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HORI Z ON S QUARTERLY

spring 2020

VOLUME 29, ISSUE 2

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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On the cover: A group of four North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) at play. River otters are highly adapted for life in water with torpedo-shaped bodies, webbed toes and water-repellent fur. nearly

31,000 acres are

protected by the lake county forest preserves .

BOARD of COMMISSIONERS PRESIDENT

A MESSAGE from

Angelo D. Kyle, Waukegan VICE PRESIDENT

ANGELO D. KYLE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES AKYLE@LAKECOUNTYIL.GOV

Julie Simpson, Vernon Hills TREASURER

Paul Frank, Highland Park ASSISTANT TREASURER

I am happy to introduce you to the refreshed

brand logo for the Lake County Forest Preserves!

It incorporates crisp clean lines, an updated

typeface, and multiple colors for the first time in the agency’s 61-year history—colors that symbolize our mission for the community. When we set out last year to refresh the brand, we sent a survey to more than 31,000 Lake County residents to assess public recognition of our logo. The survey results showed that recognition of the logo, which has served us well since 1991, was indeed strong. That strong result indicated that our familiar logo only needed updating, not a complete change. Any brand logo should embody the mission of the business or institution it signifies. We decided adding color would help us do that. We started with green: 93% of those who recognized our logo in the survey selected green as the primary color associated with it, so we kept green as the predominant

Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Dick Barr, Round Lake Beach Steve Carlson, Gurnee Jennifer Clark, Libertyville Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Michael Danforth, Fox River Grove Adam R. Didech, Buffalo Grove Bill Durkin, Waukegan Sandy Hart, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire Judy Martini, Fox Lake Brent Paxton, Zion Linda Pedersen, Antioch S. Michael Rummel, Lake Forest Jessica Vealitzek, Hawthorn Woods John Wasik, Grayslake Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ty Kovach

HORIZONS

VOLUME 29, ISSUE 2 Spring 2020 EDITOR

color. Green represents trees, foliage and grasses; dark green, mature growth,

Susan Hawkins, Horizons@LCFPD.org

light green, new growth. We added a light brown to represent soil and new

DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION

life, and blue to represent water. Other surveys we have conducted show that water is one of the most important things to Lake County residents. Water means rainwater; access to clean, safe drinking water; ponds, lakes and rivers for recreation; human settlement patterns along water sources from ancient times to today; and, the floodwater mitigation provided by forest preserve lands, which has shown itself to be increasingly important these last few years.

Jeanna Cristino CONTENT CONTRIBUTORS

Kim Mikus Croke, Jackie DeMasi, Rebekah Snyder, Brittany Abrams PHOTOGRAPHY

John D. Kavc (cover, feature), Tim Elliott, Mike Borkowski, John Konstantaras, Lori Compas SUBSCRIBE, UNSUBSCRIBE, UPDATE ADDRESS: 847–968–3335 | Horizons@LCFPD.org

A strong brand will be immediately associated with how people feel about an organization—our refreshed logo conveys the vision of the Lake County Forest Preserves to provide health and life, clean water and new growth, open spaces, and restored landscapes for you and your family to enjoy today, and for generations to come.

Horizons is the quarterly publication of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Subscriptions are free. Subscribers may also receive mailings from the Preservation Foundation of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.


z

Return of

RIVER OTTER

When Andrew Rutter took a full-time wildlife ecologist position at the Lake County Forest Preserves in 2017, he expected his work studying river otter ecology would come to an end. That’s not the case. One of Rutter’s roles here is to expand the monitoring program of semiaquatic mammals, which includes recovering North American river otters (Lontra canadensis), a species that’s becoming more abundant in Lake County. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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RIVER OTTER

Qb A with

ANDREW RUTTER

h

Wildlife Ecologist

Rutter spent two years studying river otter ecology while earning his graduate degree in southern Illinois, where the mammal is relatively abundant. We asked him some questions about this elusive animal.

Q: A:

Tell us a bit about how river otters

stream protection and restoration programs

became endangered?

have resulted in higher quality habitat for the

Because river otters were (and still are)

reestablished populations.

sought after for their fur, river otter

Q: A:

populations experienced rapid declines before state agencies began regulating their harvest. Many other species experienced declines for similar reasons throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well. Habitat loss in the form of destruction and degradation of wetlands and streams likely also played a role in their decline.

Q: A:

How does human activity or land development affect otters? That’s one of the questions my collaborative project with the Southern

Illinois University (SIU) Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory hopes to shed light on. River otters were once considered a “canary in the coal mine� of sorts; it was thought that they could only inhabit the most pristine

How and why have river otters

aquatic habitats. However, river otter

rebounded since the 1990s?

populations are persisting in degraded urban

The Illinois Department of Natural

areas where it was once thought they could

Resources (IDNR) started a translocation

not. We want to understand how these

and reintroduction program into Illinois

animals are adapting to this stressful

waterways in the mid-90s. Since those

urban environment, as well as potentially

efforts, river otters have been detected in

benefitting from our restoration efforts.

every county in Illinois and continue to

Humans still represent a major threat to

flourish. River otter harvest in Illinois is now

river otters through both habitat destruction,

heavily regulated and the animal is no longer

and by direct mortality via trapping and

listed as endangered in Illinois. Wetland and

vehicle collisions.

