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HORI Z ON S LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESERVATION, RESTOR ATION , EDUCATION AN D RECRE ATION

QUARTERLY

summer 2012 VOLUME 21, ISSUE 3


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5 more than

15

14 29,300

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

acres are protected

by the lake county forest preserves .

A MESSAGE from

BOARD of COMMISSIONERS

ANN B. MAINE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESIDENT

Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire VICE PRESIDENT

Linda Pedersen, Antioch TREASURER

Summer is a time for tradition and relaxation, remembering summers from long ago and taking in and enjoying the pace of a summer afternoon. Sun-warmed skin, refreshing afternoon thunderstorms, bright summer wildflowers and the cool dark of a shady tree can slow us down and allow us to take a much needed respite from the more hectic times of year. Lake County forests, savannas, wetlands and prairies are teeming with life and even after a blissfully warm spring the fruits of summer are just as welcome. From sunrise to sunset there is no better place to take in the abundance of activity than your local forest preserve. As with every passing year, the Lake County Forest Preserves are working hard to keep each habitat on a path towards a balanced and healthy ecosystem, one that will support native species and biodiversity. An important upcoming initiative is woodland restoration, which you can read about in the feature article of this issue. Restoration requires careful strategic planning and years of effort, but the end result is a thriving and vibrant forest preserve that our grandchildren and great-grandchildren can enjoy during their summer months. The exploration and enjoyment of summer can be found in any facet of your preserves. All three LCFP golf courses boast distinctions from Audubon International, a widely recognized group committed to helping golf courses protect natural environments and habitats. You can read more about each unique course on page 15 of this issue. This summer, we ask you to take in all of the many wonderful opportunities that your Lake County Forest Preserve has to offer. Whether it is a relaxing round of golf, or a lazy stroll through a sun-speckled forest path, there is something for everyone to enjoy. Visit LCFPD.org to learn about programs happening all over the county and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for impromptu programs that take advantage of spontaneous fun and excitement of the season. It is my sincere wish that these lands provide you and your family with a fantastic summer now and for many years down the trail. Best wishes for a great summer!

Anne Flanigan Bassi, Highland Park ASSISTANT TREASURER

Carol Calabresa, Libertyville Melinda Bush, Grayslake Pat Carey, Grayslake Steve Carlson, Gurnee Bonnie Thomson Carter, Ingleside Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Bill Durkin, Waukegan Michelle Feldman, Deerfield Susan Loving Gravenhorst, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Angelo D. Kyle, Waukegan Aaron Lawlor, Vernon Hills Stevenson Mountsier, Lake Barrington Jim Newton, Lindenhurst Audrey H. Nixon, North Chicago Diana O’Kelly, Mundelein Brent Paxton, Zion David B. Stolman, Buffalo Grove Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Tom Hahn

HORIZONS VOLUME 21, ISSUE 3

Summer 2012

EDITOR

Kara Martin kmartin@LCFPD.org CONTRIBUTING

Linda Carlstone Allison Frederick PHOTOGRAPHY

Greg Bizarro, Phil Hauck, Kim Karpeles, Travis Mahan, Magnus Manske, Dick Todd, Chip Williams, Ron Vesely, Mark Widhalm SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335

Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.


ENCOU R AGI NG A NE W G ENER AT ION OF OAK S

let the sun shine

At a glance, the woodlands of the South Des Plaines River (SDPR), appear healthy. However, data collected by District ecologists and other regional scientists show that oaks are aging, with few younger oaks in the understory to take their place. This pattern has been observed across the eastern United States. The oak has historically been revered as a symbol of strength in many cultures. In addition to being an iconic feature of the Lake County landscape, the mighty oak is a keystone species in the SDPR preserve ecosystems. Keystone species are species whose impact on its environment is disproportionately large relative to its abundance. Without oaks,

A SHIFT IN THE CANOPY Moderately moist (mesic) forest communities were historically associated with the Des Plaines River, supporting a diverse array of wildlife. Many species that were once common in more open, lightabundant woodland communities are uncommon or absent today due to changes in these habitats. Dense stands of trees that thrive in closed canopies have decreased diversity of ground-dwelling plants. Changes to water distribution and retention have caused a decline in many wildlife species, especially those that require seasonal ponds to breed.

necessary conditions for flowers and grasses, and food and habitat for wildlife would be lost. A 2009 study indicates a need for restoration focused specifically on increasing light availability in the SDPR preserves. Increased light would allow for the regeneration of oaks and other desirable species that prefer open canopy, in turn increasing biodiversity.

EASTERN SCREECH OWL AT RYERSON WOODS ST MARYS RD

SOUTH DE S PL AIN E S RIVE R PR E S E RVE S

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UK WA MIL

EVERETT RD

MACARTHUR WOODS

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

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WATER

AV E

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL

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Located in southeast Lake County, the 22

Southern Des Plaines River (SDPR) preserves include MacArthur Woods, Grainger Woods, Wright Woods, Ryerson Woods, and Cahokia Flatwoods. These preserves represent some

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of the highest quality natural areas within RW

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Lake County. DS

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DEERFIELD RD

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PHASE ONE—20 YEARS OF RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT

A visit to these woodlands in the spring provides a breathtaking panorama of wildflowers. Return to the same spot in the summer, and the difference in views is drastic. Once leaves unfurl, no sunlight reaches the plants at ground level. R E M O V I N G I N VA S I V E P L A N T S

Woodland restoration began at the SDPR preserves with the removal of approximately 600 acres of non-native, invasive plants by District crews, contractors and volunteers. This widespread clearing of invasive species improved conditions for controlled burns, reduced competition for native trees and shrubs, and increased light at the ground level in some areas. M A N AG E M E N T T O O L S

