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HORI Z ON S LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESERVATION, RESTOR ATION , EDUCATION AN D RECRE ATION

QUARTERLY

fall 2013

VOLUME 22, ISSUE 4


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5 more than

8 30,000 acres are

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

protected

by the lake county forest preserves .

A MESSAGE from

BOARD of COMMISSIONERS

ANN B. MAINE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESIDENT

Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire VICE PRESIDENT

Linda Pedersen, Antioch

I am pleased to welcome the arrival of Ty Kovach as the new executive director of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Ty brings a diverse background of national and international leadership in both the public and private sectors, as well as an ideal mix of conservation, administration and educational experience. Prior to joining our team, Ty worked internationally as chief executive officer for Cabo Delgado Investments Limited, managing a group of private islands and coastal forest land in the Republic of Mozambique in southeast Africa. The cluster of islands and their associated reefs are protected in partnership with the World Wildlife Federation, and managed for ecotourism, wildlife conservation and community development. As head of the organization, Ty developed and implemented strategies to finance the project, and established public and private partnerships to protect the land. In addition, Ty worked five years as chief operations officer for the Mustique Company Limited on the 1,400-acre private island of Mustique, part of the island country of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines in the West Indies. Managing a staff of 800, he led operation of the company and its subsidiaries, as well as a variety of conservation initiatives such as reforestation of the Grenadine Islands, reef protection and shoreline and beach restoration. In the public realm, Ty served 16 years, seven as operations manager, for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources managing strategic planning, policy and budget development, and regional programs. I am confident of Ty’s commitment to the District’s mission and know he will work hard to help us continue to meet the needs of Lake County residents. We are excited about this new chapter and look forward to working with Ty to advance our goals to open new forest preserves to the public, extend our trail system, and preserve and restore natural areas and wildlife habitat across the county in a financially-responsible way.

TREASURER

S. Michael Rummel, Lake Forest ASSISTANT TREASURER

Audrey H. Nixon, North Chicago Carol Calabresa, Libertyville Pat Carey, Grayslake Steve Carlson, Gurnee Bonnie Thomson Carter, Ingleside Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Bill Durkin, Waukegan Sandra Hart, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Aaron Lawlor, Vernon Hills Steven W. Mandel, Highland Park Diana O’Kelly, Mundelein Brent Paxton, Zion Nick Sauer, Lake Barrington David B. Stolman, Buffalo Grove Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Tom Weber, Lake Villa Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ty Kovach

HORIZONS VOLUME 22, ISSUE 4

Fall 2013

EDITOR

Kara Martin kmartin@LCFPD.org CONTRIBUTING

Allison Frederick PHOTOGRAPHY

Kim Karpeles, Robert Visconti, Chip Williams SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335

Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.


R E STORING OU R

WOODLAND HABITATS The wooded habitats along the Des Plaines River in southern Lake County are changing. Last winter, we completed 194 acres of canopy and understory thinning in woodland communities at MacArthur Woods and Grainger Woods Forest Preserves. The restoration and species monitoring that will continue for the next 20 years will help ensure the sustainability of oak woodlands and the wildlife they support for many generations to come. The Woodland Habitat Restoration Project is currently most apparent at Grainger Woods, looking northeast from the intersection of St. Marys and Everett Roads in Mettawa. A number of canopy trees have been removed there to increase the amount of sunlight reaching the

ground. Last spring, the increase in blooming marsh marigolds was visible to the casual passersby, and the view into this woodland has a more open feel. Spring monitoring efforts indicated positive results, and further research will quantify the long-term changes.

ENSURING HEALTHY OAK WOODLANDS BY INCREASING THE AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT THAT REACHES THE GROUND

ST MARYS RD

WOODLAND HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT 60

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MACARTHUR WOODS

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

PROJECT AREAS

DES PLAINES RIVER

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL

ST MARYS RD

Located in southeast Lake County, along the Des Plaines River, these preserves represent RI

some of the highest quality natural areas VE

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within Lake County. O

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EVERETT RD

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EE AV E

LAKE COOK RD

For more details, visit LCFPD.org/woodlands. UK WA MIL

DEERFIELD RD

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15% LIGHT AVAILABILITY

36% LIGHT AVAILABILITY

WOODLAND HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT

ENSURING SUSTAINABILITY

u HABITAT MONITORING Plant and wildlife monitoring has shown that the past 20 years of management has improved the habitat. These monitoring programs will continue after restoration actions have been implemented. Monitoring will help us understand the response of plants and animals to restoration actions.

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MEASURING LIGHT LEVELS

These photos illustrate the change in light transmission in the same location before and after moderate thinning treatment at MacArthur Woods. Fisheye lens photos of the canopy are analyzed by a special computer program that measures canopy cover and light availability. Prior to the first phase of restoration, average light transmission to ground level within wooded communities in project areas was 15.6%. Oaks and other open canopy species require 30-50% full sun for growth beyond the seedling stage into saplings.

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The goals of this project are broad reaching and long-term. Expert partners will continue to help monitor plants, animals and environmental conditions in project areas. Our partners include the Morton Arboretum, Chicago Botanic Garden, Lincoln Park Zoo, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Illinois Natural History Survey and Chicago Wilderness. Working with the Morton Arboretum, restoration sites were monitored throughout the summer. Permanent photo points have been established, and images will be taken in each cardinal direction. Tree mapping will occur in permanent, defined plots. This mapping requires measuring tree density, size and noting all species. Features such as standing dead trees, woody debris, shrubs, herbaceous layer, and the height and vigor of oak seedlings are also recorded. Standing dead trees and fallen logs are noted because they are important indicators of available wildlife habitat. Red-headed woodpeckers, a species of conservation concern, nests and feeds on standing dead trees. Fallen logs provide abundant habitat for insects, fungi and salamanders, which in-turn act as a food source for other larger wildlife species.