2 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0


Q: A:

How do you monitor otters and other semiaquatic mammals in the preserves? My collaborative project with SIU is focused on randomized sign surveys. Devin Hoffer, my graduate

student collaborator, and his field technicians search for scat (droppings), tracks, and feeding signs of otters and other semiaquatic mammals along shorelines. Additionally, our staff, wildlife monitoring technicians, and volunteer river stewards enter pictures of any unique scat or tracks they find into our Mobile Ecologist Web Application (mECO) for the ecologists to review.

Q: A:

You studied otters in southern Illinois. Were you expecting them in Lake County? We radio-tracked river otters in southern Illinois to some pretty heavily degraded areas. While I wasn’t

expecting to find them in Lake County initially, I wasn’t surprised when they started turning up more frequently. They’re also an elusive animal. It takes experience to accurately identify signs they leave on the landscape.

Q: A:

Where can river otters be found in Lake County? I get this question fairly frequently. River otters are carnivores and prefer remote aquatic habitats with

ample prey resources. They have to stay fairly mobile to access the food they need. The otters we tracked in southern Illinois averaged home ranges of about 10 square miles. Wetlands, rivers, streams, ponds and lakes all provide good river otter habitat. They dig underground dens close to the water’s edge, burrowing out multiple tunnel openings to enter and exit. Female river otters deliver litters of one to six young in these burrows.

Q: A:

What are some key signs of an otter’s presence? River otters leave very distinctive scat in strategic locations as a “calling card” to communicate with

other otters in the area. The scat or “spraint” is an amorphous blob of fish scales and crayfish parts that has a characteristic musky odor. When you’ve smelled enough of it, as I have during my research, you’ll recognize it immediately, and you can sometimes smell it before you see it.


River otters use their tail like a rudder while swimming and have a broad, slightly flattened head, large nose pad, stiff bristly whiskers, small black eyes, and small rounded ears. They are the largest aquatic mammal in Illinois.

Did you spot an otter? There are other mammals including the

beaver, muskrat and mink that are often mistaken for river otters. See a quick guide to their differences below.

North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis) Total length: 35–51 in.

1

10–24 lbs. F H

1 A stout tail makes up 2 Torpedo-shaped body about 30 to 40% of

is muscular and allows

total body length

for easy movement

3 in.

American Beaver (Castor canadensis)

through water

Total length: 35–47 in.

3 Water-repellent fur is 4 Short legs and five dark or reddish brown

fully webbed toes

on the back, and light

on each foot

35–70 lbs. F

brown, tan or silver on

H

the throat and belly

5 Ears and nostrils close

4 in.

underwater; whiskers aid in locating prey

2

Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) Total length: 18–24 in. H

F

2½–4 lbs.

3

2 in.

American Mink (Neovison vison)

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Total length: 17–27 in. 1–2¼ lbs.

F H

1¼ in.


Q: A:

What do otters look like? River otters are the largest member of the weasel family (Mustelidae).

Q: A:

What do otters eat? Fish and crayfish are their primary food sources, but they are oppor-

They weigh between 10 and 30 pounds

tunistic carnivores. They will also eat

and are about 3 to 4.5 feet long. They

small mammals, reptiles, amphibians

actually look like an oversized ferret.

and birds when they can catch them.

We jokingly referred to them as “furry

I’ve even heard of them raiding

cat snakes” in graduate school. While

chicken coops.

they are agile swimmers, on land they

Are there other local animals that

Q: A:

look similar?

having them on the landscape can

activities that sparked his

Mink are a semiaquatic cousin of

have far-reaching impacts on other

interest in wildlife and the

the river otter. They’re fairly

have kind of an awkward lope. Imagine if you gave a Slinky fur and legs and saw it bounding down a shoreline.

Q: A:

Why is it important that we understand river otter populations in Lake County?

GIVING HIS OTTERMOST Wildlife Ecologist Andrew

As top carnivores, river otters play

Rutter grew up camping,

a unique ecological role. Simply

hunting, fishing and trapping—

species in the food web. Their unique

outdoors. After earning a

common in Lake County and live in

habitat requirements make their

biology degree at Emporia

similar habitats. However, an adult

presence on the landscape a great

State University in Kansas,

mink is typically less than half the size

litmus test for the quality of our

he took a seasonal internship

of an adult river otter. When swimming,

restoration efforts. To me, river otters,

with Southern Illinois

beavers and muskrats can also be

and wild carnivores in general,

University working on behalf

mistaken for river otters.

represent true wildness in an area

of the Lake County Forest

experiencing profound habitat reduc-

Preserves as an ecological

tion and degradation. Understanding

field technician. Then he

“ Upon hearing their name,

why they are here should be a top

earned a master’s degree in

priority if we are to be devoted to

forestry with the Southern

people assume river otters are limited to river habitats. Many people are surprised when I tell them they inhabit all types of aquatic systems.”

ecological conservation.

Illinois University Cooperative

Q: A:

Wildlife Research Laboratory,

–ANDREW RUTTER, WILDLIFE ECOLOGIST

Q: A:

What might we expect in the future for Lake County river otters? Hopefully we will see persistence of the current population, as well

as increasing numbers. We are working

ecology made me realize how diverse and interesting the field is,” Rutter said.

organizations to do what we can to

A little more than three years

preserve aquatic habitat and increase restoration efforts in Lake County, but we can only do so much to combat urban sprawl and its associated negative impacts to aquatic habitats.

otter behaviors? Otters are unique among members

Citizens for Conservation, U.S. Fish

of the weasel family in that they

and Wildlife Service, and The Nature

animals? What are some common

“Learning about biology and

steadily with other conservation

Q: A:

Why do they say otters are social

studying river otter ecology.

ago, Rutter started his career with us to help manage a long-term wildlife monitoring program and various wildlife research projects.