Another successful management action includes the reintroduction of fire with a regular schedule of controlled burns to help prevent regrowth of invasive

plants. Reduction of white-tailed deer populations has improved the diversity of flowers, grasses and sedges. In some areas, sowing native seed has increased plant diversity and habitat for insects and other animals. RESTORING WOODED WE TL ANDS

Drain tile removal has restored wooded wetlands and improved breeding sites for amphibians and other aquatic species. Wildlife reintroductions have focused on salamanders and frogs that are characteristic of these seasonally wet woodlands, but have declined or are absent. Following a 500-acre restoration project, spring peepers, wood

frogs and spotted salamanders were reintroduced to MacArthur Woods. Follow-up monitoring indicates that successful breeding has occurred. PL ANT AND WILDLIFE MONITORING

Rare plant management and monitoring has protected state-listed orchid species and other rare plants. Invasive species removal has been focused around rare plant populations, and protective fencing has been installed to protect these rare plants from deer browse. As of 2010, the District has documented over 80 populations of state-listed and locally rare plants in these preserves. Plant and wildlife monitoring indicates that the past 20 years of management has improved habitat. For example, 85% of salamander and frog species and 75% of turtle and snake species known in Lake County are currently found in these preserves, and 138 out of 200 birds known in Lake County have been observed nesting or foraging in the SDPR preserves.

Fisheye lens photos of the canopy (circular insets) are used to assess canopy cover and light availability, using a special computer program.

85% CANOPY COVER

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Visit the SDPR preserves this summer and notice how the current canopy cover limits light at ground level. This results in a lack of ground cover, and necessary food and shelter for wildlife.


PHASE TWO—ENSURING A FUTURE GENERATION OF OAKS

WOOD FROG

GRAY FOX

Restoration of light conditions that allow for oak regeneration will require selective removal of canopy and sub-canopy trees and carefully timed controlled burns to facilitate growth of healthy oak saplings. Once oak regeneration has been reestablished, additional tree thinning and controlled burns will be required to release those saplings into the canopy. R E B U I L D I N G S U S TA I N A B L E H A B I TAT

Open canopy allows birds such as eastern phoebes and other flycatchers to hunt for insects. Some dead trees will be left standing (when they don’t pose a safety hazard) to increase openness while providing important habitat for cavity nesting birds and roosting habitat for bats. These “snags” are an important component of the habitat provided by woodlands. EASTERN PHOEBE

WHITE TRILLIUM

Changes in water distribution and retention within these habitats are affecting species such as wood frogs that breed in seasonal woodland ponds. Shifts in forest composition are reducing food levels, affecting many species such as the gray fox, and species like flycatchers that require open woodlands to forage. Research shows oaks affect plant communities as well. Oak leaves decompose slowly, supporting soil microorganisms in the winter and insulating plants such as trillium.

65% CANOPY COVER

This project will create a mosaic of habitats, improving conditions for rare plants and wildlife while maintaining conditions for common native species. These efforts will also allow future generations of oaks, hickories and walnuts to mature, rebuilding a sustainable forest ecosystem.

Oaks and other open canopy trees require 30% to 50% full sun for growth beyond seedlings into saplings. Restoration to increase light levels will aid the growth of these keystone species.

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PRESERVENEWS BOARD APPROVES NEW APPROACH TO FORT SHERIDAN

The Lake County Board of Commissioners approved a resolution this March requesting the Department of the Army remove the golf course deed restriction at Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve and allow the District to use that land as open space for recreational trails, habitat restoration and scenic overlooks.

NEW LANDS PRESERVED

227 acres in Antioch Township were approved for acquisition last winter to create a new preserve named Lake Marie, located on the north side of Beach Grove Road just west of Illinois Route 59. Unique natural features include rolling hills and a scenic vista overlooking the bay on Lake Marie. The high-quality lake provides habitat for many species of waterfowl, and groves of hickory and oak trees provide habitat for other species of wildlife. Lake Marie offers excellent potential for woodland, wetland and prairie restoration and stabilization of the lake shore. These restoration efforts will help improve the water quality entering Lake Marie and reduce storm water runoff. The Preserve will eventually offer public lake access and significant future trail and recreational uses. Funds from the voter-approved 2008 referendum support these land buys with no increase in taxes to residents. INDEPENDENCE GROVE DOG AREA TEMPORARY CLOSURES

Major work by the Illinois Department of Transportation to widen Milwaukee Avenue and reconstruct the intersection at Peterson Road (Rt. 137) in Libertyville continues through 2012. During construction, access to the Independence Grove Dog Exercise Area may be limited at times, and for a portion of the year, the Dog Area will be temporarily closed. A daily or annual permit allows you and your canine companion access to three other off-leash Dog Exercise Areas— Duck Farm in Lake Villa, Prairie Wolf in Lake Forest and Lakewood in Wauconda. Areas are open daily from 6:30 am until 7 pm or sunset, whichever is later. Check LCFPD.org for construction updates. 6 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

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If the action is successful, the District will develop a Master Plan for the site and implement public access improvements in phases. The construction, financing and operation of the proposed course have been extensively discussed for over a decade. Although many options were reviewed, a plan affordable to Lake County residents, and one in which revenues covered all operations and debt service costs could not be developed in this economic climate. In addition, no proposals from the private sector were received after a request for proposals was issued. Consistent with national trends, the local market for golf is stressed with declining rounds and a pessimistic outlook for the foreseeable future.


BATFEST IS BACK

In celebration of the Year of the Bat (yearofthebat.org), BatFest is back! Spend a fun and educational evening hanging out with our resident colony of little brown bats at Lakewood Shelter E. Live bat presentations and kids’ crafts are ongoing throughout the evening. At sunset, gather to watch bats leave their shelter. See calendar for details. Join us this summer for bat acoustic monitoring. Go on a special night hike and learn about species that live in the preserves by detecting their echolocation. Visit LCFPD.org/bats for dates and locations.

