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HORI Z ON S LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESERVATION, RESTOR ATION , EDUCATION AN D RECRE ATION

QUARTERLY

spring 2017

VOLUME 26, ISSUE 2


1

4

14

6

On the cover: Local photographers documented this red fox as she raised her kits in their Libertyville backyard. Learn more about wildlife around your home in our feature story. nearly

31,000 acres are

protected

by the lake county forest preserves .

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES BOARD of COMMISSIONERS PRESIDENT

A MESSAGE from

Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire VICE PRESIDENT

ANN B. MAINE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

Linda Pedersen, Antioch TREASURER

S. Michael Rummel, Lake Forest ASSISTANT TREASURER

It is springtime in the Midwest and everything seems to be on the move. Tiny early buds begin to appear on trees and shrubs. In both backyards and in wild places, plants emerge from their long winter dormancy, tinting the world with welcome green. In Lake County’s beautiful and abundant woodlands, the leaves of native wild leek appear in late March, soon followed by spring beauty with its tiny pink-striped white flower, early meadow rue, and large-flowered trilliums. These early bloomers are available at our annual Native Plant Sale on Mother’s Day weekend for those who want to add some native beauty to their home landscape. Wildlife is getting more active, too, as the weather warms and babies are born (see cover of a fox and her kit). Lake County is 300,000 acres in size, with a population of approximately 703,910, more than the population of many second-tier American cities. In such a densely populated setting, people, animals, and verdant habitats such as woods, savannas, and prairies in our forest preserves live in a close dynamic. In our feature article, you’ll learn about Living with Wildlife, including ways to attract or discourage wildlife in your backyard (see page 1). In the Lake County Forest Preserves, it’s more than plants and animals that are on the move this spring. The work of moving our Museum to the Forest Preserve General Offices in Libertyville continues. New exhibitions that convey stories of Lake County’s people and the land will open in late 2017. Moving a historic collection of thousands of items, including Civil War correspondence, Native American beadwork, and the world’s first practical motion picture projector, invented right here in Lake County, requires care and time. In this issue, read the remarkable story of Philip Brand’s barbershop of Waukegan, what might have been Abraham Lincoln’s last shave before growing what would become his iconic beard, and how nine white, gold-lettered shaving mugs in the Museum’s collections are being packed for the move (see page 4). Spring is all about movement and change. There’s so much to experience in our forest preserves. And things are changing all the time!

Audrey Nixon, North Chicago Chuck Bartels, Mundelein Carol Calabresa, Libertyville Steve Carlson, Gurnee Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Bill Durkin, Waukegan Paul Frank, Highland Park Sandy Hart, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Aaron Lawlor, Vernon Hills Judy Martini, Fox Lake Sidney Mathias, Buffalo Grove Brent Paxton, Zion Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Tom Weber, Lake Villa Jeff Werfel, Grayslake Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ty Kovach

HORIZONS

VOLUME 26, ISSUE 2 Spring 2017 EDITOR

Susan Hawkins, Horizons@LCFPD.org CONTRIBUTORS

Allison Frederick, Diana Dretske PHOTOGRAPHY

Jim and Joan Sayre (foxes: cover, page 2), Carol Freeman, Phil and Janet Hauck, Peter Schulz, Joyce Dever, Jeff Goldberg, Chicago Botanic Garden SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335 Horizons is the quarterly publication of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Subscriptions are free. To subscribe, unsubscribe or update your address, call the hotline or email Horizons@LCFPD.org. Subscribers may also receive mailings from the Preservation Foundation of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.


LIVING with

WILDLIFE

A

hh, spring—when nature arises from winter sleep, stretches its well-rested

muscles, and returns its efforts to producing the next generation. And so the great annual land-grab begins, as millions of creatures work to stake out their spot for the season. Some of these homesteaders will lay claim to spots in natural areas, such as forest preserves. But as the human population of Lake County grows, more and more animals find habitat in backyards and urban areas. The future of wildlife depends on striking a balance between conservation and use of the land. Healthy and self-sustaining wildlife populations are the key to a successful birdwatching hike, a memorable day in the preserves, and the success of our wildlife conservation programs.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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Uninvited Dinner Guests Do not encourage wildlife to come

Human development in urban areas has replaced natural areas that were once habitat for wildlife. Lawns, gardens, and neighborhoods have replaced open fields, forests, and wetlands. Many wild animals have adapted well to living in neighborhoods. By remembering a few key factors about living alongside wildlife, we can avoid potential problems, and enjoy the excitement that these animals bring to our backyards and communities.

2 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 01 7

in or near your home by feeding them. Unattended pet food bowls and uncovered garbage cans are an all-you-can-eat buffet for raccoons, skunks, and other wildlife. If possible, keep garbage cans inside. If not, a tight-fitting lid will deter most diners, and mothballs or ammonia-soaked rags placed inside may ward off the more enterprising. Also, keep grills clean. Fence off vegetable and flower gardens to reduce nibbling by rabbits and deer, or plant things they don’t like to eat. More than 40 percent of Americans make a regular habit of feeding birds. However, dirty feeders can spread disease or parasites, doing more harm than good. So, should we stop feeding birds? No. There are simple ways to avoid many of the potential issues. Keep your bird feeder clean. Don’t allow spilled seed to accumulate around bird feeders. Piles of seed on the ground invite small mammals to the area, which in turn attracts larger animals, such as coyotes, on the prowl for prey. Too much hassle? Instead of

reduce these elements and your home, office, or school becomes less attractive real estate for wildlife. Help prevent inappropriate nesting by closing off easy access to your home. If it’s not safe, warm, and dry, animals are less likely to move into a space. Repair broken, weak, or rotted areas all around your home. Trim overhanging tree limbs that provide easy access to your roof. Install chimney caps and vent covers, and use welded wire mesh as a backup barricade. Cover openings under decks, elevated sheds, concrete slabs and porches with welded wire. Even though it may be tempting to trap and remove a nuisance animal, removal does not usually provide a permanent solution. Trapping and removing animals only creates an opening for another animal to occupy. A trapped adult may also leave young behind, which often die of starvation in an inaccessible area. The best solution is to focus on removing the attraction, not the animal, in order to prevent future invasion.