Can citizens take any local actions to protect river otters? Supporting conservation initiatives put forth by our agency, IDNR,

readily form social groups. While family

Conservancy can go a long way. Every

groups are typical, both related and

acre of aquatic habitat preserved is

unrelated otters will band together to

one less acre that can potentially

increase their ability to catch aquatic

become developed and one more acre

prey. They can also be quite playful.

of potential habitat for river otters.

Researchers are just starting to unveil

Improving the quality of aquatic

the complexities of their social

habitats on your own property can

interactions.

also play a big role.

BELOW>> One of Rutter's camera traps captures an encounter between a river otter (upper right) and a raccoon (lower left).


Lake County Artist

JAN 25–APR 12

Reima Ratti (1914–1945) was born in Waukegan to Finnish immigrants and came of age during the Great Depression when he labored as a rock crusher with the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The backbreaking work became an inspiration for his art, and led to his acceptance as an official artist of the CCC Art Program. Ratti’s love of art guided his life as he documented the world around him in sketches and paintings of landscapes and his community, until his untimely death at the age of 31.

1899 W. Winchester Rd, Libertyville

$1 OFF ADMISSION

847-968-3400

Present coupon for $1 off one admission. One-time use. May not combine. Expires 4/12/2020. Code: HR20

DUNNMUSEUM.ORG

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

MAY–SEP 2020 SEP 2020–JAN 2021

Science + You™ Ansel Adams: Early Works


PRESERVENEWS Lakewood Master Plan

In January, the Board approved a master plan for Lakewood Forest Preserve (Wauconda). Acquired in 1968, Lakewood has 2,835 acres and is the largest forest preserve in Lake County. Engineering work begins this year, followed by construction in 2021. View plans and track progress at LCFPD.org/projects.

NEW PLANT-THEMED EDUCATOR LOAN BOX To help local teachers bring even more interactive science lessons to their classrooms, we created a fifth educator loan box. The new Plants, Seeds and Trees box features group learning activities, educational items and reference materials. For a $20 materials fee, teachers can check out the box for two weeks. Four other themed boxes are also available, all of which meet Illinois Learning Standards: mammals, insects, ecosystems and birds. As a bonus, the first 10 teachers to reserve a loan box in 2020 will receive a free bird feeder for their classroom, donated by the Panacea Products Corporation. Book a box today: 847-968-3321. Details: LCFPD.org/resources.

STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE | Communications Building broad public awareness for our organization's vision, mission and brand within Lake County is a key strategic plan goal. Last summer, Public Affairs staff Allison Frederick and Jackie DeMasi began a brand refresh project in pursuit of one of the plan objectives focused on strengthening public recognition and connection to the brand. Frederick and DeMasi analyzed brand usage across all departments, sent a survey to 31,000 residents to gauge awareness, created a graphic standards manual, and recently launched a campaign to share the newly refreshed brand logo and messaging with fellow employees and the public. After nearly 30 years in use, the former version is being replaced with the new logo on the left. This modern identity more closely aligns with our organization's vision and incorporates symbolic colors representing some of the many benefits forest preserves bring to our Lake County community: green for trees, foliage and growth, brown for soil and new life, and blue for water.

E X C E L L E N C E I S I N O U R N AT U R E LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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TOGETHER, ACHIEVING MORE FOR OUR FOREST PRESERVES.

The Preservation Foundation is the charitable partner of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Gifts of all sizes are meaningful and help support projects and initiate programs that may otherwise go unfunded or take many years to complete. Learn more at LCFPD.org/donate or call 847-968-3110.

USG Renews Grant to Dunn Museum The public can enjoy another year of free admission and special programming at the Bess Bower Dunn Museum, thanks to a renewed grant from USG Foundation. On the first and third Thursdays of each month, admission to the Dunn Museum is free after 5 pm, and visitors of all ages can participate in a variety of programs. This spring, don’t miss Wonderful Wildflowers, on April 2, ideal for families, or How Animals Observe the World, on May 21, ideal for adults.

2019 DONOR FAST FACTS ®

ANNUAL FUND SPOTLIGHT

Prioritizing Conservation Actions for Ravine Health Barrington-based Oberweiler Foundation awarded a $15,000 grant to update a critical document that provides a road map for conservation actions to protect Lake County's 40 steep-sided ravines flowing into Lake Michigan. The project integrates new data on the structural integrity and biological diversity of the ravines, many of which are impacted by erosion. In addition to the Forest Preserves, which owns and manages Hutchinson, Janes, and Scotts Ravines at Fort Sheridan (Highland Park), dozens of public and private landowners of ravine properties along the shoreline will benefit.

8 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0

The Annual Fund is a source of immediate, flexible support for the Forest Preserves, ideal for piloting new programs. In 2019, an Annual Fund grant supported a new threeweek summer immersion program, called Conservation Explorers, for students entering high school. Seven students from Waukegan, Zion and Round Lake Beach participated. Working with Forest Preserves staff, they did field work to protect the Blanding’s turtle population, learned about dune formation and erosion at Illinois Beach State Park, and conducted their own research project on Lake Michigan water quality aboard a research vessel.

76

donors with 10+ years of giving

4

99

ages of youngest and oldest donor

230 first-time donors

24,910

hours donated by 1,921 volunteers

$3+ million raised to help the Forest Preserves do more

donations came from 24 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada


SPRING CALENDAR = Pricing online LCFPD.org/calendar = Ticket required For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and tickets, visit LCFPD.org or call 847-968-3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

Join the Movement Hike with us to join the Go Lake County movement. Icon shows related programs.

MARCH 5 Amazing Amphibians Drop in to learn about Lake County amphibians and meet one face-to-face.

Thursday, 5:30–7  p m , Dunn Museum — North Shore Gas Education Classroom. All ages. FREE. Space limited.

7 Walk With a Naturalist: Fort Sheridan Learn about the human and natural history of this preserve while taking in majestic views of Lake Michigan.

Saturday, 9–10:30  a m , Fort Sheridan. Adults. FREE.

7–8, 14–15, 21–22 Maple Syrup Hikes Learn how trees work and about the sweet sap of sugar maples. Ryerson Woods is one of the few places in Lake County where conditions are right for maple syrup production, and where trees grow to a diameter and height that allows for tapping. Everyone gets a taste. Hikes start every half-hour from 12–2

pm.

Ryerson Woods. All ages. 

11, 25 Lunchtime Tours: Reima Ratti Tour the exhibit Reima Ratti: Life and Art in the Great Depression. Learn about this Waukegan artist and his work.

Wednesdays, 12–12:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults.

12 Connecting Kids With Nature Kids and outdoor exploration are a natural pairing! Join us to discover the benefits of nature play.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45  a m , Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

12 Starting Native Plants From Seed Starting seeds can be challenging until you know the tricks to sparking germination. Spend the evening with your hands in the dirt while learning a few tips.

Thursday, 6:30–8:30  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults. Space limited. 

13 Women’s History Month Lecture March is National Women’s History Month. Celebrate with us by learning about powerful Lake County women who made history, including Bess Bower Dunn, pictured right. Friday, 2–3  p m , Dunn Museum— North Shore Gas Education Classroom. 

13 Astronomy Program Learn about outer space, the sky and the universe. Stargazing after the meeting, weather permitting. In collaboration with Skokie Valley Astronomers.

Friday, 8–10  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. Adult supervision required. FREE.

14 BGI Volunteer Workday: Grassy Lake Join our Barrington Greenway Initiative (BGI) partners at a volunteer workday! Work alongside experienced volunteer stewards and staff.

Saturday, 9:30  a m –12  p m , Meet at Lake Barrington Village Hall (23860 N. Old Barrington Rd, Barrington, IL 60010) and then carpool to the work location— Grassy Lake. Activity is brush cutting.

17 Hikin’ Tykes: Green The color green symbolizes many things, including balance, harmony and growth. Explore the various shades of green with your little one through a nature-based story, craft and outdoor walk, weather permitting.

Thursday, 9:30–10:45  a m , Greenbelt Cultural Center — Education Wing. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. Embrace this month’s topic by wearing green.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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10

= Pricing online LCFPD.org/calendar

= Ticket required

For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and tickets, visit LCFPD.org or call 847-968-3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

MARCH (continued) 18 Small Discoveries: Five Senses Learn about your five senses through activities and play.

Wednesday, 10–11  a m , Dunn Museum. Children ages 2–5 with an adult. Adult supervision required. 

18 Senior Series: Maple Syrup Join in this annual maple syrup tradition. Learn how sugar maple trees produce the sap that is collected and made into syrup. Everyone gets a taste.

Wednesday, 2–3  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults 62 and up. FREE residents, nonresidents.

19 Author Talk: Artists of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Author Kathleen Duxbury shares the Great Depression story of a young Waukegan artist, Reima Ratti. This talk shares details of his time in the Civilian Conservation Corps and how that experience set him on a path to history. View his works on display in the special exhibition gallery.

Thursday, 6–7  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults. FREE. Space limited.

20 Adult Painting Workshop Paint through the eyes of featured artist, Reima Ratti, and connect to the world of art. Artists will explore self-portrait without judgment, horizon lines, and a perspective painting of a place that expresses fond memories.

Friday, 6–7:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults 18 and up. Space limited.

24 Spring Break Syruping Spending your spring break on a staycation? Join us for this weekday Maple Syrup Hike to learn how trees work and about the sweet sap of sugar maples. Everyone gets a taste. Tuesday, 11  a m –12  p m , 1–2  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. All ages. 

25 Playdate With Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthful and beneficial.

Wednesday, 1–2:30  p m , Lyons Woods. Children of all ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

26 Museum Curiosity Stations Rotate through the exhibition galleries to experience a variety of hands-on activities.

Thursday, 10  a m –12  p m , Dunn Museum. Families with children 12 and under. FREE with Museum admission.

27 Museum Family Crafts Join us during spring break to create themed crafts. Friday, 10  a m –12  p m , Dunn Museum. Families with children 12 and under. FREE with Museum admission.

28 Birdwatching Hot Spots Join us to look for waterfowl, marsh birds and other migratory species. Scopes and binoculars will be available.

Saturday, 7:30–9:30  a m , Independence Grove — North Bay Pavilion. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

28 Salamander Saturday Discover the importance of salamanders and learn what makes them a keystone species.

Saturday, 2–3  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0


MARCH (continued) 29 Art Therapy Workshop for People with Disabilities Experience a unique art therapy session designed for children and adults with disabilities. Artists will explore self-portrait without judgment, horizon lines, and a perspective painting of a place that expresses fond memories. Come explore the world of art in a meaningful way. Sunday, 10  a m –12  p m , Dunn Museum. Ages 8 and up, with an adult. Space limited. Adult supervision required. 

29 Children’s Painting Workshop Join a local artist in this kids-only painting class. Artists will explore self-portrait without judgment, horizon lines, and a perspective painting of a place that expresses fond memories.

Sunday, 2–4  p m , Dunn Museum. Children ages 6 and up. Space limited. Adult supervision required.

APRIL 1 Homeschool Companion: Reima Ratti’s Art Join other homeschoolers to explore the special exhibition on artist Reima Ratti. Learn more about this Waukegan artist, and the time period in which he lived and worked, through a tour of the exhibit and hands-on activities. Wednesday, 10  a m –12  p m , Dunn Museum. Ages 5–12, with an adult. Adult supervision required. 

2 Wonderful Wildflowers Stop by to learn about the native wildflowers that are starting to bloom, and plant one to take home.

Thursday, 5:30–7  p m , Dunn Museum— North Shore Gas Education Classroom. All ages. FREE. Space limited.

4 Walk With a Naturalist: Fox River Take a stroll to enjoy the river view that makes this site so special.

Saturday, 9–10:30  a m , Fox River. Adults. FREE.

4, 18 Birdwatching Hot Spots Join us to look for waterfowl, marsh birds and other migratory species. Scopes and binoculars will be available.

Saturdays, 7:30–9:30  a m , Hastings Lake — boat launch. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

8 Small Discoveries: Hop Into Spring Celebrate the arrival of spring with craft, stories and learning about historic spring activities. Wednesday, 10–11  a m , Dunn Museum. 

9 Connecting Kids With Nature Kids and outdoor exploration are a natural pairing! Join us to discover the benefits of nature play.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45  a m , Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

9 Object Talks: Reima Ratti Painting Take a closer look at a painting by Waukegan artist, Reima Ratti. Hear about his role in the Civilian Conservation Corps and how he documented the world around him.

Thursday, 2–2:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults. 

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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12

= Pricing online LCFPD.org/calendar

= Ticket required

For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and tickets, visit LCFPD.org or call 847-968-3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

APRIL (continued) 10 Lunchtime Tours: Reima Ratti This is your last opportunity to tour the special exhibition, Reima Ratti: Life and Art in the Great Depression. Learn more about the artist, his work and his roots in Lake County. Friday, 12–12:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults. 

10 Astronomy Program Learn about outer space, the sky and the universe. Stargazing after the meeting, weather permitting. In collaboration with Skokie Valley Astronomers.

Friday, 8–10  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. Adult supervision required. FREE.

15, 24 Lunchtime Tours: Lake County Highlights Enjoy a 30-minute guided tour of the permanent exhibition galleries.

Wednesday, Friday, 12–12:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults. 

16 Birchbark Quill Cradle Discussion Join us for a presentation by artists Terri Hom and Pat Kruse. The artists will discuss their collaboration on remaking a birchbark quill cradle, and their efforts to research and preserve birchbark quill art.

Thursday, 6:30–7:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults. FREE. Space limited.

18 Rx for Health Walk Join a health professional and an environmental educator on this walk to explore the preserve as we improve our health.

Saturday, 4–5:30  p m , Hastings Lake—Playground parking lot. Adult supervision required. FREE.

EARTH WEEK 21 Hikin’ Tykes: Water

22 Earth Day Exploration

24 Earth Week: Watersheds

Water is one thing that makes our planet unique. Experience the various states of this element. Includes a nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration, weather permitting.

Come celebrate Earth Day’s 50th Anniversary! Drop in to learn about things you can do on Earth Day (and everyday) to help our planet.

What is a watershed? Which watershed do you live in? We’ll answer these questions and more while discovering how we can keep our watery habitats healthy.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45  a m , Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. 

Wednesday, 1–3  p m , Independence Grove — North Bay Pavilion. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

Friday, 4–5  p m , Grant Woods— Monaville Road entrance. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

21 Earth Week: Purple Martins

23 Playdate With Nature

25 Spring Bird Walk: Pine Dunes

Visit our purple martin houses to learn about the migration and nesting behaviors of Lake County’s largest member of the swallow family.

Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthful and beneficial.

Join a skilled birder on this walk. Bring binoculars if you have them.

Tuesday, 4–5  p m , Independence Grove—North Bay Pavilion kiosk. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0

Thursday, 1–2:30  p m , Raven Glen. Children of all ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

Saturday, 7–9  a m , Pine Dunes. All Ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.


Male eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) have red eyes, pictured right. Females have brown eyes.

APRIL (continued) EARTH WEEK (continued) 25 Voyageur Paddle Paddle our 34-foot canoe across the lake and back in time. Go back to early Lake County as 18th-century French voyageurs and discover why they traveled to Illinois in the 1740s. Saturday, 9–10  a m , 10–11  a m , Van Patten Woods—Sterling Lake south parking lot. Adults, families with children ages 4 and up. 

25 Earth Week: Digital Scavenger Hunt

25 Evening Woodcock Walk

Bring your phone or camera, sleuthing skills and imagination for this digital scavenger hunt. The walk will be about 0.5 miles, with a longer 1.3-mile option.

Step out at dusk to watch the spectacular sky dance of the American woodcock. One of Lake County’s spring wonders, learn about this peculiar bird and its marvelous tactics to win over a mate.

Saturday, 1–4  p m , Nippersink— Shelter C. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

Saturday, 7:30–8:45  p m , Middlefork Savanna. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. FREE.

22 Senior Series: Hollywood on the Prairie Hear the story of the motion picture industry from the 1890s to 1910, beginning with Thomas Edison's laboratory in Menlo Park, to Edward Amet's backyard movie studio in Waukegan, and more.

Wednesday, 2–3  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults 62 and up. FREE with Museum admission. 

29 Senior Series: Coyotes and Other Canines Learn about the natural history and special adaptations of coyotes and other wild canines in Lake County.

Wednesday, 2–3 pm, Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults 62 and up. FREE residents, nonresidents.

30 Art in Your Backyard Join us in this after-school program to create crafts centered around nature.

Thursday, 4–5 pm, Dunn Museum. Children ages 3 and up, with an adult. Adult supervision required. FREE.

30 Native Plant Landscaping Native plants provide homes and food for our native wildlife, and bring natural beauty to our home landscapes. Join us to learn more about how to introduce native plants into your garden. Thursday, 6–7  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults. 

MAY 2 Walk With a Naturalist: Ethel's Woods Explore the beauty of this picturesque landscape as we visit Lake County’s newest forest preserve.

Saturday, 9–10:30  a m , Ethel’s Woods. Adults. FREE.

2, 3, 13, 16, 17 Spring Bird Walk: Ryerson Woods Join a skilled birder on this walk. Bring binoculars if you have them.

Saturdays, Sundays, Wednesday, 7–9  a m , Ryerson Woods— Brushwood parking lot. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

2, 16 Birdwatching Hot Spots Join us to look for waterfowl, marsh birds and other migratory species. Spotting scopes and binoculars will be available.

Saturdays, 7:30–9:30  a m , Rollins Savanna — Drury Lane parking lot. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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= Pricing online LCFPD.org/calendar

= Ticket required

For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and tickets, visit LCFPD.org or call 847-968-3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

MAY (continued) 2 Rx for Health Walk Join a health professional and an environmental educator on this walk to explore the preserve as we improve our health.

Saturday, 4–5:30  p m , Van Patten Woods— Shelter A. Adult supervision required. FREE.

3 Spring Wildflower Identification 101 Learn the basics of plant identification as we explore spring wildflowers. Walk away with an understanding of how to recognize common native species found at Ryerson and in your backyard. Sunday, 1–2:30  p m , Ryerson Woods — Classroom Cabins. Adults. 

6, 21 Lunchtime Tours: Inventions Enjoy a 30-minute guided tour to learn about inventions that have been created throughout time.

Wednesday, Thursday, 12–12:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults.

6 Senior Series: Spring Birds and Blooms Take a leisurely stroll and experience bursts of colorful birds in the treetops and wildflowers on the forest floor.

Wednesday, 2–3 pm, Wright Woods. Adults 62 and up. FREE residents, nonresidents.

7 Native Garden Tour Join us for a guided tour of the Native Plant Garden and discover the diversity of native plants for your home garden.

Thursday, 6–7  p m , Independence Grove— parking lot C kiosk. Adults. 

7 Spotlight on Collections Care Take a rare peek at our Collections Care and Storage Facility on this 30-minute guided tour focusing on the preservation of unique objects in our collection. Tours leave at 6, 6:30 and 7 p m . Limit 10 adults per tour. Thursday, 6–7:30  p m , Dunn Museum. Adults. FREE. Please sign up at the Museum front desk that evening for a tour slot. Space limited.

8 Astronomy Program Learn about outer space, the sky and the universe. Stargazing after the meeting, weather permitting. In collaboration with Skokie Valley Astronomers.

Friday, 8–10  p m , Ryerson Woods —Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. Adult supervision required. FREE.

9 Exhibit Opening: Science + You™ Learn what science is all about in this new special exhibition, Science + You™. Fill your day with science experiments, crafts and more! Saturday, 10  a m –12  p m , Dunn Museum. All ages. FREE with Museum admission. © 2011 Kohl Children's Museum of Greater Chicago. All rights reserved. Science + You™ is sponsored internationally by the AbbVie Foundation and was developed by Kohl Children's Museum of Greater Chicago.

9 Spring Bird Walk: Native Plant Sale Join us to discover some of the beautiful birds that utilize our native landscapes. The first 25 people to register and attend this walk get exclusive first entry into the sale.

HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0

Saturday, 7–9  a m , Independence Grove — North Bay Pavilion kiosk. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.  


MAY (continued) 9, 10 Native Plant Sale Purchase native flowers and woody plants, a rain barrel or compost bin, and learn about eco-friendly practices to benefit your home, pocketbook and the community. Saturday only: rain barrels and compost bins available for sale from the Solid Waste Agency of Lake County. Saturday, 9  a m –3  p m and Sunday 10  a m –2  p m , Independence Grove — North Bay Pavilion.

14 Connecting Kids With Nature Kids and outdoor exploration are a natural pairing! Join us to discover the benefits of nature play.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45  a m , Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

17 Fur, Feathers and Ferns Badge Join us as we complete badge requirements 1–4.

Sunday, 12–1:15  p m , Fox River — Shelter B. Bear Scouts.

17 Hiker Badge Complete Brownie Scout badge requirements 1–3, 5.

Sunday, 2–3:15  p m , Fox River — Shelter B. Brownie Scouts.

19 Hikin' Tykes: Tracks Learn how to find and identify animal tracks through a naturebased story, craft and outdoor exploration, weather permitting.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Hastings Lake — Shelter A. Children ages 2–4, with an adult.

20 Spring Bird Walk: Fort Sheridan Join a skilled birder on this walk. Bring binoculars if you have them.

Wednesday 7–9  a m , Fort Sheridan — Gilgare Road parking lot. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

21 Playdate With Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthful and beneficial.

Thursday, 1–2:30  p m , Fox River. Children of all ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

21 Nature's Sixth Sense: How Animals Observe the World From seeing ultraviolet light to detecting electrical fields, animals observe the world in ways we cannot perceive. Learn the biology behind amazing animal senses.