GREEN YOUTH FARM

Each summer, teens work at the Green Youth Farm at Greenbelt Forest Preserve to grow organic produce while learning about organic gardening skills, leadership, team-building and real-world job training. Offered in partnership with the Chicago Botanic Garden. Purchase fresh produce at harvest stand days, Wednesdays and Saturdays 9 am–1 pm, July 7–October 6. Enter the preserve on Green Bay Road south of Route 120 and follow the signs to Shelter B.

PREVENTING BIRD WINDOW COLLISIONS

NATURE CAM

Did you enjoy the motion-detection photos from our predator monitoring project? We are hoping to put those same cameras to good use when they aren’t helping us count carnivores. In March, the cameras were placed in a tree adjacent to a great horned owl nest and at ground level in the area. Visit LCFPD.org/naturecam to see if our experimental Nature Cam was successful, and to learn more about our star (pictured above). If it works, these cameras will change locations, recording various wildlife.

Is your home safe for birds? The Audubon Society estimates that as many as a billion birds die each year in the United States due to window collisions. One common cause of daytime window collisions is the reflection. A bird may interpret a reflection as a continuation of the landscape. Some species, such as northern cardinals, may repeatedly attack a window in a territorial attempt to drive away the “other bird.” Reduce reflection-related collisions by applying window clings, hanging brightly colored ribbons in front of the window, or attaching a hawk silhouette to the glass. Download and print a hawk silhouette at LCFPD.org/hawkshadow. If two windows are aligned to the outside through your home, a bird may be confused into thinking it can fly through to the other side. In this case, simply shut the blinds on one of the windows. Another effective solution is to install a mesh screen over the window. Leave a few inches between the glass and the mesh, and birds will collide softly with the mesh instead of hitting the glass. Bird houses and feeders should be placed either very close (within three feet) or at least ten yards away from windows, to reduce the speed and likelihood of a fatal collision. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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GRASSLAND MAMMAL CONSERVATION

After four years of extensive wildlife monitoring, we’ve found that while a significant amount of land with suitable grassland habitat has been acquired, many grassland species such as meadow jumping mice and least weasels are not present. These species have important ecosystem roles of predator, prey, and seed disperser in grassland ecosystems.

LITTLE HIKERS

Has your preschooler outgrown Hikin’ Tykes yet still wants to explore nature? Little Hikers is geared for 5–7 year olds with an adult. Programs feature more nature-based exploration and may include a story and craft. See calendar for dates.

As with many grassland-dependent species of the region, these small mammals have lost a significant amount of their historic range through conversion of grassland to agriculture and habitat fragmentation. The District has received an anonymous charitable donation to further assess the status of grassland mammals. The grant will also fund a captive breeding program in partnership with the Lincoln Park Zoo. This is the first year of a multiyear research and recovery project aimed at supplementing and restoring small mammal diversity.

CLEANER WATER Forest Preserves benefit you 24 hours a day, even if you don’t visit them. Here’s a fun assignment: next time it rains, find a storm drain or creek as it enters a Forest Preserve. Scoop up a jarful of water. Now trace the flow until it leaves the site. Take another scoop and compare the two—cleaner water! The roots of trees and other native plants filter the water, protecting waterways and community water supplies from sediment and pollution.

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PRESERVATION FOUNDATION

The Preservation Foundation of the Lake County Forest Preserves was founded in 2007 to help ensure that open space remains a priority and that vital habitat conservation and restoration continues. It seeks to protect our county’s cultural resources and to advance environmental education. We rely on support from donors, who are motivated by a personal concern for our disappearing landscapes and feel a responsibility to protect Lake County’s natural and cultural heritage. For more information or to make a donation, please contact Rebekah Snyder, executive director of the Preservation Foundation at 847-968-3434 or email rsnyder@LCFPD.org.

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SUMMER RESTORATION

Get close to nature by helping preserve and restore habitats. Opportunities are available every weekend morning and some weekdays. Restoration projects are available for scouts and large groups. No experience is required, just some sturdy shoes, work gloves and a willingness to help. For locations, details and workday schedule, look online at LCFPD.org/restoration. TICK PREVENTION

Exposure to ticks can be limited by steering clear of tick habitats such as tall grass, shrubs or leaf litter. Ticks do not drop into your hair from above. Rather, they wait patiently on vegetation along the ground for a host to brush past. Walk in the center of trails to avoid contact with adjacent vegetation. Keep ticks away from exposed skin with high boots and long pants, and by tucking shirts into pants and pants into socks to minimize gaps where ticks can access your skin. Certain insect repellents can also discourage ticks, mosquitoes and other biting insects from landing on you. Be careful to check for ticks on children, pets and clothing after coming indoors from potential tick habitat. If a tick attaches to your skin, pinch the tick as close to your skin as possible with tweezers and pull upward slowly, removing the head and body. Do not attempt to smother or burn the tick, as this may cause the tick to regurgitate. ROAD PROJECT BENEFITS LAKEWOOD

Visitors to Lakewood Forest Preserve will benefit from a major Lake County Division of Transportation (LCDOT) road improvement project in Wauconda. Visitors should be alert to signage that may direct to alternate entrances during construction (through 2014). Improvements will aid traffic flow at the Fairfield Road intersection, make entrances more accessible, and provide safe crossing for trail users via underpasses for the Millennium Trail and the Fort Hill Trail. A new paved section of the Millennium Trail and a mowed equestrian trail will also be added.

SUMMER MUSEUM ADMISSION DISCOUNTS

Active duty military and family enjoy free admission at the Lake County Discovery Museum this summer with the Blue Star Museums program: bluestarfam.org. Use your library card to check out two general admissions to the Museum with the Macy’s Adventure Pass: museumadventure.org.

NEW LAKE COUNTY NATURE BLOG For many of us, when we think of having meaningful experiences in the outdoors we think of the grand vistas of large National Parks or long road-trips to far-away destinations. However, what might be most beneficial for our health and environment is finding our own nature niches close to home. Connect daily, not once a year. Visit the new Lake County Nature blog at

lakecountynature.wordpress.com to discover what’s happening seasonally, and find your own nature niches in Lake County. Above: Gander Mountain, Fox Lake. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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Special Feature

MUSEUM NEWS

For nearly 50 years, the Lake County Discovery Museum has provided a fun, well-rounded museum experience close to home. Accredited by the American Association of Museums, a distinction held by only five percent of American museums, the Museum cares for the heritage of the county through its distinguished historic collections, mounts stunning exhibitions inspired by art, history and popular culture and provides dynamic public and school programs. Home to the world-renowned Curt Teich Postcard Archives, the world’s largest public collection of postcards and related materials, the Lake County Discovery Museum is one of the best cultural offerings in the Chicago suburbs.

R E L O C AT I O N & R E I N V E N T I O N

In the next two to three years, the Museum will move from its current location in Wauconda to a more central location in Libertyville that will provide convenient access for all Lake County residents. It will share a building with the Forest Preserve General Offices.

better accommodating school field trips and educational outreach for all ages. In the Lake County History Archives, you’ll be able to study Civil War documents, investigate your town’s history and learn how local places were named, or explore the Curt Teich Postcard Archives.

Irreplaceable collections will be protected with precise temperature and humidity controls, and with security and fire suppression capabilities. With these new systems in place, the Museum will better preserve our cultural heritage for future generations to discover and enjoy. The relocated Museum will have more than twice the display area, allowing us to showcase more of the Museum’s collections and host more special exhibitions. Dedicated classrooms will help us reach and teach more students,

The Museum offers a variety of public programs for families and adults year-round. During the summer, Museum educators provide fun and educational nature, history and art day camps. The Museum is also a great destination for field trips or group tours.

HISTOR IC CO L L E C T I O N S | ED UCATIO N | E X H IBITS | EVEN TS W I T H YO U R S U P P O RT

The Museum relocation and reinvention begins with public input. Initial survey results have reinforced the Museum’s value in sharing the interwoven story of Lake County’s natural and cultural heritage. The Lake County Forest Preserve District supports the day-to-day operations of the Museum. However, only three percent of property taxes collected in Lake County go to support all your Forest Preserves have to offer, including the Museum. Private contributions will be vital to offsetting the significant costs of relocating and reinventing this Lake County treasure.

Temporary exhibitions are hosted in galleries throughout the year. Pictured here “Classic Images: Ansel Adams.” The museum also hosts events such as Civil War Days, the largest Civil War reenactment in Illinois.

Lake County Discovery Museum 27277 North Forest Preserve Road Wauconda, IL 60084 p. 847–968–3400 f. 847–526–0024

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FIND US ONLINE

LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.com facebook.com/LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum twitter.com/LakeCoMuseum

Become a member to show your support for the Museum and your belief in its value to Lake County. Tell us what interests you and what exhibitions you would like to see. For additional information, contact Katherine HamiltonSmith, Director of Cultural Resources, by phone at 847–968–3380, or via email at khamilton-smith@LCFPD.org.


SUMMER CALENDAR Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

You can watch butterflies throughout the warm months. Each species has a specific plant host for food and laying eggs. Search those plants to observe caterpillars and adults. Right: monarch pupa on milkweed.

JUNE 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Forest Fitness Fast-paced weekly hikes provide one hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for weekly locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults, $1 residents/nonresidents. No registration required.

5 Hikin’ Tykes—Hummingbirds Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

7 Attracting Songbirds and Butterflies to Your Yard Jason Blue, Senior Landscape Architect for Applied Ecological Services, leads this workshop.

Thursday, 7–8:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 10 and up. $25, $20 Friends of Ryerson Woods and Liberty Prairie Conservancy Members.

8 Turtle Tales—Animal Babies Join us for a storytime with movement, songs and surprises.

Friday, 10–10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

13 Free Access Cart Tour—Independence Grove Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues. This trip will focus on St. Francis Woods.

Friday, 9:30–11:30 am, Independence Grove—North Bay. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

15 Community Campfire Friday Nights Gather around the fire with family and friends. Join us for drumming, singing, storytelling, crafts and more.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Use entrance on east side of Greenbay Road. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

16 Bilingual (Spanish/English) Guided Nature Hikes One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Lakewood—Gilmer Road lot. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

16 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Buffalo Creek. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

16 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Saturday, 11 am–12 pm & 1–2 pm. Adlai E. Stevenson Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

16, 23 Quickstart Kayak Intro to paddling an open-cockpit recreational kayak. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety, and paddling skills.

Saturdays, 16: 1–4 pm, 23: 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove. Adults, families with children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

20 Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild Author Tom Montgomery Fate discusses what he learned trying to apply the insights of Henry David Thoreau to busy modern life.

Wednesday, 1–2:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults, children ages 10 and up. FREE. Registration required.

20 Families Exploring—Summer Solstice Enjoy a trek to Leopold Point overlooking Independence Lake on the longest daylight of the year.

Wednesday, 6:30–8 pm, Independence Grove—North Bay. All ages. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

20 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10 am, Fort Sheridan. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

21 How to Make Your Lawn More Eco-Friendly Learn tips for moving from conventional lawn care to a more natural, chemical-free approach.

Thursday, 7–8:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults—families with children ages 10 and up. $25, $20 Friends of Ryerson Woods and Liberty Prairie Conservancy Members.

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Throughout the summer young mammals are being raised and taught to fend for themselves. Summer is a great time to see family groups traveling together. Left: Young raccoon or “kit.”

JUNE (continued) 23 Phenology & Photography Outdoor workshop combines a staff naturalist’s insight with technical tips from a professional photographer.