maintaining feeders, plant native

Please remember that it is illegal for

species of trees, shrubs, and

homeowners to trap certain species,

wildflowers. They’ll provide natural

and there are many federal and state

food sources. And native species

laws against keeping wildlife.

offer fruits and seeds best suited to native birds. Visit our annual Native Plant Sale in May to get started (see page 7). Be aware of all state of Illinois wildlife regulations. For example, it is illegal to provide food, salt or mineral blocks to wild deer or other wildlife in

Infant Wildlife Taking the proper measures when dealing with infant wildlife not only helps the baby but also protects the local habitat. In most cases, infant wildlife should be left alone. Making contact with wildlife can transfer human scent to the infant, which

areas where wild deer are present.

may make it more easily detected

Objectionable Occupants

There are ways to assess whether or

Simply put, animals require a source

not a baby animal needs assistance.

of food and water, shelter that is safe

Human presence can stress wildlife.

from predators and protects against

Before interacting with an animal,

harsh weather, and enough space to

make sure it needs rescuing.

go about their business. Remove or

by predators.


If an animal does not run away when

a raccoon that has been injured by

best course of action is to place

you approach it, is obviously injured,

a passing car. For your safety and

an injured animal with a trained,

or is in an area of danger, then action

the sake of the injured animal, try

experienced and licensed

is needed. Remember that even the

to eliminate stressors and alleviate

rehabilitator.

most experienced rehabilitators are

shock.

poor surrogate caregivers compared to life in the wild. For your safety and the sake of the injured animal, if the mother or a sibling is there to help,

Your personal safety is the first thing to consider. It is instinctual for Even though they might

Most adult animals must leave their

react to that fear. The

young unattended to search for

situation worsens if an

food. The young are often left alone

animal’s beak, teeth, or

or with siblings for long periods of

claws injure you.

eye of their parents. When determining if assistance is needed, leave the

Some of the most memorable outdoor experiences include

animals to fear humans.

then let nature take its course.

time, but remain under the watchful

Wildlife in the Preserves

an unexpected sighting of a wild animal. Take

be injured, they may

a quiet morning stroll in any forest preserve, and you are likely to see a white-tailed deer dashing across the trail

When assessing an injured

or bounding gracefully

wildlife situation, call a wildlife

through tall grasses. It is

rehabilitator or care center for

tempting to get closer to that deer

tion after some time has passed.

advice. Rehabilitators know the

or a bird’s nest or try to pet a gentle

needs of different species. They

animal, whether in the preserves or

Visit LCFPD.org/conservation for

are trained to properly observe an

in your backyard, but it is important

recommendations related to

animal’s behavior and appearance,

to observe wildlife from a distance.

commonly encountered animal

allowing them to determine whether

groups, and to find information

an animal is acting normally or

on wildlife rehabilitators and other

having a problem. Rehabilitators

professional wildlife services.

are also certified to administer

area and return to check the situa-

medications if needed and can

Injured Wildlife Occasionally, you may encounter an injured animal. Perhaps it is a bird that has flown into a window or become tangled in fishing line. You might come across a deer or

provide the best possible care

Teach children early on to enjoy wildlife through quiet observation and to never approach, attempt to touch, or feed wildlife. Animals that become habituated to humans

available for our wildlife neighbors.

can eventually become aggressive.

Federal and state laws prohibit you

to the animal. The stress of contact

from keeping most native animals,

with humans can lead to lower

even if you’re temporarily caring for

survivorship and reproductive rates.

Contact with wildlife may cause harm

it with the intent of releasing it. The

Protect Our Species Help protect Lake County’s native species. Hundreds of non-native fish, wildlife, and plant species have been observed in Illinois. Not all non-native species pose a threat to our native plants and animals, but some become invasive and cause harm to local ecosystems. Non-native animals include those that did not historically occur in Lake County, as well as pets living outside

Learn Before You Buy How big will this animal grow?

What does this animal eat?

Can I care for this animal for 15–20 years?

Don’t Let It Loose If you can’t care for a pet anymore, do not set it free — that is illegal. Plus, your pet will likely die without your care. Instead, find an alternative to release: »» Contact a pet store for proper handling advice or possible returns.

captivity. The most common pathway

»» Give to or trade with another pet owner or a local hobbyist.

by which non-native animals find their

»» Donate to a local zoo, aquarium, school, or nature center.

way into natural habitats is through escape or release by humans, whether purposeful or inadvertent.