The Illinois Natural History Survey completed breeding bird monitoring in each project area this summer, while students and staff at Lake Forest College conducted invertebrate surveys at MacArthur Woods and Ryerson Conservation Area. These efforts will serve as a baseline for future assessments in the decades following restoration. Wildlife monitoring will continue in collaboration with partners and through the District’s established Wildlife Monitoring Program. This fall, volunteers will reintroduce native plants, seeding and planting shrubs such as hazelnut, viburnum and winterberry. In the winter, thinning will shift to Ryerson Woods and Captain Daniel Wright Woods, and efforts will continue at MacArthur Woods. We will oversee contractors who will implement thinning in these ecologically important woodland communities. RESTORING DIVERSITY AND BEAUTY

The Woodland Habitat Restoration Project is a large-scale effort to restore the health of our oak woodlands, which were once more prevalent in northern Illinois. Today, healthy oak woodlands are rare. Since 1830, 88% of the oak-dominated communities in Lake County have been lost. Much of the remaining acreage is under acute pressure from a combination of threats,


This project will create a mosaic of habitats, improving conditions for rare plants and wildlife while maintaining conditions for common native species.

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5 w Oak leaves decompose slowly, supporting soil microorganisms in the winter and insulating plants, affecting plant communities such as these spring wildflowers, rue anemone and mayapple. x & y Changes in the canopy and forest composition are reducing food levels, affecting many species that require open woodlands for foraging and nesting, such as the red-headed woodpecker and the rare grey fox.

including habitat fragmentation due to development, invasive species, and changes in the frequency, intensity and pattern of fires. Oak woodlands have changed drastically since European settlement. Historically, many oak trees had wide branches, allowing broad rays of sunlight to reach the woodland floor. The plant community in these woodlands consisted of a variety of blooming plants that tolerated fire and colored the landscape for almost nine months of the year. This ground layer of vegetation also prevented soil erosion and retained rain water. Low depressions in these woodlands formed pools of water, providing habitat for salamanders, frogs and aquatic invertebrates­­—an important food source for snakes, wood ducks and other native wildlife. A healthy woodland provides homes for large diversity of wildlife, trees, shrubs, wildflowers, ferns, fungi, and countless other groups.

Oaks are considered a “keystone” species in northeastern Illinois. They are crucial to our natural communities and drive much of the diversity of plants and wildlife in the region. However, oak saplings are lacking— only two of 1,000 saplings in our project areas are oaks. The Woodland Habitat Restoration Project will help ensure the future of oak woodlands and the wildlife they support. LEARN MORE »

See the calendar on pages 9–13 for upcoming tours and programs about the project.

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PRESERVENEWS TY KOVACH NAMED EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Following an extensive search, Ty Kovach of Akeley, Minnesota, was named the new Executive Director of the Lake County Forest Preserves. He brings a mix of conservation, administration and educational experience to the position. As leader of the agency, Kovach oversees management of more than 30,000 acres of land, 168 miles of trails, three public golf courses, public access to the Fox River, award-winning education programs and events, and facilities of special interest including Independence Grove, Ryerson Conservation Area, the Lake County Discovery Museum and Greenbelt Cultural Center. Upon accepting the position, Kovach said, “ The success of the Lake County Forest Preserves and the pride that residents have is so evident. I am excited to be part of it and will do my best to continue to move the organization forward. I take a long-range view of landscapes and see the Lake County Forest Preserves as the custodian of a very important resource. We need to be thinking of future generations as decisions are made and resources are managed.” IDEA EXCHANGE—OUR VIRTUAL TOWN HALL

Lake County residents have long been enthusiastic about offering ideas to make their Forest Preserves better. Public participation just got easier with a new online tool called Idea Exchange. The site lets you take surveys, view project plans, give feedback, share creative ideas, and support, or disagree with, the ideas of others. Idea Exchange is a convenient place to let us know what is best for you and your family as we create new preserves, expand trail systems, improve facilities, design museum exhibits and develop educational and cultural programs and events. Currently on the site are surveys seeking discussion on summer camps and trails. New topics are added frequently as decisions develop. Join the conversation at LCFPD.org/IdeaExchange. BALD EAGLES IN LAKE COUNTY

This summer marked the second season for a successful eagle nest in the Fox River Forest Preserve (Port Barrington), and eagle sightings near area waterways have been increasing. Bald eagles inhabit a wide range across North America, including Lake County. Since their diet consists of mostly fish, they tend to live along quiet coastal areas, rivers or lake shores that have large, tall trees where they can build their enormous nests. In Lake County, you may spot bald eagles during migration along Lake Michigan, or at preserves with large water features, such as Independence Grove (Libertyville). You’ll recognize them by their sheer size—over 3 feet tall with a 7-foot wingspan. Both male and female adults have the distinctive white head and yellow bills and feet, while the plumage of immature bald eagles is nearly all dark brown (see photo, right). 6 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

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ENDANGERED SPECIES FOUND

Presumed extinct in Illinois—it has been nearly 100 years since bog rosemary (Andromeda glaucophylla) was last found growing in Lake County. However, this spring we found a small population in a forest preserve wetland. “It was like stepping back in time,” recall District botanists upon discovering the plant. “We knew we were in a special place when we saw the rich diversity of native grasses, sedges and forbs.” Many are extremely rare in Lake County or listed as threatened or endangered species in Illinois. Lake County’s bog rosemary has very likely been growing in this wetland for 10,000 years, ever since the glaciers melted and mastodons, mammoths and bear the size of beaver roamed our area. Today, just a few plants remain.