Saturday, 6–9 am, Almond Marsh. Adults. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

24 Flatwater Canoe Safety and Rescues Practice safety and rescue techniques, including reentry after capsizing. Must have paddling experience.

Sunday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Marina. Adults, children ages 10 and up. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

24 Little Hikers—Frogs Learn about a frog’s life cycle while looking for this leaping amphibian. Wear shoes that can get wet.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Independence Grove. Children ages 5–7, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

27 Little Sprouts—Planting a Seed Find out why gardens are so important and how to plant your own. Tour the garden and sow seeds to take home.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents, no charge for chaperone.

30 Free Access Cart Tour—Restore Galore Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Saturday, 9:30–11:30 am, Heron Creek—Shelter B. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

JULY 7, 14, 21, 28 Forest Fitness Fast-paced weekly hikes provide one hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for weekly locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults, $1 residents/nonresidents. No registration required.

7 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Independence Grove—North Bay. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

8 Quickstart Canoe Intro to paddling in a tandem canoe on flatwater. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety, and efficient strokes.

Sunday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Marina. Adults, children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

7 & 8 Civil War Days History comes to life at this reenactment, featuring battles, demonstrations, kids’ activities and Civil War-era shopping. Daily schedule, coupon: LCFPD.org/civilwar.

Saturday, 10 am–5 pm & Sunday, 9 am–3 pm, Lakewood. Daily: $8 adults, $4 youth (ages 4–17) & seniors, 3 & under free. Weekend pass: $12 adults, $6 youth & seniors.

7, 21, 29 Quickstart Kayak Intro to paddling an open-cockpit recreational kayak. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety, and paddling skills.

Saturdays, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Marina (7, 21), Van Patten Woods (29). Adults, families with children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

11 Little Sprouts—Watching It Grow Get your hands dirty in the garden and find out what plants need to survive and thrive. Check seeds we planted in June.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents, no charge for chaperone.

12 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to group’s ability.

Thursday, 9–10 am, Cuba Marsh. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

13 Skokie Valley Astronomers—Planets Orbiting Distant Stars Learn about exoplanets from a Northwestern professor.

Friday, 8–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, children ages 12 and up. FREE. No registration required.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

JULY (continued) 14 Bilingual (Spanish/English) Guided Nature Hikes One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month. 14 BatFest Celebrate the Year of the Bat! This family event focuses on the lives of bats, featuring the bat shelter at Lakewood. At sunset, gather to watch the bats leave the shelter.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Rollins Savanna—Drury Lane lot. All ages. FREE. No registration required. Saturday, 6–9:30 pm, Lakewood—Shelter E. All ages. $5 adult/$3 child residents, $7 adult/$4 child nonresidents. LCFPD.org/bats.

16 The Great Black Migration and Cultural Exports to Illinois Speaker Denese Neu explores how the musicians and folkways of Louisiana influenced modern Chicago.

Monday, 6–8 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $6. CPDUs available. Presented with the support of the Illinois Humanities Council.

17 Hikin’ Tykes—Weather Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Nippersink—Shelter C. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

18 Families Exploring—Nocturnal Animals Animals that are active at night are the focus of this evening’s exploration, featuring the only flying mammal.

Wednesday, 6:30–8 pm, Independence Grove—North Bay. All ages. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

19 The Prairie and the Prairie School of Architecture David Bagnall, Curator of the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, will discuss the connections between the prairie and the Prairie architectural style.

Thursday, 7–8:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults, children ages 10 and up. $10, $8 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members.

19 Twilight Paddle—Sunset Enjoy the unique experience of padding in the twilight hours as a naturalist guides you. Must have paddling experience.

Sunday, 7:30–9:30 pm, Van Patten Woods—Sterling Lake. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $23 residents, $32 nonresidents.

21 & 22 Plein Air Oil Painting Workshop: On Location Landscape artist William Marvin leads this class on plein air painting.

Saturday and Sunday, 10 am–5 pm, Ryerson Woods— Brushwood. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $195. To register, call North Shore Art League at 847–446–2870.

22 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Sunday, 11 am–12 pm, 1–2 pm & 2:30–3:30 pm. Adlai E. Stevenson Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

23–26 Fishing Fun Have fun learning fishing basics and then test your newly acquired skills at our fishing pier. All equipment is provided.

Monday–Thursday, 5:30–7:30 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Ages 8–16. $40 residents, $60 nonresidents.

25 Little Sprouts—Fresh from the Garden Pick fresh produce from the garden and make a healthy snack. Learn why fruits and veggies are so good for us.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents, no charge for chaperone.

25 Playdate with Nature Activities such as fairy house and fort building, ponding and insect observation expand child’s appreciation of nature.

Wednesday, 1 pm, Nippersink—Shelter D. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

26 Blue Road Live Combining roots rock, blues and soul, Blue Road performs a lively mix of familiar cover tunes and original songs.

Thursday, 7–9 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $10.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

JULY (continued) 27 Community Campfire Friday Nights Gather around the fire with family and friends. Join us for drumming, singing, storytelling, crafts and more.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Use entrance on east side of Greenbay Rd. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

28 Free Access Cart Tour—Lakes and Bluffs Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues. Tour Fort Sheridan for a refreshing view of Lake Michigan.

Saturday, 9:30–11:30 am, Fort Sheridan. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

29 Little Hikers—Bugs! Use field nets to find out what’s hopping in the tall grass.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Raven Glen. Children ages 5–7, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

AUGUST 4, 11, 18, 25 Forest Fitness Fast-paced weekly hikes provide one hour of heart-pumping exercise in a friendly group atmosphere.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for weekly locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults, $1 residents/nonresidents. No registration required

4 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Sun Lake. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

4 Solo Touring Canoe Take your canoeing skills to the next level. Previous completion of Intro to Canoe class is highly recommended.

Saturday, 8 am–5 pm, Van Patten Woods. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $80 residents, $113 nonresidents.

