Page 1

East Regional

Southwest Regional

at Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina 86, Washington 83 at Cleveland Ohio State 98, George Mason 66 Marquette 66, Syracuse 62

at Chicago Florida State 71, Notre Dame 57 Virginia Commonwealth 94, Purdue 76

NCAA SCOREBOARD

West Regional at Charlotte, N.C. Duke 73, Michigan 71 at Tulsa, Okla. Arizona 70, Texas 69

at Tulsa, Okla. Kansas 73, Illinois 59

Sweet 16 Thursday Butler-Wisconsin Florida-BYU Duke-Arizona SDSU-UConn

Friday Ohio St-Kentucky UNC-Marquette Kansas-Richmond Florida State-VCU

NCAA TOURNAMENT EDITION

L A W R E N C E

JOURNAL-WORLD

®

75 CENTS

Vol.153/No.80 38 pages

LJWorld.com

MONDAY • MARCH 21 • 2011

KANSAS 73, ILLINOIS 59

STAYIN’ ALIVE

Nick Krug/Journal-World Photos

KANSAS FORWARD MARKIEFF MORRIS DELIVERS on an alley-oop dunk from teammate Tyshawn Taylor during the second half. Morris had a team-high 24 points in the Jayhawks’ 73-59 victory over Illinois on Sunday in Tulsa, Okla.

Morris twins help Kansas bury Illini By Gary Bedore gbedore@ljworld.com

TULSA, OKLA. — There were no funeral services held for Bill Self and his Kansas University basketball players on Sunday night in BOK Center. The 2010-11 Jayhawks are still breathing today, marching on to the NCAA Tournament’s Sweet 16 after a convincing 73-59 victory over Illinois and coach Bruce Weber, the man who held a mock burial service for Self after Self left U of I for KU in 2003. “We’re all alive and well and glad coach Self is our coach,” KU senior guard Tyrel Reed said in a festive locker room. The top-seeded Jayhawks (342) wanted to play well for several reasons Sunday, none bigger than taking care of their beloved coach. “When we broke the huddle at halfcourt before the game, Marcus said, ‘We want to do this for coach. We have to win this game

MORE ONLINE ■ For loads more on Kansas’

Round-of-32 victory over Illinois, including video, audio, a photo gallery, message boards, The Keegan Ratings and more, go to KUsports.com for coach,’’’ said KU junior guard Tyshawn Taylor. “He said we couldn’t let coach down.” Marcus backed up his pregame words by scoring 17 points and grabbing 12 rebounds on a night his brother, Markieff, hit the No. 9-seeded Illini (20-14) for 24 points and 12 boards. “That’s our guy,” Marcus Morris said of Self. “Coach didn’t say anything about it, but I felt this game meant a lot to him. I told the guys, ‘Let’s do it for coach.’’’ “We definitely did that for coach,” noted Markieff, who had KANSAS COACH BILL SELF watches with the bench as the Jayhawks make a run against Please see KANSAS, page 4A Illinois during the second half.

What a sweet day for KU athletics TULSA, OKLA. — Three great athletes from Kansas University finished like champions Sunday and showed the world how much they have grown. Two of them always wowed people with their unusual skill for men their size, displaying such amazing finesse, but they arrived at KU needing to instill power in their games. Another always had extraordinary power and had to refine the finesse end of his game. Right about the time Marcus and Markieff Morris were riding the Kansas team bus to the BOK Center for a game against Illinois, the tallest team in the NCAA Tournament, Gary Woodland, 26 and one of the longest drivers of the golf ball on the PGA Tour, drained clutch putts 1,200 miles away, in Tampa, Fla., to win his first tour event, a $990,000 purse, and a spot in the Masters field. The performance of the Mor-

Tom Keegan tkeegan@ljworld.com

ris twins in a 73-59 victory against Illinois had little to do with finesse and everything to do with power and toughness. Woodland’s greatness wasn’t about overpowering the golf ball, though he certainly did that, smoking a 2-iron 287 yards off the tee on No. 18. It was about him making all of his putts. “I talked to him Saturday night, and the last thing I said to him was, ‘Let’s make tomorrow a great day for Jayhawks.’ He Please see KEEGAN, page 5A


Sports 2

2A | LAWRENCE JOURNAL-WORLD | MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2011

COMING TUESDAY

TWO-DAY

• More coverage of the KU men’s basketball team as it gets ready for the Sweet Sixteen

SPORTS CALENDAR

KANSAS UNIVERSITY

TUESDAY • Baseball vs. Ark.-Little Rock, 3 p.m.

| SPORTS WRAP |

Woodland comes up clutch for first PGA victory PALM HARBOR, FLA. — Gary Woodland, a pure athlete who only started serious golf competition eight years ago, figured out quickly that hitting the ball from here to the moon was not going to help him win tournaments. Perhaps it was only fitting that his biggest shot Sunday at the Transitions Championship came with his putter. The race to the finish at Innisbrook was so wild that Woodland didn’t make a single par on the back nine until the last hole. He made a 10foot par putt that proved to be the difference in a one-shot victory over Webb Simpson. “I can’t come out here and hit the golf ball 900 yards and win,” said Woodland, exaggerating only slightly. “I was very conservative this week, laid back almost all day — all four days — and just tried to get the ball in the fairway, get it on the green and let the putter do the work. That’s what I’m learning.” The final par — his only par on a back nine that featured five birdies and three bogeys — gave Woodland a 4-under 67 and his first trip to Augusta National for the Masters. Simpson also flew long on the 18th green and faced the same scary shot as Woodland in the group ahead. He hit off the back of the green, chipped 20 feet by the hole and the par putt was the only bad stroke he made all day. The bogey gave him a 69 and a runner-up fin-

Chalmers to miss up to 2 weeks MIAMI (AP) — Miami Heat point guard Mario Chalmers is expected to miss up to two weeks after spraining his right knee. Chalmers was injured against the Denver Nuggets on Saturday. Tests performed on his knee Sunday confirmed the original diagnosis. It’s a blow for the Heat, with the playoffs opening in less than a month, though not as severe as it could have been. The only other true point guard Miami has on the roster is Mike Bibby, who has been with the Heat for only 10 games. Chalmers is averaging 6.6 points and 2.4 assists per game. After Miami’s “Big 3” of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, he ranks fourth on Miami’s roster in scoring.

Royals fall to Rangers S U R P R I S E , A RIZ . (AP ) — Derek Holland made the argument on the mound and continued after his outing was over. He wants a spot in the Texas Rangers’ rotation. Holland pitched five strong innings to help the Rangers beat the Kansas City Royals, 5-2, on Sunday, snapping a five-game losing streak. “I had all my pitches working for me,” he said. “I was locating the ball well and my defense behind me was making the plays. Everything was working out perfect for us. The A-game.” The left-hander allowed an unearned run and five singles, struck out three and walked one. Brett Tomko finished for Texas, yielding one run and four hits. Holland’s role on the Rangers could be linked to Neftali Feliz, who could join the rotation after saving 40 games and winning the AL Rookie of the Year award last season. If Feliz becomes a starter, Holland could end up the in the bullpen, where he was in the 2010 playoffs and World Series. “My goal is to make the rotation,” Holland said. “Feliz wants to be there, too. It’s going to go either way. It’s our job to make it hard for them. If I get put in the bullpen, I’m going to be OK, but like I said, I’m going to be in that rotation. I know I will. I have confidence. Confidence is everything.” All-Star closer Joakim Soria pitched 1 1⁄3 scoreless innings for the Royals, finishing his outing with a flourish. Elvis Andrus hit a leadoff double in the seventh and Josh Hamilton followed with a single, but Soria struck out Adrian Beltre, Michael Young and Nelson Cruz to end the inning. He also struck out Mitch Moreland to begin the eighth. “That’s the closer in him,” Royals manager Ned Yost said. “First and third and all of a sudden that extra little thing he’s got that makes him so special kicks in. We’re up to the point in spring where we’re trying to get him up to a 35-pitch inning and we did that today.” Moreland had two hits, including his third spring homer, for Texas. Julio Borbon went 3 for 4 to raise his average to .380. Royals right f ielder Jeff Francoeur snapped an 0-for-25 skid with three hits.

ish in an otherwise solid performance for his first time in serious contention. Woodland took only 23 putts in the final round — 10 on the back nine. According to the Shotlink data, he didn’t miss a single putt inside 20 feet in the final round, with four of those 17 putts outside 10 feet. Woodland, who played college basketball at Washburn until deciding to transfer to Kansas to play golf, became the first player to earn his inaugural PGA Tour title at Innisbrook. The win gives Woodland an invitation to Augusta National, where his awesome power and soft putting touch could make for an interesting marriage at the Masters. He missed the second half of his rookie season two years ago with shoulder surgery, but began to show potential when he lost in a playoff at the Bob Hope Classic. Woodland finished at 15-under 269 and earned $990,000, moving up to No. 3 in the FedEx Cup standings. “One thing that helped me was putting, and today it saved me,” Woodland said. “Luckily, it won me a golf tournament.”

COLLEGE BASKETBALL Texas Tech hires Gillispie LUBBOCK, TEXAS — Texas Tech hired Billy

Gillispie as the new men’s basketball coach, two seasons after he was fired at Kentucky. Gillispie will be introduced Wednesday at a news conference, school athletics spokesman Blayne Beal said Sunday. Gillispie replaces Pat Knight, who was fired this month. In 2009, Kentucky fired Gillispie after the Wildcats went 40-27 in his two seasons and missed the NCAA Tournament for the first time in 17 years. He agreed to a five-year contract, according to a statement released by the school. “I can’t wait to get started,” Gillispie said in the statement. “Texas Tech is a great school that is located in a great community and is part of one of the toughest conferences in the country.”

Rockets 110, Jazz 108 HOUSTON — Kyle Lowry had 28 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists for Houston’s f irst triple-double of the season.

BRISTOL, TENN. — Kyle Busch can’t be beat at Bristol Motor Speedway. Busch beat Carl Edwards and Jimmie Johnson off pit road after the final stops Sunday, then held them off over the closing 60 laps to win the Sprint Cup Series race at the Tennessee bullring. It gave Busch a sweep of the weekend and his fifth consecutive victory at Bristol dating back to a three-race sweep last August.

UTAH (108) Kirilenko 4-7 1-2 10, Millsap 12-18 9-12 35, Jefferson 7-23 3-5 17, Harris 4-15 2-4 12, Miles 8-16 1-2 19, Bell 1-4 0-0 2, Favors 4-9 0-0 8, Watson 0-2 0-0 0, Hayward 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 42-97 16-25 108. HOUSTON (110) Budinger 2-4 2-2 7, Scola 1-5 2-3 4, Hayes 3-11 12 7, Lowry 9-14 7-8 28, Martin 7-18 18-18 34, Lee 2-9 4-6 8, Patterson 7-11 0-0 14, Hill 0-5 2-2 2, Dragic 2-5 0-0 6. Totals 33-82 36-41 110. Utah 19 28 28 33 — 108 Houston 30 25 22 33 — 110 3-Point Goals—Utah 8-16 (Millsap 2-3, Harris 24, Miles 2-5, Hayward 1-1, Kirilenko 1-1, Watson 01, Bell 0-1), Houston 8-19 (Lowry 3-4, Dragic 2-3, Martin 2-8, Budinger 1-1, Lee 0-3). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Utah 63 (Jefferson 19), Houston 55 (Patterson 13). Assists—Utah 20 (Millsap, Jefferson 4), Houston 18 (Lowry 10). Total Fouls— Utah 26, Houston 20. Technicals—Utah defensive three second. A—14,459 (18,043).

Raptors 95, Thunder 93 OKLAHOMA CITY — Amir Johnson made a layup with 1.4 seconds left to help Toronto stop a 14-game road losing streak. TORONTO (95) J.Johnson 5-9 1-1 12, A.Johnson 2-5 1-2 5, Bargnani 7-18 7-10 23, Calderon 1-7 1-1 3, DeRozan 7-14 2-2 16, Evans 4-6 5-6 13, Bayless 15 0-0 2, Davis 0-3 0-0 0, Weems 1-4 0-0 2, Barbosa 7-10 2-2 19. Totals 35-81 19-24 95. OKLAHOMA CITY (93) Durant 6-21 7-8 20, Ibaka 4-9 0-0 8, Perkins 2-5 1-4 5, Westbrook 7-19 8-8 22, Sefolosha 2-4 0-0 4, Collison 2-2 1-2 5, Harden 5-9 11-13 23, Maynor 03 0-0 0, Mohammed 0-0 0-0 0, Cook 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 30-75 28-35 93. Toronto 25 23 28 19 — 95 Oklahoma City 22 22 22 27 — 93 3-Point Goals—Toronto 6-14 (Barbosa 3-5, Bargnani 2-4, J.Johnson 1-1, DeRozan 0-1, Bayless 0-1, Calderon 0-2), Oklahoma City 5-17 (Cook 2-3, Harden 2-3, Durant 1-6, Maynor 0-1, Westbrook 02, Sefolosha 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Toronto 50 (Evans 9), Oklahoma City 53 (Perkins 12). Assists—Toronto 20 (Calderon 9), Oklahoma City 18 (Westbrook, Perkins, Harden 4). Total Fouls—Toronto 24, Oklahoma City 19. Technicals— A.Johnson, Perkins. A—18,203 (18,203).

Bucks 100, Knicks 95 MILWAUKEE — Carlos Delfino scored a career-high 30 points, and Brandon Jennings finished an assist short of a triple-double. NEW YORK (95) Anthony 7-14 7-8 23, Stoudemire 11-28 3-3 25, She.Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Billups 6-13 7-10 21, Fields 5-11 0-0 13, Douglas 3-13 0-0 7, Sha.Williams 2-5 0-0 5, Jeffries 0-0 0-0 0, Mason 0-2 1-1 1, Turiaf 00 0-0 0. Totals 34-88 18-22 95. MILWAUKEE (100) Delfino 8-13 8-10 30, Mbah a Moute 3-11 13-13 19, Bogut 6-12 1-2 13, Jennings 5-13 4-6 14, Salmons 8-17 5-6 22, Dooling 0-2 0-0 0, Sanders 13 0-0 2, Boykins 0-1 0-0 0, Brockman 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-72 31-37 100. New York 9 32 31 23 — 95 Milwaukee 32 15 28 25 — 100 3-Point Goals—New York 9-22 (Fields 3-6, Anthony 2-3, Billups 2-4, Douglas 1-3, Sha.Williams 1-3, Stoudemire 0-1, Mason 0-2), Milwaukee 7-19 (Delfino 6-11, Salmons 1-3, Dooling 0-1, Jennings 04). Fouled Out—Billups. Rebounds—New York 47 (Stoudemire 11), Milwaukee 58 (Bogut 12). Assists—New York 22 (Douglas 9), Milwaukee 18 (Jennings 9). Total Fouls—New York 26, Milwaukee 18. Technicals—Anthony, New York defensive three second, Bogut, Salmons, Milwaukee defensive three second 3. A—18,052 (18,717).

Suns 108, Clippers 99 LOS ANGELES — Steve Nash had 23 points, 13 assists and seven rebounds. PHOENIX (108) Hill 2-8 2-2 6, Frye 6-14 2-2 19, Lopez 0-2 1-1 1, Nash 8-13 4-6 23, Carter 4-7 0-0 8, Gortat 7-10 3-4 17, Dudley 6-11 0-0 14, Warrick 4-9 4-4 12, Pietrus 0-2 0-0 0, Dowdell 4-8 0-0 8. Totals 41-84 16-19 108. L.A. CLIPPERS (99) Gomes 1-2 0-0 3, Griffin 6-18 5-6 17, Kaman 9-16 3-3 21, Williams 6-13 5-6 18, Gordon 4-11 0-0 10, Aminu 0-1 0-0 0, Diogu 3-6 1-2 7, Bledsoe 2-6 0-0 5, Foye 5-9 0-0 13, Smith 1-1 0-0 2, Cook 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 38-84 14-17 99. Phoenix 27 27 27 27 — 108 L.A. Clippers 23 26 29 21 — 99 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 10-22 (Frye 5-12, Nash 3-3, Dudley 2-3, Carter 0-1, Pietrus 0-1, Hill 0-2), L.A. Clippers 9-20 (Foye 3-4, Gordon 2-6, Cook 1-1, Gomes 1-1, Williams 1-4, Bledsoe 1-4). Fouled Out— Griffin. Rebounds—Phoenix 48 (Gortat 13), L.A. Clippers 47 (Kaman 11). Assists—Phoenix 24 (Nash 13), L.A. Clippers 24 (Williams 7). Total Fouls— Phoenix 15, L.A. Clippers 20. Technicals—Griffin, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—19,060 (19,060).

How former Jayhawks fared

STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

W 49 36 35 22 20

L 19 34 34 46 49

Pct .721 .514 .507 .324 .290

GB — 14 141⁄2 27 291⁄2

W 48 44 40 28 17

L 22 26 30 41 51

Pct .686 .629 .571 .406 .250

GB — 4 8 1 19 ⁄2 30

W 49 30 28 25 13

L 19 40 41 45 55

Pct .721 .429 .406 .357 .191

GB — 20 211⁄2 25 36

W 56 49 40 38 37

L 13 21 31 32 34

Pct .812 .700 .563 .543 .521

GB — 71⁄2 17 181⁄2 20

W 45 41 40 36 17

L 24 29 30 34 54

Pct .652 .586 .571 .514 .239

GB — 1 4 ⁄2 51⁄2 91⁄2 29

W L Pct y-L.A. Lakers 50 20 .714 Phoenix 35 33 .515 Golden State 30 40 .429 L.A. Clippers 27 44 .380 Sacramento 17 51 .250 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Today’s Games Orlando at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Indiana at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Chicago, 7 p.m. Utah at Memphis, 7 p.m. Golden State at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at Denver, 8 p.m.

GB — 14 20 231⁄2 32

y-Boston Philadelphia New York New Jersey Toronto Southeast Division x-Miami x-Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington Central Division y-Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division x-San Antonio x-Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston Northwest Division Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Minnesota Pacific Division

TUESDAY • Baseball at St. James Academy, 5 p.m.

LAWRENCE HIGH

TODAY • Baseball at Bishop Kelley (Okla.), 4:30 p.m.

SEABURY ACADEMY

VERITAS CHRISTIAN

AUTO RACING Kyle Busch sweeps Bristol again

NBA Roundup The Associated Press

FREE STATE HIGH

Mavericks 101, Warriors 73 D A L L A S — Dirk Nowitzki scored 20 points, and Peja Stojakovic added 17, helping the Mavericks get back on track. GOLDEN STATE (73) Wright 2-8 0-0 6, Lee 4-10 2-2 10, Udoh 4-7 0-0 8, Curry 4-12 2-3 11, Ellis 7-18 3-3 18, Thornton 2-7 44 8, Law 1-2 0-0 2, Amundson 1-3 0-4 2, Williams 2-8 0-0 5, Radmanovic 0-2 0-0 0, Adrien 0-0 3-4 3. Totals 27-77 14-20 73. DALLAS (101) Stevenson 3-6 0-0 8, Nowitzki 9-15 2-2 20, Chandler 0-4 7-8 7, Kidd 3-8 0-0 8, Beaubois 5-11 45 15, Barea 1-7 1-2 4, Cardinal 0-3 2-2 2, Stojakovic 6-11 0-0 17, Terry 4-10 0-0 9, Mahinmi 2-3 5-6 9, Brewer 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 34-80 21-25 101. Golden State 23 20 20 10 — 73 Dallas 31 20 25 25 — 101 3-Point Goals—Golden State 5-20 (Wright 2-6, Curry 1-3, Williams 1-4, Ellis 1-6, Radmanovic 0-1), Dallas 12-34 (Stojakovic 5-8, Stevenson 2-5, Kidd 2-7, Terry 1-3, Beaubois 1-4, Barea 1-4, Brewer 0-1, Cardinal 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Golden State 45 (Lee 12), Dallas 61 (Chandler 17). Assists—Golden State 16 (Curry 6), Dallas 24 (Barea, Kidd 6). Total Fouls—Golden State 19, Dallas 22. Technicals—Dallas defensive three second. A—20,324 (19,200).

Hawks 104, Pistons 96 A T L A N T A — Al Horford scored 18 points, Josh Smith and Joe Johnson each added 17, and Atlanta stopped a twogame slide. DETROIT (96) Prince 5-13 0-0 10, Monroe 6-7 5-8 17, Wallace 12 0-0 2, McGrady 2-8 0-0 4, Hamilton 2-9 2-2 6, Stuckey 9-18 3-3 22, Wilcox 9-10 0-0 18, Villanueva 2-4 1-2 6, Gordon 2-4 0-0 6, Daye 1-3 2-2 5. Totals 39-78 13-17 96. ATLANTA (104) Williams 5-7 2-3 13, Smith 8-13 1-2 17, Horford 5-11 8-9 18, Hinrich 6-11 0-0 15, Johnson 7-13 2-4 17, Crawford 3-8 1-3 9, Pachulia 2-5 9-10 13, Wilkins 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 37-70 23-31 104. Detroit 17 33 24 22 — 96 Atlanta 21 34 24 25 — 104 3-Point Goals—Detroit 5-15 (Gordon 2-4, Villanueva 1-2, Daye 1-2, Stuckey 1-3, McGrady 0-1, Prince 0-1, Hamilton 0-2), Atlanta 7-15 (Hinrich 3-6, Crawford 2-6, Johnson 1-1, Williams 1-1, Smith 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 38 (Monroe 10), Atlanta 46 (Horford 10). Assists—Detroit 23 (Stuckey 8), Atlanta 25 (Johnson 8). Total Fouls— Detroit 21, Atlanta 12. Technicals—McGrady, Wilcox, Atlanta defensive three second. A—17,580 (18,729).

Kings 127, Timberwolves 95 MINNEAPOLIS — Samuel Dalembert had 26 points and 17

SPORTS ON TV TODAY College Basketball Time Missouri St. v. Miami 6 p.m. Davidson v. Creighton 7 p.m. New Mexico v. Alabama 8 p.m. Duquesne v. Oregon 9 p.m. Okla. St. v. Wash. St. 10:30 p.m.

Net ESPN HDNET ESPN HDNET ESPN2

Cable 33, 233 298 33, 233 298 34, 234

Women’s Basketball NCAA Tourney NCAA Tourney NCAA Tourney

Net ESPN2 ESPNU ESPN2

Cable 34, 234 35, 235 34, 234

Spring Training Time Philadelphia v. Boston Noon

Net ESPN

Cable 33, 233

NHL Pittsburgh v. Detroit

Net VS.

Cable 38, 238

Cole Aldrich, Oklahoma City Did not play (coach’s decision) Nick Collison, Oklahoma City Pts: 5. FGs: 2-2. FTs: 1-2. Drew Gooden, Milwaukee Did not play (foot injury) Kirk Hinrich, Atlanta Pts: 15. FGs: 6-11. FTs: 0-0. Darnell Jackson, Sacramento Pts: 8. FGs: 2-2. FTs: 3-4.

rebounds, and Marcus Thornton added 23 points. SACRAMENTO (127) Garcia 2-11 2-2 7, Cousins 1-2 1-2 3, Dalembert 13-20 0-2 26, Udrih 8-13 1-1 19, Thornton 7-12 5-6 23, Thompson 3-8 0-0 6, Jeter 6-9 1-1 13, Casspi 13 0-2 2, Greene 5-8 0-2 13, Jackson 2-2 3-4 8, Taylor 3-3 1-1 7. Totals 51-91 14-23 127. MINNESOTA (95) Beasley 3-8 7-9 13, Love 0-2 0-0 0, Milicic 6-10 12 13, Ridnour 8-13 3-4 22, Johnson 1-5 0-0 2, Webster 2-6 2-2 7, Ellington 4-9 0-0 8, Pekovic 1-3 0-0 2, Flynn 1-5 0-0 3, Randolph 6-11 2-3 14, Tolliver 1-2 1-2 4, Hayward 2-5 2-2 7. Totals 35-79 18-24 95. Sacramento 28 29 28 42 — 127 Minnesota 23 25 27 20 — 95 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 11-22 (Thornton 4-5, Greene 3-5, Udrih 2-4, Jackson 1-1, Garcia 1-5, Casspi 0-2), Minnesota 7-17 (Ridnour 3-3, Tolliver 1-1, Webster 1-2, Flynn 1-3, Hayward 1-3, Beasley 0-1, Ellington 0-2, Johnson 0-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Sacramento 58 (Dalembert 17), Minnesota 41 (Milicic 6). Assists—Sacramento 30 (Thornton 9), Minnesota 20 (Love, Ridnour 4). Total Fouls—Sacramento 22, Minnesota 20. Technicals—Cousins 2, Garcia, Beasley, Pekovic, Randolph. Ejected—Cousins. A—18,993 (19,356).

Wizards 98, Nets 92 W A S H I N G T O N — John Wall scored 26 points, and Washington overcame a 17-point deficit to get the win. NEW JERSEY (92) James 4-7 0-0 8, Humphries 7-17 4-5 18, Lopez 916 3-4 21, Farmar 5-14 0-0 10, Morrow 7-13 2-2 19, Vujacic 1-8 3-3 5, Gaines 1-4 0-2 2, Petro 4-7 0-0 8, Outlaw 0-1 1-2 1, Graham 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-87 13-18 92. WASHINGTON (98) Booker 4-10 1-2 9, Yi 3-8 3-4 9, McGee 8-9 0-0 16, Wall 11-22 4-6 26, Crawford 8-17 5-5 21, Seraphin 1-1 0-0 2, Evans 7-11 0-0 15, Martin 0-2 0-0 0, Jeffers 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 42-81 13-17 98. New Jersey 35 21 12 24 — 92 Washington 23 20 28 27 — 98 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 3-17 (Morrow 3-7, James 0-1, Outlaw 0-1, Vujacic 0-2, Farmar 0-3, Gaines 0-3), Washington 1-8 (Evans 1-2, Martin 01, Booker 0-1, Crawford 0-2, Wall 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 57 (Humphries 17), Washington 40 (Booker 8). Assists—New Jersey 26 (Farmar 17), Washington 21 (Wall 8). Total Fouls—New Jersey 23, Washington 15. A—17,761 (20,173).

Lakers 84, Trail Blazers 80 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 10 of his 22 points in a dynamic fourth quarter, and the Los Angeles Lakers rallied from behind in the final three minutes for their 12th win in 13 games. Nicolas Batum scored 22 of his 25 points in the first three quarters for the Blazers. PORTLAND (80) Batum 10-16 1-2 25, Wallace 4-8 1-2 9, Aldridge 8-17 2-3 18, Miller 3-14 1-2 7, Matthews 0-4 0-0 0, Camby 1-2 1-2 3, Fernandez 3-10 2-2 10, Roy 3-12 2-2 8, Mills 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-83 10-15 80. L.A. LAKERS (84) Artest 4-9 2-2 10, Odom 8-11 0-0 16, Gasol 6-15 2-3 14, Fisher 3-6 2-2 8, Bryant 9-20 2-2 22, Barnes 2-6 2-2 7, Blake 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 3-8 1-1 7, Caracter 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-78 1112 84. Portland 20 28 18 14 — 80 L.A. Lakers 27 17 18 22 — 84 3-Point Goals—Portland 6-25 (Batum 4-9, Fernandez 2-7, Wallace 0-2, Matthews 0-2, Roy 05), L.A. Lakers 3-17 (Bryant 2-7, Barnes 1-3, Fisher 0-1, Blake 0-1, Brown 0-2, Artest 0-3). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Portland 57 (Camby 10), L.A. Lakers 43 (Gasol 13). Assists—Portland 21 (Miller 5), L.A. Lakers 24 (Odom 6). Total Fouls—Portland 11, L.A. Lakers 17. Technicals—Artest, L.A. Lakers defensive three second. A—18,997 (18,997).

Time 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 8 p.m.

Time 6:30 p.m.

TUESDAY College Basketball NIT Kent St. v. Colorado NAIA Championship

Time 6 p.m. 8 p.m. 9 p.m.

Net ESPN ESPN CBSC

Cable 33, 233 33, 233 143, 243

Women’s Basketball NCAA Tourney NAIA Championship NCAA Tourney NCAA Tourney

Time 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 8 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

Net ESPN2 CBSC ESPN2 ESPNU

Cable 34, 234 143, 243 34, 234 35, 235

NBA Time Chicago v. Atlanta 7 p.m. Phoenix v. L.A. Lakers 9:30 p.m.

Net TNT TNT

Cable 45, 245 45, 245

NHL Washington v. Philly St. Louis v. Phoenix

Net VS. FSN

Cable 38, 238 36, 236

Spring Training Time Baltimore v. N.Y. YankeesNoon

Net ESPN

Cable 33, 233

College Baseball Time Charleston v. S.Carolina 6 p.m.

Net FCSA

Cable 144

College Lacrosse Dartmouth v. UNC

Net ESPNU

Cable 35, 235

Time 6:30 p.m. 9 p.m.

Time 6 p.m.

LATEST LINE NBA Favorite .........................................Points.....................................Underdog Indiana ..........................................2 (196) ...............................NEW JERSEY Orlando .......................................111⁄2 (194) ...............................CLEVELAND Boston..........................................11⁄2 (201) ..................................NEW YORK MEMPHIS.......................................7 (203) ..............................................Utah 1 CHICAGO .....................................14 ⁄2 (196) .............................Sacramento SAN ANTONIO ............................101⁄2 (211)...................................Golden St DENVER.......................................121⁄2 (214) ......................................Toronto COLLEGE BASKETBALL Favorite .........................................Points.....................................Underdog N.I.T. Tournament Second Round MIAMI-FLORIDA...............................41⁄2......................................Missouri St ALABAMA .........................................41⁄2 ....................................New Mexico WASHINGTON ST ............................51⁄2 ..................................Oklahoma St CBI Tournament Quarterfinals CENTRAL FLORIDA.........................41⁄2..................................Rhode Island CREIGHTON........................................7 ...........................................Davidson BOISE ST.............................................9..........................................Evansville OREGON...............................................1..........................................Duquesne College Insider Tournament Quarterfinals NORTHERN IOWA............................71⁄2 ...................................................Smu Thursday, March 24th NCAA Tournament Louisiana Superdome-New Orleans, LA. Southeast Regional Semifinals Florida..........................................21⁄2 (149)...............................................Byu Wisconsin .....................................4 (123)............................................Butler NCAA Tournament Honda Center-Anaheim, CA. West Regional Semifinals Connecticut..................................1 (129) ...............................San Diego St Duke...............................................X (XXX) .........................XXXXXXXXXXXX Friday, March 25th NCAA Tournament Prudential Center-Newark, NJ. East Regional Semifinals North Carolina...........................X (XXX) .........................XXXXXXXXXXXX Kentucky......................................X (XXX) .........................XXXXXXXXXXXX NCAA Tournament Alamodome-San Antonio, TX. Southwest Regional Semifinals Richmond ....................................X (XXX) .........................XXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXX........................X (XXX) .........................XXXXXXXXXXXX NHL Favorite..........................................Goals .....................................Underdog DETROIT........................................Even-1⁄2...................................Pittsburgh LOS ANGELES..................................1⁄2-1 ............................................Calgary Home Team in CAPS (C) 2011 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

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SPORTS

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

X Monday, March 21, 2011

| 3A.

NCAA SOUTHWEST REGIONAL

Irish, Purdue upset most of the night by the Seminoles’ defense, scoring 18 points on 5-of-13 shooting Florida State 71, before fouling out with 3:19 Notre Dame 57 CHICAGO — Bernard James left. scored 14 points, Michael FLORIDA ST. (23-10) Snaer added 13 and Florida White 2-6 6-7 10, James 6-8 2-3 14, Snaer 5-7 02-7 5-6 10, Dulkys 3-5 0-0 8, Jordan State showed there’s more to 00-013,0-0Kitchen 0, Gibson 0-3 0-0 0, Shannon 0-1 2-4 2, its game than defense with a Rutledge 1-2 0-0 3, Loucks 1-1 2-3 5, Miller 1-3 0dominant upset of second- 0 3, Singleton 0-2 0-0 0, Moreau 0-0 0-0 0, Kreft 1-2 3. Totals 22-48 18-25 71. seeded Notre Dame that put 1-3 NOTRE DAME (27-7) Nash 2-3 0-0 4, Abromaitis 8-18 2-2 21, Scott 1the Seminoles in the round of 2-2 4, Martin 0-4 0-0 0, Hansbrough 5-13 4-6 16 for the first time since 1993. 10 18, Atkins 3-10 1-4 7, Dragicevich 0-0 0-1 0, It was an impressive effort Knight 0-0 0-0 0, Brooks 0-3 2-2 2, Cooley 0-1 0Kopko 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 19-62 12-19 57. by the 10th-seeded Seminoles, 0 0,Halftime—Florida St. 34-23. 3-Point Goals— who had four players in dou- Florida St. 9-19 (Snaer 3-4, Dulkys 2-4, Loucks 11-1, Kitchen 1-2, Miller 1-3, Gibson 0ble figures and went 9 of 19 1,1, Rutledge White 0-1, Singleton 0-2), Notre Dame 7-30 from three-point range. (Hansbrough 4-10, Abromaitis 3-9, Martin 0-1, Florida State (23-10) now Brooks 0-2, Atkins 0-4, Scott 0-4). Fouled Out— Hansbrough. Rebounds—Florida St. 40 faces upstart Virginia Com- Brooks, (James 10), Notre Dame 38 (Scott 11). Assists— monwealth in the Southwest Florida St. 15 (Loucks, Snaer 4), Notre Dame 12 5). Total Fouls—Florida St. 18, Notre regional semifinals Friday in (Atkins Dame 25. Technicals—Singleton, Snaer, Scott. San Antonio. According to A—18,146. STATS LLC, it will be the first 10 vs. 11 matchup in NCAA Virginia Commonwealth 94, Tournament history. Purdue 76 C H I C A G O — Bradford For Notre Dame, meanwhile, it was another disap- Burgess scored 23 points and pointing showing in the 11th-seeded VCU made it NCAAs. The Fighting Irish three victories in five days, (27-7) had their highest seed routing third-seeded Purdue since 1981 under Digger to earn a trip to the Southwest Phelps, but they’ve reached regional semifinals. the regional semifinals only VCU’s remarkable run once in the last 24 years sends the Rams to the round (2003). of 16 for the f irst time in Big East player of the year school history. They’ve oustBen Hansbrough was stifled ed Southern California, The Associated Press

John Young/Journal-World Photo

KANSAS OUTFIELDER CASEY LYTLE DELIVERS A HIT during the first game of a doubleheader against Oklahoma State. The Jayhawks swept the Cowboys on Sunday at Hoglund Ballpark.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Kansas sweeps OSU J-W Staff Reports

Senior Jimmy Waters went 3-for-4 and drove in what proved to be the winning run as Kansas knocked off Oklahoma State, 5-4, to sweep a Big 12 baseball doubleheader Sunday at Hoglund Ballpark. KU won the first game, 7-2. Kansas improved to 9-10 on the season and 2-1 in the Big 12 with the victory. The loss dropped the Cowboys to 14-5 on the season and 1-2 in the Big 12. This is the third straight year the Jayhawks have won their first Big 12 series of the season. “I’m really proud of how mature we were this weekend,” KU coach Ritch Price said. “We showed some toughness, and we grinded through all three days of the series. I think it shows the progress that we’ve made in the last four weeks. We’ve played a really difficult schedule to prepare for this weekend, and I think you just saw the benefit of it.” The Cowboys made one last attempt at a rally in the top of the ninth as catcher Jared Womack made it 5-4 with a sacrifice fly. The Cowboys put runners on the corners with two outs, but Kansas reliever Colton Murray shut down the OSU offense, getting right fielder Randy McCurry to fly out to right to end the game. Murray earned his second victory, pitching four innings of relief and allowing two runs on five hits. Freshman Alex Cox pitched five innings, giving up two runs on eight hits with six strikeouts. Waters and Elgie both

BOX SCORES KANSAS 7-5, OKLAHOMA STATE 2-4 First Game OKLAHOMA STATE ab r Davis Duren 2b 4 1 Zach Johnson 1b 4 0 0 Dane Phillips dh 3 1 Devin Shines lf 3 0 Jared Womack c 4 0 Mark Ginther 3b 4 0 Luis Uribe rf 2 0 Heath Wilda ph 1 0 Graham Saiko rf 1 0 Gabe Weidenaar cf 2 0 Hunter Bailey ss 3 0 Totals 31 2

h 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 8

bi 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

KANSAS ab r h bi Jason Brunansky cf 5 0 1 0 Casey Lytle rf 4 1 1 0 Jimmy Waters lf 4 1 1 3 Jake Marasco 3b 4 0 1 1 Brandon Macias ss 5 1 2 0 Alex DeLeon c 4 0 0 0 Zac Elgie 1b 4 1 2 0 Chris Manship dh 4 2 2 1 Kaiana Eldredge 2b 3 1 2 1 Totals 37 7 12 6 Oklahoma State 101 000 000 — 2 Kansas 030 400 00x — 7 E—Ginther, Barnes. DP—Kansas 1. LOB— Oklahoma State 6, Kansas 10. 2B—Duren, Saiko, Brunansky, Eldredge. 3B—Waters. HR—Phillips. SF—Shines. IP H R ER BB SO OKLAHOMA STATE Andrew Heaney L,3-1 31⁄3 6 5 5 1 1 Blake Barnes 42⁄3 6 2 2 2 3 KANSAS Tanner Poppe W,1-2 7 7 2 2 3 3 Frank Duncan 2 1 0 0 0 3 WP—Heaney. HBP—by Heaney (Waters). PB— Womack. T—2:19. A—N/A.

enjoyed multi-hit and multiRBI days. In the first game, Waters’ three-run triple in the fourth inning led the Jayhawks. “I was on deck, and I was just hoping that (Casey) Lytle was going to get on, because I wanted an opportunity to try to salvage some of the slow start. I put a good swing on a changeup that hung. I’m just really happy that the ball fell in for me, because I thought I hit it well enough to get out of the ballpark. It just fell in the gap. It was a big hit for us and a big blow for them.” KU starter Tanner Poppe

Second Game OKLAHOMA STATE Davis Duren 2b Zach Johnson 1b Andrew Heck pr Dane Phillips dh/rf Jared Womack c Mark Ginther 3b Devin Shines lf Randy McCurry rf/p GAbe Weidenaar cf Hunter Bailey ss Totals

ab 5 2 0 5 4 5 5 5 3 4 38

r 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

h 1 2 0 3 2 1 1 2 1 0 13

bi 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4

KANSAS ab r h bi Jason Brunansky cf 3 0 1 0 Casey Lytle rf 3 1 1 0 Jimmy Waters lf 4 1 3 2 Jake Marasco 3b 3 0 00 0 Jordan Dreiling 3b 0 0 0 0 Brandon Macias ss 4 1 0 0 Zac Elgie 1b 3 0 2 2 Alex DeLeon c 3 1 0 0 Chris Manship dh 3 0 1 1 Kaiana Eldredge 2b 3 1 1 0 Totals 29 5 9 5 Oklahoma State 000 021 001—4 Kansas 000 211 10X—5 E—Ginther, McCurry, Macias. DP—OSU. LOB— OSU 12, KU 6. 2B—Johnson 2, Phillips 9, Womack 2, Ginther, Waters, Manship. 3B—Eldredge. SH— Weidenaar, Marasco. SF—Womack. CS— Brunansky, Elgie, Manship. IP H R ER BB SO OKLAHOMA STATE Mike Strong 32⁄3 5 2 2 1 5 Chris Marlowe, L 1-1 2 3 2 2 3 2 Randy McCurry 21⁄3 1 1 0 0 2 KANSAS Alex Cox 5 8 2 2 1 6 Colton Murray W, 2-0 4 5 2 2 1 0 WP—Cox. HBP—by Cox (Johnson), by McCurry (Elgie). T—2:35. A—1,165.

pitched seven strong innings, surrendering two runs on seven hits with three walks and three strikeouts. In relief, freshman Frank Duncan went two innings, giving up just one hit and striking out three. Chris Manship went 2-for4 with an RBI. “We’ve played in a lot of close games and really struggled swinging the bats. Today, we broke out with the bats; I think we had seven two-out RBIs in the game one win.” Kansas will take on Arkansas-Little Rock at 3 p.m. Tuesday at Hoglund Ballpark.

COLLEGE SOFTBALL

Grand slam propels KU J-W Staff Reports

C O N W A Y , S . C . — Tied through six innings, Kansas University loaded the bases in the top of the seventh, and sophomore Maggie Hull launched a grand slam to lift the Jayhawks to a 6-2 softball victory over Coastal Carolina on Sunday. Kansas concluded the weekend a perfect 5-0 to win the Chanticleer Classic, its fifth pre-conference tournament title this season. KU also extended an 11-game winning streak as it improved to 26-3 overall. CCU fell to 14-11 on the season. “I am really proud of the way we played this weekend,” KU coach Megan Smith said. “We were definitely tested, and our girls battled and did extremely well. I think Maggie Hull had an unbelievable weekend at the plate so we’re really proud of her and we’re really excited to start Big 12 play Wednesday.” Hull led Kansas with a .438 batting average (7-for-16) during the tournament, including two home runs and two dou-

BOX SCORE KANSAS Alex Jones cf Kelsey Alsdorf ph Rosie Hull rf Brittany Hile c Liz Kocon dp Mariah Montgomery 2b Maggie Hull lf Ashley Newman ss Marissa Ingle 3b Kendra Cullum 1b Laura Vickers ph-1b Totals

ab 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 33

r 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 6

h 0 0 1 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 12

bi 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 6

COASTAL CAROLINA ab r h bi B. Donovan 2b 4 0 1 0 S. Maples lf 2 0 0 0 M. Evans p 3 0 0 0 C. Pierre dp 3 0 0 0 C. Pineda c 3 0 2 0 K. Vonatzski pr 0 1 0 0 J. Winans ss 1 1 0 0 J. Daigle 3b 3 0 0 0 S. Snellings 1b 2 0 0 0 Piccirillo cf 3 0 2 2 Totals 24 2 5 2 Kansas 001 010 4—5 Coastal Carolina 020 000 0—2 E—Newman, Ingle, Winans 3. LOB—Kansas 10, Coastal 5. 2B—Pinda. HR—Hill, M. Hull. SH— Jones, INgle, Maples, Winans 2. IP H R ER BB SO KANSAS Kristin Martinez W,12-1 7 5 2 0 0 4 COASTAL CAROLINA M. Evans L,4-3 7 12 6 4 2 2 WP—Evans 2. HBP—by Martinez (Snellings). T—1:56. A—163.

bles to help bring in a teamhigh seven RBIs. KU found itself trailing after an error in the bottom of the second inning scored two unearned Coastal runs.

Senior Brittany Hile was responsible for tying the game as she batted in a run in the third and fifth innings. Her single up the middle in the third frame plated Kendra Cullum, while her leadoff homer in the fifth knotted the score at 2-all. The round-tripper was her team-high 10th home run of the season. Hile finished 3-for-4, while Liz Kocon and Maggie Hull added two hits apiece as KU outhit the Chanticleers, 12-5. Hull’s home run marked her second grand slam of the season and the team’s sixth. Sunday’s finale was also the Jayhawks’ 10th contest with multiple home runs. Freshman pitcher Kristin Martinez collected the win, improving to 12-1 with her seventh complete game. The lefty hurler gave up no walks in the outing and added four strikeouts as she improved her ERA to a team-best 1.63. Kansas is back in action for its home and Big 12 Conference opener on Wednesday versus Missouri. The doubleheader is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m.

Georgetown and P urdue since Wednesday night. VCU (26-11) will play Florida State on Friday in San Antonio. Jamie Skeen added 13 points in a balanced attack as the Rams led by as many 20, shutting down the Boilermakers (26-8) and quieting a large contingent of Purdue fans at the United Center. Speedy floor leader Joey Rodriguez had 12 points and 11 assists, controlling the tempo. VCU shot 57 percent and had 26 assists to just four turnovers. Big Ten player of the year JaJuan Johnson scored 25 in his final game for the Boilermakers to go with 14 rebounds. VCU (26-11) Rodriguez 5-10 1-2 12, Burgess 8-12 4-4 23, Skeen 5-9 3-4 13, Haley 2-2 2-2 6, Nixon 5-8 0-0 11, Reddic 6-8 0-0 12, Theus 1-1 0-0 2, Brandenberg 1-2 0-0 2, Daniels 1-1 0-0 3, Veal 0-1 0-0 0, Rozzell 3-11 2-2 10. Totals 37-65 12-14 94. PURDUE (26-8) Byrd 2-7 1-2 6, Jackson 3-10 4-4 10, Smith 7-9 0-0 20, J. Johnson 11-20 2-3 25, Moore 5-15 0-0 10, T. Johnson 2-5 1-2 5, Hart 0-1 0-0 0, Carroll 00 0-0 0, Marcius 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-67 8-11 76. Halftime—VCU 42-32. 3-Point Goals—VCU 8-21 (Burgess 3-4, Rozzell 2-8, Daniels 1-1, Nixon 1-2, Rodriguez 1-4, Brandenberg 0-1, Skeen 0-1), Purdue 8-25 (Smith 6-8, J. Johnson 1-4, Byrd 1-5, Hart 0-1, Jackson 0-2, T. Johnson 0-2, Moore 0-3). Fouled Out—Byrd. Rebounds—VCU 35 (Burgess 8), Purdue 33 (J. Johnson 14). Assists—VCU 26 (Rodriguez 11), Purdue 20 (Jackson 7). Total Fouls—VCU 13, Purdue 15. A—NA.

NCAA WEST REGIONAL

Arizona edges Texas The Associated Press

Arizona 70, Texas 69 T U L S A , O K L A . — Derrick Williams is now 2-for-2 in game-saving plays in the NCAA Tournament. The Arizona sophomore and Pac-10 Player of the Year made his second in as many tournament games Sunday night, completing a threepoint play with 9.6 seconds remaining to lift the Wildcats. Williams also had the saving block with 2 seconds remaining in Arizona’s opening 77-75 win over Memphis on Friday. He struggled for much of the game Sunday but f inished with 17 points, including the final three. “I wasn’t surprised by the block against Memphis,” Williams said. “I am a little surprised by the shot I made today. I haven’t seen the replay yet, but I wasn’t looking at the basket. I was looking down so I wouldn’t have a hard fall. “I was surprised it went in, but at the same time I’m glad it went in.” The win over the No. 4 seed Longhorns didn’t come without its share of controversy. Texas (28-8) trailed by as many as 13 points in the first half before J’Covan Brown scored 21 of his 23 in the second to lead the Longhorns back into the game. Brown was 13-of-13 on free throws, bringing his twogame tournament total to a perfect 25-of-25. His jumper in the lane with just over a minute remaining gave Texas a 69-67 lead, its first since it was up 12-11 early in the game. The shot appeared as though it would keep the

Longhorns in the lead for good after Williams misfired on a go-ahead attempt with 14.5 seconds remaining. Texas freshman Tristan Thompson blocked the attempt, which Jordan Hamilton corralled before calling a timeout for the Longhorns. Following the timeout is when the fun began, at least for Arizona. Texas’ Cory Joseph struggled to inbound the ball against the swarming Wildcats defense and appeared to call a timeout. However, referee Richard Cartmell called Joseph for a five-second violation, though replays showed he appeared to make the call before reaching five. “I had five seconds before the kid turned and signaled a timeout,” Cartmell said in a statement. “I had to make a decision whether it was five seconds or a timeout, and I made the decision it was five seconds because I had counted five seconds before he called timeout.” Texas coach Rick Barnes only wished afterward that replays could have been used to determine if the correct call had been made.

Duke 73, Michigan 71 C H A R L O T T E , N . C . — Nolan Smith scored 24 points and Duke held off a late rally to beat Michigan and give coach Mike Krzyzewski his 900th career victory. Kyle Singler added 1 3 points for the Blue Devils (32-4), who shot 51 percent, never trailed in the second half and advanced to the round of 16 for the 12th time in 14 years. Darius Morris scored 16 points to lead the eighthseeded Wolverines (21-14), who trailed by 15 with 10:51 to play but clawed within one point twice in the final 90 seconds. They had one last chance after Smith missed a free throw with 8.7 seconds left. Morris’ runner in the lane with 2 seconds left bounced off the back iron and Smith grabbed the rebound at the buzzer, sealing Duke’s trip to Anaheim for the West regional semifinals. Kyrie Irving and Ryan Kelly scored 11 points apiece for the defending national champions, who won their eighth straight game in the NCAA Tournament.

ARIZONA (29-7) Jones 0-6 0-0 0, Fogg 2-2 0-0 5, Williams 4-14 915 17, Perry 2-5 0-0 4, Hill 7-12 2-2 16, Natyazhko 0-1 0-0 0, Parrom 1-3 1-2 4, Mayes 6-7 0-0 16, Lavender 2-2 2-3 8, Horne 0-2 0-0 0, Jacobson 00 0-0 0. Totals 24-54 14-22 70. TEXAS (28-8) Johnson 6-9 2-3 14, Hamilton 7-18 1-2 18, Balbay 1-1 1-2 3, Joseph 3-5 0-0 6, Thompson 1-4 1-2 3, Lucas 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 5-13 13-13 23, Wangmene 1-2 0-0 2, Hill 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 24-53 18-22 69. Halftime—Arizona 36-25. 3-Point Goals— Arizona 8-14 (Mayes 4-4, Lavender 2-2, Fogg 1-1, Parrom 1-2, Horne 0-1, Perry 0-1, Williams 0-3), Texas 3-11 (Hamilton 3-7, Lucas 0-1, Brown 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Arizona 32 (Williams 9), Texas 33 (Hamilton, Johnson, Thompson 6). Assists—Arizona 17 (Fogg 4), Texas 13 (Joseph 4). Total Fouls—Arizona 20, Texas 17. A—NA.

MICHIGAN (21-14) Morgan 4-5 2-2 10, Novak 4-9 0-0 12, Douglass 1-4 0-1 2, Morris 7-14 2-2 16, Hardaway Jr. 5-12 4-4 15, Vogrich 0-1 0-0 0, Horford 1-1 1-1 3, McLimans 0-0 0-0 0, Smotrycz 5-7 1-1 13. Totals 27-53 10-11 71. DUKE (32-4) Ma. Plumlee 2-2 0-2 4, Singler 5-12 2-5 13, Mi. Plumlee 2-3 0-0 4, Smith 8-13 6-7 24, Curry 0-3 00 0, Irving 1-4 9-10 11, Dawkins 2-6 0-0 6, Kelly 56 1-1 11. Totals 25-49 18-25 73. Halftime—Duke 37-33. 3-Point Goals— Michigan 7-21 (Novak 4-9, Smotrycz 2-2, Hardaway Jr. 1-6, Vogrich 0-1, Morris 0-1, Douglass 0-2), Duke 5-20 (Smith 2-4, Dawkins 25, Singler 1-5, Kelly 0-1, Irving 0-2, Curry 0-3). Fouled Out—Smotrycz. Rebounds—Michigan 22 (Novak 5), Duke 33 (Singler 8). Assists— Michigan 13 (Morris 6), Duke 12 (Singler 4). Total Fouls—Michigan 23, Duke 18. A—18,329.

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4A

KANSAS 73,

| Monday, March 21, 2011

Fast break HALFTIME Illinois Kansas

Pick-and-roll key for Jayhawks ————

29 33

BRIEFLY

Illinois led twice early, at 3-2 and 5-4, before the Jayhawks bolted to a lead that hit 12 at its first-half peak, 18-6. … Kansas led, 18-10, in points in the paint, 8-6 in points off turnovers, 8-0 in fast-break points and 6-5 in bench points. … Illinois led, 4-3, in secondchance points.

ILLINOIS LEADERS

Scoring: Mike Davis 11. Rebounding: Mike Tisdale 5. Assists: Demetri McCamey 3. Turnovers: McCamey 3.

KANSAS LEADERS

Halftime adjustment helps Kansas pull away from Illini By Jesse Newell jnewell@ljworld.com

TULSA , O KLA . — Kansas University’s offense was stagnant toward the end of the first half, and KU coach Bill Self told his players he believed he knew why. At halftime of the Jayhawks’ 73-59 victory over Illinois on Sunday, Self told his guards that they needed to be tougher, as Illinois’ guards were pushing them toward midcourt — and out of their offense. “No one’s going to say, ‘Hey, I thought that Kansas

played the ball screen great in the second half, and that’s why they won the game,’” KU senior guard Tyrel Reed said, “but, in essence, I thought we did a good job.” Because KU’s guards were more physical in the second half — and came around ball screens shoulder-to-shoulder with their screen-setting teammates at the three-point line — the Jayhawks were able to get some easy baskets off the pick-and-roll. A few times, KU guard Brady Morningstar wrapped around a ball

screen then dropped a bounce pass for either Marcus or Markieff Morris, who finished the play with a layup or slam. The play works best when the KU guard comes around the ball screen, acts like he is attacking the rim to draw both defenders, then quickly drops off the pass to his unguarded teammate. KU’s guards work on that particular bounce pass every day in practice. “It’s the toughest thing to guard. It really is,” Reed said of the pick-and-roll. “If you’ve got a great point

guard that can make plays — and I think all of our guards can make plays — it’s tough to stop.” It’s especially difficult to defend because of the versatility of the Morris twins. Because the two juniors can drive and also hit three-pointers, opponents have to respect them on cuts to the basket and also when they pop out to the perimeter. “They work it so well. The brothers know each other — the actions and things like that,” Illinois center Mike Tisdale said.

“Their guards were giving them the ball in good spots.” Reed said KU’s ballscreen defense also was improved against Illinois. Not only were KU’s guards sticking to their men better on ball screens, the big men were doing a better job of hedging — or switching for a second before quickly recovering to get back to their original men. “That’s what we practice every day,” Reed said. “When we do it right, we’re a pretty good defensive team.”

Scoring: Markieff Morris 10. Rebounding: Markieff and Marcus Morris 5 each. Assists: Marcus Morris, Elijah Johnson 2 each. Turnovers: Marcus Morris 4.

TALE OF THE TAPE

Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kansas 39.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FFG% . . . . . . . . . . . .✓ 54.2 3ptFG% . . . . . . . . . .✓ 60.0 30.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 80.0 ✓ . . . . . . . . . . . .FFT% . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66.7 Reb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .✓ 16 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R Asst. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A TO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 6 ✓ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T Blk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B Stl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4 ✓ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S

FINAL Illinois Kansas

59 73

BRIEFLY

Pesky Illinois kept the margin in single digits until the final four minutes, when KU gradually pulled away. … Kansas led, 40-20, in points in the paint, 16-8 in points off turnovers, 12-6 in second-chance points and 8-2 in fast-break points. … Illinois had a 15-8 edge in bench points.

ILLINOIS LEADERS

Scoring: Mike Davis 17, D.J. Richardson 15. Rebounding: Mike Tisdale 11. Assists: Demetri McCamey 7. Turnovers: McCamey 4.

KANSAS LEADERS

Scoring: Markieff Morris 24, Marcus Morris 17, Tyshawn Taylor 13. Rebounding: Markieff and Marcus Morris 12 each. Assists: Brady Morningstar 6. Turnovers: Marcus Morris 4.

TALE OF THE TAPE

Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kansas 38.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FFG% . . . . . . . . . . . .✓ 51.9 3ptFG% . . . . . . . . . . . .33.3 28.6 ✓ . . . . . . . . . . .3 77.8 ✓ . . . . . . . . . . . . .FFT% . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75.0 Reb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .✓ 36 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .R Asst. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .✓ 17 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A TO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T Blk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B Stl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 7 ✓ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .S LINES TO REMEMBER

Illinois: Mike Davis 8-for-16 FG, 7 rebounds, 17 points. Kansas: Markieff Morris 10-for-13 FG, 1-for2 3pt FG, 12 rebounds, 24 points. LINES TO FORGET

Illinois: Demetri McCamey 2-for-9 FG, 1for-5 3pt FG, 6 points in 36 minutes. Kansas: Tyrel Reed 1-for-7 FG, 6 points in 32 minutes. BOX SCORE ILLINOIS (59)

FT REB PF TP m-a o-t Mike Davis 39 1-1 2-7 5 17 Bill Cole 20 1-2 1-3 3 3 Mike Tisdale 35 4-4 5-11 3 13 Brandon Paul 27 0-0 1-3 3 5 Demetri McCamey 36 1-2 0-3 1 6 D.J. Richardson 31 0-0 0-2 0 15 Crandall Head 6 0-0 0-0 0 0 Tyler Griffey 3 0-0 0-1 1 0 Meyers Leonard 2 0-0 0-0 2 0 Joseph Bertrand 1 0-0 0-0 0 0 team 1-1 Totals 23-60 7-9 10-31 18 59 Three-point goals: 6-21 (Richardson 3-8, Paul 1-3, Tisdale 1-5, McCamey 1-5). Assists: 16 (McCamey 7, Paul 3, Tisdale 2, Head 2, Richardson, Bertrand). Turnovers: 12 (McCamey 4, Davis 3, Tisdale, Paul, Richardson, Head, Leonard). Blocked shots: 2 (Tisdale, Richardson). Steals: 7 (Richardson 3, McCamey 2, Davis, Paul). KANSAS (73)

MIN

FG m-a 8-16 1-1 4-14 2-6 2-9 6-14 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

MIN

FG m-a 10-13 6-13 4-6 2-5 1-7 1-3 2-4 0-0 1-1 0-0

FT REB PF TP m-a o-t Markieff Morris 31 3-5 3-12 3 24 Marcus Morris 35 5-6 1-12 0 17 Tyshawn Taylor 23 4-5 0-1 2 13 Brady Morningstar 35 0-0 1-1 1 5 Tyrel Reed 32 3-4 0-3 1 6 Elijah Johnson 19 0-0 0-1 0 2 Thomas Robinson 11 0-0 1-3 1 4 Josh Selby 10 0-0 0-1 2 0 Mario Little 3 0-0 1-1 1 2 Travis Releford 1 0-0 0-0 0 0 team 0-1 Totals 27-5215-20 7-36 11 73 Three-point goals: 4-12 (Taylor 1-1, Markieff Morris 1-2, Morningstar 1-3, Reed 1-5, Johnson 0-1). Assists: 17 (Morningstar 6, Taylor 4, Marcus Morris 2, Johnson 2, Selby 2, Reed). Turnovers: 12 (Marcus Morris 4, Markieff Morris 3, Taylor 3, Morningstar, Johnson). Blocked shots: 2 (Markieff Morris, Robinson). Steals: 5 (Markieff Morris, Marcus Morris, Taylor, Morningstar, Johnson). Illinois ..................................................29 30 — 59 Kansas .................................................33 40 — 73 Officials: Joe DeRosa, Brian Dorsey, Bert Smith. Attendance: 15,839.

Mike Yoder/Journal-World Photo

TYREL REED, LEFT, AND MARKIEFF MORRIS (21) double up on Illinois’ Demetri McCamey.

Kansas CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

eight points in a 10-0 run that stretched a 56-51 lead with 6:33 left to an insurmountable 66-51 at 2:31. The players were unanimous in their feelings about the matter. “Coach always has our back in everything. We had to have his back tonight,” noted senior Brady Morningstar, who contributed five points with six assists against just one turnover. Self, who downplayed his personal feelings about playing his former school before the game, admitted walking away from his postgame media interview session that this was a redletter day in his career. “Yes, that was big for me,” Self acknowledged. “It’s one of those games when the bracket comes out you say, ‘Geez,’ because I know it’d bring some talk back and forth. But eight years is a long time. It wasn’t like it’s been two or three years. “It’s big for me personally in coming back home to Tulsa (where he coached at Oral Roberts and Tulsa) and playing the school I used to coach at where it was controversial when I left. This was big.” Of course, by winning for Self, the Jayhawks did themselves and KU’s legion of fans a favor. The season continues Friday in San Antonio, where the Jayhawks will meet No. 12 seed Richmond at 6:27 p.m. in the Alamodome. The game will be shown on TBS. The winner will play either No. 11-seed VCU or No. 10-Florida State in the Elite Eight in a region full of upsets. “We had a little celebration in here,” Marcus Morris said of the locker room. “We finally got over the hump after losing to Northern Iowa (in second game) last year. Now it’s time to see if we can get two wins in our next weekend tournament.”

Self again was brutally honest when asked if he felt “relieved” the Jayhawks advanced after losing as a top seed so early last season. “I’d be lying if I said no,” Self said. “You say all the time ‘attack mode’ and smile and have fun, but at the end of the day it was a big win for us. They’ve been reminded a long time of what happened last year.” As far as the specifics of actually how KU advanced, the Jayhawks not only had the back-breaking 10-0 run late, but a 14-1 surge in the first half (Tyshawn Taylor had five points and Markieff Morris four) that turned KANSAS GUARD TYREL REED (14) GETS UP for a rebound against Illinois in the second half. KU beat the a 5-4 deficit into an 18-6 lead. “The twins were awesome,” said Self, who felt conf ident at halftime despite the fact the Illini lagged by just four, 33-29. “I told our guys it was the same score as the Boston game,” he added of a 72-53 first-round victory. “Even though they cut the lead from 12 to four, I still felt we had control of the game because it really hurt us when Tyshawn got his second foul (with KU up, 20-13 with 10:04 left in first half; Taylor sat out the rest of the half). “I thought Elijah did a great job on Demetri in his absence,” he added of guard Demetri McCamey, who had just six points off 2-of-9 shooting, including one of five from three. “Then in the second half we kind of got it going and Nick Krug/Journal-World Photo played through these two KANSAS FORWARD THOMAS ROBINSON (0) BATTLES INSIDE for a rebound with the guys,” he added of the Illinois defense during the first half. twins, who erupted for a combined 26 points the final half. Illinois’ Mike Davis had 17 points, D.J. Richardson 15 Exhibition Colorado, W 89-63 (25-2, 10-2) at California, W 78-63 (11-0) Texas-Arlington, W 82-57 (12-0) Oklahoma State, W 92-65 (26-2, 11-2) and Mike Tisdale 13, but Washburn, W 92-62 Miami (Ohio), W 83-56 (13-0) State, W 90-59 at Oklahoma, W 82-70 (27-2, 12-2) holding McCamey down REmporia egular Season UMKC, W 99-52 (14-0) Texas A&M, W 64-51 (28-2, 13-2) was pivotal. at Michigan, W 67-60, OT (15-0) Longwood, W 113-75 (1-0) at Missouri, W 70-66 (29-2, 14-2) at Iowa State, W 84-79 (16-0, 1-0) Big 12 tournament “Coach said if we cut the Valparaiso, W 79-44 (2-0) Nebraska, W 63-60 (17-0, 2-0) North Texas, W 90-63 (3-0) Oklahoma State, W 63-62 (30-2, 14head off the rest of the team Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, W 82-41 at Baylor, W 85-65 (18-0, 3-0) 2) Texas, L 63-74 (18-1, 3-1) Colorado, W 90-83 (31-2, 14-2) would follow. That’s what (4-0) at Colorado, W 82-78 (19-1, 4-1) University in Las Vegas, W, 98Texas, W 85-73 (32-2, 14-2) we did,” Taylor said. “I’m 41Ohio NCAA Tournament Kansas State, W 90-66 (20-1, 5-1) (5-0) really excited about next Arizona in Las Vegas, W 87-79 (6-0) at Texas Tech, W 88-66 (21-1, 6-1) Boston U. in Tulsa, Okla., W 72-53 at Nebraska, W 86-66 (22-1, 7-1) (33-2) week. Coach told us to be UCLA, W 77-76 (7-0) Missouri, W 103-86 (23-1, 8-1) W 81-68 (8-0) Illinois in Tulsa, Okla., W 73-59 (34happy, have fun, but not to Memphis, Iowa State, W 89-66 (24-1, 9-1) Colorado State, Sprint Center, 2) be content. Just know it’s Kansas City, Mo., W 76-55 (9-0) Friday — vs. Richmond in San at Kansas State, L 68-84 (24-2, 92) USC, W 70-68 (10-0) Antonio, Texas, 6:27 p.m. not over yet.”

KU BASKETBALL SCHEDULE


ILLINOIS 59

X L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

| 5A.

KU slows Illini leader ————

IU’s McCamey held to six points By Matt Tait mtait@ljworld.com

Nick Krug/Journal-World Photo

KANSAS FORWARD MARKIEFF MORRIS, LEFT, WATCHES as teammate Tyshawn Taylor comes away with a steal from Illinois guard Demetri McCamey.

TULSA , O KLA . — Of all the players in college basketball and all the games shown on television this year from which he could choose, Kansas University guard Elijah Johnson probably watched more minutes played by Illinois’ senior Demetri McCamey than anyone. Johnson’s familiarity with McCamey’s game paid off bigtime Sunday at the BOK Center, where KU knocked off Illinois, 73-59, and advanced to the Sweet 16. Two nights after watching the rugged, 6-foot-3, 200pound guard torch UNLV for 17 points and seven assists on 7-of-13 shooting, Kansas held McCamey to six points on 2of-9 shooting in 36 minutes. His final bucket came on a layup with 2:15 to play and Kansas leading 66-51. “That was the key for us. Definitely defensively,” said junior guard Tyshawn Taylor, who drew the defensive assignment from the jump. “Cut the head off, and the rest of the body follows. He’s the key to their team, and that’s what we had to do.” Early on, Taylor used length

and quickness to frustrate McCamey and keep him from being much of a factor. But two first-half fouls sent Taylor to the bench. That’s when Johnson got his shot to pick up where Taylor left off. “Tyshawn did a great job on him to start, and then he got in foul trouble, and I told him, ‘Just because you’re in foul trouble ... he’s gotta deal with another problem,’” Johnson said. That problem was Johnson, who hit McCamey with a dose of toughness that added to the toll Taylor’s quickness, length and athleticism already had taken. Johnson first checked in with 14:19 remaining in the first half. He didn’t check out until the clock showed 1:50. Even then, Johnson only sat for 40 seconds, checking back in at the 1:10 mark to finish the half. “I watched him a whole lot this year, every chance I got,” Johnson said of McCamey. “I just watched him and learned. He’s good. He can teach you just from watching him on TV. So when I heard that I was going to get a chance to play him, I was so psyched about it. I was looking forward to it.” Although Johnson and Tay-

lor were given the bulk of the credit for slowing down the Illini’s leading scorer, McCamey said the credit belonged elsewhere. “I don’t think it was just two guys,” McCamey said. “Their whole team played great defense, and they collapsed on me every time I tried to get into the paint.” The key, Johnson and Taylor said, was staying in front of McCamey and not allowing him to play games with them. “He’s so crafty with the ball, and he can make some good fakes, so the key was just to stay down and be a solid defender,” Taylor said. Added Johnson: “We didn’t want to let him get too comfortable. After a while, he wasn’t into it too much, and that’s when we had to turn it up even more.” In reality, the two KU guards had the defensive dial cranked all the way to the right from the opening tip, something that did not go unnoticed. “Hey, our guards were great,” KU coach Bill Self said. “I believe when the other team’s best player (is) a point guard, you’ve got to do a great job on him. Those guys did a great job on him.”

KANSAS NOTEBOOK Big winner Tyrel Reed has passed Sherron Collins as winningest fouryear player in Kansas University history. Reed has been part of 131 victories against 16 losses. Collins went 130-19 from 2007 to 2010. “Being a Kansas kid ... words can’t describe how proud I am. Being the winningest player in Kansas history is a big honor,” Reed, a senior from Burlington, said after scoring six points off 1-of-7 shooting (1-for-5 from three) in Sunday’s 73-59 Round of 32 victory over Illinois. KU coach Bill Self informed the team of the milestone in a happy locker room after the game. “He said, ‘It’s a cool thing Tyrel had done,’’’ Reed said. The NCAA record for most wins in a four year span is 133 by Duke’s Shane Battier from 1998-2001.

Nick Krug/Journal-World Photo

Illini, 73-59, Sunday in Tulsa, Okla.

Keegan

Numbers earned with rugged play on this night. “I think they’re more tough than they are skilled,” Taylor said. “I think they just CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A use their skill a little bit more. When it gets time with said he knew what I meant,” games like this and they said Woodland’s college know that the refs are letting coach, Ross Randall. “He did- them play, I think they like it n’t miss a single putt inside more, especially Markieff, as 20 feet. Nobody does that. you can see. He was a beast That just doesn’t happen.” today. And Marcus made And Marcus and Markieff some amazing shots, some Morris, who as freshmen tough shots.” said they bypassed dunks in The twins impressed order to conserve energy, tough Tyrel Reed. didn’t miss a chance to rattle “There may be moments the rim in closing out an Illi- in games where coach (Bill) nois team that did a nice job Self says, ‘You’re soft,’ or in of hanging around. practice, but really deep The referees let the players down at the core they’re play in this one, and the twins some tough kids,” Reed said. played through chops on the “They realize they’ve got arm, smacks in the face and each other’s back, no matter shoves in the back without what. So they’re going to hearing a whistle, losing their fight and play as hard as they cool or stopping to beg for a can, and no matter what hapcall. They kept plowing forpens, the other one’s got the ward, kept attacking the rim. other one’s back. I’m proud “It was one of those games of those guys.” where we knew if we didn’t Thomas Robinson, always attack the basket, we easily a physical presence, battles could lose,” said Markieff, the twins in practice and who didn’t let that happen by knows more than anybody contributing 24 points in 12 what’s inside them. rebounds. “I won’t say they’re toughMarcus added 17 points ness is overlooked,” Robinand 12 rebounds. son said. “In my eyes, physi“There’s two of them, cal and tough players are there’s two of them,” point what they are. They played guard Tyshawn Taylor said. like grown men tonight, “That’s what we keep saying. especially in the second half. And they come up with the They took over the game.” same numbers.” All the KU players felt like

a million bucks, even though they made $990,000 less than Woodland on Sunday. “Winning a million dollars, jeez, I bet he’s feeling pretty good right now,” Reed said. “Maybe there’s a correlation. One Jayhawk does good, and the other ones follow.” Self played a round with Woodland a few summers ago at Lawrence Country Club, and Woodland drove the green on the 359-yard first hole. Woodland, who played basketball at Washburn University as a freshman, made the 15-footer for an eagle, and Self spent the next 17 holes trailing him. “This was a big day for KU,” Self said. “I heard he won it on the 18th hole. Moved to No. 3 in the Fed Ex standings, if I’m not mistaken (Self wasn’t), and probably the top five in money (third with $1.85 million). Gary obviously is a great golfer, but what a great guy. And he’s a ballplayer. That gives all of us guys who played ball hope that we can golf. I heard our softball team had a great day, and I heard our baseball team had a good day, so this was a good day for KU athletics.” It certainly was, and three athletes who worked hard to turn their weaknesses into strengths had a big part in making it such a memorable one.

Self respect Self and Illinois coach Bruce Weber passed each other quickly in the handshake line, with Weber telling Self good luck the rest of the way. Self seemed surprised when asked about the handshake in his postgame media session. “We are not close by any means, but that didn’t have anything to do with anything,” Self said, adding that he respects Weber as a coach and the job he’s done at Illinois. Not a shot! Marcus Morris banged a pass off the backboard to his brother, Markieff, who couldn’t complete a highlight-reel dunk. “I’m glad you guys noticed that wasn’t a shot. I would never take a bad shot like that,” Marcus said. “We kind of did it in practice when coach wasn’t looking, so we said we’d do it in

the game because they both bit on our fade screen perfectly. It just slipped off Kieff’s hand when he missed it. “But I had to take the blame for it. I shoulda never done it, but I’ll do it again,” he added, laughing. Self’s take: “That was one of those deals they’ve laid around talking and figured out that would be a highlight play. Marcus said it was a good pass, and Kieff just missed it. I thought it was a crap pass, and nobody could have caught it. We’ll talk about that when moving forward. But those guys are pretty creative. They are great passers. But that wasn’t the time or place (with KU up 28-20 in first half) to try that one, I didn’t think.”

Big numbers KU will be heavily favored to advance to the Final Four. The top-seeded Jayhawks will meet No. 12 Richmond at 6:27 p.m. Friday in San Antonio, then if victorious meet either No. 10seed Florida State or No. 11 VCU on Sunday. “Ten, 11 and 12 are left, but it’s not seeds, it’s matchups,” Self said. “All the teams left in this tournament are good teams,” Brady Morningstar noted. San Antonio is where KU won the 2008 national title. “We’ll try to make new memories,” Self said. Hinson loves Tulsa Kansas University director of basketball operations Barry Hinson had a great time rekindling some old friendships over the weekend in Tulsa. Hinson worked four years as an assistant coach and two as head coach at Oral Roberts (1993-99) after working six years as head coach at Tulsa Bishop Kelley High School.

“Somebody asked me today, did I have family that lives here. I said, ‘Yeah, about 6,000,’’’ Hinson said. “No relatives but a lot of friends. I came down a day early to do the pre-stuff before we travel and got to see a lot of friends. “My wife and I considered this may be the place we retire,” Hinson added. “Tulsa has literally everything you’d want. We raised our kids here. We’d love the opportunity to come back.” The best thing about Tulsa? “No question, it’s the people. No matter where you go in Tulsa, somebody will say hi, help you out,” Hinson said. “It’s one of the friendliest places there is, a big city with a small town atmosphere.” Hinson pinpointed the biggest wins he’d been involved with in Tulsa prior to last weekend’s NCAA games. “That would have been with coach (Self). We beat Arkansas at ORU,” Hinson said. “The biggest win is what got me into college coaching. My team at Bishop Kelley beat Oklahoma City Star Spencer when they were No. 1 in the country. We were the underdog. We beat the big dog that day.”

Recruiting Stan Simpson, a 6-foot-10, 235-pound forward from Logan Junior College in Chicago, tweeted that KU has offered him a scholarship for next season. Simpson spent two years at the University of Illinois, one year as a red-shirt before transferring to Logan. He averaged about 14 points and 10 rebounds per game for Logan. Kentucky is reportedly his leader, with Memphis, UConn, KU, DePaul, Cincinnati, Tennessee and others hot on his trail. Simpson attended Chicago’s Simeon High.

Nick Krug/Journal-World Photo

KANSAS FORWARD THOMAS ROBINSON TURNS TO FIRE A PASS to save the ball from going out of bounds in the first half.


NCAA TOURNAMENT

|

6A Monday, March 21, 2011

EAST REGIONAL

BOX SCORES

Marquette upsets Syracuse The Associated Press

Marquette 66, Syracuse 62 CLEVELAND — Oh, is there ever a Buzz in the NCAA Tournament. Brent Williams is better known as Buzz — Coach Buzz if you play for Marquette — and his postgame celebrations have become the stuff of legend. Sunday, he might have had his wildest yet. His bald head glistening with sweat, he leaped in the air, pounded his f ists on tables, shared tears and hugs with his family. He saluted the fans, slapped hands with band members and anyone he could touch wearing the Golden Eagles’ gold and blue. Williams is off to the Round of 16 — and he wanted to bring the party with him. Darius Johnson-Odom sparked the celebration by hitting a tiebreaking threepointer with 27 seconds left that sent Marquette to a victory over Big East rival Syracuse, putting the Golden Eagles in the NCAA Tournament’s Round of 16 for the first time in eight years. “Luckily, I knocked the shot down,” Johnson-Odom said. Luck didn’t set up the winner as much as the last sloppy pass in a turnover-marred game by Syracuse. With 51 seconds left, Dion Waiters threw his sideline inbounds pass too high and close to the midcourt line. Scoop Jardine tiptoed over the line on his jump to snag the ball for a backcourt violation. “I thought I had him, and I was just trying to throw the pass where I thought he could catch it,” Waiters said. “I don’t know what happened.”

Johnson-Odom delivered the shot of his career for a 6259 lead, and 11th-seeded Marquette is moving on to the Round of 16 for the first time since Dwyane Wade led it to the Final Four in 2003. The Golden Eagles will play No. 2 seed North Carolina (28-7) in the East Regional semifinals Friday in Newark, N.J. Marquette, known then as the Warriors, beat North Carolina to win the national championship in 1977. At Marquette, there’s always a link to the ’77 team and its treasured coach, Al McGuire. Where most teams have a logo or a letter on the jersey, Marquette has “AL” at the neck. This was the second straight early exit for thirdseeded Syracuse (27-8). The Orange were a No. 1 seed last year and lost in the round of 16 to Butler. “I thought it was just a great game,” Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim said.

North Carolina 86, Washington 83 C H A R L O T T E , N . C . — Tyler Zeller scored 23 points, Harrison Barnes added 22, and North Carolina survived a frantic finish to beat Washington and advance to the second weekend of the NCAA Tournament for a record 24th time. Rallying from deficits of 11 points in the first half and five in the second, the secondseeded Tar Heels (28-7) went ahead for good on Barnes’ three-pointer with 4:06 left. But they needed two free throws from Dexter Strickland and a defensive stop in the closing seconds to advance.

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

Terrence Ross scored 19 points for the seventh-seeded Huskies (24-11), who overcame a hostile crowd to nearly pull the upset in a fastpaced game full of entertaining plays and mental miscues down the stretch.

Ohio State 98, George Mason 66 CLEVELAND — David Lighty made all seven of his threepointers and scored 25 points, Jared Sullinger added 18 after informing one of George Mason’s players “it’s over,” and top-seeded Ohio State made 16 threes to advance in the NCAA Tournament with a jaw-dropping rout. With thousands of fans chanting “O-H-I-O” at every opportunity, the Buckeyes (34-2) took apart the eighthseeded Patriots (27-7), who created some March mayhem a few years ago and hoped to follow Butler’s lead by taking out a No. 1 seed in this tourney. Ohio State destroyed any upset plans and moved closer to its first national title since 1960. The Buckeyes will meet Kentucky (27-8) in the East regional semifinals Friday in Newark. Ohio State is 5-0 in NCAA tournament matchups with the Wildcats. After falling behind 11-2, the Big Ten champions used their devastating inside-outside attack to post the most lopsided tournament victory in school history. Cam Long scored 16 points to lead George Mason, which played without Luke Hancock, one of its best players. The sophomore guard had food poisoning and remained with a trainer at the team’s hotel.

MARQUETTE 66, SYRACUSE 62 MARQUETTE (22-14) Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Butler 4-11 2-2 10, Otule 12 4-6 6, Johnson-Odom 7-15 0-0 17, Buycks 2-6 1-2 6, Blue 0-1 0-0 0, Cadougan 3-6 3-3 9, Fulce 0-1 0-0 0, Crowder 4-8 7-8 16, Gardner 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 21-51 19-23 66. SYRACUSE (27-8) Jackson 3-6 1-2 7, Joseph 5-7 2-2 12, Keita 0-0 0-0 0, Jardine 2-8 1-2 6, Triche 3-5 0-0 8, Waiters 8-10 1-1 18, Fair 2-3 0-0 4, Southerland 3-8 0-0 7, Melo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 26-47 5-7 62. Halftime—Marquette 34-31. 3-Point Goals— Marquette 5-11 (Johnson-Odom 3-7, Buycks 1-1, Crowder 1-2, Butler 0-1), Syracuse 5-15 (Triche 2-3, Waiters 1-3, Southerland 1-4, Jardine 1-5). Fouled Out—Otule. Rebounds—Marquette 30 (Crowder 7), Syracuse 24 (Joseph 9). Assists— Marquette 15 (Johnson-Odom 4), Syracuse 11 (Jardine 6). Total Fouls—Marquette 13, Syracuse 21. A—20,164.

OHIO ST. 98, GEORGE MASON 66 GEORGE MASON (27-7) Morrison 3-6 0-0 6, Pearson 4-10 4-4 13, Tate 2-7 0-0 4, Long 5-7 2-3 16, Cornelius 3-7 0-0 8, Bennett 0-1 0-0 0, Allen 3-7 0-0 6, Arledge 2-2 00 4, Vaughns 0-2 0-0 0, Whack 1-2 0-0 3, Williams 3-9 0-0 6. Totals 26-60 6-7 66. OHIO ST. (34-2) Sullinger 7-10 4-6 18, Lighty 9-10 0-2 25, Lauderdale 3-4 0-1 6, Diebler 4-9 1-1 13, Buford 7-14 0-0 18, Thomas 3-7 0-0 7, Sibert 1-2 1-2 3, Craft 2-3 2-2 6, Days 0-0 1-2 1, Smith Jr. 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 36-59 10-18 98. Halftime—Ohio St. 52-26. 3-Point Goals— George Mason 8-18 (Long 4-6, Cornelius 2-4, Pearson 1-1, Whack 1-2, Vaughns 0-1, Williams 0-1, Tate 0-1, Allen 0-2), Ohio St. 16-26 (Lighty 7-7, Buford 4-7, Diebler 4-8, Thomas 1-3, Sibert 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—George Mason 29 (Long 6), Ohio St. 33 (Sullinger 8). Assists—George Mason 13 (Pearson 4), Ohio St. 23 (Craft 15). Total Fouls—George Mason 17, Ohio St. 11. A—NA.

NORTH CAROLINA 86, WASHINGTON 83 WASHINGTON (24-11) Bryan-Amaning 7-14 0-0 14, Holiday 2-6 0-0 4, N’Diaye 2-3 0-0 4, Thomas 5-15 2-2 12, Suggs 36 0-0 8, Overton 1-3 3-3 5, Wilcox 4-9 0-0 11, Ross 7-10 2-2 19, Gant 2-6 0-0 6. Totals 33-72 7-7 83. NORTH CAROLINA (28-7) Henson 4-12 2-5 10, Barnes 9-19 0-0 22, Zeller 8-14 7-7 23, Strickland 5-8 3-4 13, Marshall 3-6 6-7 13, McDonald 2-5 0-0 5, Watts 0-1 0-0 0, Knox 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-66 18-23 86. Halftime—Washington 45-44. 3-Point Goals— Washington 10-19 (Wilcox 3-5, Ross 3-5, Gant 23, Suggs 2-4, Thomas 0-2), North Carolina 6-12 (Barnes 4-7, Marshall 1-2, McDonald 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 40 (N’Diaye 11), North Carolina 37 (Henson 10). Assists—Washington 17 (Thomas 8), North Carolina 18 (Marshall 14). Total Fouls— Washington 20, North Carolina 9. A—NA.


SPORTS

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

X Monday, March 21, 2011

| 7A.

SCOREBOARD NHL

Sunday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 2 Nashville 4, Buffalo 3, OT New Jersey 3, Columbus 0 Montreal 8, Minnesota 1 Chicago 2, Phoenix 1 Anaheim 5, Calgary 4, OT Today’s Games Pittsburgh at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Calgary at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

NCAA Tournament

FIRST ROUND Tuesday, March 15 At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio No. 16 Seed Southeast: UNC Asheville 81, Arkansas-Little Rock 77, OT No. 12 Seed East: Clemson 70, UAB 52 Wednesday, March 16 No. 16 Seed East: Texas-San Antonio 70, Alabama State 61 No. 11 Seed Southwest: Virginia Commonwealth 59, Southern Cal 46 EAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. West Virginia 84, Clemson 76 Kentucky 59, Princeton 57 Friday At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina 102, Long Island University 87 Washington 68, Georgia 65 At Quicken Loans Arena Cleveland George Mason 61, Villanova 57 Ohio State 75, Texas-San Antonio 46 Marquette 66, Xavier 55 Syracuse 77, Indiana State 60 Third Round Saturday At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. Kentucky 71, West Virginia 63 Sunday At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina 86, Washington 83 At Quicken Loans Arena Cleveland Ohio State 98, George Mason 66 Marquette 66, Syracuse 62 At The Prudential Center Newark, N.J. Regional Semifinals Friday, March 25 North Carolina (28-7) vs. Marquette (22-14), 6:15 p.m. (CBS) Ohio State (34-2) vs. Kentucky (27-8), 8:45 p.m. (CBS) SOUTHEAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At The Verizon Center Washington Butler 60, Old Dominion 58 Pittsburgh 74, UNC Asheville 51 At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. Florida 79, UC Santa Barbara 51 UCLA 78, Michigan State 76 At The Pepsi Center Denver BYU 74, Wofford 66 Gonzaga 86, St. John’s 71 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Wisconsin 72, Belmont 58 Kansas State 73, Utah State 68 Third Round Saturday At The Verizon Center Washington Butler 71, Pittsburgh 70 At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. Florida 73, UCLA 65 At The Pepsi Center Denver BYU 89, Gonzaga 67 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Wisconsin 70, Kansas State 65 At New Orleans Arena Regional Semifinals Thursday, March 24 Florida (28-7) vs. BYU (32-4), 6:27 p.m. (TBS) Butler (25-9) vs. Wisconsin (25-8), 8:57 p.m. (TBS) SOUTHWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At The Pepsi Center Denver Morehead State 62, Louisville 61 Richmond 69, Vanderbilt 66 Friday At The United Center Chicago Notre Dame 69, Akron 56 Florida State 57, Texas A&M 50 Purdue 65, St. Peter’s 43 Virginia Commonwealth 74, Georgetown 56 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Kansas 72, Boston University 53 Illinois 73, UNLV 62 Third Round Saturday At The Pepsi Center Denver Richmond 65, Morehead State 48 Sunday At The United Center Chicago Virginia Commonwealth 94, Purdue 76 Florida State 71, Notre Dame 57 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Kansas 73, Illinois 59 At The Alamodome San Antonio Regional Semifinals Friday, March 25 Kansas (34-2) vs. Richmond (29-7), 6:27 p.m. (TBS) Florida State (23-10) vs. Virginia Commonwealth (26-11), 8:57 p.m. (TBS) WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Temple 66, Penn State 64 San Diego State 68, Northern Colorado 50 At The Verizon Center Washington Connecticut 81, Bucknell 52 Cincinnati 78, Missouri 63 Friday At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Texas 85, Oakland, Mich. 81 Arizona 77, Memphis 75 At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. Michigan 75, Tennessee 45 Duke 87, Hampton 45 Third Round Saturday At The Verizon Center Washington Connecticut 69, Cincinnati 58 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. San Diego State 71, Temple 64, 2OT Sunday At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. Duke 73, Michigan 71 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Arizona 70, Texas 69 At The Honda Center Anaheim, Calif. Regional Semifinals Thursday, March 24 San Diego State (34-2) vs. Connecticut (28-9), 6:15 p.m. (CBS) Duke (32-4) vs. Arizona (29-7), 8:45 p.m. (CBS)

NIT

Second Round Friday, March 18 Colorado 89, California 72 Saturday’s Games Northwestern 85, Boston College 67 College of Charleston 64, Cleveland State 56

Sunday’s Games Wichita State 79, Virginia Tech 76, OT Kent State 72, Fairfield 68 Today’s Games Missouri State (26-8) at Miami (20-14), 6 p.m. New Mexico (22-12) at Alabama (22-11), 8 p.m. Oklahoma State (20-13) at Washington State (20-12), 10:30 p.m. Quarterfinals March 22-23 Tuesday Kent State (25-11) at Colorado (23-13), 8 p.m. Wednesday Northwestern (20-13) vs. Oklahoma StateWashington State winner, TBD College of Charleston (26-10) at Wichita State (26-8), TBD Alabama-New Mexico winner vs. Missouri State-Miami winner, TBD

NCAA Women’s Tournament

PHILADELPHIA REGIONAL First Round Saturday At Bryce Jordan Center University Park, Pa. Penn State 75, vs. Dayton 66 DePaul 56, Navy 43 At Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham, N.C. Marist 74, Iowa State 64 Duke 90, Tennessee-Martin 45 Sunday At Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs, Conn. Connecticut 75, Hartford 39 Purdue 53, Kansas State 45 At Comcast Center College Park, Md. Maryland 70, St. Francis, Pa. 48 Georgetown 65, Princeton 49 Today At Bryce Jordan Center University Park, Pa. Penn State (25-9) vs. DePaul (28-6), 6:10 p.m. At Cameron Indoor Stadium Durham, N.C. Marist (31-2) vs. Duke (30-3), 6:15 p.m. Tuesday At Harry A. Gampel Pavilion Storrs, Conn. Connecticut vs. Purdue At Comcast Center College Park, Md. Georgetown vs. Maryland

DAYTON REGIONAL First Round Saturday At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee 99, Stetson 34 Marquette 68, Texas 65 At St. John Arena Columbus, Ohio Georgia Tech 69, Bowling Green 58 Ohio State 80, UCF 69 At Huntsman Center Salt Lake City Temple 63, Arizona State 45 Notre Dame 67, Utah 54 Sunday At John Paul Jones Arena Charlottesville, Va. Miami 80, Gardner-Webb 62 Oklahoma 86, James Madison 72 Today At Thompson-Boling Arena Knoxville, Tenn. Tennessee (32-2) vs. Marquette (24-8), 6:05 p.m. At St. John Arena Columbus, Ohio Georgia Tech (24-10) vs. Ohio State (23-9), 6:20 p.m. At Huntsman Center Salt Lake City Temple (24-8) vs. Notre Dame (27-7), 8:40 p.m. Tuesday At John Paul Jones Arena Charlottesville, Va. Oklahoma vs. Miami SPOKANE REGIONAL First Round Saturday At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. St. John’s 55, Texas Tech 50 Stanford 86, UC Davis 59 At The Pit/Bob King Court Albuquerque, N.M. North Carolina 82, Fresno State 68 Kentucky 66, Hampton 62, OT At McCarthey Athletic Center Spokane, Wash. Gonzaga 92, Iowa 86 UCLA 55, Montana 47 Sunday At Cintas Center Cincinnati Louisville 81, Vanderbilt 62 Xavier 72, South Dakota State 56 Today At Maples Pavilion Stanford, Calif. Stanford (30-2) vs. St. John’s (22-10), 8:40 p.m. At The Pit/Bob King Court Albuquerque, N.M. North Carolina (26-8) vs. Kentucky (25-8), 8:45 p.m. At McCarthey Athletic Center Spokane, Wash. Gonzaga (29-4) vs. UCLA (28-4), 8:35 p.m. Tuesday At Cintas Center Cincinnati Louisville vs. Xavier DALLAS REGIONAL First Round Sunday At Ferrell Center Waco, Texas West Virginia 79, Houston 73 Baylor 66, Prairie View 30 At Intrust Bank Arena Wichita Wisconsin-Green Bay 59, Arkansas-Little Rock 55 Michigan State 69, Northern Iowa 66 At Auburn Arena Auburn, Ala. Florida State 76, Samford 46 Georgia 56, Middle Tennessee 41 At CenturyTel Center Shreveport, La. Texas A&M 87, McNeese State 47 Rutgers 76, Louisiana Tech 51 Tuesday At Ferrell Center Waco, Texas Baylor vs. West Virginia At Intrust Bank Arena Wichita, Kan. Wisconsin-Green Bay vs. Michigan State At Auburn Arena Auburn, Ala. Georgia vs. Florida State At CenturyTel Center Shreveport, La. Rutgers vs. Texas A&M

WNIT

First Round Wednesday, March 16 Toledo 58, Delaware 55 Loyola-Maryland 67, Old Dominion 65 Charlotte 62, Liberty 56 South Carolina 67, Appalachian State 54 Oklahoma State 81, Pepperdine 74 Wisconsin 68, Butler 48 Kansas 79, Wichita State 58 Wyoming 79, Portland State 44 Thursday, March 17 Boston College 85, Yale 61 St. Joseph’s 72, VCU 66 Virginia 69, Morgan State 56 Duquesne 64, Kent State 56 St. Bonaventure 77, Lehigh 43 Syracuse 77, Monmouth, N.J. 53 Eastern Michigan 67, Michigan 59 UNC Wilmington 63, Richmond 54 Utah State 103, Arizona 95 Oral Roberts 76, TCU 74 Auburn 68, Tennessee Tech 54 Arkansas 91, Lamar 65 Tulane 61, Southern 31 Northwestern 89, Creighton 63 Alabama 80, Memphis 69 Missouri State 76, Rice 65 Illinois State 72, Central Michigan 59 BYU 75, Denver 60 Colorado 71, UC Riverside 62 California 74, Cal Poly 60 Southern Cal 67, UC Santa Barbara 64 Nevada 65, St. Mary’s Calif. 62 Friday, March 18 Florida 59, UMBC 47 Florida Gulf Coast 73, Drexel 67

Second Round Saturday’s Games Toledo 67, Auburn 52 Boston College 86, Saint Joseph’s 59 BYU 102, Utah State 63 Duquesne 80, Kansas 63 Sunday’s Games Charlotte 69, South Carolina 57 Illinois State 62, Wisconsin 59 Arkansas 65, Missouri State 64 Alabama 72, Northwestern 70 Virginia 71, Loyola-Maryland 49 Southern Cal 78, Nevada 59 Today’s Games St. Bonaventure (21-11) vs. Syracuse (23-9), 7 p.m. Eastern Michigan (23-12) vs. UNC Wilmington (24-8), 7 p.m. Florida (19-14) at Florida Gulf Coast (28-3), 7:05 p.m. Tulane (23-10) at Oral Roberts (22-10), 8 p.m. Oklahoma State (17-14) at Wyoming (23-8), 9 p.m. California (18-15) at Colorado (16-15), 9 p.m. Third Round Tuesday’s Game Alabama (18-14) at Toledo (25-8), 7 p.m Wednesday’s Games Southern Cal (21-12) at BYU (25-8), 9 p.m. Thursday’s Games Boston College (20-12) at Virginia (18-15), 7 p.m. Duquesne (24-8) at Illinois State (22-10), 8:05 p.m. Charlotte (25-9) vs. Florida-Florida Gulf Coast winner at TBA March 23-25 Arkansas (21-11) vs. Tulane-Oral Roberts winner at TBA

Paribas Open

Sunday At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden Indian Wells, Calif. Purse: Men: $4.76 million (Masters 1000); $4.5 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Championship Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. Women Championship Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Marion Bartoli (15), France, 6-1, 2-6, 6-3.

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Assigned RHP Wynn Pelzer to their minor league camp. BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned C Mark Wagner and OF Daniel Nava to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned RHP Matt Fox to their minor league camp. National League SAN DIEGO PADRES—Claimed RHP Pat Neshek off waivers from the Minnesota Twins. Optioned OF Luis Durango and RHP Samuel Deduno to Tucson (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended Los Angeles Lakers C Andrew Bynum two games for a Flagrant Foul, Penalty Two against Minnesota F Michael Beasley during a March 18 game. Suspended Phoenix G Aaron Brooks one game for throwing a ball at an official and striking him in the leg during a March 18 game against Golden State. CHICAGO BULLS—Signed G John Lucas III and G Jannero Pargo. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled F Ben Smith from Rockford (AHL) and then sent him back to Rockford. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F T.J. Hensick and D Tyson Strachan to Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned G Jaroslav Janus from Norfolk (AHL) to Florida (ECHL). American Hockey League AHL—Suspended Syracuse RW Brian McGrattan one game as a result of his actions in a March 19 game against Charlotte. COLLEGE TEXAS TECH—Named Billy Gillispie men’s basketball coach.

Sprint Cup

Sunday At Bristol Motor Speedway Bristol, Tenn. Lap length: .533 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (12) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 500 laps, 132.6 rating, 47 points. 2. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 500, 120.1, 43. 3. (6) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 500, 135.6, 43. 4. (11) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 500, 95.2, 40. 5. (4) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 500, 107.2, 40. 6. (15) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 500, 115.1, 39. 7. (20) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 500, 107.7, 37. 8. (2) Greg Biffle, Ford, 500, 97.3, 36. 9. (10) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 500, 105.6, 35. 10. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 500, 98.2, 35. 11. (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 500, 79.2, 33. 12. (9) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 500, 92.9, 32. 13. (16) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 500, 88.4, 31. 14. (7) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 500, 84.8, 30. 15. (14) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 500, 75.5, 29. 16. (5) David Ragan, Ford, 500, 80.7, 28. 17. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 500, 94.2, 28. 18. (23) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 500, 66.9, 26. 19. (13) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 500, 80.4, 25. 20. (17) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 498, 63.3, 24. 21. (24) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 498, 57.2, 23. 22. (3) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 498, 69.7, 22. 23. (18) Joey Logano, Toyota, 497, 67.2, 21. 24. (36) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 497, 69.9, 20. 25. (37) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 497, 50.2, 19. 26. (35) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 496, 47.4, 0. 27. (29) David Gilliland, Ford, 495, 67.3, 18. 28. (41) Tony Raines, Ford, 494, 45.1, 16. 29. (31) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet, 493, 39.5, 15. 30. (26) David Reutimann, Toyota, 493, 40.3, 14. 31. (28) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 493, 43.8, 13. 32. (42) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 491, 34.6, 12. 33. (25) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 488, 42.5, 11. 34. (19) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 482, 57.6, 0. 35. (27) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, engine, 456, 55.4, 9. 36. (30) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 441, 33.4, 8. 37. (43) Casey Mears, Toyota, 427, 48.9, 7. 38. (40) Dennis Setzer, Dodge, suspension, 336, 26.8, 6. 39. (33) Robby Gordon, Dodge, accident, 127, 51.6, 5. 40. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 97, 38.2, 4. 41. (34) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, brakes, 72, 30.4, 0. 42. (32) Landon Cassill, Toyota, brakes, 36, 32.4, 0. 43. (39) Michael McDowell, Toyota, brakes, 35, 29.6, 1.

Kansas

at TCU — L, 8-2 (0-1) at TCU, L 1-7 (0-2) at TCU, W 4-3, 14 innings (1-2) vs. Creighton, L 3-4 (1-3) vs. Iowa, W 5-2 (2-3) vs. Southern Utah, W 2-1 (3-3) vs. Southern Utah, W 5-1 (4-3) vs. UC Riverside, Surprise, Ariz., L 1-2 (4-4) vs. Cal State Bakersfield, Surprise, Ariz., L 0-12 (4-5) Arizona State, Surprise, Ariz., L 3-4 (4-6) vs. Air Force, Surprise, Ariz., W 4-1 (5-6) vs. North Dakota, W 5-3 (6-6) Eastern Michigan, W 8-2 (7-6) vs. Eastern Michigan, L 1-8 (7-7) vs. Eastern Michigan, L 4-10 (7-8) at Arkansas, L 2-4 (7-9) vs. Oklahoma State, L 1-3 (7-10, 0-1) vs. Oklahoma State, 1 p.m. vs. Oklahoma State, W 7-2 (8-10, 1-1) vs. Oklahoma State, W 5-4 (9-10, 2-1) Tuesday — vs. Arkansas-Little Rock, 3 p.m. Friday — at Texas A&M, 6:35 p.m. Saturday — at Texas A&M, 2:05 p.m. Sunday — at Texas A&M, 1:05 p.m. March 30 — at Missouri State, 6:30 p.m. April 1 — vs. Baylor, 6 p.m. April 2 — vs. Baylor, 2 p.m. April 3 — vs. Baylor, 1 p.m.

April 5 — vs. Missouri State, 6 p.m. April 6 — vs. Missouri, 5:30 p.m. April 8 — vs. Nebraska, 6 p.m. April 9 — vs. Nebraska, 2 p.m. April 10 — vs. Nebraska, 1 p.m. April 12 — at Iowa, 6:05 p.m. April 15 — at Missouri, 6 p.m. April 16 — at Missouri, 4 p.m. April 17 — at Missouri, 1 p.m. April 21 — vs. Texas, 6 p.m. April 22 — vs. Texas, 6 p.m. April 23 — vs. Texas, 1 p.m. April 26 — at Creighton, 6:30 p.m. April 29 — at Texas Tech, 6:30 p.m. April 30 — at Texas Tech, 5 p.m. May 1 — at Texas Tech, 1 p.m. May 3 — vs. Wichita State, 6 p.m. May 4 — at Wichita State, 6:30 p.m. May 6 — at Oklahoma, 6:30 p.m. May 7 — at Oklahoma, 2 p.m. May 8 — at Oklahoma, 1 p.m. May 10 — at Arkansas-Little Rock, 6 p.m. May 13 — vs. Alabama A&M, 6 p.m. May 14 — vs. Alabama A&M, 2 p.m. May 15 — vs. Alabama A&M, 1 p.m. May 20 — at Kansas State, 6:30 p.m. May 21 — vs. Kansas State, 6 p.m. May 22 — vs. Kansas State, 6 p.m.

Transitions Championship

Sunday At Innisbrook (Copperhead Course) Palm Harbor, Fla. Purse: $5.5 million Yardage: 7,332; Par: 71 Final (a-amateur) Gary Woodland (500), $990,00067-68-67-67—269 Webb Simpson (300), $594,000 67-67-67-69—270 Scott Stallings (190), $374,000 66-70-66-70—272 Brandt Snedeker (135), $264,000 72-64-67-70—273 Marc Turnesa (90), $180,125 68-67-73-66—274 Martin Laird (90), $180,125 66-70-68-70—274 Roland Thatcher (90), $180,12568-67-69-70—274 Chris Couch (90), $180,125 69-64-70-71—274 Justin Rose (90), $180,125 70-65-65-74—274 Brendon de Jonge (90), $180,125 69-66-66-73—274 Chez Reavie (68), $132,000 70-70-65-70—275 Stewart Cink (68), $132,000 68-70-67-70—275 Jim Furyk (59), $110,000 67-70-69-70—276 Nick Watney (59), $110,000 66-72-65-73—276 John Senden (54), $88,000 67-72-68-70—277 Sergio Garcia (54), $88,000 68-66-72-71—277 Rory Sabbatini (54), $88,000 67-72-67-71—277 Peter Hanson (0), $88,000 69-67-69-72—277 Garrett Willis (54), $88,000 66-67-70-74—277 Lucas Glover (48), $55,481 73-64-72-69—278 John Rollins (48), $55,481 70-71-69-68—278 Martin Kaymer (0), $55,481 68-70-71-69—278 Matteo Manassero (0), $55,48168-68-72-70—278 Justin Leonard (48), $55,481 67-71-69-71—278 J.J. Henry (48), $55,481 69-72-66-71—278 Zach Johnson (48), $55,481 70-68-68-72—278 Jonathan Byrd (48), $55,481 70-67-67-74—278 Bubba Watson (39), $34,283 70-69-72-68—279 Cameron Beckman (39), $34,283 71-67-73-68—279 Geoff Ogilvy (39), $34,283 70-67-73-69—279 Jason Dufner (39), $34,283 68-70-72-69—279 Ricky Barnes (39), $34,283 71-67-71-70—279 Brian Davis (39), $34,283 70-71-68-70—279 Retief Goosen (39), $34,283 72-69-68-70—279 Chad Campbell (39), $34,283 69-69-70-71—279 Trevor Immelman (39), $34,283 72-66-68-73—279 Joe Durant (31), $23,650 67-71-73-69—280 Steven Bowditch (31), $23,650 72-68-71-69—280 Woody Austin (31), $23,650 71-69-71-69—280 Charley Hoffman (31), $23,650 68-71-70-71—280 Brian Gay (31), $23,650 67-73-67-73—280 Paul Casey (31), $23,650 64-71-71-74—280 David Toms (31), $23,650 69-68-69-74—280 Marc Leishman (24), $16,233 68-73-72-68—281 Dean Wilson (24), $16,233 71-70-72-68—281 Kevin Na (24), $16,233 69-72-72-68—281 Ryan Moore (24), $16,233 67-69-74-71—281 Spencer Levin (24), $16,233 70-68-72-71—281 Kevin Sutherland (24), $16,233 68-69-71-73—281 Kent Jones (24), $16,233 70-71-66-74—281 Chris Riley (18), $12,943 69-72-72-69—282 Blake Adams (18), $12,943 68-72-71-71—282 Troy Matteson (18), $12,943 70-69-69-74—282 Vijay Singh (18), $12,943 68-70-70-74—282 Ryan Palmer (18), $12,943 72-69-67-74—282 Jason Day (18), $12,943 70-71-65-76—282 Stuart Appleby (12), $12,210 67-69-77-70—283 Bill Lunde (12), $12,210 71-69-72-71—283 a-Peter Uihlein 70-69-72-72—283 Mark Wilson (12), $12,210 70-66-74-73—283 Andres Romero (12), $12,210 69-72-69-73—283 Alex Cejka (12), $12,210 73-68-67-75—283 Chad Collins (7), $11,770 68-71-74-71—284 Tommy Gainey (7), $11,770 71-70-70-73—284

Sicilian Open

Sunday At Donnafugata Golf Resort & Spa Ragusa, Sicily Purse: $1.4 million Yardage: 7,158; Par: 71 Fourth Round Joel Sjoholm, Sweden 70-68-70-69—277 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 71-71-69-68—279 Lorenzo Gagli, Italy 72-69-69-69—279 Carlos Del Moral, Spain 68-70-71-70—279 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 71-70-68-70—279 Oscar Floren, Sweden 69-68-71-71—279 Leaderboard Golfer Score Thru Raphael Jacquelin, France -11 12 Anthony Wall, England -10 12 Jose Manuel Lara, Spain -9 15 Joel Sjoholm, Sweden -7 F Jamie Elson, England -6 11 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium -5 F Lorenzo Gagli, Italy -5 F Carlos Del Moral, Spain -5 F Scott Jamieson, Scotland -5 F Oscar Floren, Sweden -5 F Chris Wood, England -5 16 Simon Dyson, England -5 15 Peter Whiteford, Scotland -5 15

Founders Cup

Sunday At JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, Wildfire Golf Club Phoenix Purse: $1 million Yardage: 6,613; Par: 72 Final Round Karrie Webb, $150,000 71-67-66—204 Paula Creamer, $85,110 69-70-66—205 Brittany Lincicome, $85,110 67-68-70—205 Cristie Kerr, $55,362 69-68-69—206 Angela Stanford, $44,561 66-66-75—207 Mindy Kim, $36,459 69-67-72—208 Morgan Pressel, $28,627 70-71-68—209 Sun Young Yoo, $28,627 69-70-70—209 Seon Hwa Lee, $24,036 69-69-72—210 Sarah Jane Smith, $20,344 71-73-67—211 Sandra Gal, $20,344 70-70-71—211 Stacy Prammanasudh, $20,344 72-68-71—211 Pornanong Phatlum, $15,375 73-69-70—212 Jenny Shin, $15,375 72-70-70—212 Kyeong Bae, $15,375 70-71-71—212 Shanshan Feng, $15,375 71-70-71—212 Brittany Lang, $15,375 72-69-71—212 Mina Harigae, $15,375 68-70-74—212 Pat Hurst, $12,423 75-69-69—213 Jean Reynolds, $12,423 69-73-71—213 Samantha Richdale, $12,423 72-70-71—213 Chella Choi, $10,340 72-72-70—214 Amy Yang, $10,340 73-71-70—214 Stephanie Louden, $10,340 72-70-72—214 Meaghan Francella, $10,340 70-71-73—214 Anna Grzebien, $10,340 73-68-73—214 Alena Sharp, $10,340 71-70-73—214 Heather Bowie Young, $10,340 71-70-73—214 Jiyai Shin, $7,400 71-75-69—215 Jennifer Song, $7,400 72-74-69—215 Yani Tseng, $7,400 73-73-69—215 Stacy Lewis, $7,400 71-72-72—215 Gerina Piller, $7,400 72-71-72—215 Wendy Ward, $7,400 71-72-72—215 Pernilla Lindberg, $7,400 70-72-73—215 Aree Song, $7,400 67-75-73—215 Jenny Suh, $7,400 73-69-73—215 Amelia Lewis, $7,400 68-73-74—215 Karine Icher, $5,509 73-73-70—216 Ilhee Lee, $5,509 74-72-70—216 Sophie Gustafson, $5,509 68-76-72—216 Amy Hung, $5,509 72-69-75—216 Paige Mackenzie, $4,207 71-75-71—217 Jennifer Johnson, $4,207 72-73-72—217 Leta Lindley, $4,207 69-76-72—217 Mollie Fankhauser, $4,207 73-71-73—217 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $4,207 69-75-73—217 Hee Kyung Seo, $4,207 74-70-73—217 Lindsey Wright, $4,207 73-71-73—217 Jimin Kang, $4,207 74-69-74—217 Song-Hee Kim, $4,207 70-73-74—217 Beatriz Recari, $4,207 68-72-77—217 Danah Bordner, $3,187 74-72-72—218 Laura Davies, $3,187 75-71-72—218

Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo

BAYLOR GUARD KIMETRIA HAYDEN (1) GOES UP FOR A SHOT past Prairie View A&M guard Latia Williams in a first-round game of the women’s NCAA Tournament on Sunday in Waco, Texas. Hayden had 12 points in the Bears’ 66-30 rout.

BIG 12 WOMEN IN NCAA TOURNAMENT

Baylor, Oklahoma, Texas A&M advance —

‘Cats lose opening round The Associated Press

Baylor 66, Prairie View 30 W A C O , T E X A S — Brittney Griner and Brooklyn Pope each had 17 points as topseeded Baylor opened the NCAA Tournament with a victory Sunday night over Prairie View, whose miserable shooting translated into the lowest-scoring half ever in the tournament. The Lady Bears (32-2) raced out to a 16-0 lead at home while Prairie View (2112) missed its first 12 shots before finally getting a layup from Waco native Robin Jones more than 9 minutes into the game. Baylor, which went to the Final Four last season when the 6-foot-8 Griner was a freshman, led 34-8 at halftime. That was the fewest points in a half ever by a women’s team in an NCAA Tournament game. Griner also had eight rebounds and six blocks in her team-high 28 minutes. PRAIRIE VIEW (21-12) Jones 1-8 0-0 2, W. Williams 0-4 0-0 0, Smith 316 0-0 6, Soliz 4-17 1-3 12, Robinson 1-2 0-0 2, Washington 0-2 2-2 2, L. Williams 1-7 0-0 2, Larsen 0-0 0-0 0, Henry 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 12-60 35 30. BAYLOR (32-2) Williams 3-6 1-2 7, Griner 5-8 7-10 17, Sims 1-5 3-4 5, Madden 0-3 0-0 0, Jones 0-3 0-0 0, Hayden 6-8 0-0 12, Zachariason 1-3 0-0 2, Robertson 0-3 1-2 1, Condrey 1-1 0-0 3, Field 1-2 0-0 2, Palmer 0-2 0-0 0, Pope 7-10 3-10 17, Chandler 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 25-55 15-28 66. Halftime—Baylor 36-8. 3-Point Goals—Prairie View 3-15 (Soliz 3-10, Jones 0-1, Robinson 0-1, Smith 0-3), Baylor 1-11 (Condrey 1-1, Zachariason 0-1, Jones 0-1, Hayden 0-1, Madden 0-2, Sims 0-2, Robertson 0-3). Fouled Out—W. Williams. Rebounds—Prairie View 33 (Henry 5), Baylor 51 (Jones 9). Assists—Prairie View 3 (Henry, Jones, Washington 1), Baylor 12 (Madden 4). Total Fouls—Prairie View 16, Baylor 9. A—8,368.

Oklahoma 86, James Madison 72 CHARLOTTESVILLE , V A. — Whitney Hand scored 24 points and Oklahoma squandered much of a 19-point second-half lead before holding on to beat James Madison in the first round of the women’s NCAA Tournament. Danielle Robinson added 19 points for the Sooners (22-11), who are trying to make their third consecutive run to the Final Four. Oklahoma will play Miami in the second round Tuesday. Dawn Evans, the nation’s No. 3 scorer with a 23.2 average, led the Dukes with 20 points, but hit just 7-of-27 shots. James Madison (26-8) fell short in its bid for its first NCAA Tournament victory since the 1991 team beat topranked Penn State in the second round in State College, Pa. The Dukes had no answer for the speed, quickness and size of the Sooners until late. JAMES MADISON (26-8) Newman 1-2 0-0 2, Jimenez 6-11 1-3 14, Hamner 4-10 2-2 11, Hislop 6-21 4-5 16, Evans 727 6-7 20, Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Whitehurst 2-4 0-0 4, Burkholder 0-0 0-0 0, Taylor 2-2 1-2 5, Connely 00 0-0 0. Totals 28-77 14-19 72. OKLAHOMA (22-11) Roethlisberger 2-6 4-4 8, Robinson 7-17 5-5 19, Griffin 4-5 0-0 8, Ellenberg 7-15 1-2 17, Hand 814 6-8 24, Hook 0-4 0-0 0, Hartman 0-0 0-0 0, McFarland 3-6 4-4 10. Totals 31-67 20-23 86.

Halftime—Oklahoma 41-28. 3-Point Goals— James Madison 2-25 (Jimenez 1-2, Hamner 1-6, Newman 0-1, Hislop 0-5, Evans 0-11), Oklahoma 4-16 (Hand 2-5, Ellenberg 2-6, Roethlisberger 02, Hook 0-3). Fouled Out—Newman, Robinson. Rebounds—James Madison 38 (Whitehurst 8), Oklahoma 49 (McFarland 15). Assists—James Madison 7 (Evans 2), Oklahoma 12 (Robinson 6). Total Fouls—James Madison 21, Oklahoma 20. A— 3,763.

Purdue 53, Kansas State 45 S TORRS , C ONN . — Brittany Rayburn scored 21 points and ninth-seeded Purdue moved into the second round of the NCAA Tournament with a win over Kansas State. Drey Mingo, who overcame a life-threatening bout with meningitis earlier this season, added 16 points for the Boilermakers (21-11), who advance to play the tournament’s top seed, Connecticut, on Tuesday. Brittany Chambers had 18 points for Kansas State (21-11), which missed its first 12 shots. Taelor Karr added 16 points for the Wildcats. PURDUE (21-11) Mingo 6-9 1-2 16, Jones 0-2 0-0 0, Rayburn 7-15 6-6 21, Moses 1-4 3-4 5, Poston 0-1 0-0 0, Howard 2-4 2-2 7, Williams 0-0 2-2 2, Guyton 1-6 0-0 2, Woods 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 17-42 14-16 53. KANSAS ST. (21-11) Brown 2-6 0-0 4, Chambers 7-20 0-0 18, Caron 1-4 0-0 2, Karr 6-17 1-2 14, White 0-4 0-0 0, Hill 11 0-0 3, Voronenko 0-2 0-0 0, Childs 2-9 0-0 4. Totals 19-63 1-2 45. Halftime—Purdue 25-17. 3-Point Goals— Purdue 5-14 (Mingo 3-4, Howard 1-2, Rayburn 16, Woods 0-1, Moses 0-1), Kansas St. 6-23 (Chambers 4-12, Hill 1-1, Karr 1-7, Caron 0-1, Voronenko 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Purdue 27 (Mingo 7), Kansas St. 42 (Chambers 12). Assists—Purdue 9 (Moses 5), Kansas St. 6 (White 4). Total Fouls—Purdue 9, Kansas St. 15. A—6,418.

Texas A&M 87, McNeese St. 47 BOSSIER CITY, LA. — Danielle Adams scored 18 points and Texas A&M rolled to a victory over McNeese State in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament. Kelsey Assarian and Tyra White each added 12 points for second-seeded Texas A&M (28-5), which raced to a 22-3 lead and led by 39 when Adams scored inside while being fouled five minutes into the second half. The victory moved Texas A&M into the second round at the Shreveport site and marked the fifth straight year the Aggies have gotten through the f irst round. Caitlyn Baggett scored 22 for McNeese State (26-7), which had a size disadvantage and struggled to stop the Aggies in the paint or in transition. Texas A&M scored 54 points inside, including 18 fast-break points. MCNEESE ST. (26-7) Anderson 2-8 0-0 6, Wells 0-0 0-0 0, A. Baggett 3-17 0-0 7, C. Baggett 10-20 1-2 22, Johnson 0-1 1-2 1, Kendrix 0-0 0-0 0, LaCombe 0-1 0-0 0, Gatlin 3-6 2-2 8, Hines 0-0 0-1 0, Hull 1-6 1-3 3. Totals 19-59 5-10 47. TEXAS A&M (28-5) Carter 3-5 1-1 7, Colson 2-5 0-0 5, Adams 6-11 6-6 18, Elonu 5-9 0-0 10, White 6-12 0-0 12, Grant 0-0 0-0 0, Windham 0-0 0-0 0, Collins 0-4 0-0 0, Pratcher 3-4 1-2 9, Gilbert 2-3 0-0 4, Assarian 6-6 0-0 12, Bellock 2-2 0-0 4, Baker 2-4 2-2 6. Totals 37-65 10-11 87. Halftime—Texas A&M 41-15. 3-Point Goals— McNeese St. 4-17 (Anderson 2-7, C. Baggett 1-3, A. Baggett 1-6, LaCombe 0-1), Texas A&M 3-11 (Pratcher 2-2, Colson 1-2, White 0-1, Carter 0-2, Adams 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— McNeese St. 25 (Hull 10), Texas A&M 45 (Adams, White 6). Assists—McNeese St. 3 (Anderson, C. Baggett, Wells 1), Texas A&M 26 (Colson 6). Total Fouls—McNeese St. 13, A&M 14. A—NA.


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JAPAN

Sister city largely spared from disaster By Shaun Hittle sdhittle@ljworld.com

A week after the devastating earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan, a representative from Lawrence’s sister city of Hiratsuka, Japan, sent updates about how the city is doing following the disaster.

Though Hiratsuka sustained minor damage compared with other areas of the country, access to food and electricity remains problematic, said Yoshimi Tomita, president of Friends of Lawrence in Hiratsuka. Tomita wrote about planned power outages and

shortages of basic goods in an email to the Journal-World on Saturday. But conditions should return to normal shortly, Tomita said, and Hiratsuka has been able to send emergency workers and supplies to more affected areas. Lawrence Mayor Mike

Amyx asked Lawrence residents to offer assistance to Japan. “As the world reaches out to the Japanese people, I urge the citizens of Lawrence to find ways to help the global community SISTER, page 2B

HOW TO HELP WITH RELIEF EFFORTS IN JAPAN For those interested in donating to relief efforts in Japan, the city of Lawrence suggests one of the following agencies: ● Mid-America Chapter of the American Translators Association: kcjas.org. ● American Red Cross: Text

“REDCROSS” to 90999 and a $10 donation will be charged to your phone bill. ● AmeriCares disaster relief agency: americares.org. ● GlobalGiving, which is working with the International Medical Corps: globalgiving.org.

Bike shops gear up for higher sales

Dinner serves as lesson on etiquette By Andy Hyland

—— ahyland@ljworld.com

Rising fuel prices a factor, but check the cost-efficiency

Erin Wolfram walked around the room, gently correcting the little slip-ups. Bring the food to you; don’t go to the food. Always wipe your mouth before you take a drink. Pass across your body, and receive across your body. Welcome to Kansas University’s etiquette dinner, a popular event with students that occurs once every semester. KU brings in members of the local business community to dine with students at the Adams Alumni Center so the students can learn some of the basic rules of etiquette and professionalism.

By Christine Metz cmetz@ljworld.com

ONLINE: See videos of bicycle experts discussing bike options at LJWorld.com

As the weather warms and gas prices soar, people begin trading four wheels for two to help save on fuel costs. While spring is always busy for Cycle Works, 2121 Kasold Drive, the store was really hopping in the summer of 2008 when gas prices spiked to nearly $4, owner Gary Long said. He saw recordbreaking sales monthly. “And not just by a little bit,” Long said. “It was 45 percent.” If you are looking to save money, getting on a bike isn’t always as simple or as inexpensive as you think. You have to find the bike that best suits your needs and then all of the gear that goes with it. To help figure out just how much to spend and how far you have to ride to make the investment pay off, we’ve provided this bicycle-friendly guide.

Please see DINNER, page 2B

To get you started Regardless of how fancy the bike, all cyclists should be equipped with basic gear to keep them safe. Helmets: $25 to $35 Matt Farnsworth, manager at the Re-Cyclery, 731 N.H., said that helmets are a lot more comfortable and less expensive than what they used to be. And, everyone wears one nowadays, leaving no excuse

Kevin Anderson/Journal-World Photos

ERIN WOLFRAM, LEFT, with University Career Center and an etiquette expert, explains how to hold utensils at a recent business dinner.

SEAN O'NEILL, OVERLAND PARK, listens to dinner conversations. KU students participated in an etiquette dinner where they learned how to behave, converse and participate in a business-style dinner.

Please see BIKE, page 2B

‘Boomeroos’ turn dogs into Wildcats, Jayhawks By Sara Shepherd sshepherd@theworldco.info

SHAWNEE — A few years retired from her job as an elementary school principal, Barbara McPherson was working part time for Baker University, supervising teachers who were training to become administrators. She was looking for

something else to add to her schedule, but she didn’t want to sacrifice her flexible hours or spend a lot of cash on overhead for a business venture. About a year ago, McPherson’s epiphany came while walking her shih tzu, Boomer, down her west Shawnee street. “All of the sudden it

just hit me,” she said. “I told my neighbor next door, ‘I’m going to make KU and K-State doggie jackets, and I’m going to call it Boomeroos!’” Now, in time for NCAA March Madness, McPherson’s homegrown business is up and running. She sells her made-to-order, customfit fuzzy fleece doggy

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University, Iowa State University and the University of Missouri, as well as neutral paw-print emblazoned fleece. She recently expanded her offerings to include baby blankets, sleep sacks and car seat covers, which she calls Baby Boomeroos. All can be monogrammed.

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BOOMER, A SHIH TZU, is the inspiration for Boomeroos, Please see BOOMEROOS, page 2B custom-made collegiate fleece jackets for dogs.

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jackets online at boomeroos.com. The name was inspired both by Boomer, whom McPherson adopted after he was rescued from a puppy mill, and by Fruit of the Loom’s fun children’s character undies, Underoos. She makes doggie jackets in the colors of Kansas University, Kansas State

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

Orlin Wagner/AP Photo

DEER WATCH VEHICLES PASS on a rural road near Atlanta, Kan. This photo was taken on Friday.

Bike CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

for why you shouldn’t. In fact, if you are under 18, wearing a helmet is the law. Lights: $15 to $20 Another biking law is to have lights on at night. Bikes should have a headlight in front and a red reflector in the rear. Dan Hughes with Su n f l owe r O utd o o r a n d Bike Shop, 802 Mass., recommends using red blinking lights in the back to more easily get the attention of the drivers behind you. Even for cyclists who think they will never bike at night, Farnsworth said it’s something that should be put on just in case. Water bottle: $5 cage and $4 to $10 for a bottle Having some form of hydration for the bike ride is a good idea, especially if you plan on biking during the hot, humid summer. Locks: $15 to $25 If you plan to leave your bike in public places, a lock wouldn’t be a bad idea. Bicycle theft is a pretty common crime in Lawrence.

The ride

$100 to $250 You won’t find any new bikes at Lawrence cycling shops in this price range (although you will at large national retailers). The best bet is looking for used bikes. At the Re-Cyclery, used bikes start around $125 to $150. Last week, the ReCyclery had a 1994 red Takara cruiser on sale for $125 and a 90s model Giant Option for $225. To find anything cheaper, check out Craigslist. Last week, a quick scan on the website showed a number of bikes for sale in the $50 price range. If you buy a used bike online, Farnsworth advises

Boomeroos CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

McPherson hit several obstacles before transitioning Boomeroos from vision to reality. For starters, she couldn’t sew. Enter Lenexa’s Missouri Sewing Machine Co., where McPherson bought her sewing machine and an embroidery machine, and got some basic instructions. On a recent afternoon, Boomer was milling around McPherson’s feet as she pulled some of her f irst attempts from a bag of rejected Boomeroos. Boomer — who is supposed to be a diehard K-State fan like his owner — promptly curled up on a rough-edged, mismatched KU fleece she tossed on the floor. Fortunately, McPherson also met Missouri Sewing

buyers to make sure to find a bike that fits. After buying the bike, it would be a good idea to get it checked out by a local bike shop. A simple tuneup costs $35 at the Re-Cyclery. For bikes that need new tire tubes, brakes and cables, the cost will be more like $60. $300 to $400 For less than $300, Long doesn’t think you can buy a quality new bike. At Cycle Works, Long suggests starting off with the versatile Giant Boulder, which is priced at $309. He also has a comfortable city cruiser bike priced at $379. Over at Sunflower, mountain bikes start at $320. $400 to $500 For cyclists who are mostly interested in commuting, Hughes recommends a road hybrid bike. Road hybrids have thicker tires than road bikes but taller wheels than mountain bikes. At Sunflower, road hybrids start at $429.

The bells and whistles We didn’t check on the price of whistles, but at Sunflower, bells start at $5. But that’s not all the gear and gadgets you can buy that will make your ride more comfortable and fun. Baskets: $20 to $40 At Re-Cyclery, you can also buy used baskets and racks for $5 to $10. Panniers: $30 to $40; pannier rack: $25 to $30 Panniers are great for carrying groceries, clothes or work supplies. They can be slung over a rank in the back of your bike. Fenders: $30 Fenders prevent mud and water from splashing up off the back tire. This will prevent a strip of brown from forming on the middle of your back when roads are wet. Flat tire supplies: $14 The cold, hard truth of

Machine Co. store manager Bethany Howe, an avid seamstress and dog lover who wanted some sewing project to take home after hours. Howe and her daughter now work for McPherson sewing Boomeroos. “I’ve been sewing since I was 12,” Howe said. “So I helped her with her product development, but she had all the ideas and jumped through all the hoops.” Getting collegiate licensing for all those schools was one of McPherson’s biggest hoops. Her first approval took a nearly 40-page application and four months of waiting. She’s now licensed for KU, KState and Iowa State, with Mizzou in the works. In the meantime, she’s working on challenges, including how to make premade jackets fit better, for those dog owners who want to buy one off the rack instead of sending in their dog’s

cycling is that one day you will get a flat tire. To keep from pushing your bike home, here are some supplies you should bring along: levers to remove tire ($3), new tire tubes ($5), patch kit ($3), air canisters to fill tire ($3).

The payoff The real question is how far would you have to ride before your investment pays off. To do the math, we looked at the fuel efficiency for the average car (25 miles per gallon) and the current cost of fuel in Lawrence ($3.39). Here’s what we found:

$150 In this price range, you could snag a bike off of Craigslist, get a tune up and all the basic start-up gear. Before your investment paid off, you would have to pedal 1,106 miles. $400 For about $400, you could buy the lowest-priced brand new bike at Sunflower or Cycle Works and still be able to afford all the basic start-up gear. However, you won’t start saving money until you have ridden almost 3,000 miles. $600 For around $600, you could purchase the road hybrid bike, the basic safety gear, a basket or pannier and rack, flat tire kit and fenders. In just 4,425 miles, you will have biked enough to pay off the cost. It should be noted that many would claim the biggest benefits of biking aren’t the economic ones. Biking provides exercise, cuts down on traffic congestion and carbon monoxide emissions, and saves on the wear and tear of the vehicle. Oh, and did I mention cyclists usually get rock star parking? — Reporter Christine Metz can be reached at 832-6352.

measurements and waiting for a custom-made coat. “We’re constantly in design mode,” she said. McPherson spent 12 years as principal of Stony Point North Elementary School in Kansas City, Kan. Too busy for a pet then, she got Boomer in 2009, several years after she retired. He had spent his entire 4-year life in a puppy mill. McPherson said he was extremely shy, not potty trained, didn’t know what treats were, didn’t respond to being called by a name and didn’t know how to go up or down stairs. It took a lot of TLC, McPherson said, but Boomer now lives like a normal house dog. Plus, she said, he and her other dog, Remmy, make excellent models for Boomeroos.

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NAME CARDS were at each seat at a KU etiquette dinner, among various cutlery, plates and glassware. his company is also looking to network with potential candidates for jobs in the future. Gina Gerstner, a KU senior from Frankfort, said she definitely picked up some good etiquette tips: how to eat bread, which way to pass the sugar and how to sit down properly. The business representatives also offered interviewing and networking tips, both at a question-and-answer session before dinner, and during dinner conversations. “It was really great to network with a lot of businesses that were here and to hear about people who are doing jobs in the industry that I’m going to be doing,” said Gerstner, who is majoring in journalism. “I heard a lot of great tips for the interview process and job hunting in general.” Wolfram said the program’s popularity — about 65 students showed up for the event — can be partly attributed to the difficult economy that students find themselves entering. “I think that nowadays, especially with the economy, you really need to be at the top of your game when you’re going out to look for an internship or a full-time job,” Wolfram said. “So the more you can do to prepare to make yourself be professional, the better.” — Higher education reporter Andy Hyland can be reached at 832-6388. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/LJW_KU.

TABLE ETIQUETTE 101 A few etiquette tips courtesy of Erin Wolfram, assistant director of the KU Career Center and a professional etiquette consultant. ● Your mom’s probably already told you not to put your elbows on the table. She was right, Wolfram said. Here’s why: When you put your elbows on the table, it hinders your space, she said. The wait staff can’t bring a new course to you if your elbows are in the way, she said. Or, if you’re finished, they can’t easily access your plate to take it away. ● The napkin. Grab it, and unfold it to your right, and fold it in half. Put it on your lap, with the crease toward your stomach. ● Even sitting down has a proper procedure. First, stand behind the chair, and take a step to the right. And as you step to the right, pull your chair back. Then, stand in front of your chair, and as you sit down, pull the chair in.

Sister CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

and assist Japan. ... ” Amyx said in a news release issued by the city Friday. Hiratsuka, a city of more than a quarter million people located about 40 miles southwest of Tokyo, has been a sister city of Lawrence since 1990. James Hilliard, president of the Friends of Hiratsuka here in Lawrence, said he’s been in frequent contact with people in Hiratsuka and they’re mon— Shawnee Dispatch news editor Sara itoring the situation closely. Shepherd can be reached at 913-962-3000, Hilliard said he’s been told ext. 111. that Hiratsuka is not affected

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And Wolfram is the person who knows all the rules. She’s employed by KU’s Career Center and has been certified as a professional etiquette consultant. “I think that what I try to do is to be quite general in the training that I teach, to give them some basic tips that allow them to get through a situation without getting noticed in a negative way,” she said. In addition to the once-asemester events, Wolfram will spend some of her time going to classes and speaking at other events, too. “We were seeing a lot of need for etiquette in the workplace or professional interview settings,” she said. As she walks around the room in the Adams Alumni Center, students interrupt their dinners to stop Wolfram to ask their own questions, too. Is it OK to sop up a tasty sauce or dressing with bread? Yes, Wolfram said. But you should be sure to poke the bread with your fork, swirl it around a bit, and then eat it with your fork. Dan Napralla is vice president of consumer goods at Huhtamaki, a De Soto packaging and disposable products manufacturing company. He was one of the business leaders who attended this dinner. He said he applauded the students who came not just for the etiquette tips, but also for the opportunity to network with representatives from local businesses. “I think that etiquette in general is not what it should be,” Napralla said. “By the same token, I don’t think we should be so highly structured that we’re worried about some of the details.” He also said he was impressed to see freshmen and sophomores among the students who came to this event, joining the usual complement of seniors. “I applaud them for taking the initiative to start up a network early,” he said. And selfishly, he admitted,

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This should ensure you avoid hitting the table, knocking your drink over or other various calamities. ● One of the tough ones for students to pick up, Wolfram said, is placing silverware in “resting” and “finishing” position. Finishing position lets the wait staff know you’re done with the meal so they can pick up that plate. For resting position put your knife horizontally across the top of the plate with the pointy part of the knife toward the left. The fork should rest at 4 o’clock on your plate, placed diagonally with tines up. This lets the wait staff know you’re not finished yet. When you are actually done, flip the tines of the fork over, and drop the knife parallel to the fork. Luckily, the students at the dinner had three courses to practice all that.

by radiation issues from the nuclear reactor problems in the northeastern part of the country. A delegation trip to Japan is scheduled for June, Hilliard said. Tomita, who has made two trips to Lawrence, said he knows the Lawrence community is concerned about Hiratsuka and Japan. “I think that a lot of people in Lawrence have been watching TV and they can’t believe the tremendous devastation,” he said. “I deeply appreciate that our Lawrence friends are praying for Japan.” — Reporter Shaun Hittle can be reached at 832-7173.

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WORLD BRIEFING

1 3 5 4

LAWRENCE JOURNAL-WORLD ● LJWorld.com/local ● Monday, March 21, 2011 ● 3B 2

1 | NEW YORK CITY

AT&T to buy T-Mobile USA for $39B AT&T Inc. said Sunday it will buy T-Mobile USA from Deutsche Telekom AG in a cash-and-stock deal valued at $39 billion that would make it the largest cellphone company in the U.S. The deal would reduce the number of wireless carriers with national coverage from four to three, and is sure to face close regulatory scrutiny. It also removes a potential partner for Sprint Nextel Corp., the struggling No. 3 carrier, which had been in talks to combine with T-Mobile USA, according to Wall Street Journal reports. AT&T is now the country’s second-largest wireless carrier and T-Mobile USA is the fourth largest. The acquisition would give AT&T 129 million subscribers, vaulting it past Verizon Wireless to make it the largest U.S. cellphone company. For T-Mobile USA’s 33.7 million subscribers, the news doesn’t immediately change anything. Because of the long regulatory process, AT&T expects the acquisition to take a year to close. But when and if it closes, T-Mobile USA customers would get access to AT&T’s phone line-up, including the iPhone. 2 | YEMEN

Tribe abandons weakened president The U.S.-backed president of Yemen suffered a devastating political blow on Sunday when his own powerful tribe demanded his resignation, joining religious leaders, young people and the country’s traditional opposition in calls for an end to his three decades in power. Massive crowds flooded cities and towns around the impoverished and volatile nation, screaming in grief and anger as they mourned dozens of protesters killed Friday when President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s security forces opened fire from rooftops on a demonstration in the capital. Saleh appeared to be trying to hold on, firing his entire Cabinet ahead of what one government official said was a planned mass resignation, but making no mention of stepping down himself. Yemen’s ambassador to the United Nations and its human rights minister had announced their resignations earlier in the day. 3 | WASHINGTON, D.C.

2 Bush officials in running for FBI head Two officials who worked for President George W. Bush, including one who threatened to resign to block legally questionable anti-terror surveillance, have a realistic chance of being asked to head the FBI, according to people familiar with the search. James Comey and Kenneth Wainstein served in sensitive national security-related posts at the Justice Department in the Bush administration. That could make for interesting confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee if President Barack Obama selects either to succeed FBI Director Robert Mueller. His 10-year, nonrenewable term expires Sept. 4. Their service as political appointees under a Republican president is a key factor in explaining the rise of Comey and Wainstein in the search. The Obama administration faces an expanded Republican minority in the Senate with the votes to seriously complicate the confirmation prospects of any nominee who draws their united opposition. 4 | HAITI

Haitians cast ballots for new leader

Making the tough calls CAPITOL

BRIEFING

KU professor, soccer referee has officiated more than 2,000 games

News from the Kansas Statehouse Compiled by Scott Rothschild

By Joe Preiner jpreiner@ljworld.com

Jim LaPoint plays by the rules. As one of the best soccer referees in the state of Kansas, he has to. LaPoint, a Kansas University professor and longtime official, was named the Kansas State Boys Soccer Referee of the Year for 2010. It‘s the fourth time he’s been recognized for his skills on the field, something he acknowledges with a smile. “I think it’s a validation that what you’re doing is being accepted and appreciated,” he said. And all that LaPoint, 69, is doing is the same thing he’s been doing since moving to Lawrence in 1978. He’s refereed more than 2,000 games on the college and high school levels. He’s spent more than Photo courtesy of Jason Dailey/Lawrence Magazine 3,000 hours on soccer fields for REFEREE JIM LAPOINT WORKS THE SIDELINE in this 2010 file the simple enjoyment of the photo. LaPoint, also a KU professor, has officiated more than 2,000 game. soccer games at the college and high school level. “I like the activity, and I like being with the kids,” LaPoint ate degree. He’s been a tennis health, sport and exercise scisaid. “I just like the sport.” coach and instructor. His chil- ences department. He also dren played hockey and soccer. finds time for officiating. An athletic background He currently holds the sought“I’ve never turned down a LaPoint knows a thing or after position of KU men’s bas- game,” LaPoint said of reffing two about sports. He played ketball timer. And LaPoint has junior varsity games even after baseball, football, basketball helped run a youth summer working college games and 18 and tennis for four years each sports camp at KU for the last high school state champiin high school. He became a 30 years. onships. “I’ve never changed student manager in college Even with all of this, he still Please see REFEREE, page 5B while seeking an undergradu- finds time to teach in KU’s

Senate to mull budget measure The full Senate will probably consider a budget recommendation next week, leaders said. The proposal hammered out by the Senate Ways and Means Committee closes a $500 million revenue shortfall for the fiscal year that starts July 1. The biggest hit is to public schools, which will see a cut of approximately 5.6 percent, or $226 per student in base state aid. Senate President Steve Morris, RHugoton, said combined with earlier cuts to schools, education has sustained heavy cuts over the past couple of years. QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“It looks like to me that if shooting these immigrating feral hogs works, maybe we have found a (solution) to our illegal immigration problem.” — State Rep. Virgil Peck, R-Tyro, commenting in the House Appropriations Committee. Peck later said he was joking and then issued a two-sentence apology, but numerous national groups and legislators called on Peck to resign. Please see CAPITOL, page 5B

State A.G. defends death penalty law By Roxana Hegeman Associated Press Writer

WICHITA — Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt’s office is defending the constitutionality of the state’s death penalty law from a challenge raised in the case against the Great Bend man accused of killing a teenager whose charred body was found at an asphalt plant. In preparation for a hearing Tuesday in Great Bend, state prosecutors filed their written responses late Friday afternoon to the death penalty challenge and other motions the defense had mostly filed in January. The move came after questions were raised as to why no written responses to the defense

Haitians scarred by decades of poverty, political corruption and natural disasters cast ballots Sunday for president in hopes a new leader could do what others have not: Replace homes and schools in the earthquake-devastated capital, improve education and create some optimism for the future. Voters chose between Michel “Sweet Micky” Martelly, a popular musician who has never held public office, and Mirlande Manigat, a former first lady and senator and longtime fixture on the political scene. Voters formed what for the most part were orderly lines, some shrugging off delays of three hours. Preliminary results are expected March 31. Whoever wins will face enormous challenges in a country emerging from last year’s earthquake, which the government estimates killed more than 300,000 people. A multibillion-dollar reconstruction effort has stalled, and some 800,000 people still live in the camps that emerged around Port-auPrince after the quake. Compounding the misery is a cholera outbreak that has killed more than 4,700 By David Clouston people and is expected to surge again with the rainy season.

motions had yet been made despite Barton County Judge Hannelore Kitt’s standing order requiring the state to do so in the death penalty case against Adam Joseph Longoria. “I think we are in compliance,” Deputy Attorney General Victor Braden said after the filings. “We are ready for Tuesday and we will see how it goes.” Longoria faces capital murder and criminal sodomy charges in the August killing of 14-year-old Alicia DeBolt. The attorneys with the Kansas Death Penalty Defense Unit who represent Longoria, Jeffrey Wicks and Tim Frieden, did not return a message left at their office Friday seeking comment.

Death penalty prosecutions are handled in two phases. First is the trial to determine whether a suspect is guilty. If convicted, the next step is a penalty phase to determine whether the crime warrants the death sentence. In the second phase, jurors consider aggravating factors such as whether a killing was especially heinous and mitigating factors such as whether a defendant lacked a previous significant criminal record. Longoria’s defense has argued the death penalty in the state is unconstitutional because socalled relaxed evidentiary standards allow the government too much leeway in the type of evidence it can present for aggravating factors. The defense also

separately challenged the law on the basis that death penalty verdicts are ambiguous and unreliable since they do not require the jury to disclose the considerations that motivated the death sentence and what weight jurors gave to any mitigating evidence. Defense attorneys also noted the death penalty has been upheld by the Kansas Supreme Court and acknowledged they were filing the request to preserve the issue for future appeals. The state’s responses were faxed to Great Bend so late on Friday that they were not available on the court’s website. Please see LAW, page 5B

Couple to sell Smoky Blowing it out of the water Hill Vineyard and Winery

5 | SOUTH CAROLINA

Bill targets Facebook users in prison The proliferation of cell phones smuggled into prisons has some inmates routinely updating their status from the inside, and South Carolina is considering becoming the first state to make that a crime. The measure would add 30 days to a prisoner’s sentence if he is caught interacting on social networking sites via cell phone. The bill goes a step further, too, making it illegal for anyone to set up a page for a prisoner, which legal experts say violates inmates’ free speech rights even if they are using contraband cell phones. Rep. Wendell Gilliard, a Democrat from Charleston who proposed the law, says crime victims shouldn’t have to worry about seeing or being threatened by a prisoner online. There’s also a fear convicts are coordinating criminal activity.

Salina Journal

SALINA — Norm and Jen Jennings have announced plans to sell the Smoky Hill Vineyard and Winery they own and operate north of Salina and embark on a ministerial career. “Our hope is that we find an individual or entity that wants to run the winery as Smoky Hill Winery and just carry it directly forward as it is today,” said Norm Jennings. He said the decision has nothing to do with the recession or the business. “It is very successful,” he said. The couple notified the winery staff of the decision recently and began notifying the public, he said. Norm’s father, Steve, founded

the winery in 1991 with a business partner, Kay Bloom, after the two men retired. Steve Jennings died in 2005. The winery, which covers 40 acres and includes 10 acres of grape vines, has been managed by Norm Jennings and his wife since his father’s death. The winery is located at 212 W. Golf Link, just north of Salina. The Jenningses hope to sell the winery intact. Norm Jennings says they are confident, given the reputation and popularity of the Smoky Hill brand, that there will be interested buyers. Plans are to begin looking for a buyer soon. It’s a big career move for JenJohn Young/Journal-World Photo nings, who also serves as a Salina city commissioner, but not his WARM TEMPERATURES AND MOSTLY SUNNY SKIES brought many people out on the first day of spring, including this windsurfer at Please see WINERY, page 5B Clinton Lake.

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LAWRENCE • STATE

|

4B Monday, March 21, 2011

SOUND OFF

Super-full moon

Q:

How would I lodge a complaint about customer service at the Kansas Department of Revenue?

HOW TO HELP

Clinic needs organizational crew Staff Reports

Agency: Heartland Community Health Center Contact: Ali Edwards at 785-841-7297 or ali@leo center.org

A:

Jeannine Koranda, media contact at the department, said anyone with a complaint that wasn’t specific to taxes, car registrations or another department could call her at 785-296-0671. Koranda said she would help direct the person to the right contact.

Heartland Community Health Center needs a group of volunteers to help organize its 15-by-20-foot storage room. A group of two to four people would be the perfect size to complete this task in a single day. The plan is to take everything out of the room, organize it and decide what to keep, donate, sell and throw away. Contact Ali Edwards at 785-841-7297 or ali@leocenter.org to coordinate details.

CALL SOUND OFF If you have a question for Sound Off, call 832-7297.

HOSPITAL Lawrence Memorial Hospital reported no births on Sunday.

CORRECTIONS The Dole Institute study groups “Life in Congress” with former U.S. Rep. Dennis Moore and “Corporate Responsibilty” with Walt Riker will not be conducted this week because of spring break at Kansas University. Moore’s study group will resume March 29, and Riker’s on March 30. Also, there is no City Commission meeting this week. These events had appeared in the Journal-World calendar.

PUMP PATROL LAWRENCE

The Journal-World found gas prices as low as $3.37 at Shop N Go, 1000 W. 23rd St. If you find a lower price, call 832-7154.

ON THE RECORD LJWORLD.COM/BLOTTER

DOUGLAS COUNTY DISTRICT COURT

MARRIAGE LICENSES ISSUED James Albert Keefer, 77, Lawrence, and Mary Elizabeth McMechan, 74, Lawrence. Shay Michael Brown, 36, Lawrence, and Rebecca Jo Pepper, 33, Lawrence. Justin Michael Thornton, 23, Lawrence, and Ashley Meshell Schlotzhauer, 27, Lawrence. Michael Shawn Crawford, 28, Lawrence, and Mary Katherine Corcoran, 31, Lawrence. Edward Francis Miller, 57, Eudora, and Gwendolyn Marie Marzette-Cunning, 56, Eudora. James Franklin Dawayne Barnett, 32, Ottawa, and Heather Alyson O’Neal, 36, Ottawa. Todd Patrick Mailen, 39, Lawrence, and Denise Adelicia Faimon, 39, Perry. Jeremy Michael Conway, 30, Lawrence, and Amy Diane Allen, 36, Lawrence. James Norris Holland Jr., 47, Lawrence, and Melinda Bucsa, 28, Lawrence. Patrick William Reanier, 40, Lawrence, and Holly Kathleen Bohardt, 37, Lawrence. David Leon Bell, 48, Topeka, and Dalia Bernardino Aguado, 41, Topeka. Brian James Fuller, 48, Lawrence, and Patricia Dawn Atchison, 48, Lawrence.

DIVORCES GRANTED Donna S. Beebe, 60, Lawrence, and Terry L. Beebe, 57, Baldwin City. Gayane Torosyan Stevens, 36, Lawrence, and Timothy David Stevens, 49, Lawrence. Shannon Danielle Holloway, 31, Lawrence, and Homer A. Holloway Jr., 31, Baldwin City. Richard Daniel Vega, 40, Lawrence, and Diana M. Vega, 52, Lawrence.

BANKRUPTCIES Douglas County residents or businesses filing for bankruptcy protection recently in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the District of Kansas, according to court records: • Matthew Alan Parker and Kallista Fae Parker, formerly known as Kallista Fae Foster, 1424-C Brighton Circle, Lawrence. • Shari Nicole Portenier, 933 Christie Court, Lawrence. • Janet Kay Barrick, formerly doing business as Beaus Imports Inc., 3905 Willshire Drive, Lawrence. • Dale G. Rogers, 539 Graystone Drive, Apt. 8, Lawrence. • Sharon Lee Cummings, 3112 Ranger Drive, Lawrence. • Duane Irvin LaFrenz and Cheryl Ann LaFrenz, 828 Fir St., Eudora. • Kenneth Lee Caple, 628 E. 1600 Road, Baldwin City. • Amy Elizabeth Shepard, 1600 Haskell Ave., #191, Lawrence. • Sandy Ray Summers and Terrie Renee Summers, 3300 W. 24th Terrace, Lawrence.

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

Orlin Wagner/AP Photo

THE MOON SETS BEHIND CLOUDS and a farmhouse near Rose Hill, southeast of Wichita, on Sunday morning. The perigean moon was at its closest point to Earth since March 1993. Clouds in northeast Kansas obscured the view Saturday night.

Newton flour mill rises to 21st century standard N E W T O N ( A P ) — After months of enduring detours, demolition and construction, residents of Newton have had a chance to see what the work was all about — the upgrade of the central Kansas town’s old flour mill into a state-ofthe art operation. Horizon Milling held an open house last week to show off the new packing and shipping facility, complete with robotic arms that do the loading and lifting of sacks of flour. Bought in 1974 by Cargill, majority owner of multistate Horizon Milling, the Newton plant — parts of which were built in 1918 — grinds 850,000 pounds of flour a daily, mostly from regionally grown hard red winter wheat, The Wichita Eagle reported. For years, much of the Newton-milled flour was shipped to Horizon’s Topeka mill to be bagged for sales in grocery stores. But the Topeka plant was even more antiquated,

and Cargill announced last year it was closing the 128year-old mill in the capital in favor of expanding the Newton mill to include a bagging and shipping operation. Newton offered tax incentives and gained 30 jobs, doubling the mill’s work force. Flour milled in the older building on one side of Broadway near downtown is now piped across the street to giant bins on an upper floor in the new building. The flour flows down to machines that pour it into 2-, 5-, 10- and 25-pound bags. Three robotic arms lift and load the sacks onto scores of pallets, each bearing thousands of bags that are combined and sorted for shipping by rail or truck. Horizon officials said the new shipping operation is so productive it can process more than the Newton mill produces and might, one day, pack bulk flour from elsewhere.

N.Y. TIMES CROSSWORD SOLUTION FOR MARCH 20 M R M O M

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N I M O N E N G T H H O S T O R A R D S T E Y O U R R N I C A N M A R S M Y M O E G R O M O T B A C O U C K T P I C H I L H A L L M E S

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P L A Y S B O I O U P A T A D L E I N U N D H E E U N D H N A B E T A N O L E D E D S S

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A M I D A L Y A E A R H A I B O W M O W H E W L I N L G T E A R L O C P A R W I T H F E R A M A E Y N C S L

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Immediate needs ● The Parent Autism Support Group of the Easter Seals Capper Foundation is in need of volunteers to help out at its Statewide Autism Awareness Carnival on April 17. The event will be held from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Tecumseh Park in Tecumseh, approximately 20 minutes west of Lawrence. Volunteers are needed for setup,

cleanup, carnival games, sensory games, traffic control and many other fun things. This statewide event will raise public awareness about autism while providing a fun-filled day the public. Please contact Mari White at 785-766-6632 for more details on how you can get involved. ● The Sunset Hill and Hillcrest School Gardens are in need of community volunteers to help prepare the sites for the upcoming season. The work day (weather permitting) will be from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 2. Contact Lily Siebert at The Merc at 8438544 or lily@themerc.coop to sign up and help out. ● Health Care Access Clinic is in need of volunteers to help with the upcoming Kansas Half Marathon Presented by Hy-Vee. This event, which is the clinic’s largest annual fundraiser, will begin at 7:30 a.m. on April 17 and will feature a halfmarathon, 10K and 5K races,

S K Y E

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S F E A L U R OR A L T E HUS K A A A SUM T S I I SC CKME K E A S E T RCE S HA L A T U I B G K I M E BOX N OA ERN GS A E S D L E U

A S T A BOARD CRE L OUV ER I ON UNDONE D T AM WE A S V SOP ER HAG RA T Y B E S S BRED RA E ERA S ARA B CUR I O E T ECA OS A S AMOV A R P TONER I MAG I NE A OS NAN MEC TORS SCEN T I B E PROS C A L M WAGS R I A E S E V R COMB WE I E A BU H I V A T AR S P I L ERA I L CORE RSU L A G I L D

PUP A S A FOU L COT T A RS PU T E T I ME E AREND L I E DE L F T S DARE K A NA E I GS K I N OP A L S ERO HAN I CS S GNA T P EDRO F US I ON I C AMY E K S S S Y F I T T NA TO A OREG S D EMO

— For more volunteer opportunities, contact Shannon Reid at the United Way’s Roger Hill Volunteer Center, at 785-865-5030 or volunteer@rhvc.org, or go to volunteerdouglascounty.org

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SUNDAY CROSSWORD SOLUTION FOR MARCH 20 T O D D

as well as a free half-mile Fun Run/Walk and the Hy-Vee Mile At A Time Marathon Finale. Volunteers are needed for a variety of positions on race day in addition to some pre-race projects. For more information, contact Sally Zogry, event coordinator at 841-5760, ext. 209 or zogrys@healthcareaccess.or g. ● Midnight Farm, affiliated with Community Living Opportunities, is in need of volunteers to help out at its Spring Family Fun Day on April 30. Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of tasks including parking, kid’s games, plant sales and more. The event will take place at Midnight Farm, located at 2084-B N. 600 Road, Baldwin City; volunteers are needed from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Contact Lauren Ray at 979-1889 or laurenray@clokan.org to get involved.

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LAWRENCE • STATE

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

X Monday, March 21, 2011

| 5B.

Topeka Zoo recovers accreditation Winery TOPEKA (AP) — The Topeka Zoo’s accreditation has been restored to full status after several issues caused it to nearly lose the stamp of approval from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums a year ago. The Topeka Capital-Journal reported that the association announced its decision Sunday. “It’s great news,” Topeka Zoo director Brendan Wiley said. “It lets us know we are on the right track or path with our choices.” Wiley became director of the zoo after the U.S. Department of Agriculture criticized it for numerous animal deaths, its professional accreditation was tabled last March and most of its management left or were fired. A loss of accreditation would have bruised the zoo’s reputa-

tion and prevented it from sharing animals with other facilities that are part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. A team from the accrediting organization conducted a status check on Jan. 17. Then on Sunday, Wiley and three other representatives from the Topeka Zoo meet with 12 members of the accreditation commission during the organization’s annual midyear meeting in Chattanooga, Tenn. The zoo team discussed the progress that has been made, including that the Topeka City Council passed a council resolution that would allow the Friends of the Zoo to fund improvements to the outdoor hippo exhibit, as well as passed two ordinances to help with the zoo’s perimeter fence and necropsy room.

After the 20 minute update and 10 minutes for deliberation, the commission returned with a response. “The first words were congratulations,” Wiley said. “Then they shared their optimism.” Staff will submit a prog ress report to the accreditation commission in six months. “We are elated,” Wiley said. “We know that this isn’t the end of the story and that we still have a lot of work in front of us but having the affirmation and support of your accrediting agency behind you is priceless.” City manager Norton Bonaparte said the news was “wonderful.” “It shows we are returning to a world-class zoo,” he said.

Lawrence school board candidates to chat on LJWorld.com Before city elections on April 5, LJWorld.com will host live online chats with the candidates for the Lawrence school board. You can submit questions in advance for these chats now on LJWorld.com: ● Randy Masten, 11 a.m. today.

Referee

● Ola Faucher, 11 a.m. Tues-

day.

● Jim Clark, 12:30 p.m.

Tuesday. ● Tyler Palmer, 1 p.m. Wednesday. To submit a question, log on to LJWorld.com/chats. Click on the chat and submit your

question. A free LJWorld.com user account is required to submit a question. You can also read the transcripts of past live chats, including chats with all of the Lawrence City Commission candidates, in our elections section at LJWorld.com/elections.

He’s known to be very much a purist, one of those refs that’s strict and controls the game to a ‘T’.”

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3B

the schedule once. That’s not how I am. Whatever game I’m assigned, that’s what I take.” It’s that attitude that has helped LaPoint be successful. He demands control of the environments surrounding the games he works. He keeps the coaches, crowds and players under control. “He’s one of the more professional and classy of the referees,” Lawrence High boys soccer coach Mike Murphy said. “If there are ever any questionable calls, Jim is one who’s made the fewest.”

Tough but fair LaPoint credits his success to the way he approaches the game, which is the same way he approaches teaching: tough but fair. During the years, refereeing has become a labor of love for LaPoint. He watches European games on TV and finds he pays more

— Kaw Valley Soccer Association Executive Director Marcus Dudley attention to the positioning of the officials than the players themselves. His passion for soccer is one reason he says he’ll continue to referee even after he retires from KU at the end of the year. The money he makes from games is an added bonus. “It’s nice to have a little slush fund,” he said. “To have a few extra dollars, have some spending money.” Though LaPoint has been recognized as one of the best, he’s the first to admit he doesn’t get every call right. He’s also not afraid to let coaches and players know when he makes a mistake. Kaw Valley Soccer Association Executive Director Marcus Dudley has seen the effect of LaPoint’s methods. “He’s known to be very much a purist, one of those

refs that’s strict and controls the game to a ‘T’,” Dudley said. “He’s very well-respected.” And LaPoint has earned that respect during his years on the field. A common question asked by those who know him is, “How do you do that?” The question is mostly in regard to how LaPoint manages to stay in good enough shape to keep up with high school athletes. “I value fitness,” LaPoint said simply. People who know LaPoint agree he doesn’t look his age. He hopes his fitness will allow him to continue officiating for years to come. “I don’t know that he’ll ever really retire,” Dudley said. “It’s just not him.” — Reporter Joe Preiner can be reached at 832-6314.

‘RINOs’ buttons in crosshairs

No sales tax on guided, nonguided hunt fees

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3B

A dozen or so people were at the Statehouse on Friday showing support for a proposed constitutional amendment that supporters say would block the federal health care reform law in Kansas. The people were wearing buttons that had a picture of a rhinoceros in crosshairs. Sometimes moderate or liberal Republicans are called RINOs, or Republicans In Name Only, by their critics. The use of crosshairs in signs has been criticized recently after the shooting of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz. House Democratic Leader Paul Davis of Lawrence said the buttons were “disgraceful.”

The Kansas Department of Revenue has determined that hunting guides and nonguided hunt fees are not subject to state sales tax. “Governor Sam Brownback is promoting our state’s world-class outdoor tourism opportunities, and this will keep these activities more affordable,” said Kansas Revenue Secretary Nick Jordan.

Sen. Carolyn McGinn, RSedgwick, has filed a bill on abolishing the death penalty. She said that she doubted there would be a hearing on it this year but that the legislation needs to be considered eventually. McGinn has been an opponent of the death penalty, favoring instead a life-withoutparole sentence. Funds currently spent on expensive death penalty appeals, she said, could be better directed toward crime prevention programs.

Law CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3B

Braden declined to email the documents, citing a previous court order that had set up the website for public access. Ron Keefover, chief information officer with the Office of Judicial Administration, told the AP that statutorily in Kansas written responses are due within five days of a motion’s filing, although parties are not required to file responses. Keefover, the media liaison for the Great Bend case, acknowledged that in the Longoria case the judge specifically ordered prosecutors to file written responses to all defense motions. Braden disputed that there was any such f ive-day response requirement, insisting he could have hand-carried his written motions to court on Tuesday had he wanted to do so. The death penalty case

first. He worked as an engineer for 12 years in cities across the country before moving back to Salina, his hometown, and joining his father’s wine business. Running the winery’s dining operation, “marketing and management were my areas, and wine-making and the vineyard were definitely Dad’s passions,” Jennings said. Under the management of Norm and Jen Jennings, the winery completed an expansion project that enabled it to double production, as well as give it a bigger dining, reception and gift boutique area. The couple say they’re moving ahead with plans to form a lay ministry, counseling engaged and married couples and children of divorce. It’s a religious calling the couple have been considering and praying about for about a year and a half, Norm Jennings said. He said the couple’s plans are to remain in Salina. “The unknown is a fear, and it does exist. It kind of weighs against the call we feel the Lord has put on our shoulders,” he said. “We don’t know exactly where this is going to take us.” He said he and his wife haven’t made a choice about how to list the business for sale, or whether to go with a national brokerage company specializing in wineries. He said wineries used to be difficult to sell, but today, existing wineries with good, established brands are stable and command good prices. Jennings said it used to be that someone buying a winery had better have experience making wine. Now winery owners can focus on operations and managing

against Longoria was filed by former Attorney General Steve Six, who personally prosecuted it until losing his election bid. He was assisted in the case by Deputy Attorney General Barry Disney, who also left the state attorney general’s office during the transition. Six has since been nominated by President Barack Obama for a seat on the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, and Disney has accepted a job with the U.S. attorney’s office. Court filings show that when Six was handling the case prosecutors responded in writing within days to defense motions. Barton County Attorney Doug Matthews said in an email that he has “every confidence” in Braden as well the new attorney general and his staff to handle the prosecution. “I’ve attended several meeting with Mr. Braden and the other AG staff who are working on the prosecution of the case, and have been greatly impressed with the

What’s next Most of the legislative action will take place before the full House and Senate today, Tuesday and Wednesday.

time and energy they’ve committed,” Matthews said. Both Six and Schmidt said during their election campaigns last year that they supported the death penalty. But the election upset left the attorney general’s office scrambling to replace the prosecutors who filed the charges. Braden took over prosecution of the case in late December during the transition. Assistant Attorney General Andrew Bauch entered his appearance in it last week. Unlike his predecessor, Schmidt is not personally prosecuting the Longoria case. “Attorney General Schmidt decided to appoint the head of the criminal division, Vic Braden, a career prosecutor, to lead the case,” said Jeff Wagaman, spokesman for the Kansas attorney general’s office. “Vic has extensive experience prosecuting homicide cases, and he led the prosecution team in the last death penalty verdict case in Kansas.”

Tom Dorsey/AP Photo

GRAPES ARE HARVESTED at the Smoky Hill Vineyard and Winery north of Salina in this Sept. 14, 2010, photo. their businesses and hire graduates of wine-making schools to make their wine. “On one hand, there’s less money out there, but on the

other hand, people are still looking for businesses, hoping to find something that hasn’t gotten beat up in the recession,” he said.

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For complete listings, go to www.lawrence.com/listings


6B

JAPAN

Disaster death toll more than 18,000 By Eric Talmadge and Mari Yamaguchi Associated Press Writers

FUKUSHIMA, JAPAN — The toll of Japan’s triple disaster came into clearer focus today after police estimates showed more than 18,000 people died, the World Bank said rebuilding may cost $235 billion and more cases of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water turned up. Japanese officials reported progress over the weekend in their battle to gain control over a nuclear complex that began leaking radiation after suffering quake and tsunami damage, though the crisis was far from over, with a dangerous new surge in pressure reported in one of the plant’s six reactors. The announcement by Japan’s Health Ministry late Sunday that tests had detected excess amounts of radioactive elements on canola and chrysanthemum greens marked a low moment in a day that had been peppered with bits of positive news: First, a teenager and his grandmother were found alive nine days after being trapped in their earthquake-shattered home. Then, the operator We consider of the that now we overheathave come to ed nuclear a situation plant said where we are two of the six reacvery close to tor units getting the were situation safely under control.” cooled down. “We — Deputy Cabinet consider Secretary Tetsuro that now Fukuyama we have come to a situation where we are very close to getting the situation under control,” Deputy Cabinet Secretary Tetsuro Fukuyama said. Still, serious problems remained at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex. Pressure unexpectedly rose in a third unit’s reactor, meaning plant operators may need to deliberately release radioactive steam. That has only added to public anxiety over radiation that began leaking from the plant after a monstrous earthquake and tsunami devastated northeastern Japan on March 11 and left the plant unstable. As day broke today, Japan’s military resumed dousing of the complex’s troubled Unit 4. The World Bank said in report today that Japan may need five years to rebuild from the catastrophic disasters, which caused up to $235 billion in damage, saying the cost to private insurers will be up to $33 billion and that the government will spend $12 billion on reconstruction in the current national budget and much more later. The safety of food and water was of particular concern. The government halted shipments of spinach from one area and raw milk from another near the nuclear plant after tests found iodine exceeded safety limits. Tokyo’s tap water, where iodine turned up Friday, now has cesium. Rain and dust are also tainted. Early today, the Health Ministry advised Iitate, a village of 6,000 people about 19 miles northwest of the Fukushima plant, not to drink tap water due to elevated levels of iodine. Ministry spokesman Takayuki Matsuda said iodine three times the normal level was detected there — about one twentysixth of the level of a chest Xray in one liter of water. In all cases, the government said the radiation levels were too small to pose an immediate health risk. All six of the nuclear complex’s reactor units saw trouble after the disasters knocked out cooling systems. In a small advance, the plant’s operator declared Units 5 and 6 — the least troublesome — under control after their nuclear fuel storage pools cooled to safe levels.

NATION • WORLD

| Monday, March 21, 2011

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

U.S. deems Libya bombing successful LIBYAN SOLDIERS SURVEY THE DAMAGE to an administrative building hit by a missile late Sunday in in Tripoli, Libya, early today.

By Robert Burns Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON — The U.S. on Sunday claimed initial success two days into an assault on Libya that included some of the heaviest firepower in the American arsenal — long-range bombers designed for the Cold War — but American officials said Sunday it was too early to define the international military campaign’s endgame. The top U.S. military officer suggested that Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi might stay in power in spite of the military assault aimed at protecting civilians, calling into question the larger objective of an end to Gadhafi’s erratic 42-year rule. Other top U.S. officials have suggested that a weakened and isolated Gadhafi could be ripe for a coup. A second wave of attacks, mainly from American fighters and bombers, targeted Libyan ground forces and air defenses, following an opening barrage Saturday of sea-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles.

Jerome Delay/AP Photo

Defense Secretary Robert Gates said the U.S. expects to turn control of the mission over to a coalition — probably headed either by the French and British or by NATO — “in a matter of days.” Late Sunday, however, NATO’s top decision-making body failed to agree on a plan to enforce the no-fly zone over Libya, although it did approve a military plan to implement a U.N. arms embargo. At the Pentagon, Navy Vice Adm. William E. Gortney, staff director for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told a news conference that the back-toback assaults Saturday and

Sunday had inflicted heavy damage. They largely silenced Gadhafi’s air defenses, blunted his army’s drive on the rebel stronghold of Benghazi and confused his forces. “We judge these strikes to have been very effective in significantly degrading the regime’s air defense capability,” Gortney said. “We believe his forces are under significant stress and suffering from both isolation and a good deal of confusion.” Gortney’s assessment suggested that further strikes on the scale of Saturday’s heavy assault with sea-launched Tomahawk cruise missiles

may not be needed, although he did not rule out further attacks. Gortney said Gadhafi himself is not a target, but he could not guarantee the strongman’s safety. Inside Gadhaf i’s huge Tripoli compound, an administration building was hit and badly damaged late Sunday. An Associated Press photographer at the scene said half of the round, three-story building was knocked down.. The systems targeted most closely were Libya’s SA-5 surface-to-air missiles, Russianmade weaponry that could pose a threat to allied aircraft many miles off the Libyan coastline. Libya has a range of other air defense weaponry, including portable surface-toair missiles that are more difficult to eliminate by bombing. Sunday’s attacks, carried out by a range of U.S. aircraft — including Air Force B-2 stealth bombers as well as Marine Harrier jets flying from an amphibious assault ship in the Mediterranean — demonstrated the predominance of U.S. firepower in the

international coalition. By striking Libyan ground forces, coalition forces also showed that they are going beyond the most frequently discussed goal of establishing a no-fly zone over the country. A military official said the B-2s flew 25 hours in a round trip from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri and dropped 45 2,000-pound bombs. U.S. missiles and warplanes were clearly in the lead Saturday and Sunday, but Gates said the plan remains for the U.S. to step back once the threat from the Libyan military is reduced. “We agreed to use our unique capabilities and the breadth of those capabilities at the front of this process, and then we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others,” Gates told reporters traveling with him to Russia. “We will continue to support the coalition, we will be a member of the coalition, we will have a military role in the coalition, but we will not have the preeminent role.”


OPINION

LAWRENCE JOURNAL-WORLD ● LJWorld.com ● Monday, March 21, 2011

EDITORIALS

Overreaction Throwing out the State Board of Education and the Kansas Board of Regents isn’t the best way to improve education coordination in the state.

I

f some state legislators are concerned about a lack of coordination between K-12 schools and higher education in Kansas, they should look at that problem but resist throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Last week, House Speaker Mike O’Neal announced his intention to pursue a constitutional amendment that would abolish the Kansas Board of Regents and the Kansas State School Board and replace them with a single cabinet-level secretary of education who would be appointed by the governor. His main justification for the move was to improve coordination for students from kindergarten through their post-secondary education. Coordination of those efforts certainly is desirable, but having an appointed secretary of education isn’t guaranteed to improve that situation and would open the door to many undesirable political influences in the state’s education system. The State Board of Education went through a difficult time fairly recently when it became highly politicized and experienced a number of philosophical swings. Think how many more swings might occur if every time a new governor is elected, he or she appoints a single cabinet member with broad authority to set the agenda, curriculum and policies for schools from pre-K to college. Both the State Board of Education and the Board of Regents are specifically designed to include members from from all parts of the state. State school board members are directly elected by staggered terms by Kansas voters; the regents are appointed to staggered terms and the board often includes members appointed by more than one governor. The system minimizes the political influence of any one group or governor. It may not be a perfect system, but it provides some key representation for Kansas residents that could be lost under an appointed secretary of education. Whether by appointment or popular election, the best way to ensure education excellence is to have Board of Regents and state school board members with the courage, wisdom and knowledge needed to make powerful decisions on behalf of Kansas students. O’Neal said he didn’t plan to push for action on the proposed amendment until the next legislative session. Perhaps by then, some less drastic ways can be found to address the Speaker’s concerns about education coordination.

7B

Wilson’s higher ed query resonates today PITTSBURGH — It was a Saturday night in April a century ago. The country was at peace. The economy was stable. But the breezes of reform were blowing across the nation and progressive leaders were asking uncomfortable questions — about how society was organized, about whether the ladder of opportunity had been kicked aside, about whether the country was as dedicated to democratic principles as its founders had been. In that atmosphere, in a hotel that now houses the student union at the University of Pittsburgh, a college president rose to speak to a group of Ivy League alumni who had poured into town on trains from around the region to sing their college songs, offer their college toasts and later to repair to a college smoker. An orchestra was present. So were some of the leading men of the day. It was an evening of high spirits and highballs. And then a member of the Class of 1879 rose to speak. His name was Woodrow Wilson and he was the president of Princeton at a time when the institution was more college than university: a parochial, passive place that personified privilege far more than prestige.

A penetrating question In less than seven months Wilson would be elected governor of New Jersey. In less than two years he would take the oath as president of the United States. He was not a frivolous man, and his were not frivolous words. He asked the sons of Old Nassau a penetrating question that had become his obsession, that tortured him as he contemplated Princeton and the world it occupied: “Would Lincoln have been a better instrument for the country’s good if he had been put through the processes of one of our modern colleges?” The question astonished his listeners, who amid the songs and the toasts and at their tables festooned with orange and black streamers had come to celebrate Princeton, not to question it, who

David Shribman asked the sons of “OldHeNassau … ‘Would

Lincoln have been a better instrument for the country’s good if he had been put through the processes of one of our modern colleges?’” had cheered the arrival of a papier-mache orange-and-black tiger, the college’s mascot, with illuminated eyes, and who had lustily devoured ice cream confections molded in the shape of tigers that were placed in front of them by an army of waiters. This was an occasion for a reunion, not for reflection. Wilson’s question injected a moment of stunning sobriety to the Princeton proceedings. The account in the Pittsburgh Gazette Times carried this subheadline: “President Wilson Startles.” The second headline in the Pittsburgh Dispatch read: “Princeton President’s Fiery Speech Received in Silence by Local Alumni.” The Dispatch’s account of Wilson’s remarks began this way: “Until Dr. Wilson began to speak, the affair was one of jollity.”

Wilson’s answer Wilson answered his own question, saying that Lincoln would not have been advantaged by a Princeton education, or a college education as it was understood a century ago. Here is his argument: “The processes to which the college man are subjected do not render him serviceable to the country as a whole. It is for this reason that I have dedicated

every power in me to a democratic re-generation. The American college must become saturated in the same sympathies as the common people. The colleges of this country must be reconstructed from the top to the bottom.” Wilson’s theme was that American colleges were too marinated in exclusiveness and not suff iciently concerned with “moral advance.” But his question — whether Lincoln would have been improved by a college education — is relevant to us now, when the rush to the colleges is at full flood but when college life is full of distractions, binge drinking, distorted sleep patterns and evershrinking hours of contemplation and study.

Modern responses In the past several weeks I posed the Wilson question to a half-dozen college presidents, past and present, and most acknowledged, uncomfortably, that Lincoln somehow had become educated without stepping into a college classroom. “He was street and politically smart — and had excellent values,” said C. Peter Magrath, who has been president of five universities and now serves as interim president of Binghamton University in New York. Mark Nordenberg, chancellor of the University of Pittsburgh, said: “Though we take pride in helping to strengthen values, sharpen insights and develop a broader sense of social context, it appears that Mr. Lincoln did not need much help on any of those fronts.” James E. Wright, who taught me history before he became the president of Dartmouth College, replied that “as hard as it is for an academic to admit, I can’t imagine that a college education would have enabled Lincoln to be of any greater service to the country.” Wright, who retired nearly two years ago, added: “Today we often confuse certification with education. In fact our society seems to value the former more than the latter. That

was not true in Lincoln’s time ... But he did need to be educated. And he clearly accomplished that largely on his own. I define being educated for this purpose as an individual having an understanding of his or her context — their place in history, in culture, in the physical and biological world. I define it as understanding others and knowing yourself — what you stand for and what you value. Lincoln had these things. He read widely and understood well who he was and understood his country at that time in our history.” The Wilson question is important because it focuses us on the purpose of college when the word is not being used as a modifier to “football” or “basketball tournament.” This is not to minimize the importance of sport and healthy attitudes toward exercise. Indeed, one of Wilson’s predecessors and his persistent political rival, Theodore Roosevelt, championed and probably saved college football, a tale told in John J. Miller’s forthcoming “The Big Scrum” (HarperCollins).

Other paths to knowledge But somehow Lincoln acquired experience, wisdom and perspective without sitting in a seminar room, developed a sense of spirit without being revved up by screaming announcers and wildly shifting light shows at a basketball arena, and learned to express himself without going to the campus writing center. He did it by revering knowledge, respecting history, worshipping the written word, studying tradition — and daring to imagine a world where the ennobling traditions were enhanced and the rancid ones eliminated. Those are the goals of the best college students, if not always the so-called best colleges. Everything else is ephemeral, as Woodrow Wilson taught the college revelers at their Pittsburgh reunion. He asked a question that should preoccupy us still. — David Shribman is executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

OLD HOME TOWN

100

From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for March 21, 1911: YEARS “Chief Herd’s AGO entire force is scatIN 1911 tered over town today making a searching examination of back yards and alleys. It is the advance guard of the spring sanitation inspection which Lawrence will receive. Chief Herd is planning to scour the town three times before the end of April. This vigilance followed by the annual Tin Can day of the Civic League will convert Lawrence into a Spotless Town. The officers out today are making notes of all trash piles and unsightly back yards. The owners are notified that the unsanitary conditions must be immediately remedied.” — Compiled by Sarah St. John

Read more Old Home Town at LJWorld.com/news/lawrence/ history/old_home_town.

YOUR TURN

Local faith leaders oppose death penalty By Joanna Harader, Jill Jarvis and Thad Holcombe

LAWRENCE

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This Ash Wednesday, Governor Pat Quinn of Illinois signed into law a bill that repealed the state’s death penalty. Quinn’s decision was influenced largely by his communication with faith leaders, highlighting the great moral and spiritual dilemma of the death penalty system. As leaders representing a variety of faith communities in Lawrence, we renew our call to end capital punishment in the Sunflower State as well. We believe the current provision for the death penalty sentence in Kansas is wrong from spiritual, moral and public policy perspectives. As people of faith, we seek justice for all people. We firmly believe that those who commit crimes should be held accountable for their actions and that the needs of family members of murder victims must be addressed in the aftermath of murder. There is growing evidence to suggest that the death penalty harms victim families.

Imposing the death penalty often prolongs the suffering and delays the healing of the victim’s family members as they are forced to relive the trauma of the crime again and again while they endure the appeals process. In addition to the stresses placed on victims’ families, the use of the death penalty also puts the state in danger of executing innocent people. We now know that the death penalty in this country has resulted in the execution of those who were innocent. In addition, evidence shows that the death penalty is often unfairly applied due to factors such as race or geographic location. Furthermore, many studies suggest that the death penalty is not an effective deterrent; it does not prevent murders. We also recognize the financial implications of the current policy. We believe that the death penalty is neither the highest priority nor the best use of the state’s limited financial resources. Instead, state funds should be used to support programs that prevent crime, improve education and provide services to the families of murder victims. We should use

our resources to improve life, not end it. Finally, we believe all human life is sacred and created by God, and therefore, we must see all human life as significant and valuable. As people of faith we believe in and affirm people’s capacity for change. We believe that no individual is beyond redemption and that our government should not condone policies that deny the prospect of redemption. In 2010, the Kansas Senate was one vote short of passing legislation that would have repealed the Kansas death penalty. This year, another death penalty abolition bill, HB 2323, is under consideration in the Kansas House. We urge the Kansas Legislature to abolish the death penalty in our state. Whether you approach the issue from a spiritual, ethical or policy perspective, the reasons to keep the Kansas death penalty just don’t add up. — Joanna Harader is pastor of Peace Mennonite Church. Jill Jarvis is minister of the Unitarian Fellowship of Lawrence. Thad Holcombe is campus minister of the Ecumenical Christian Ministries.


8B

WEATHER

| Monday, March 21, 2011 TODAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

CALENDAR

FRIDAY

21 TODAY

Mostly cloudy

Strong t-storms; mainly cloudy

Sunny and breezy

Partly sunny and breezy

Breezy with clouds and sun

High 73° Low 55° POP: 25%

High 75° Low 45° POP: 65%

High 64° Low 36° POP: 5%

High 55° Low 41° POP: 10%

High 57° Low 40° POP: 25%

Wind SSE 8-16 mph

Wind S 12-25 mph

Wind WNW 10-20 mph

Wind ENE 10-20 mph

Wind S 10-20 mph

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Kearney 68/47

McCook 78/41 Oberlin 78/45 Goodland 80/37

Beatrice 70/56

Oakley 80/43

Manhattan Russell Salina 72/54 75/52 Topeka 70/56 72/55 Emporia 72/56

Great Bend 73/52 Dodge City 80/50

Garden City 81/45 Liberal 80/47

Kansas City 73/55 Lawrence Kansas City 73/56 73/55

Chillicothe 74/54 Marshall 75/55 Sedalia 75/56

Nevada 76/57

Chanute 73/58

Hutchinson 71/55 Wichita Pratt 70/55 72/52

Centerville 70/53

St. Joseph 73/54

Sabetha 70/53

Concordia 70/56 Hays 76/50

Clarinda 70/54

Lincoln 69/53

Grand Island 67/52

Coffeyville Joplin 73/57 77/59

Springfield 78/55

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

LAWRENCE ALMANAC Through 8 p.m. Sunday.

Temperature High/low Normal high/low today Record high today Record low today

82°/49° 59°/37° 90° in 1916 10° in 1913

Precipitation in inches 24 hours through 8 p.m. yest. Month to date Normal month to date Year to date Normal year to date

0.02 1.34 1.64 5.16 4.08

REGIONAL CITIES

Today Tue. Today Tue. Cities Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Cities Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Atchison 73 55 c 75 44 t Independence 74 57 c 75 51 t Belton 72 55 c 72 46 t Fort Riley 72 54 c 79 42 c Burlington 72 57 c 75 44 t Olathe 71 54 c 71 46 t Coffeyville 73 57 c 75 51 t Osage Beach 80 55 c 76 55 t Concordia 70 56 c 75 41 pc Osage City 72 55 c 75 43 t Dodge City 80 50 c 75 36 s Ottawa 73 54 c 73 46 t Holton 72 55 c 77 45 t Wichita 70 55 c 79 41 pc Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice. Seattle 48/38

NATIONAL FORECAST

SUN & MOON

New

Tue.

7:22 a.m. 7:34 p.m. 11:42 p.m. 8:50 a.m.

First

Billings 56/32

San Francisco 56/45

Full Los Angeles 62/46

Mar 26

Apr 3

Apr 11

LAKE LEVELS

Lake

Clinton Perry Pomona

Level (ft)

875.12 889.63 972.51

Discharge (cfs)

52 100 15

INTERNATIONAL CITIES Cities Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Brussels Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Dublin Geneva Hong Kong Jerusalem Kabul London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Oslo Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw Winnipeg

Today Hi Lo W 89 74 s 53 42 s 53 45 r 87 60 c 93 78 sh 50 28 s 52 41 pc 52 41 s 84 64 s 77 59 pc 25 17 sn 54 42 pc 55 36 s 83 67 c 67 46 s 68 40 pc 54 41 c 60 39 sh 77 44 s 34 27 sn 37 21 sf 93 59 pc 54 39 pc 55 37 s 82 73 sh 57 39 pc 48 21 pc 86 75 t 47 42 pc 77 64 sh 54 42 r 56 30 r 49 41 pc 48 39 s 43 38 pc 31 14 sn

Hi 88 50 55 87 91 54 60 54 88 74 29 52 57 68 60 68 56 59 79 34 35 95 57 58 82 59 43 83 46 77 50 38 51 58 53 29

Tue. Lo W 73 s 39 pc 42 pc 55 pc 76 t 35 s 42 s 43 s 62 t 56 s 17 sn 37 pc 40 s 59 c 44 pc 40 s 39 pc 36 sh 45 s 14 sf 28 pc 63 s 29 s 37 s 74 pc 45 s 23 s 73 t 36 pc 61 sh 38 r 14 pc 37 pc 47 s 40 s 10 c

New York 52/40

Denver 73/34

Washington 67/48

Kansas City 73/56

Atlanta 75/56

Shown are today’s noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for today.

Houston 80/64

Fronts Warm Stationary

Miami 79/64

Precipitation Showers T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s National Summary: Snow and sleet will fall in northern New England today, while rain dampens areas farther south. Thunderstorms will rumble from New Jersey to Iowa. Numerous showers will wet most of the West and thunderstorms are expected in central California. Mountain snow will continue. Today Tue. Today Tue. Cities Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Cities Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Albuquerque 75 44 pc 60 33 pc Memphis 80 61 pc 78 61 c Anchorage 37 26 c 38 28 pc Miami 79 64 s 80 65 s Atlanta 75 56 pc 80 58 pc Milwaukee 57 35 c 44 33 r Austin 80 63 pc 83 64 c Minneapolis 53 36 pc 45 33 sn Baltimore 68 45 t 60 42 pc Nashville 79 55 pc 82 60 c Birmingham 79 59 s 79 59 c New Orleans 80 62 s 80 62 pc Boise 50 34 c 49 30 pc New York 52 40 r 53 32 pc Boston 41 36 sn 47 30 pc Omaha 67 53 t 71 42 t Buffalo 50 30 r 40 26 pc Orlando 82 55 s 83 56 s Cheyenne 69 34 pc 53 25 pc Philadelphia 58 42 r 56 39 pc Chicago 60 40 c 45 44 r Phoenix 67 51 r 69 50 s Cincinnati 70 52 t 70 56 c Pittsburgh 65 36 t 49 41 r Cleveland 59 35 c 44 37 r Portland, ME 40 29 sn 47 25 c Dallas 80 61 c 82 62 pc Portland, OR 52 39 sh 53 37 pc Denver 73 34 pc 62 24 pc Reno 44 25 sn 44 32 c Des Moines 69 54 t 68 44 r Richmond 74 51 c 71 48 pc Detroit 59 34 c 42 31 c Sacramento 54 37 t 58 46 c El Paso 83 55 pc 76 44 s St. Louis 74 57 c 72 56 t Fairbanks 30 5 pc 34 7 pc Salt Lake City 56 32 t 49 30 pc Honolulu 85 72 c 84 72 pc San Diego 63 49 sh 61 51 s Houston 80 64 pc 82 64 pc San Francisco 56 45 t 57 46 c Indianapolis 71 52 t 68 56 r Seattle 48 38 sh 50 36 pc Kansas City 73 56 c 74 46 t Spokane 42 32 sh 43 29 pc Las Vegas 63 45 r 62 44 pc Tucson 75 47 pc 69 41 s Little Rock 79 57 pc 79 59 c Tulsa 75 60 c 77 53 t Los Angeles 62 46 sh 62 48 pc Wash., DC 67 48 t 63 45 pc National extremes yesterday for the 48 contiguous states High: Laredo, TX 92° Low: Lake Yellowstone, WY -8°

WEATHER HISTORY On March 21, 1952, a massive outbreak of tornadoes raged from Missouri to Alabama. They killed 343 people and caused over $15 million in property damage.

Q:

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Jabberjosh, Lucky Graves, 10 p.m., Replay Lounge, 946 Mass. Acoustic Open Mic with Tyler Gregory, 10 p.m., Jazzhaus, 926 112 Mass. Casbah Karaoke, 10:30 p.m., The Casbah, 803 Mass.

ONGOING

Lawrence Arts Center Art Auction Exhibition, featuring original art donated by approximately 150 artists, Lawrence Arts Center, 940 N.H., through April 9. AARP volunteer income tax assistance for low- to moderColumboid ate-income senior citizens, 1 Long Island, N.Y., band p.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays Columboid is playing the through Thursdays, and 9 a.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Mass., to noon Saturdays, Lawrence and if you're a fan of experiSenior Center, 745 Vt., through mental music with some April 18. overtly psychedelic influHawaiian Kine art exhibit by ences, you owe it to yourself Jennifer Joie Webster, Do’s to check them out. The Deluxe, 416 E. Ninth St., band added Man-Man's Rusthrough April 30. sell Higbee on bass shortly “Higher,” recent drawings by after first meeting. The Michael Krueger, Wonder Fair, now-trio recorded their first 803 1/2 Mass., through April 24. set of songs on a laptop and “Crossroads” Art at the Blue then released "Cruise on Red Dog’s Dog Days winter Dot, artists Robert Lundbom, Your Own" on cassette tape. workout, 6 a.m., Allen FieldEdmee Rodriguez, Ryan Hasler Their newest album, "We house, Enter through the and Carol Beth Whalen, featurWere One" maintains the southeast doors and meet on ing photographs, drawings, band's DIY spirit, but has a the southeast corner of the prints, cards and painted clarity and focus owed in no second floor. gourds, Blue Dot Salon, 15 E. small part to the studio. See Movies & Munchies: “Easy Seventh St., through April 28 them tonight at 10 p.m. “Blended Bits + Scintillating A,” for grades 7-12, 2 p.m. to 4 Symbols = JOY,” assemblages p.m., Lawrence Public Library, 707 Vt. and paintings by Marsene p.m., 803 Mass. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Feldt, Lumberyard Arts Center It’s Karaoke Time with Sam Douglas County, 5:15 p.m., in Baldwin City, through March and Dan, 10 p.m., Jackpot 1525 W. Sixth St., Suite A. Infor26. Music Hall, 943 Mass. Spencer Museum of Art mation meeting for prospecFor All Mankind, 10 p.m., The exhibits: Roots and Journeys, tive volunteers. For more inforGranada, 1020 Mass. mation, call 843-7359. through spring 2011; Burning Itch, White Mystery, Bilingual yoga class, gentle, Nature/Natural, through spring 10 p.m., Replay Lounge, 946 5:45 p.m., Plymouth Congrega2011, “That Invisible Dance: Art Mass. Open jam tional Church, 925 Vt.O and Literature Under the British session, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Slow Empire from the 1800s to Ride Roadhouse, 1350 N. Third Beyond,” through May 22. St. Museum open until 4 p.m. Big Brothers Big Sisters of March Mustache Madness daily, 8 p.m. on Thursdays, 1301 Douglas County, noon, 1525 W. Miss. opening reception, 6-8 p.m., Lawrence Public Library Sixth St., Suite A. Information Teller’s, 746 Mass. Lawrence school board can- meeting for prospective volun- storytimes: Toddler storytime, didate forum, sponsored by the teers. For more information, 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Voter Education Coalition, 7 call 843-7359. Tuesdays and Fridays; Library Fairytale Crafts, a drop-in p.m., City Hall, 6 E. Sixth St. storytime, 10:30 a.m. TuesBilingual yoga class, intercraft day for ages 5-12, 1-2:30 days, 7 p.m. Thursdays, 10:30 mediate, 7 p.m., Plymouth Con- p.m., Lawrence Public Library, a.m. Fridays; Storytime in gregational Church, 925 Vt. 707 Vt. Spanish, 10:30 a.m. SaturEnglish as a Second LanDuct Tape Crafts for grades days; Family storytime, 3:30 guage class, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., 7-12, 3:30-5 p.m. , