum admission. Children FREE.

17 Homeschool Companion­—Stewardship in Spring Join other homeschoolers to discover how non-native plants can throw nature off balance, and how we can help.

Thursday, 10 am–12 pm, Almond Marsh. Children ages 7–17. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

23 Small Discoveries—Egg Hunt Decorate eggs, go on a hunt and learn about baby animals.

Weds 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

26 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Art and Nature Help keep the earth clean and healthy for everyone. Explore a fun way to recycle by making art.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3-5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

26 Walk on the Wildflower Side Uncover the secrets of wildflowers. Learn the folklore and healing powers they hold.

Saturday, 10–11:30 am, Wright Woods. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

26 Hastings Lake Nature Open House Celebrate nature at the newly opened Hasting Lake Forest Preserve. Explore the woodlands, waters and open spaces to look for what is springing up! Fun for children and adults alike. 27 Spring Sounds Night Walk Listen for a variety of sounds on a springtime evening. Learn about the animals who make these noises and why.

Saturday, 1–3:30 pm, Hastings Lake—Shelter A. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

Sunday, 7:30–9 pm, Cuba Marsh. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

MAY 3, 4, 7, 10, 11, 17, 18, 21 Free Bird Walks May is the month for songbirds. Join us for staff and Audubon Society-led walks. Binoculars recommended.

3: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 4: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 7: 7:30 am, Nippersink; 10: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 11: 7 am, Wright Woods; 17: 7 am, Ryerson Woods; 18: 7 am, Half Day; 21: 7:30 am, Rollins Savanna—Drury Lane entrance. Follow the signs.

3, 10, 24, 31 Forest Fitness One hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

3 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Sedge Meadow. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents.

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Trout season typically begins the first Saturday of April—check LCFPD.org for details. Find our free Fishing Guide at LCFPD.org /fishing for directions to fantastic angling spots, detailed bottom maps and illustrations of the fish to seek .

MAY (continued) CELEBRATE SPRING Sunshine and warmer weather brings the itch to get outdoors. Visit Ryerson Woods on Sunday, May 4 for an afternoon of activities. 4 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Sunday, 1–2 pm, Ryerson Woods­—cabins. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

4 Sounds of Spring The forest comes alive with sound in the spring. Join us as we listen for the birds and frogs that call our preserves home.

Sunday, 1–2 pm, Ryerson Woods­—cabins. All ages. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

4 Spring Wildflower Walk Join a guided walk and experience the magic of a spring woodland.

Sunday, 3–4 pm, Ryerson Woods­—cabins. All ages. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

4 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Sunday, 1–2 pm & 2:30-3:30 pm, Adlai E. Stevenson Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

7 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore some of the many habitats found in Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10 am, Fourth Lake—meet at the Operations & Public Safety Facility. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

7 Small Discoveries—Digging for Dinos Become a paleontologist as you dig for fossils, make fossil casts, create a dinosaur mask and more.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

8 Healthy, Happy Kids in Nature Kids play in nature, while adults learn about the health benefits of playing outdoors. New activities and topics every month.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 1-8, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

10 Scout Saturday—Bird Study Merit Badge Learn about and observe the birds that live in and migrate through Lake County as you earn your Merit Badge.

Saturday, 8 am–12 pm, Ryerson Woods—cabins. Boy Scouts. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

10–11 Native Plant, Rain Barrel and Compost Bin Sale Planting native species, using rain barrels and practicing composting are eco-friendly practices that benefit your home, community and pocketbook. Co-sponsored by SWALCO and Stormwater Management Commission.

Saturday, 9 am–3 pm or Sunday, 10 am–3 pm. Please note: Rain barrels and compost bins available Saturday only. Independence Grove—North Bay Pavilion.

10 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Mighty Mastodons Explore the mysterious megafauna (giant animals) of the Ice Age—many of which lived right here in Lake County.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3-5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

10 Phenology & Photography Outdoor workshop combines a staff naturalist’s insight with technical tips from a professional photographer.

Saturday, 1–4 pm, Grainger Woods­—meet at the Adlai E. Stevenson Home parking lot. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

10 Spring Sounds Night Walk Listen for a variety of sounds on a springtime evening. Learn about the animals who make these noises and why.

Saturday, 8–9:30 pm, Middlefork Savanna. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

MAY (continued) 13 Hikin’ Tykes—Not a Stick Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Hastings Lake—Shelter A. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child resident, $7 adult/$2 child nonresident.

14 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Wednesday, 3 pm, Half Day—Shelter A. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

14 Full Moon Paddle Watch the sunset and moonrise from your canoe or kayak. Previous paddling experience required.

Wednesday, 7–9:30 pm, Van Patten Woods. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $9 residents, $12 nonresidents.

17 Quickstart Kayak Intro to paddling in an open-cockpit recreational kayak. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety, and paddling skills.

Saturday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove. Adults, families with children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

17 Smith Nature Symposium: What Killed the Mammoths? What makes a species go extinct? Can you clone a mammoth? Evolutionary biologist Beth Shapiro analyzes ancient genes to trace the complex relationship between environment, extinctions and the evolution of the species.

Saturday, 5:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods— Brushwood. $175 for reception and dinner. $90 for Young Philanthropists (30 and under with ID). $1,500 for table of 10.

18 Introduction to Canoeing Learn canoe nomenclature and how to canoe on flat water in this six-hour American Canoe Association certified class.

Sunday, 10 am–4 pm, Independence Grove. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $54 residents, $76 nonresidents.

18 Bonner Farm Touch-A-Tractor Climb into the seat of a real tractor, talk to farmers, and learn about farming at this special program for kids and families.

Sunday, 12–4 pm, Bonner Heritage Farm. All ages. $3, children 3 and under FREE.

21 Homeschool Companion—Luminaries of the 20th Century Join other homeschoolers to learn about photographer Arnold Newman and the famous people he portrayed.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 5–12. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

21 Free Access Cart Tours—Bird Watching Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Wednesday, 9:30–11 am, Half Day. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

21 Stroller Tours—Luminaries of the 20th Century Enjoy guided tours of current Museum exhibitions with your little ones in tow.

Wednesday, 10:30–11:15 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Parents and caregivers with children 18 months and younger. $6, includes Museum admission. Children FREE.

31 Bilingual (Spanish/English) Nature Hike One-hour guided bilingual outdoor nature hike. Presented in partnership with the Mundelein Park District.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Mundelein Sports Complex. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

30 Community Campfire Friday Night Bring your friends and family to roast marshmallows, share stories, and enjoy nature at night. Nature activities vary monthly.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center—meet at the pond. All ages. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

31 Walk on the Wildflower Side Uncover the secrets of wildflowers. Learn the folklore and healing powers they hold.

Saturday, 10–11:30 am, Lyons Woods. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

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SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

March 15–August 17

Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the 20th Century in Art, Politics and Culture LCFPD.org/ArnoldNewman

With a career spanning 60 years, Newman’s body of work reads as a roll call of the biggest names of the 20th century such as: Pablo Picasso, Adlai E. Stevenson, Igor Stravinsky, Jackson Pollock, Salvador Dalí, Ayn Rand, Langston Hughes, Martha Graham, Leonard Bernstein, Georgia O’Keeffe, Andy Warhol, John F. Kennedy, Philip Glass, and Woody Allen­—a portrait of a groundbreaking era from one of its own. First time in the Chicago area. Lake County Discovery Museum

Opens February 15

Real Photo Postcards Millions of real photo postcards were sent in the early part of the 20th century. These fascinating snapshot messages were the equivalent of today’s Facebook wall, Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr posts. Learn about these sometimes wacky, always curious images of everyday life 100 years ago, from the collections of the Curt Teich Postcard Archives.

Georgia O’Keeffe

Arnold Newman: Luminaries of the 20th Century in Art, Politics and Culture is a national touring exhibition of the innovative minds and personalities that defined a century as seen through the eyes of one of its own: Arnold Newman. Recognized as the “father of environmental portraiture,” his work is collected and exhibited in major museums and collections around the world.

Through July 27

The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon. This original exhibition explores connections between the human world, and looks at some of the work being done today to help prevent similar extinctions from occurring. Greenbelt Cultural Center

March 9–April 30

Facing Extinction In 1914, the last known passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) died at the Cincinnati Zoo. One hundred years later, we are still grappling with the environmental, cultural and moral issues of human-caused extinctions. In this group exhibition, artists present work that addresses the extinction—and survival—of species and the potential resiliency of Earth’s biodiversity. Curated by Franck Mercurio.

Lake County Discovery Museum

Artist reception Sunday, March 9, 1–3 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood Center Left: “Martha” illustration by Diana Sudyka

May 4–July 3

Moving Targets The year 2014 marks the centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon. Once the most abundant bird in North America, they were hunted to extinction within a period of 40 years. Moving Targets, a collaborative art installation by Ann Rosenthal and Steffi Domike, links the artists’ forced family migrations to the story of the passenger pigeon through a shared visual language, maps, and creative research. Artist reception Sunday, May 4, 1–3 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood Center LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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SPECIAL FACILITIES Directory GENERAL OFFICES

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048 847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

911 emergency 847–549–5200 nonemergency public safety issues

LCFPD.org 8 am –4:30 pm, Monday–Friday

OUTDOOR RECREATION

EDUCATION & CULTURE

GOLF

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015

847–968–3499 Main 847–247–1111 Banquets, Meetings

847–968–3320

IndependenceGrove.org Visitors Center Hours 9 AM–4:30 PM, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees visit our website. Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $5 per car Monday–Thursday $10 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without stopping to verify residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center.

LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours

Prairie & Traditional Courses 20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060 847–968–3100 Tee Times 847–968–3441 Golf Gift Cards 847–489–1931 Golf Outings

9 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Saturday 11 AM–4 PM, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays

CountrysideGolfClub.org

Brushwood Center Hours

A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course

10 AM–4 PM, Monday–Thursday 1–3 PM Sundays, or by appointment GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER 1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064 847–968–3477 GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099 847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–968–3450

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org

Gallery & Office Hours

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

FOX RIVER MARINA

11 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Friday

28500 West Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010

33600 North US Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–247–1119

847–381–0669 FoxRiverMarina.org Boat Launch & Marina Hours 7 AM–sunset, daily, in season

16 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 01 4

Lake County History Archives Curt Teich Postcard Archives 27277 North Forest Preserve Road Wauconda, Illinois 60084 847–968–3400 Main 847–968–3381 Archives, Research LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.org Museum Gallery Hours 10 AM–4:30 PM, Monday–Saturday 1–4:30 PM, Sunday Adults $6, Youth 4–17 $2.50, 3 years and under FREE 62 and up $3 daily, FREE in January Discount Tuesdays: Adults $3, Youth 17 and under FREE

raeocholflub.org

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES FOREST PRESERVE Entrance/Parking

More than 30,000 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves. Most preserves are open 6:30 AM –sunset, daily. MAP CURRENT AS OF

Friday, February 7, 2014

FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS STATE LAND (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources) CANOE LAUNCH DOG AREA COMMUNITY GARDEN

LCFPD.ORG DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL Planned section M CCLORY TRAIL / NORTH SHORE PATH

MILLENNIUM TRAIL Planned section GRAND ILLINOIS TRAIL Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

(L.C.Division of Transportation)

MIDDLEFORK GREENWAY Planned section PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL

FORT HILL TRAIL Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

(L.C.Division of Transportation)

CASEY TRAIL Planned section

GENERAL OFFICES

OPERATIONS FACILITY


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

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TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

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THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 61 MATURE TREES, 19,765 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES, 6,008 LBS SOLID WASTE

Summer Camps

Native plant sale

Our summer camps are a great way to give your child

Choose from more than 60 varieties of flowers and grasses. See calendar inside or LCFPD.org/plantsale.

new and exciting experiences. While programs focus on fun and outdoor adventure, they are also educationally engaging. Hands-on activities help kids explore and

Mother’s Day weekend May 10, 2014, 9 am–3 pm May 11, 2014, 10 am–3 pm

appreciate art, nature and history. A variety of week long sessions at locations throughout the county make it easy to find a camp that is convenient for you. It’s not too early to plan your summer

Sunset at Lake Marie Forest Preserve (Antioch) courtesy Andrew St. Paul via Facebook: facebook.com/LCFPD.

adventures. Find our schedule of summer camps online at LCFPD.org/summercamps.