BLANDING’S TURTLE RECOVERY PROGRAM

Blanding’s turtle is a medium-sized, semi-aquatic turtle distinguished by its bright yellow chin and throat and mottled shell. Historically common in northern Illinois, they now remain in only a few isolated remnant wetland patches, and were designated as endangered in 2009. In 2004, a study conducted by Chicago Wilderness documented only one population within our preserves. Since then, our wildlife biologists have studied this population, one of the largest in the state, and have discovered isolated populations at five additional preserves. However, monitoring has indicated that the majority of these populations are extremely small or declining and not likely viable in the long term without careful management. Recovery strategies have been initiated to halt further declines and stabilize local populations of Blanding’s turtles, including a head-starting program and continued monitoring via radio-telemetry. Since 2009, 371 turtles have been released, and ongoing monitoring shows that a significant proportion of released individuals are surviving out in the wild.

GIFTS COME IN ALL SHAPES AND SIZES

This year, donations to the Forest Preserves have come in all shapes and sizes—and from all types of donors. In this year alone: A local Girl Scout troop raised and donated more than $340 for restoration efforts at Old School Forest Preserve (Libertyville) in celebration of the organization’s 100th anniversary. An individual donor has contributed $200,000 and begun the process to donate a valuable 15-acre property, with the intention that it be sold and the proceeds directed to support our habitat restoration efforts. All gifts are meaningful to us. To learn how you can give in a way that is meaningful to you, contact the Preservation Foundation of the Lake County Forest Preserves at 847-968-3110 or visit LCFPD.org/donate. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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MITIGATION IMPROVEMENTS AT PINE DUNES

LIKE TO HIKE?

Enjoy fall breezes and autumn colors while exploring designated “Hike Lake County” trails. At each preserve, look for the Hike Lake County logo at the trailhead to get you started on the right route. Complete just seven of the hikes before November 30 and you’ll earn a commemorative shield for your walking stick. Travel log, trail maps and program details at LCFPD.org/HLC. Let your dog join in the fun! Purchase an optional Hike Lake County collar for your dog, then take your dog along with you on the trails. Record your dog’s name in the Travel Log, and your canine friend will receive a commemorative collar tag (up to 3 dogs).

An intergovernmental agreement with the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority (ISTHA) will provide an estimated $8.5 million for restoration, recreational facilities, and trails at Pine Dunes Forest Preserve (Antioch). The ISTHA’s Elgin O’Hare Western Access (EOWA) project west of O’Hare International Airport will impact 23 acres of wetland and 3 acres of water, requiring approximately 80 acres of mitigation. Federal regulations and urban development do not make it possible to mitigate within the vicinity of the airport. The ISTHA has determined through a selection process that a recent 315-acre addition to Pine Dunes is the best site to accomplish necessary wetlands mitigation. Construction is anticipated to begin in late 2013. Recreational features will be built to our specifications and proposed trails will connect east to Van Patten Woods and the Des Plaines River Trail, and provide future connections to several other neighboring preserves. Natural resources will benefit as well—about 286 acres of wetlands and more than a mile of stream corridors will be restored. That work will involve planting 6,000 trees and shrubs and 240,000 wetland plants.

LEARN AS YOU EXPLORE

Borrow a nature-themed Explore Backpack at Ryerson Woods, filled with hands-on activities for families and children up to 10 years old. The packs are free to use while in the preserve and can be checked out at the preserve’s Welcome Center. A driver’s license is held as a deposit. Choose from four themes: plants, farm, birds or general nature.

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CONTROLLED BURN SEASON IS HERE

If you see smoke rising from a forest preserve this fall, chances are that it’s from a controlled burn. Controlled burning removes weedy non-native species, helping native grasses and wildflowers thrive. Check LCFPD.org/burninfo for daily announcements.


FORT SHERIDAN HEADSTONE PROJECT

Soldiers visited the cemetery at Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve (Lake Forest) this summer to scrub and photograph headstones as part of a digital makeover for all U.S. military cemeteries. When completed, public records about every headstone will be available online. The on-site experience will also be enhanced with a mobile app to easily locate graves. The Fort Sheridan cemetery is managed under a cooperative agreement between the federal government and the Lake County Forest Preserves. Plots are available for eligible veterans and family. For questions regarding burials, contact Joe Rafferty at 847-615-0232. SOUTHSIDE MANNA COMMUNITY GARDEN PROJECT

BEGUILED BY THE WILD

The Manna Garden Initiative kicked off its first season this summer, growing food for those in need on a small parcel of forest preserve land in Waukegan. This garden benefits a “food desert” area, one with limited access to grocery stores and the fresh and affordable foods needed for a healthy diet. For more information, contact the Manna Garden Project at 312-450-7680, or

Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper is sure to delight art and animal lovers alike. Harper’s distinctive use of geometric shapes and vivid colors inspires environmental stewardship in people of all ages. This interactive exhibition opens September 21 at the Lake County Discovery Museum (see calendar for details).

mannagarden@fullercenterlakecounty.org.