6–9 Acting Class Have fun acting out your favorite characters. The grand finale is a special performance for friends and family.

Monday–Thursday, 5:30–7:30 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Ages 8–12. $40 residents, $60 nonresidents.

7 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to group’s ability.

Tuesday, 9–10 am, Sedge Meadow. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

7 Hikin’ Tykes—Ants Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Fort Sheridan. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

10 Skokie Valley Astronomers—Curious about Curiosity? Learn about the Mars Science Laboratory Mission and its rover, Curiosity.

Friday, 8–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, children ages 12 and up. FREE. No registration required.

11 Bilingual (Spanish/English) Guided Nature Hikes One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Raven Glen. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

11 Quickstart Kayak II Learn advanced strokes and rescue maneuvers.

Saturday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Marina. Adults, children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

11 Barrelhouse Chuck and Friends: Outdoor Concert Barrelhouse Chuck, Erwin Helfer and friends live in concert. 14 Playdate with Nature Activities such as fairy house and fort building, ponding and insect observation expand child’s appreciation of nature.

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Saturday, 1–3 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. All ages. $10 adults, $5 children. Rain date 8/12. Tuesday, 10 am, Grassy Lake—meet at the Lake Barrington Village Hall. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.


2012 is the Year of the Bat (yearofthebat.org ). Seven species of bats are found in Lake County. The three most common are the little brown bat, the big brown bat, and the eastern red bat. Right: little brown bat.

AUGUST (continued) 15 Little Sprouts—Mooing and Milking Learn to milk using our model cow, and find out how milk is turned into delicious dairy products.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents, no charge for chaperone.

15 Families Exploring—Canoeing Explore the natural world on a guided paddle. Adults must have some paddling experience. Equipment provided.

Wednesday, 6:30–8 pm, Independence Grove—North Bay. Adults, children ages 4 and up. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

18 Will Bison Roam in Illinois? Hear about the return of bison to Illinois and the exciting work restoring prairie remnants.

Saturday, 7–8:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, children ages 10 and up. $15, $10 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members.

19 Quickstart Canoe Intro to paddling in a tandem canoe on flatwater. We’ll cover the basics: attire, safety, and efficient strokes.

Sunday, 9 am–12 pm, Independence Grove— Marina. Adults, children ages 9 and up. $29 residents, $41 nonresidents.

19 Little Hikers—Water Wonders Get wet exploring the watery world with dip nets and other discovery equipment. Wear shoes that can get wet.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Lake Carina. Children ages 5–7, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

24 Turtle Tales—Whooo Lives in the Dark? Join us for a storytime with movement, songs and surprises.

Friday, 10–10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

25 Outdoor Environmental Film Festival Picnic under the stars while watching a selection of films about nature. Includes guided tour of Genius Loci art exhibit.

Saturday, 7–9:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults, children ages 10 and up. $15 adult ($10 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members), $5 child.

25 Free Access Cart Tour—Des Plaines River Trail, North Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Saturday, 9:30 am–12 pm, Van Patten Woods—Shelter A. All ages. FREE. Registration required.

26 Introduction to Kayak Intro to paddling kayaks on flatwater with emphasis on safety, equipment, rescues and stroke development.

Sunday, 9 am–3:30 pm, Independence Grove—Marina. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $58 residents, $82 nonresidents.

26 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Sunday, 11 am–12 pm, 1–2 pm & 2:30–3:30 pm. Adlai E. Stevenson Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

29 Little Sprouts—Eggcellent Adventures We’ll take a closer look at the inside of an egg and at the cute creatures that hatch out.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents, no charge for chaperone.

29 Twilight Paddle—Moonlit Enjoy the unique experience of padding in the twilight hours as a naturalist guides you. Must have paddling experience.

Wednesday, 6:45–8:45 pm, Van Patten Woods—Sterling Lake. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $23 residents, $32 nonresidents.

31 Community Campfire Friday Nights Gather with family and friends to roast marshmallows and experience nature at night. Bring along a musical instrument to play or a nature story to share. Activities will vary monthly.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Use entrance on east side of Greenbay Road. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

EVENTS IN THE PLAZA

Independence Grove, Libertyville Bring lawn chairs and blankets for these outdoor musical performances, beginning at 7:30 pm. Arrive early to secure your spot; cars are turned away when parking is full. Parking is $5 per car after 5 pm on event days. Rain dates: Thursdays.* June 19 Old Californio

Rising stars of folk rock at the only Chicagoarea outdoor performance of their nationwide tour.

June 26 Big James and the Playboys

High-energy Chicago soul blues. Featured on stage at the 2012 Chicago Blues Fest.

Through August 19

The Blues: From the Heart & Soul

Hypnotic blend of afro-cuban rhythms influenced by the sound and spirit of Santana.

From playbills to autographs to the original musical instruments that created some of the most influential music in American history. The Blues: From the Heart & Soul brings the sound and feel of the Chicago blues scene to the galleries of the Lake County Discovery Museum. This exhibition features the private collection of internationally known Chicago blues pianist “Barrelhouse” Chuck Goering. For more info, visit LCFPD.org/TheBlues.

July 17 Gizzae

Lake County Discovery Museum

July 3 Great Lakes Naval Band

Independence Day celebration with the Naval Brass Band and Color Guard.

July 10 Rico

Live jams and wicked solos from Chicago’s own award-winning roots reggae band.

Through July 18

Through September 7

Funk and soul that hearkens to the great progressive albums of the 70s, with modern pop appeal.

The beauty and complexity of Illinois native plants are highlighted in a diverse selection of Kathleen Garness’ watercolor paintings. Garness’ work has been exhibited around the Chicago area, including the Chicago Botanic Garden and the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum.

Riverwoods Nature Photographic Society is pleased to present the photographic exhibit Nature Around the World. This exhibit features exquisite color and black and white photographs by club members who have explored Lake County and beyond.

*Bands subject to change. See LCFPD.org.

Independence Grove Visitors Center

GREENBELT FESTIVALS

Through June 29

July 24 Fareed Hauque Trio

Virtuoso guitarist and music professor, recently nominated “Best Jazz Entertainer of the Year.”

July 31 Henhouse Prowlers

Powerhouse Chicago quartet perform their brand of innovative bluegrass.

August 7 Bumpus

Greenbelt Cultural Center, North Chicago Join us for this popular series of free family events, Sundays at Greenbelt. Use the entrance on the east side of Green Bay Road. June 10 Kids Nature Fun Fest 2–5 pm

Kids ages 4–12 learn about nature with nature walks, scavenger hunts, and fun activities, plus: face painting, games, prizes and refreshments.

July 22 Gospel Fest 3–7 pm

Get inspired by the best voices of Gospel with local choirs, soloists and praise dancers from throughout Lake County.

August 5 Jamaica & the Sounds of the Caribbean 3–7 pm

Experience the market, dance, costumes, food and live music of these cultures in celebration of Jamaica’s Independence Day.

Wondrous Things

Nature Around the World

July 8–August 31

Genius Loci: Listening to Nature’s Muse

SPECIMENS: Photographs by Julie Meridian A constant collector of nature’s commonplace wonders, Julie Meridian is an artist with reverent curiosity about the natural world. Inspired by the carefully classified and preserved specimens in the vast collections of the Field Museum, she began photographing her own collection. Instead of documentation, her intent is to convey the unfathomable mysteries the specimens exude, exploring themes of fragility and endurance, beauty and decay, chance and destiny, life and death. Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

Greenbelt Cultural Center

A new generation of artists and designers are exploring how we, as humans, can learn from natural systems and make art that works within the rules set forth by Nature. This group exhibition presents a variety of these artists and designers whose work responds to the specifics of different ecosystems: grasslands, forests, mountains and coastal areas. What are the lessons that can be derived from each? How can art, architecture and design—and by extension, our daily lives and the planet—be transformed in the process? Artist Reception July 8, 1–3 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

August 18 Afrofest & Ribfest 2–7 pm

Don’t miss the 25th annual celebration showcasing the music, food and culture of Africa. You be the judge and name the Best Ribs of Lake County.

16

Þ Impromptu Program Announcements Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive notice of impromptu programs.

facebook.com/LCFPD | HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

S U M M E R 2 01 2

twitter.com/LCFPD


Special Feature

GOLF COURSES

At the Lake County Forest Preserves, a new golf season means awakening three public courses from winter dormancy, bringing their rolling terrain, sand bunkers and short-trimmed greens up to par.

who favor Links style, wide-open spaces. The Traditional Course, like its name, is fashioned with old-style narrow passages through tree-lined fairways and smaller greens which reward precision shot making.

It also means maintaining the courses in a manner consistent with the District’s mission to preserve natural habitats and protect the environment. Organic fertilizer applications and

ThunderHawk, located in Beach Park, offers the best of two worlds with its designer holes—no two alike— meandering through wetlands, oak and hickory groves, and native prai-

measures to reduce mowing pollution and fuel usage are just a few examples of those practices.

ries, filled with switchgrass, Indian grass and big bluestem.

Brae Loch Golf Club offers the public a player-friendly, relaxed golfing environment with its subtle rolling terrain that is valued by golfers who prefer to walk with nature throughout their round of golf. It’s a wonderful course to enhance your playing skills.

The result: preserved open spaces that appeal to the birds, the buttercups and the seekers of the birdie (also known as golfers). When it comes to golfing features, however, the three courses take on separate personalities that appeal to a range of skill levels from beginners to seasoned players. The flagship course is the critically acclaimed ThunderHawk Golf Club designed by legendary golf course architect Robert Trent Jones II.

From the moment of its ribbon cutting in 1999, ThunderHawk has consistently earned top national rankings from discriminating golf reviewers: Golfweek—“Best Courses You can Play,” Zagat—“America’s Top Golf Courses,” Golf Magazine—“Best Courses You can Play in Illinois,” to name a few. At Countryside Golf Club, golfers can choose from two very different 18-hole courses. The Prairie Course features large greens and strategically placed bunkers preferred by golfers

All three Forest Preserves courses are recognized by Audubon International certification programs that help golf officials enhance the valuable natural areas and wildlife habitats that golf courses provide. Countryside and Brae Loch hold the “Certified Cooperative Sanctuary” designation. ThunderHawk carries the advanced “Audubon Signature Program” affiliation. For golfers, that translates into rounds played in a natural environment where “pars, birdies and eagles” coexist with butterflies, hawks and native plants.

BRAE LOCH GOLF 3360 N US Highway 45 Grayslake, IL 60030

THUNDERHAWK GOLF 39700 N Lewis Ave Beach Park, IL 60099

847–968–3100

847–968–3100

18 holes, par 70 Yardage: 5,876

18 holes par 72 Yardage: 7,031

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF 20800 W Hawley St Mundelein, IL 60060 847–968–3100 Prairie/Traditional Courses 18 holes, par 72 (each) Yardage: 6,757/6,397

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1 8

SPECIAL FACILITIES Directory GENERAL OFFICES

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048 847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

911 emergency 847–549–5200 non-emergency public safety issues

LCFPD.org 8 am –4:30 pm, Monday–Friday

OUTDOOR RECREATION

EDUCATION & CULTURE

GOLF

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

Lake County History Archives Curt Teich Postcard Archives

A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course

847–968–3499 Main 847–247–1111 Banquets, Meetings

27277 North Forest Preserve Road Wauconda, Illinois 60084

39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099

IndependenceGrove.org

847–968–3400 Main 847–968–3381 Archives, Research

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–968–3450

Visitors Center Hours 9 AM–4:30 PM, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees visit our website Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $5 per car Monday–Thursday $10 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without stopping to verify residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center. FOX RIVER MARINA

LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.org Museum Gallery Hours 10 AM–4:30 PM, Monday–Saturday 1–4:30 PM, Sunday Adults $6, Youth 4–17 $2.50, 3 years and under FREE Discount Tuesdays: Adults $3, Youth 17 and under FREE GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER 1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064

Prairie & Traditional Courses 20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060 847–968–3100 Tee Times 847–968–3441 Golf Gift Cards 847–489–1931 Golf Outings CountrysideGolfClub.org BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

11 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Friday

FoxRiverMarina.org RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA 21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015 847–968–3320 LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours 9 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Saturday 11 AM–4 PM, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays Brushwood Hours 10 AM–2 PM, Tuesday–Friday 1–3 PM Sundays S U M M E R 2 01 2

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

33600 North US Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030

Gallery & Office Hours

HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org

GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

847–381–0669

7 AM–sunset, daily, in season

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

847–968–3477

26034 Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010

Boat Launch & Marina Hours

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–247–1119

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

BraeLochGolfClub.org


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

LCFPD.ORG

FOREST PRESERVE Entrance/Parking

More than 29,300 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves.

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL Planned section

FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS

CANOE LAUNCH

MAP CURRENT AS OF

GENERAL OFFICES

Red Wing Slough State Natural Area

CASEY TRAIL Planned section

PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL Planned section

OPERATIONS AND PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITY

GANDER MOUNTAIN

FORT HILL TRAIL Planned (Lake County Dept. of Transportation)

MIDDLEFORK GREENWAY Planned section

DOG AREA

Friday, March 30, 2012

GRAND ILLINOIS TRAIL Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

M CCLORY TRAIL / NORTH SHORE PATH (managed by Lake County Dept. of Transportation)

STATE PARK (managed by the Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

Most preserves are open 6:30 AM –sunset, daily.

MILLENNIUM TRAIL Planned section

SPRING BLUFF

VAN PATTEN WOODS

DUTCH GAP PINE DUNES

PRAIRIE STREAM

OAK-HICKORY

Hunt Club Rd

SEQUOIT CREEK RAVEN GLEN

Chain O'Lakes State Park

ETHEL'S WOODS

SUN LAKE

BLUEBIRD MEADOW

WADSWORTH SAVANNA

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

HASTINGS LAKE Gelden Rd

MCDONALD WOODS

Cedar Lake State Bog

WAUKEGAN SAVANNA DOG SLED AREA

DUCK FARM

Cedar Lake Rd

GRANT WOODS

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

BONNER HERITAGE FARM Stear

MILL CREEK

ns Sch

FOURTH LAKE

TANAGER KAMES

LYONS WOODS

SEDGE MEADOW

ool R

d

ROLLINS SAVANNA

Volo Bog State Natural Area

Washington St

LAKE CARINA BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

NIPPERSINK KESTREL RIDGE

GREENBELT

ALMOND MARSH

GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

MARL FLAT INDEPENDENCE GROVE

Lake Michigan

Rd

SINGING HILLS

Waukegan

KETTLE GROVE

VISITORS CENTER

!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

BLACK BLACK CROWN CROWN

WILMOT WOODS

Winchester Road

RAY LAKE

ATKINSON STORMWATER FACILITY

Bonner Road

OLD SCHOOL kee Ave

Middlefork Dr

er

lm

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

ORIOLE GROVE

Milwau

Gi

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB Rd

LAKEWOOD

MIDDLEFORK SAVANNA

MACARTHUR WOODS

rfie Fai ld

FOX RIVER

Rd

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

MARINA Rand Rd

ADLAI E. STEVENSON HISTORIC HOME

FORT SHERIDAN

CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

HALF DAY GRASSY LAKE

PRAIRIE WOLF

Half Day Rd

EGRET MARSH

ry

EDWARD L. RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

DUFFY STORMWATER BERKELEY FACILITY PRAIRIE

WELCOME CENTER

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

Saunders Rd

Rd

BUFFALO CREEK

en cH

Rd

M

nd

Arlington Hts Rd

Ra

CUBA MARSH

HERON CREEK

SKOKIE RIVER WOODS


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

t

TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

HORI Z ON S

q

THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 66 MATURE TREES, 20,995 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES, 8,077 LBS SOLID WASTE

Events in the Plaza 10th anniversary

DISCOUNT TUESDAYS

Watch the sunset and join us for an outdoor concert at Independence Grove’s 10th annual Events in the Plaza series in Libertyville beginning June 19. Arrive early to secure your spot and enjoy a light dinner, snack or beverage from the walk-up café. The preserve remains open past sunset on concert nights. Blankets or lawn chairs are recommended.

Kids are free and adult admission is just $3 on Tuesdays at the Lake County Discovery Museum. For hours, location, special exhibits and a discount coupon visit LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.com.

Hot spot to cool off Grab your swimsuit, towel and suntan lotion and dig your toes into 400 feet of sand beach at Independence Grove (Libertyville). Open daily from Memorial Day weekend. Save 20% with a 20-punch Beach Admission Card.

To celebrate the 10th anniversary, Events in the Plaza is featuring an exciting lineup of local and national breakthrough artists performing original music. See page 14 for dates and details.

FLICKR PICK Many plants used in preserve restoration get their start in the Native Seed Nursery at Rollins Savanna. Get involved at LCFPD.org/volunteer. Misty summer meadow at Rollins Savanna posted by Monica Photography via Flickr. Connect with us! For up-to-the-minute Forest Preserve news and events: Find us on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, or YouTube @LCFPD. Download our mobile app in the Apple app store or Android market—search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.”

Horizons quarterly // Summer 2012  

Horizons is the quarterly publication of your Lake County Forest Preserves, featuring articles on Lake County wildlife, natural and cultural...

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