»» Seal aquatic plants in plastic bags and dispose of them in the trash. »» Contact a veterinarian or pet retailer for humane disposal guidance.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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Special Feature

PHILIP BRAND: THE MAN WHO SHAVED

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

MUSEUM ARTIFACTS BRING STORIES TO LIFE We’ve been tracking the work of the collections and exhibits team as they bring artifacts out of storage in preparation for the Museum’s move to its new Libertyville location in late 2017. A set of barber mugs from Philip Brand’s barbershop of Waukegan, over 100 years old and bearing the names of prominent Lake County citizens, caught our attention, and here’s why. ABOVE: A white-haired Philip Brand standing at the fore of his shop on Genesee Street, circa 1895. LCDM 2010.24 INSET: Exterior view of Brand’s barbershop, 57 Genesee Street, circa 1870, Miltimore family photo.

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I

n March and April of 1860,

at the Case Warehouse at the

Abraham Lincoln was in Chicago

North Pier. Elisha Ferry rose and

attending sessions of the United

said that he believed the alarm was

States District Court, as counsel for

a Democratic plot to break up the

the defendants in the “Sand Bar”

meeting. Lincoln in turn said, “Well,

case, which involved rights over sand

gentlemen, let us all go, as there

bars along the Lake Michigan coast.

really seems to be a fire, and help

By then, Lincoln was frequently men-

put it out.” Local legend states that,

tioned as a possible candidate for

indeed, Lincoln helped to extinguish

the presidency, and it was thought

the blaze, ruining his suit in the

he would be nominated at the

process. It has also been said that

Republican Convention in May.

Lincoln promised to come back to

Lincoln received frequent invitations to speak, and accepted one from

finish his speech another time, but he never made it back to Waukegan.

the citizens of Waukegan as pre-

Brand (1840–1914) was a German

sented by his friends and fellow

immigrant from the Hesse region and

attorneys, Elisha Ferry (also Mayor

came to Waukegan in 1859. His sense

of Waukegan) and Henry Blodgett.

for business, and a visit by Lincoln, did a good deal to

The day of the

make his clientele

speech—April 2,

grow. In the years

1860—Lincoln came

to come, Brand’s shop

up to Waukegan

served Waukegan’s

on the Chicago &

elite businessmen.

Milwaukee Railroad,

He eventually built

accompanied by

a three-story building

Illinois Senator,

Lincoln got a shave at

To safely move the mugs, special housing was fabricated using archival materials, including corrugated board, Ethafoam, and muslin. These materials protect the mugs from acids, gases, and dyes found in non-archival packing materials. All the shaving mugs are boxed together to ensure the ease of moving and storing a multiple-object collection. LEFT: Brand barber mug for Chase E. Webb, circa 1890. Webb was a Civil War veteran, Lake County Sheriff from 1886–1890, and Chief of Police in Waukegan from 1891–1897. LCDM 70.83.1

RIGHT: Brand barber mug for George R. Lyon, circa 1890. Lyon attended Lincoln’s speech at Dickinson’s Hall and was a Civil War veteran. He succeeded in his father’s general store business in 1893, served on the county board 1886–1887, and state legislature 1896–1900. LCDM 70.83.7

for his business inter-

Norman B. Judd. That afternoon,

Packing Precious Cargo

ests, which included Philip Brand, circa 1860, Miltimore family photo.

Philip Brand’s barbershop on Genesee Street. In 1860, Brand’s shop was new, since he had just emigrated from Germany the year before. How Lincoln came into Brand’s shop is not known, but his patronage certainly increased business thereafter. Brand was rightfully proud that Abraham Lincoln had come to him for a shave. That evening, hundreds of Waukeganites attended Lincoln’s speech at Dickinson’s Hall, including Philip Brand, William Besley (brewer), and George Lyon (store clerk). Lincoln spoke of the wrong of slavery, and that the country was half slavery and half freedom, and no government divided against itself in such manner could stand. Twenty minutes into the speech, word came that there was a fire

a bathhouse complete with bathtubs, shaving, and hairdressing

facilities. Philip Brand continued as a barber until his retirement about 1900. Though it seemed Brand’s barbershop was lost to time, in the spring of 1964, the shop was rediscovered during excavation work on Genesee Street. J.W. Peterson plumbers were digging a hole under the street and unexpectedly found barber mugs, bearing the names of former citizens.

Track the Move Visit LCFPD.org/Museum and follow us on Facebook @LakeCoun-

tyDiscoveryMuseum for updates on the Museum’s move, reveals of never-before-displayed artifacts, and glimpses of the new exhibit designs.

The barbershop, which had originally been on the first floor of the building, was moved at some point to the basement and filled in when Genesee Street was widened and paved. The surviving mugs and barber bottles that were found are in remarkably good condition considering the circumstances. Today, they are part of the Museum’s historic collections.

About the Author Diana Dretske is our Museum Curator, Lake County historian, and author of the Lake County History blog. For more stories of people, events and the land, visit LCFPD.org/blogs.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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PRESERVENEWS PICNIC SEASON

Picnic permits provide exclusive use of a shelter with parking, picnic tables, water, grills, and more. For details, call 847-367-6640 or visit LCFPD.org/permits. SPRING CONTROLLED BURNS

Each spring, our ecologists conduct controlled burns across hundreds of acres of forest preserve land. JOIN THE NAVY AND VOLUNTEER WITH US

It takes an army of volunteers — make that a Navy of volunteers — to keep our forest preserves beautiful. Recruits from Naval Station Great Lakes are part of a team, led by Forest Preserve volunteer Bob Rizzoli, which regularly cares for the native garden at Independence Grove (Libertyville). Last fall they did heavy lifting on mulching duty. You can also join up to help. View our many volunteer positions at LCFPD.org/volunteer. ALMOND MARSH ROOKERY OBSERVATION

Welcome herons, cormorants and hooded mergansers back to Lake County this spring. For great viewing, visit the Almond Marsh heron rookery (Grayslake), open Saturdays, April–June, 8 a m–noon (except Memorial Day weekend).

6 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY S PRING 2 01 7

Fire is the most efficient tool for managing natural communities, improving habitat by decreasing invasive plants, removing dead leaves, and exposing the seedbed to the sun. For daily updates, visit LCFPD.org/burninfo. TROUT SEASON OPENS

Banana Lake at Lakewood (Wauconda) opens for rainbow trout fishing on Saturday, April 1, following the release of roughly 500–600 rainbow trout. For details and a free Fishing Guide, visit LCFPD.org/fishing.


NEW SECTION OF MILLENNIUM TRAIL COMPLETED

A new 1-mile section of the Millennium Trail and Greenway along Hawley Street between Midlothian Road and Seymour Avenue in Mundelein opened in late 2016. Completed in partnership with the Lake County Department of Transportation, this segment features a combination of paved trail, and a portion of sidewalk that runs between Highway 45 and Seymour Avenue. The planned 41-mile Millennium Trail is a vital trail corridor designed to connect central, western and northern Lake County. When tied with neighboring Lake County trails, such as the Fort Hill Trail, North Shore Path, Des Plaines River Trail, and the McClory Trail, it becomes part of a spectacular system linking residential areas to parks, forest preserves, schools, and business districts. Today, nearly 31 miles of the Millennium Trail are open to hikers, bicyclists and cross-country skiers. A 9.25-mile section from Lakewood (Wauconda) north to Singing Hills (Round Lake) is also open to equestrians. Elsewhere, new trail sections are being engineered and constructed, and final routes are being identified to complete the trail. For maps and construction updates, visit LCFPD.org.

NATIVE PLANT SALE

Prepare your wish list of native plants and visit our Native Plant Sale this Mother’s Day weekend at Independence Grove (Libertyville), May 13–14. You can choose from a variety of native plants, shrubs and trees suited to almost any backyard. Native plants require less watering, less fertilizer, and are guaranteed to thrive in local gardens. Native flowering species also provide an abundance of nectar, and attract wildlife ranging from butterflies and songbirds, to beneficial insects. Proceeds from the plant sale benefit our nature education programs. Visit LCFPD.org/plantsale for a plant list, and for details regarding rain barrels and compost bins available for purchase at the sale. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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TOGETHER, ACHIEVING MORE FOR OUR FOREST PRESERVES.

The Preservation Foundation is the charitable partner of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Gifts of all sizes are meaningful and help support projects and initiate programs that may otherwise go unfunded or take many years to complete. Learn more at LCFPD.org/donate or call 847-968-3110. CLEARING MAKES WAY FOR WILDFLOWERS

If you have ridden Metra through Middlefork Savanna (Lake Forest) recently, you have probably noticed big changes in your view to the west. With a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Chi-Cal Rivers Fund, we cleared 70 acres of buckthorn from this preserve, which is bisected by the headwaters of the Chicago River. Generous donations from Richard and Elizabeth Uihlein, and John and Paula Lillard provided the required matching funds. This fall, SUPPORT STUDENT CREW AT GREEN YOUTH FARM

diverse seed mix will be planted in the cleared

Early spring crops are already growing in a greenhouse near the Chicago Botanic Garden. Spinach, radishes, and peas will be among the first fruits of the labors of 28 high school students hired in April to plant, tend, and harvest the 1.25-acre Green Youth Farm at Greenbelt Forest Preserve (North Chicago). You can buy produce July through October at their Farm Stand.

areas. By next spring, expect wildflowers to

We’ve partnered with the Garden since 2003 to provide this youth development program. North Chicago and Waukegan students gain job skills, spend time with adult mentors, and learn about nutrition, cooking, and entrepreneurism while growing fresh produce for their community. Help underwrite the cost of one Green Youth Farm crew, which is $6,750. Contribute at LCFPD.org/donate.

8 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY S PRING 2 01 7

appear and bring this landscape back to life.

ANNUAL FUND BY THE NUMBERS Since 2014, $226,538 has been granted from the Preservation Foundation Annual Fund to support projects that would otherwise be impossible.

425

31

500

6,000

volunteers

linear feet of

homeowners

students

celebrated for

new museum

contacted for

benefited from

their good

archive

property

education

works

created

restoration

programs

30,452

48

74

29,765

river

Green

pounds of

people

locations

Youth Farm

Green Youth

fed by the

sampled for

students

Farm produce

Green Youth

water quality

employed

grown

Farm


SPRING TRAIL ALERTS

GOLF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

Develop and expand your golf skills with instructional programs taught by our PGA and LPGA staff. Group, individual and junior lessons are available throughout the season for all skill levels at Countryside (Mundelein) and ThunderHawk (Beach Park) golf courses. Call 847-968-3100 for details.

Although spring brings warmer trail-going weather, it also brings increased rainfall and snowmelt, putting trails at risk for flooding. After submerged sections dry, our maintenance crews are quick to regrade and repair any water damage. Check the status (open/closed) of preserves and trails at LCFPD.org/closures. OUTINGS AT THUNDERHAWK, COUNTRYSIDE, BRAE LOCH

Our exceptional golf facilities and professional staff combine to make each golf outing a success. We offer packages for groups as small as 20, as large as 250, and at prices to fit any budget. You can tailor the event to your needs and tastes, and choose from a wide assortment of food, beverages, and appetizers. Call our event staff at 847-968-3100, or email Alex Eichman: aeichman@LCFPD.org. STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE

LCFPD.org/vision

Mike Tully, our Chief Operations Officer, was recently named to the Board of Directors of the National Association of County Park and Recreation Officials (NACPRO). NACPRO is a non-profit association through which park and recreation professionals communicate and collaborate about issues, best practices, and legislation bearing on the nation’s public parks and open spaces. Developing partnerships with organizations and individuals in Lake County, as well as in the state, region, and nation, is one of 13 strategic objectives to help us achieve our 100-year Vision for Lake County. Learn more at LCFPD.org/vision.

E X C E L L E N C E I S I N O U R N AT U R E LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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SPRING CALENDAR Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration, visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

MARCH 2 Dr. Seuss’s Read Across America Day Celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday and explore the wonders of nature as we read one of his books at stops along the trail.

Thursday, 10–11 am, Hastings Lake—Shelter A. Families with children ages 2–10. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents. Children ages 3 and under, FREE.

4, 11, 18, 25 Forest Fitness Group fitness walks feature a new preserve each week.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

4 Walk with a Naturalist Discover the diversity of plant and animal life on this naturalist-guided walk. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10:30 am, Fox River—Shelter B. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

4 Pop-Up Museum—Shelf Indulgence Share a book from your prized collection at a Pop-Up Museum hosted by the Lake County Discovery Museum.

Saturday, 10 am–3 pm, Wauconda Area Library. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

9 Connecting Kids with Nature Connect your kids with nature through outdoor exploration. Along the way, learn about the benefits of nature play.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages, caregivers. Adult supervision required. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

11–12, 18–19, 25–26 Maple Syrup Hikes Learn how trees work and about the sweet sap of sugar maples. Ryerson Woods is one of the few places in Lake County where climate conditions are right for maple syrup production, and where trees grow to a diameter and height that allows for tapping. Everyone gets a taste. Program also available as a school or scout field trip, call 847-968-3321 for details. Hikes fill fast, so register soon. Last three weekends in March. Hikes every half-hour from 12–2 pm. Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. All ages. $6. Children ages 3 and under, FREE. 15 Volunteer Open House Volunteer opportunities abound within the forest preserves. Find an ideal fit for you that will set you on the path to giving back, meeting new people and learning new things.

Wednesday, 5–7 pm, General Offices. Adults, youth ages 15 and up. FREE. No registration required.

28 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthful and beneficial for children of all ages.

Tuesday, 1–2:30 pm, Greenbelt—Dugdale Road entrance. Children of all ages, caregivers. Adult supervision required. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

29 Scout Wednesday

Animal Habitats: 10–11:30 am, Junior Girl Scouts ages 8–11. Indian Lore: 10–11:30 am, Boy Scouts ages 11–17. Into the Wild: 1–2:30 pm, Webelos ages 9–12. Playing the Past: 1–2:30 pm, Junior Girl Scouts ages 8–11. Wednesday. Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

APRIL 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Forest Fitness Group fitness walks feature a new preserve each week.

10 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

S PR IN G 2 01 7

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. FREE. No registration required.


Woodcocks have one of the most spectacular breeding displays in Lake County. Males can be heard “peenting” at dawn and dusk . Join our educators on Woodcock Walks, April 15 and 23, for a peek at the unique courtship flight and call of this fascinating bird.

APRIL (continued) 1 Walk with a Naturalist Discover the diversity of plant and animal life on this naturalist-guided walk. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10:30 am, Grant Woods— Rollins Road lot. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

5 Habitat Walk for Seniors Explore one of the many habitats found in Lake County, learning as you take part in this series of walks.

Wednesday, 9–10 am, Independence Grove—North Bay lot­. Seniors ages 62 and up. FREE. No registration required.

5 Homeschool Companion—Birds Learn about these amazing feathered friends flying through Lake County this spring, make a bird craft, and then take a walk to see birds in action.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Independence Grove Visitors Center. Children ages 5–12, with an adult. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

8, 15, 22, 29 Rookery Watch Join us for viewing of nesting herons, cormorants and other waterfowl. Supported by Lake County Audubon volunteers.

Saturday, 8 am–12 pm, Almond Marsh. All ages. FREE. No registration required. Spotting scope provided.

8 Rx for Health—Walking in Nature Join a health professional and an educator on this walk to explore the preserve as we improve our health.

Saturday, 4–5:30 pm, Hastings Lake—Playground lot. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

11 Hikin’ Tykes—Blue-spotted Salamander Learn with your preschooler about this priority animal species of Chicago Wilderness and how you can help them. Hands-on activities, craft and outdoor exploration, weather permitting.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

11 Phenology and Photography Outdoor workshop for serious amateur photographers. Naturalists will guide you to the highest natural point in Lake County to enjoy the Full Pink Moon. Along the way we will search for photo subjects of seasonal interest.

Tuesday, 6:30–8:30 pm, Gander Mountain. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents. Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes for hiking.

13 Connecting Kids with Nature Connect your kids with nature through outdoor exploration. Along the way, learn about the benefits of nature play.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

28 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthful and beneficial for children of all ages.

Friday, 1–2:30 pm, Independence Grove—Canoe launch. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

29 Spring Bird Walk Join a skilled birder on this walk to look for returning spring migrants. Bring binoculars if you have them.

Saturday, 7–9 am, Wright Woods. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

29 Wildflower Wonders Lake County is home to more than 600 species of wildflowers. Appreciate their beauty in a different preserve each month.

Saturday, 10 am–12 pm, Wright Woods. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

29 Rx for Health—Walking in Nature Join a health professional and an educator on this walk to explore the preserve as we improve our health.

Saturday, 4–5:30 pm, Nippersink—Shelter D. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

11


Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration, visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

APRIL (continued) EARTH WEEK A week of FREE nature programs in honor of Earth Day (April 22). No registration required, except where noted. 18 12 Priority Species Trivia Trail Walk the 1.3-mile trail loop at one of the most biodiverse sites in northeastern Illinois while learning about the 12 priority animal species of Chicago Wilderness.

21 Native Seed Nursery Tour Tour our Native Seed Nursery, where rare seeds of native species are carefully grown and used to restore native habitat in preserves throughout the county.

Tuesday, 4–5 pm, Middlefork Savanna. All ages.

Friday, 4–5 pm, Native Seed Nursery at Rollins Savanna. Adults.

17 National Bat Appreciation Day Drop in to learn about the role bats play in nature and how to help them through trivia, a touch table, and building a demonstration bat box.

19 Look-alikes Is it a monarch or viceroy? Bee or wasp? There are many look-alikes in nature. Learn the trick to telling them apart and take a walk to observe them out in the preserve.

22 Earth Day Celebration Celebrate the 47th Annual Earth Day at Ryerson Woods. Join us for guided hikes, Green Building tours, habitat restoration projects, live animals and other activities.

Monday, 10 am–3 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. All ages.

Wednesday, 4–5 pm, Fox River— Shelter B. All ages.

Saturday, 1–4 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. All ages.

17 Acoustic Bat Monitoring Bats use echolocation to hunt. Learn what species live here by detecting their sonar frequency on a 1.5-mile night hike.

20 Birding Lake County More than 350 species of birds have been recorded in Lake County. Learn about locations that will maximize your chances of seeing certain birds.

23 Meet and Greet Education Animals Visit with our live education animals, and feel furs, feathers, and scales of local wildlife on our touch table.

Monday, 7:30–9:30 pm, Lakewood— Shelter E. All ages.

Thursday, 7–9 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. Ages 12 and up. Registration required.

30 3rd Annual Lake County History Symposium Open to the public, this annual symposium focuses on Lake County history. Join us for a fascinating series of presentations on this year’s theme, Immigrant Stories.

Sunday, 1–3 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. All ages.

Sunday, 9 am–4:30 pm, Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $10 adult/$5 ages 16–17. Boxed lunch option available for an additional $10. Teacher professional development hours available.

MAY 3 Habitat Walk for Seniors Explore one of the many habitats found in Lake County, learning as you take part in this series of walks.

Wednesday, 9–10:30 am, Van Patten Woods—Shelter A lot. Seniors ages 62 and up. FREE. No registration required.

6, 7, 13, 14, 17, 21 Spring Bird Walks

Join a skilled birder on these walks to look for returning migrants. Bring binoculars if you have them. 6, 7, 13, 14, 17: Ryerson Woods—Brushwood Center lot. 21: Wright Woods. 7–9 am. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE. No registration required. 6, 13, 20, 27 Forest Fitness Group fitness walks feature a new preserve each week.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, for weekly locations see LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

6, 13, 20, 27 Rookery Watch Join us for viewing of nesting herons, cormorants and other waterfowl. Supported by Lake County Audubon volunteers.

Saturday, 8 am–12 pm, Almond Marsh. All ages. FREE. No registration required. Spotting scope provided.

12 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

S PR IN G 2 01 7


Turtles are on the move during May and June, as females search for a spot to lay their eggs, and later as hatchlings migrate back to aquatic habitats. Be alert when driving near ponds, lakes or wetlands.

MAY (continued) 6 Scout Saturday—Bird Study Learn about and observe birds that live in and migrate through Lake County as you earn the Bird Study Merit Badge.

Saturday, 8 am–12 pm, Ryerson Woods—Classroom Cabins. Boy Scouts, ages 10–17. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

6 Walk with a Naturalist Discover the diversity of plant and animal life on this naturalist-guided walk. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10:30 am, Wright Woods. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

7 Spring Beauties—Birds and Blooms Look and listen for the sights and sounds of spring on this beginner bird and wildflower walk.

Sunday, 10–11 am, Ryerson Woods—Classroom Cabins. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $1 per person. No registration required.

9 Hikin’ Tykes—Blanding’s Turtles Learn with your preschooler about this priority animal species of Chicago Wilderness and how you can help them. Hands-on activities, craft and outdoor exploration, weather permitting.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

11 Connecting Kids with Nature Connect your kids with nature through outdoor exploration. Along the way, learn about the benefits of nature play.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

13–14 Native Plant Sale Purchase flowers and woody plants, a rain barrel or compost bin, and learn about ecofriendly practices to benefit your home and pocketbook. Saturday only: Rain barrel and compost bins available for sale from SWALCO and Stormwater Management. Saturday, 9 am–3 pm or Sunday, 10 am–2 pm, Independence Grove—North Bay Pavilion. 18 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tour Drop in to learn about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his home, a National Historic Landmark, at your own pace.

Thursday, 12–4 pm, Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

19 Community Campfire Friday Nights Bring your friends and family to roast marshmallows, share stories and enjoy nature at night.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

20 Rx for Health—Walking in Nature Join a health professional and an educator on this walk to explore the preserve as we improve our health.

Saturday, 4–5:30 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. All ages. Adult supervision required. FREE. No registration required.

23 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven healthful and beneficial for children of all ages.

Tuesday, 1–2:30 pm, Half Day—Shelter A lot. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Lake County Nature Network Event.

27 Bilingual (English/Spanish) Nature Hike One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10:30 am, Ryerson Woods— Brushwood Center lot. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

27 Wildflower Wonders Lake County is home to more than 600 species of wildflowers. Appreciate their beauty in a different preserve each month.

Saturday, 10 am–12 pm, Lyons Woods. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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Meet Your Forest Preserve

Board Members A 21-member elected Board of

They act and make decisions on behalf

Commissioners governs your Lake County

of you—their constituents, and for the

Forest Preserves. They guide the agency’s

sustainability of our preserves and facili-

mission and approve all land acquisitions,

ties. If you have questions about actions

restoration and improvement projects,

or decisions they make, or if you would like

educational programs, the budget and

to invite a Board member to speak to your

other administrative actions. Each member

community group, school or other organi-

of our Board also serves on standing

zation, you can contact them directly.

committees.

Meetings, Agendas and Minutes All of our meetings are open to the public and we welcome public comment. Meeting notices, agendas, minutes, and videos are posted on our website at LCFPD.org/board.

14 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 01 7


Elected Officials 2016–2018 Chuck Bartels Mundelein (District 10)

Carol Calabresa Libertyville (District 15)

Steve Carlson Gurnee (District 7)

Mary Ross Cunningham Waukegan (District 9)

Bill Durkin Waukegan (District 8)

Paul Frank Highland Park (District 11)

Sandy Hart Ann B. Maine

Linda Pedersen

President Lincolnshire (District 21)

Vice President Antioch (District 1)

Lake Bluff (District 13)

Diane Hewitt Waukegan (District 2)

Aaron Lawlor Vernon Hills (District 18)

Judy Martini Fox Lake (District 5)

Sidney Mathias Buffalo Grove (District 20)

Brent Paxton Zion (District 4)

Craig Taylor Lake Zurich (District 19)

Tom Weber Lake Villa (District 3)

Jeff Werfel Grayslake (District 6)

S. Michael Rummel

Audrey Nixon

Treasurer Lake Forest (District 12)

Assistant Treasurer North Chicago (District 14)

Engage and Connect

Subscribe to Board Member Newsletters

Website

LCFPD.org/board

Phone 847-367-6640

Email

forestpreserves@LCFPD.org

Stay up-to-date with news, construction updates, events, and activities in your area by subscribing to your Board

Terry Wilke Round Lake Beach (District 16)

Attend Meetings to Learn More For meeting dates, locations, agendas and minutes, or to contact your Board member directly, visit LCFPD.org/board or call 847-367-6640.

member’s e-newsletter. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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SPECIAL FACILITIES Directory GENERAL OFFICES

OPERATIONS AND PUBLIC SAFETY

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

19808 West Grand Avenue Lake Villa, Illinois 60046

847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

847-968-3411 tel (Operations) 847-968-3404 tel (Public Safety) 847-968-3116 fax

8 am –4:30 pm, Monday–Friday

6:30 am –3 pm, Monday–Friday

911 emergency 847–549–5200 nonemergency public safety issues

OUTDOOR RECREATION

EDUCATION

GOLF

LCFPD.org

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015

A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course

847–968–3499 Main 847–247–1111 Banquets, Meetings

847–968–3320

39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099

IndependenceGrove.org Visitors Center Hours 9 AM–4:30 PM, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees visit our website. Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $5 per car Monday–Thursday $10 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without stopping to verify residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center. FOX RIVER MARINA 28500 West Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010 847–381–0669 FoxRiverMarina.org Boat Launch & Marina Hours For hours and fees visit our website.

16 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY SPRI N G 2 01 7

LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours 9 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Saturday 11 AM–4 PM, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–968–3450

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org

GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064

33600 North US Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030

847–968–3477

Office Hours

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–247–1119

Open for events or by appointment.

BraeLochGolfClub.org

MUSEUM

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

Closed. Reopening in late 2017 at new Libertyville location. Call or visit our website for move updates.

20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060

GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

847–968–3400 Main LCFPD.org/Museum

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

Prairie & Traditional Courses

847–968–3100 Tee Times 847–968–3441 Golf Gift Cards 847–489–1931 Golf Outings CountrysideGolfClub.org


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES FOREST PRESERVE Entrance/Parking

Nearly 31,000 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves.

FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS STATE LAND (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

Most preserves are open 6:30 am –sunset, daily. If a preserve gate is open before 6:30 am , the preserve is considered open for use.

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL CASEY TRAIL

MAP CURRENT AS OF

Friday, February 3, 2017

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BEACH PARK

WAUKEGAN SAVANNA

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Yorkhouse Rd

LYONS WOODS

Sand Lake Rd

MILL CREEK

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SEDGE MEADOW

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Blanchard Rd

Delany Rd

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS

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FOURTH LAKE

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

WADSWORTH

McDONALD WOODS

BONNER HERITAGE FARM

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OLD MILL CREEK

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Kilbourne Rd

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OAK-HICKORY

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WINTHROP HARBOR

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Wilmot Rd

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Lewis Ave

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HASTINGS LAKE Grass L Gelden Rd

Cedar Lake State Bog

VAN PATTEN WOODS

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GRAND ILLINOIS TRAIL Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

Des Plaines River

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Grass Lake Rd

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SUN LAKE

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BLUEBIRD MEADOW FOX LAKE

M CCLORY TRAIL / NORTH SHORE PATH Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

! ! ! ! ! !

RAVEN GLEN

Town Line Rd

FORT HILL TRAIL Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

Sheridan Rd

Grass Lake Rd

MIDDLEFORK GREENWAY Planned Section

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Beach Grove Rd

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PRAIRIE STREAM

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MILLENNIUM TRAIL Planned Section

DOG AREA

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Chain O'Lakes State Park

SEQUOIT CREEK

COMMUNITY GARDEN

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LAKE MARIE

ANTIOCH

OPERATIONS FACILITY

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Russell Rd

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CANOE LAUNCH

Green Bay

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Deep Lake Rd

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DUTCH GAP Edwards Rd

Red Wing Slough State Natural Area

Fox River

GENERAL OFFICES and FUTURE HOME OF THE MUSEUM, LATE 2017

CHAIN O’ LAKES BIKE PATH Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL (L.C. Division of Transportation)

GANDER MOUNTAIN

WAUKEGAN

Grand Ave

!

Rollins Rd

! !

! !

Almond Rd

Winchester Rd

!

Fremont Center Rd

Oak Spring Rd

Midlothian Rd

! ! !

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Rand Rd

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HAWTHORN WOODS

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ADLAI E. STEVENSON ! HISTORIC HOME

INDIAN CREEK

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Everett Rd

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HALF DAY

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NORTH BARRINGTON

Quentin Rd

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CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS Riverwoods Rd

LONG GROVE

Half Day Rd

gton Rd

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Cuba Rd

!

DUFFY STORMWATER FACILITY

RIVERWOODS

HIGHLAND PARK

BERKELEY PRAIRIE

Deerfield Rd

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DEERFIELD

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CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

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BUFFALO GROVE

Saunders Rd

Lake Cook Rd

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EDWARD L. RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

NORTH

SKOKIE RIVER WOODS

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WELCOME CENTER

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CUBA MARSH

Arlington Heights Rd

BARRINGTON

LINCOLNSHIRE

Schaeffer Rd

BARRINGTON HILLS

KILDEER

HERON CREEK

°

HIGHWOOD

!

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!

EGRET MARSH

PRAIRIE WOLF

!

FORT SHERIDAN

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Ela Rd

Kels

LAKE ZURICH

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Old Elm Rd

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Miller Rd

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! ! ! ! ! !

Old M

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GRASSY LAKE LAKE BARRINGTON

Old Barrin

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

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Old

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METTAWA

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Milto s Rd

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VERNON HILLS

LAKEWOOD

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MUNDELEIN

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ATKINSON STORMWATER FACILITY

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Lake Michigan

Sheridan Rd

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St Mary's Rd

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COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

!

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WAUCONDA

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LAKE BLUFF

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ISLAND LAKE

Hawley St

NORTH CHICAGO

LIBERTYVILLE

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GREEN OAKS

Erhart Rd !

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WILMOT WOODS

! ! ! !

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Peterson Rd

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RAY LAKE

!

! ! ! !

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VISITORS CENTER

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Chardon Rd

14th St

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

Casey Rd

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Bonner Rd

Fox River

! ! !

GREENBELT

Rd

SINGING HILLS

BLACK ! ! ! ! CROWN

MARINA

ALMOND MARSH

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GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

Rd

Bay

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Belvidere

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Fish Lake Rd

Hunt Club Rd

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ROUND LAKE PARK

PARK CITY !

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KETTLE GROVE

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LAKE CARINA

Waukegan Rd

LAKEMOOR

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Washington St

Center St

Belvid

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NIPPERSINK

KESTREL RIDGE

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BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

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Washington St

THIRD LAKE !

Washington St

Nippersink Rd ROUND LAKE

GURNEE

ROLLINS SAVANNA

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Kil bo Rd urne

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ROUND LAKE BEACH

TANAGER KAMES

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LCFPD.ORG

Lake Cook Rd


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

t

TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

HORI Z ON S

q

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335 email : Horizons@LCFPD.org

THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 56 MATURE TREES, 18,220 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES, 5,554 LBS SOLID WASTE

Native plant sale Choose from a variety of native ferns, flowers, grasses, shrubs, vines, and trees suited to almost any backyard. See calendar inside or visit LCFPD.org/ plantsale for details.

Research has proven that time spent in nature fosters the

Mother’s Day weekend May 13, 9 am–3 pm and May 14, 10 am–2 pm

healthy development of children. While our summer camp programs focus on fun and outdoor adventure, they are also

HOT SPOT TO COOL OFF

educationally engaging. Activities help kids ages 4–14 explore

Beach season passes for Lake County residents are on sale now for unlimited access to the swimming beach and Family Fun Friday activities at Independence Grove. Purchase by May 1 for 10 percent off. Visit LCFPD.org for prices, or call 847-968-3499.

nature, art, and history. A variety of weeklong sessions are offered at preserves throughout the county so it’s easy to find camps that are convenient for you. Browse camps and register online at LCFPD.org/camps, or call 847-968-3321.

◄ FLICKR PICK An American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) enjoying the lake at Independence Grove Forest Preserve. Posted by Phil Hauck via Flickr. Connect with us! for up-to-the-minute Forest Preserve news and events: Find us on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, or YouTube @LCFPD. Download our mobile app in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store— search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.”


Horizons quarterly // spring 2017