GARDEN VOLUNTEERS

Learn about gardening techniques and native wildflowers, ferns and grasses while helping care for Independence Grove’s demonstration Native Garden. Volunteers are welcome for individual work days or on a regular basis. Volunteers are busy throughout the year, not just in the summer months. Visit LCFPD.org/volunteer to find out how you can get involved. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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Special Feature

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“SPOOKY” LAKE COUNTY

alling leaves and shorter days signal that Halloween is right around the corner. In the spooky spirit of the season, we present one of Lake County’s creepy crawlies and a few fascinating artifacts from the collections of the Lake County Discovery Museum (Wauconda). Within the next few years, the Museum will move to a larger, more accessible location in Libertyville. Learn more at LCFPD.org/museum. 1 ' MOURNING ART AND JEWELRY During the mid to late 19th century, jewelry and art made of human hair was created to memorialize and mourn loved ones. Pictured here is framed hair work (Millburn, 1875) and a woven watch chain (Zion, 1880).

2 ' “DARK SOUVENIRS” The tradition of collecting souvenirs to commemorate an event dates back centuries. In particular, Americans wanted to remember the events of the Civil War (1861–1865), and traveled to battle sites to collect souvenirs, recording the location or event on the item. These objects were thought to be “charged” with the event. Today, historians also refer to these charged objects as “dark souvenirs” because they often represent tragic events.

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Shown here is framed ribbon and floral remnants from President Lincoln’s catafalque (1865), a block of wood from the Confederate Andersonville Prison (Georgia), and a Civil War cannon ball fragment from the first Battle of Bull Run (Virginia, 1861).

3 ' POISON ARROWS FROM FORT SHERIDAN These poison bamboo arrows made by natives from Ninh Thuan Province, Vietnam, were collected by a Fort Sheridan soldier during the Vietnam War, circa 1965.

4 ' ARACHNOPHOBIA

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It could be said no other insect generates as much fear as the spider. Of course, much of this fear is undeserved. We appreciate spiders for the important roles they play in habitats, pest control, medicine, engineering and other human realms. Shown here: Jumping spiders do not build webs. Instead, these spiders sneak up on their prey and pounce. They can leap great distances considering their size, and have some of the best vision of all invertebrates. Four pairs of eyes give them a near 360 degree view of the world.

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Every Thursday on Facebook is “No Way Thursday,” an amazing factoid adventure—follow us at facebook.com/LCFPD or check out the Lake County Nature Blog at lakecountynature.com, and watch for special “spooky” nature posts throughout October Read about Lake County history, Museum collections and the Curt Teich Postcard Archives online at lakecountyhistory.blogspot.com and teicharchives.blogspot.com.

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FALL CALENDAR Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

SEPTEMBER Water Connects Lake County Join us this year as we celebrate water with educational and recreational programs on the theme. Explore water ecosystems, join a paddling class, and learn how you can help address water quality. Discover the importance of freshwater and the need for conservation and sustainable management of this precious resource. Thru Nov 30 Hike Lake County Hike seven of 12 designated trails throughout the county to earn a commemorative hiking shield.

Details and materials: LCFPD.org/HLC. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

1 Ryerson Reads: American Canopy by Eric Rutkow A special kickoff event for the 10th season of Ryerson Reads! Join an outdoor book discussion of Eric Rutkow's American Canopy while under a canopy of trees at Ryerson Woods.

Sunday, 4–5:30 pm, Ryerson Woods. Adults. $15 ($10 Friends of Ryerson Woods) per session, or $60 ($40 Friends of Ryerson Woods) for the five-part season.

s 4 Free Access Cart Tour—The Flood Plain Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Wednesday, 9:30–11 am, Oak Spring Road Canoe Launch. Adults. FREE. Registration required.

7, 14, 21, 28 Forest Fitness Fast-paced group fitness hikes feature a different preserve each week.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for weekly locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

7 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Wadsworth Savanna. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

7 Phenology and Photography Outdoor workshop combines a naturalist’s insight with technical tips from a professional photographer.

Saturday, 1–4 pm, Middlefork Savanna. Adults. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

8 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Sunday, 11 am–12 pm, 1–2 pm, & 2:30–3:30 pm, Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

s 8 Waterfest Learn about lake ecology, watersheds and aquatic species as part of the Water Connects Lake County initiative. Activities include aquatic animal hikes, crafts, fishing, ponding, boating, water monitoring, conservation and more.

Sunday, 1–4 pm, Independence Grove— North Bay Pavilion. All ages. $5 per person. Parking is free for Lake County residents.

10 Hikin’ Tykes—Monarchs Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Heron Creek—Shelter A. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

11 Little Sprouts—All About Apples Learn about different types of apples, how they grow and the best time to pick and eat them.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

12 Healthy, Happy Kids in Nature Kids play in nature, while adults learn about the health benefits of outdoor play. New topic each month.

Thursday, 10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 1–8, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

13 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Friday, 1 pm, Buffalo Creek. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

SEPTEMBER (continued) 14 Bilingual (Spanish/English) Guided Nature Hikes One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Independence Grove—meet at Lot G. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

14 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Art and Nature Join us for stories and activities that explore the connections between art and nature.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

s 15 Introduction to Canoeing Learn efficient ways to tandem paddle on the flatwater of Independence Grove lake. All equipment provided.

Sunday, 10 am–4 pm, Independence Grove. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $54 residents, $76 nonresidents.

15 Fiestas Patrias Celebrate Mexican and Central American independence with live music and authentic food. Lots of activities for children.

Sunday, 2–7 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

18 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10:15 am, Nippersink­—meet at the first lot near the entrance. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

s 18 Wetland Wonders What makes a wetland a wetland? Come explore and learn about the plants and animals that call a wetland home.

Wednesday, 5–6:30 pm, Sedge Meadow. All ages. $4 adult/$1 child residents, $6 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

18 Ryerson Reads: Air by William Bryant Logan Book discussion of William Bryant Logan’s Air. Logan writes as a naturalist, poet, and mystic in this descriptive history of Earth’s atmosphere.

Wednesday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults. $15 ($10 Friends of Ryerson Woods) per session, or $60 ($40 Friends of Ryerson Woods) for the five-part season.

s 19 Full Moon Paddle

Thursday, 6–8:30 pm, Van Patten Woods—Boat Launch. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $9 residents, $12 nonresidents.

Watch the sun set from the seat of your own canoe or kayak. Previous paddling experience required. 21-22 Farm Heritage Festival 21st annual family festival celebrates Lake County’s agricultural roots. Tractor parade, sheep herding, wagon rides, animals and more—see LCFPD.org/farmheritage.

s 21 Fort Sheridan Beach Cleanup Lend a hand and a few hours for International Coastal Cleanup day.

s 21 Night Voyageur Canoe Paddle

Saturday & Sunday, 9 am–4 pm, Lakewood. Daily: $10 adults, $5 ages 4–17 and seniors; Weekend pass: $15 adults, $7 ages 4–17 and seniors. Children 3 and under are free. No registration required. Saturday, 9 am–12 am, Fort Sheridan. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

Paddle our giant canoe while learning about the fur trade in 18th-century Lake County and the lives of the Voyageurs.

Saturday, 6–8 pm, Van Patten Woods—Boat Launch. Adults, families with children ages 9 and up. $7 residents, $10 nonresidents.

25 Museum Volunteer Docent Informational Meeting Learn about being a docent at the Discovery Museum—share your love of history through guided tours and programs.

Wednesday, 2:30–3:30 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

25 Little Sprouts—Crows in the Corn Learn about corn’s many uses and make scarecrows to protect our corn from birds.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

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Taste the results of the Green Youth Farm: fresh, organic produce grown in Greenbelt Forest Preserve (North Chicago) by local youth. Farmstand sales through October 5—see chicagobotanic.org / greenyouthfarm for locations, dates and details.

SEPTEMBER (continued) 25 Homeschool Companion—Stewardship in Fall Explore, discover and participate in fall nature restoration. Learn why and how you can help nature become healthier.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Almond Marsh. Children ages 7–17. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

27 Ideology and the Dead: An Archaeological Analysis Dr. Scott Palumbo discusses work exploring how changes in the memorialization of the dead affected class ideologies.

Friday, 7–8 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $7 residents, $9 nonresidents.

27 Community Campfire Friday Nights Gather around the fire with family and friends. Roast marshmallows and experience nature at night. Activities vary.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center—meet at the pond. Bring a blanket or chair. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

28 Walk on the Wildflower Side Uncover the secrets of wildflowers. Learn the folklore and healing powers they hold.

Saturday, 10–11:30 am, Grant Woods—Monaville Road entrance. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

28 Woodland Habitat Restoration Overview Learn the details of this project and how it will improve woodland habitats at Ryerson Woods and other preserves.

Saturday, 1–2:30 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center Adults. FREE. No registration required.

28 Scout Saturday Reptile & Amphibian Study Merit Badge Become a herpetologist for a day as we learn about the reptiles and amphibians found in our area.

Saturday, 1–5 pm, Ryerson Woods. Boy Scouts. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

29 Nature Discovery Bike Ride Ride your bike with a naturalist and stop along the trails to discover some natural wonders.

Sunday, 1–3 pm, Wright Woods. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

29 Charley Harper Guided Tour and Hike Learn about Charley Harper on a guided gallery tour, then join a guided hike to observe his subjects in their natural habitat.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. All ages. $7 adult/$4 child residents, $9 adult/$6 child nonresidents.

OCTOBER 2 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10:15 am, Wright Woods­—meet near the parking lot. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

2 Woodland Habitat Restoration Overview Learn the details of this project and how it will improve woodland habitats at Ryerson Woods and other preserves.

Wednesday, 7–8 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

5, 12, 19, 26 Forest Fitness Group fitness hikes feature a different preserve each week.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

5 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Millennium Trail—meet at Bonner Farm. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

5 Photography & Sunprints Learn about the use of positive and negative space, then apply that knowledge to create a sunprint with natural materials.

Saturday, 1–2 pm, Greenbelt. Children ages 5–10. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

OCTOBER (continued) 5 Woodlands Habitat Tour See the early results of the District’s Woodland Habitat Restoration project first hand, while learning the details of this project. Help collect acorns as part of the project.

Saturday, 1:30–2:30 pm, Grainger Woods. Adults. FREE. No registration required.

5 & 6 Dear Carol Ann Kick off National Breast Cancer Awareness Month with this heartwarming play.

Saturday & Sunday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and older. $12 adult/$7 child residents, $17 adult/$12 child nonresidents.

6 Bonner Country Fair Enjoy wagon rides, kids’ crafts, games, live music, a petting zoo and more at this fun family festival.

Sunday, 12–4 pm, Bonner Heritage Farm. All ages. $5 per person, ages 3 and under FREE. No registration required.

8 Hikin’ Tykes—Owls Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Ryerson Woods. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

9 Little Sprouts—Harvest Hoe-Down Help pick the last vegetables of the season and prepare the garden for winter. Then celebrate with songs and games.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Bonner Heritage Farm. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

10 Healthy, Happy Kids in Nature Kids play in nature, while adults learn about the health benefits of outdoor play. New topic each month.

Thursday, 10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 1–8, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

10 Museum Teacher Open House Learn about programs and resources for your class, tour the exhibitions and take part in guided teacher training sessions.

Thursday, 4:30–7:30 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Lake County Educators. CPDUs available. FREE.

11 BYOB Painting Party Enjoy an evening out with friends and let the art of Charley Harper inspire you as you create your own masterpiece. All supplies and artist led instruction provided by Bottle & Bottega.

Friday, 6–9 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $42. Register at bottleandbottega.com/evanston.

s 12 Paddle with a Naturalist Join an environmental educator for a two-hour canoe paddle where you’ll explore what nature reveals. Experience required.

Saturday, 7:30–9:30 am, Van Patten Woods—Boat Launch. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $13 residents, $18 nonresidents.

12 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Clay Creations Join us for stories and activities that explore our creative side. We’ll make projects out of clay to take home.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

13 Fall Color Hike Learn why leaves fall and how critters adapt to cold weather.

Sunday, 1–2 pm, Ryerson Woods—Cabins. All ages. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

13 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Sunday, 1 pm, Ryerson Woods—Cabins. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

13 Fall Camouflage Hike Learn about animals that use camouflage to help them survive, then hike in the woods in search of hidden critters.

Sunday, 2–3 pm, Ryerson Woods—Cabins. All ages. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

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When night temperatures fall below freezing, morning frost creates a sparkling wonderland. Look for flowers, landscapes and spider webs glistening in the morning sun.

OCTOBER (continued) 14 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Monday, 1 pm, Grant Woods—Monaville Road entrance. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

16 Free Access Cart Tour—Autumn Changes Guided cart hike for Lake County residents with mobility issues.

Wednesday, 9:30–11 am, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. Adults. FREE. Registration required.

s 18 Full Moon Paddle Watch the sun set from the seat of your own canoe or kayak. Previous paddling experience required.

Friday, 5–7:30 pm, Van Patten Woods—Boat Launch. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $9 residents, $12 nonresidents.

18 Community Campfire Friday Nights Gather around the fire with family and friends. Roast marshmallows and experience nature at night. Activities vary.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center—meet at the pond. Bring a blanket or chair. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

19 Silkscreen for Kids Learn about the work of wildlife artist Charley Harper and create your own silkscreen to take home.

Saturday, 1–2 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 7–12. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

20 Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home Tours Learn more about this Illinois governor and ambassador to the United Nations as you tour his restored family home.

Sunday, 11 am–12 pm, 1–2 pm, & 2:30–3:30 pm, Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

20 Terrific Trees Explore the many parts of trees and the importance they serve.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Old School—Trails lot. Children ages 6–9. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

23 Small Discoveries—A Happy Halloween Celebrate Halloween traditions with stories, games and a variety of spooktacular activities. Costumes encouraged.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adults/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

25-26 Halloween Hikes Ninety-minute event that include a 60 minute guided group hike along a candlelit path to watch fun naturethemed skits, followed by donuts and cider. Not scary. Even your littlest will enjoy this family favorite. 27 Trick or Treat Trails Enjoy trick-or-treating, nature activities, games, crafts, movies and refreshments. Costume contest at 3:30 pm.

Friday & Saturday, hikes begin every 30 minutes from 6–8 pm, Ryerson Woods. Families with children ages 4–12. $9 residents, $11 nonresidents.

Sunday, 2–7 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Families with children to age 12. FREE. No registration required.

NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Forest Fitness Group fitness hikes feature a different preserve each week.

Saturdays, 8–9 am, see website for weekly locations: LCFPD.org/FF. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

2 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Singing Hills. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents. No registration required.

6 Small Discoveries—Potawatomi Play Explore the lives of early Lake County Native Americans. Help build a wigwam and learn about the Potawatomi.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adults/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

Join the Skokie Valley Astronomers at Ryerson Woods on the second Friday of the month. Learn about topics in astronomy and stargaze with members’ telescopes, weather permitting. For details, visit LCFPD.org/astronomy.

NOVEMBER (continued) 9 Greenbelt Mini Explorers—Digging up Dinosaurs Be a paleontologist—dig for fossils, make fossil casts, and more.

Saturday, 10–11 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 3–5, with an adult. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

11 Playdate with Nature Move your kids outdoors for unstructured seasonal play activities, proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages.

Monday, 1 pm, Lyons Woods. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

12 Hikin’ Tykes—Animal Tails Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

13 Habitat Walks for Seniors Explore many of the different habitats of Lake County, learning as you walk. Walks are paced to the group’s ability.

Wednesday, 9–10:15 am, Old School—meet at Trails Parking Lot. Seniors. FREE. No registration required.

13 Homeschool Companion—Charley Harper Join other homeschoolers to learn about Charley Harper and his bold, colorful wildlife artwork with hands-on activities.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 5–12, with an adult. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

13 Ryerson Reads: The Creation by E.O. Wilson Book discussion of E.O. Wilson’s The Creation, a proposal for an historic partnership between scientists and religious leaders to preserve Earth’s rapidly vanishing biodiversity.

Wednesday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults. $15 ($10 Friends of Ryerson Woods) per session, or $60 ($40 Friends of Ryerson Woods) for the five-part season.

14 Healthy, Happy Kids in Nature Kids play in nature, while adults learn about the health benefits of outdoor play. New topic each month.

Thursday, 10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 1–8, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

15 Chocolate, Champagne and Shopping Indulge while shopping unique gift vendors. Proceeds benefit the Friends of the Lake County Discovery Museum.

16

Friday, 4:30–9 pm, General Offices. Adults. $15 in advance, $18 at the door. Purchase tickets online at LCFPD.org/CCS.

16 BYOB Painting Party Enjoy an evening out with friends and let the art of Charley Harper inspire you as you create your own masterpiece. All supplies and artist led instruction provided by Bottle & Bottega.

Saturday, 6–9 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $42. Register at bottleandbottega.com/evanston.

20 Small Discoveries—Turkey Tales Join us for a morning of Thanksgiving-themed storytelling and make a seasonal craft to take home for the holiday.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adults/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

21 Winds of Change: Changing Skies Are we experiencing more significant weather events? How will accelerating climate change impact who flies in our skies and what grows in our landscapes? Join us for a panel discussion.

Thursday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods Welcome Center. Adults. $20, $15 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members. FREE for students with ID.

24 Thanksgiving for Nature Scavenger Hunt Have fun searching for clues about the gifts of nature.

Sunday, 1–3 pm, Fox River—Large Pavilion. Activity is selfpaced—arrive any time to start exploring. All ages. $2.

30 Snowmobile Safety Class and Certification Exam Passing the written exam at the end of the class allows youth ages 12–16 to operate a snowmobile on their own.

Saturday, 8 am–5 pm, Operations and Public Safety Facility. Adults, families with children ages 10 and up. FREE. Registration required: 847-968-3411.

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SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

Through March 30, 2014

Transitions: Photography by Debbie Walker

Transitions is a journey where there is divine order that is followed by all things. When left untouched, it is expressed eloquently. Not always obvious, but always eloquent. Stages expressed in nature, mirror those expressed in all things; emerging, basking, surrender, transition and rebirth. This exhibit focuses on those universal changes in time, and the beauty and strength that are present in all seasons of life. For all things there is a time to thrive, a purpose to serve and a season to express it. Independence Grove Visitors Center

September 8–October 31

Distant Skies and Landscapes: Photos by Lloyd Davidson

September 21, 2013–February 16, 2014

Beguiled by the Wild: The Art of Charley Harper

Fixing his lens on vital landscapes and stirring skies, Lloyd Davidson seeks to document the complexity and vulnerability of nature. Each image evokes the sense of the wonder and thrill of discovery Davidson experienced when encountering these vistas. With a keen eye for quality of light, he shares the thrill of being witness to what nature reveals. This body of work captures the grandeur of nature, as well as its smallest wonders.

Charley Harper’s (1922–2007) life-long love of nature inspired his work in this wonderful collection entitled “Beguiled by the Wild.” Harper was best known for his highly stylized wildlife prints, posters and book illustrations.

Artist Reception Sunday, September 8, 1–3 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

He called his style “minimal realism,” capturing the essence of his subjects with the fewest possible visual elements. Using graphic shapes and bold colors, Harper distilled and simplified complex elements. When enhanced by the Museum’s signature focus on interactive exhibits, this national touring exhibition is a must see for the entire family.

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon. This original exhibition explores connections between the human world and looks at some of the work being done today to help prevent similar extinctions from occurring.

Lake County Discovery Museum

Casualties, Subtractions and Augmented Reality

Through February 2, 2014

The Hidden World of Infrared This stunning collection of Infrared photographs looks into a beautiful and often eerie world invisible to the naked eye. Using a modified digital camera, photographer Rob Kuehnle challenges viewers to see familiar subjects in new ways. Greenbelt Cultural Center

September 21, 2013–February 2, 2014

The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction

Lake County Discovery Museum

November 10–December 22

Using new technologies, artist Annette Barbier addresses issues of home and how we relate to our environment. Her work explores how home must be redefined as populations shift and the natural world deteriorates. In addition to video, Barbier uses laser cutting and engraving on natural materials such as leaves and feathers to heighten our awareness of our detrimental impact on the natural world. Artist Reception Sunday, November 10, 1–3 Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

pm

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SPECIAL FACILITIES Directory GENERAL OFFICES

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048 847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

911 emergency 847–549–5200 nonemergency public safety issues

LCFPD.org 8 am –4:30 pm, Monday–Friday

OUTDOOR REREATION

EDUCATION & CULTURE

GOLF

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015

847–968–3499 Main 847–247–1111 Banquets, Meetings

847–968–3320

IndependenceGrove.org Visitors Center Hours 9 AM–4:30 PM, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees visit our website. Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $5 per car Monday–Thursday $10 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without stopping to verify residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center.

LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours 9 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Saturday 11 AM–4 PM, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays Brushwood Hours 10 AM–4 PM, Monday–Thursday 1–3 PM Sundays, or by appointment GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

28500 West Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010 847–381–0669

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course 39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099

847–968–3477

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org

11 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Friday LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

FoxRiverMarina.org Boat Launch & Marina Hours

27277 North Forest Preserve Road Wauconda, Illinois 60084 847–968–3400 Main 847–968–3381 Archives, Research LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.org Museum Gallery Hours 10 AM–4:30 PM, Monday–Saturday 1–4:30 PM, Sunday Adults $6, Youth 4–17 $2.50, 3 years and under FREE Discount Tuesdays: Adults $3, Youth 17 and under FREE

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CountrysideGolfClub.org

GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

Lake County History Archives Curt Teich Postcard Archives

7 AM–sunset, daily, in season

847–968–3100 Tee Times 847–968–3441 Golf Gift Cards 847–489–1931 Golf Outings

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–968–3450

1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064

Gallery & Office Hours FOX RIVER MARINA

Prairie & Traditional Courses 20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB 33600 North US Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030 847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–247–1119

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

BraeLochGolfClub.org


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

LCFPD.ORG

FOREST PRESERVE Entrance/Parking

More than 30,000 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves.

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL Planned section

FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS

(L.C.Division of Transportation)

DOG AREA

Friday, July 19, 2013

PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL

COMMUNITY GARDEN

GANDER MOUNTAIN

Red Wing Slough State Natural Area

RAVEN GLEN

SUN LAKE

BLUEBIRD MEADOW

HASTINGS LAKE

DUCK FARM

OAK-HICKORY

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

WAUKEGAN SAVANNA

DOG SLED AREA

BONNER HERITAGE FARM

SPRING BLUFF

VAN PATTEN WOODS

SEDGE MEADOW

Milburn Rd

Cedar Lake Rd

OPERATIONS FACILITY

WADSWORTH SAVANNA

MCDONALD WOODS

Gelden Rd

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

LYONS WOODS

MILL CREEK

FOURTH LAKE

TANAGER KAMES

GENERAL OFFICES

ETHEL'S WOODS

Cedar Lake State Bog

GRANT WOODS

CASEY TRAIL Planned section

PINE DUNES

PRAIRIE STREAM

Beach Grove Rd

(L.C.Division of Transportation)

Hunt Club Rd

Chain O'Lakes State Park

DUTCH GAP

SEQUOIT CREEK

LAKE MARIE

FORT HILL TRAIL Planned (L.C. Division of Transportation)

MIDDLEFORK GREENWAY Planned section

CANOE LAUNCH

MAP CURRENT AS OF

GRAND ILLINOIS TRAIL Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

M CCLORY TRAIL / NORTH SHORE PATH

STATE LAND (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

Most preserves are open 6:30 AM –sunset, daily.

MILLENNIUM TRAIL Planned section

Stearn s School Rd

ROLLINS SAVANNA

Volo Bog State Natural Area

Washington St

NIPPERSINK

GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

ALMOND MARSH

KETTLE GROVE

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

SINGING HILLS

GREENBELT

W auk egan R d

KESTREL RIDGE MARL FLAT

LAKE CARINA

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

Lake Michigan

VISITORS CENTER

BLACK CROWN

WILMOT WOODS

Winchester Road

RAY LAKE

Bonner Road

ATKINSON STORMWATER FACILITY

OLD SCHOOL

Middlefork Dr

d rR

me

Gil

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

ORIOLE GROVE

kee Milwau Ave

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB LAKEWOOD eld

irfi

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

Rd

n Rd

Milto

MIDDLEFORK SAVANNA

MACARTHUR WOODS

Fa

FOX RIVER R and R d

MARINA ADLAI E. STEVENSON HISTORIC HOME

CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

HALF DAY GRASSY LAKE Half Day Rd

EGRET MARSH

ry

EDWARD L. RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

WELCOME CENTER

S aunders R d

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

SKOKIE RIVER WOODS

DUFFY STORMWATER BERKELEY FACILITY PRAIRIE

Rd

BUFFALO CREEK

en

Rd

cH

nd

M

Ra

Arlington Hts Rd

CUBA MARSH

HERON CREEK

PRAIRIE WOLF

FORT SHERIDAN


LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

t

TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

HORI Z ON S

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THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 61 MATURE TREES, 19,528 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES, 7,491 LBS SOLID WASTE

join us for Waterfest

Plan your picnic

Join us Sunday, September 8 from 1–4 pm at Independence Grove for Waterfest, an event in celebration of water conservation and our beautiful waterways as part of the Water Connects Lake County initiative. Activities include aquatic animal hikes, crafts, fishing, ponding, paddling, water monitoring, conservation and more. Learn about lake ecology, watershed and glacial activity, and aquatic species such as fish, turtles and frogs. Admission is $5 per person. Check LCFPD.org or follow us on Facebook at /LCFPD for updates.

Plan your 2014 family reunion, company picnic or other group gathering early to help ensure your first choice for shelter or date. Picnic shelter reservations begin Monday, October 14, see LCFPD.org/picnics.

ANNUAL PERMIT DISCOUNT Annual Dog Exercise Area permits and Equestrian Trail Use permits are discounted for the remainder of the year beginning September 1. Annual permits are issued for the calendar year, valid until December 31, see LCFPD.org/permits.

◄ FLICKR PICK People and pets alike enjoy fresh air and exercise while exploring scenic open spaces at our Dog Exercise Areas. Daily or annual permits are required for admission: see LCFPD.org/dogarea. Photo posted by Vivienne Shen via Flickr. Connect with us! Find us on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, or YouTube @LCFPD. Download our mobile app in the Apple App Store or Android Play Store—search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.”

Horizons quarterly // fall 2013  

Horizons is the quarterly publication of your Lake County Forest Preserves, featuring articles on Lake County wildlife, natural and cultural...

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