Thursday, 6–7  p m , Dunn Museum— North Shore Gas Education Classroom. Adults. FREE. Space limited.

22 Turtles of Lake County Get a jump start to your weekend by celebrating World Turtle Day. Learn about species and meet a few local to Lake County. Includes a short hike to look for turtles.

Friday 4–5  p m , Nippersink— Shelter A. All ages. Adult supervision required.

30 Access to Nature Don’t let your cane or walker stop you from joining us on this hike to enjoy lake views from the paved trail. We will walk at the pace of the group and learn about the preserve as we go. Saturday, 2:30–3:30  p m , Independence Grove — North Bay Pavilion. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE.

30 Rx for Health Walk Join a health professional and an environmental educator on this walk to explore the preserve as we improve our health.

Saturday, 4–5:30  p m , Captain Daniel Wright Woods. Adult supervision required. FREE.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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SPECIAL FACILITIES Directory

GENERAL OFFICES

OPERATIONS AND PUBLIC SAFETY

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

19808 West Grand Avenue Lake Villa, Illinois 60046

847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

847-968-3411 tel (Operations) 847-968-3404 tel (Public Safety) 847-968-3116 fax

8 am –4:30 pm , Monday–Friday

6:30 am –3

OUTDOOR RECREATION

EDUCATION

pm ,

LCFPD.org 911 emergency 847-549-5200 nonemergency public safety issues

Monday–Friday

GOLF

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064

33600 North U.S. Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030

847-968-3499 Main 847-247-1111 Banquets, Meetings

847-968-3477

Office Hours

847-968-3100 847-968-3441 847-489-1931 847-247-1119

By appointment only

BraeLochGolfClub.org

BESS BOWER DUNN MUSEUM

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

IndependenceGrove.org Visitors Center Hours 9 am–4:30 pm, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees, visit our website. Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $6 per car Monday–Thursday $12 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without having to verify Lake County residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center. FOX RIVER MARINA 28500 West Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010 847-381-0669 FoxRiverMarina.org Boat Launch and Marina Hours For hours and fees, visit our website.

Prairie and Traditional Courses

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060

847-968-3400 Main

847-968-3100 Tee Times 847-968-3441 Golf Gift Cards 847-489-1931 Golf Outings

DunnMuseum.org Gallery and Gift Shop Hours 10 am–5 pm, Tuesday–Saturday 12–5 pm, Sundays Closed, Mondays

CountrysideGolfClub.org

$6 adults/$10 nonresidents $3 seniors, youth/$6 nonresidents Free, children ages 3 and under

A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

Discount Tuesdays $3 adults/$5 nonresidents $1.50 seniors, youth/$3 nonresidents Open until 8 pm on the first and third Thursdays of every month with free admission after 5 pm. Free admission sponsored by: ®

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA 21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015 847-968-3320 LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours 9 am–5 pm, Tuesday–Saturday 11 am–4 pm, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099 847-968-3100 847-968-3441 847-489-1931 847-968-3450

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org


LCFPD.org

Nearly 31,000 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves. Most preserves are open 6:30 a m –sunset, daily. If a preserve gate is open before 6:30 a m , the preserve is considered open for use.

FOREST PRESERVE Entrance/Parking

GENERAL OFFICES AND DUNN MUSEUM

FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS

OPERATIONS AND PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITY

COMMUNITY GARDEN

STATE LAND

MILLENNIUM TRAIL Planned Section

MIDDLEFORK TRAIL AND GREENWAY Planned Section

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL

FORT HILL TRAIL Planned Section

M CCLORY TRAIL /NORTH SHORE PATH

CASEY TRAIL

Friday, January 31

! !

! !

! !

! ! ! ! ! ! !!

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Kilbourne Rd

Hunt Club Rd

!

Wadsworth Rd

!

McDONALD WOODS

BONNER HERITAGE FARM

BEACH PARK

!

FOURTH LAKE

WAUKEGAN SAVANNA

!

Yorkhouse Rd

LYONS WOODS

Sand Lake Rd

MILL CREEK

!

!

33rd St

WADSWORTH

Ste arns Sc

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SEDGE MEADOW

l Rd

!

Blanchard Rd

Delany Rd

Cedar Lake Rd

! !

!

OLD MILL CREEK

!

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

Lewis Ave

! !

Sand Lake Rd

Monaville Rd

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ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS

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! ! ! ! LINDENHURST

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DUCK FARM

LAKE VILLA

GRANT WOODS

Crawford Rd

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OAK-HICKORY

WADSWORTH SAVANNA

ETHEL'S WOODS

!

Cedar Lake State Bog

!

! ! ! !

HASTINGS LAKE Grass L Gelden Rd

!

Des Plaines River

!! !

!

! ! Petite Lake Rd

Grass Lake Rd

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

RAVEN GLEN SUN LAKE

!

WINTHROP HARBOR

! !

FOX LAKE

DUTCH GAP !

Town Line Rd

SPRING BLUFF

Sheridan Rd

Grass Lake Rd

PRAIRIE STREAM

!

Beach Grove Rd

BLUEBIRD MEADOW

VAN PATTEN WOODS

Edwards Rd

! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

LAKE MARIE

Chain O'Lakes State Park

ANTIOCH

SEQUOIT CREEK

! !

Rd

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Deep Lake Rd

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! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

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Russell Rd !

Green Bay

Wilmot Rd

GRAND ILLINOIS TRAIL Planned

! !

Red Wing Slough State Natural Area

Fox River

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!

PATRIOT PATH Planned

PINE DUNES

GANDER MOUNTAIN

! !

DOG PARK

CHAIN O’LAKES BIKE PATH Planned Section

PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL/ GRAYSLAKE BIKE PATH

MAP CURRENT AS OF

CANOE LAUNCH

WAUKEGAN

Grand Ave

!

Rollins Rd

! !

! ! ! !

Midlothian Rd

! ! ! ! ! !

! !

Kil bo Rd urne

! ! ! !

ADLAI E. STEVENSON ! HISTORIC HOME

INDIAN CREEK

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Miller Rd

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Everett Rd

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HALF DAY

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Quentin Rd

Riverwoods Rd

LONG GROVE

Half Day Rd

gton Rd

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!

LINCOLNSHIRE

BERKELEY PRAIRIE

BUFFALO GROVE

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

DEERFIELD

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES Lake Cook Rd

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Rd

er Rd

Deerfield Rd

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RIVERWOODS

HIGHLAND PARK

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DUFFY STORMWATER FACILITY Saunders Rd

Lake Cook Rd

BUFFALO CREEK

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DEER PARK

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SKOKIE RIVER WOODS

BANNOCKBURN

Duffy Ln

WELCOME CENTER !

HIGHWOOD

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CUBA MARSH

EDWARD L. RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

PRAIRIE WOLF

Rd

Cuba Rd Arlington Heights Rd

BARRINGTON

HERON CREEK Schaeffer Rd

BARRINGTON HILLS

KILDEER

! !

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FORT SHERIDAN

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EGRET MARSH

Old Elm Rd

Ri

Ela Rd

Kels

LAKE ZURICH

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CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

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HAWTHORN WOODS

Old M

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GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE ! ! ! !

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MIDDLEFORK SAVANNA

METTAWA

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MacARTHUR WOODS

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Fox River

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VERNON HILLS

LAKEWOOD

Sheridan Rd

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Des Plaines River

St Mary's Rd

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COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

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LAKE BLUFF

LIBERTYVILLE

Milwau

Hawley St

PORT BARRINGTON

Atkinson Rd

ATKINSON STORMWATER FACILITY

!

WAUCONDA

!

Lake Michigan

! !

Fish Lake Rd

Hunt Club Rd Almond Rd

Oak Spring Rd

ISLAND LAKE

!

WILMOT WOODS

Winchester Rd

!

Fremont Center Rd

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Bonner Rd

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Historical Ray Lake Boundary

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GREEN OAKS

Erhart Rd !

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Peterson Rd

Bu

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VISITORS CENTER

RAY LAKE

NORTH CHICAGO

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

Casey Rd

!

Chardon Rd

14th St

GREENBELT n Gree

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!!

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!

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GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

videre Rd

ALMOND MARSH

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SINGING HILLS

MARINA

PARK CITY !

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GRAYSLAKE

KETTLE GROVE

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HAINESVILLE

ere R

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MARL FLAT

Belvid

!

LAKE CARINA

Waukegan Rd

LAKEMOOR

! !

Washington St

Center St

KESTREL RIDGE

!

! !

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

NIPPERSINK

ROUND LAKE

Washington St

THIRD LAKE !

Washington St

Nippersink Rd VOLO

GURNEE

ROLLINS SAVANNA

! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! !

Volo Bog State Natural Area

Black Crown Marsh ! ! State Natural Area!!

! !

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ROUND LAKE BEACH

TANAGER KAMES


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

t

TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

HORI Z ON S

q

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335 email : Horizons@LCFPD.org

THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 81 MATURE TREES, 6,080 GALS WATER, 11,670 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES

Native

Summer Camps

P L ANT SALE

May 9, 9

am–3 pm

| May 10, 10

am–2 pm

Choose from a variety of native ferns, flowers, shrubs or woody plants suited to almost any backyard, and learn about eco-friendly practices to benefit your home. Visit LCFPD.org/plantsale for details.

Life is Better at the Beach Beach season passes for Lake County residents are on sale for unlimited access to the swimming beach and Family Fun Friday activities at Independence

Grove. Purchase by May 1 for 10% off. Visit LCFPD.org for prices, or call 847-968-3499.

2 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 02 0

Summer camp in the forest preserves is time well-spent. Every day at camp is different from the last, offering a balanced learning experience. Children can explore some of the most beautiful natural areas in the region, learn how Lake County’s rich history influences the present, and create unique art with diverse techniques while discovering local artists. Browse camps and register online at LCFPD.org/camps, or call 847-968-3321.

◄ FLICKR PICK Photographer John D. Kavc of Lake Barrington captured this colorful red-legged grasshopper (Melanoplus femurrubrum) along the trail at Fox River Forest Preserve (Port Barrington). Posted via Flickr.

Connect with us! For up-to-the-minute Forest Preserve news and events, find us on: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Flickr, or YouTube @LCFPD. Download our mobile app in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store — search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.”

Profile for Lake County Forest Preserve District

Horizons quarterly // spring 2020  

Horizons is the quarterly publication of your Lake County Forest Preserves, featuring articles on Lake County wildlife, natural and cultural...

Horizons quarterly // spring 2020  

Horizons is the quarterly publication of your Lake County Forest Preserves, featuring articles on Lake County wildlife, natural and cultural...

Profile for lcfpd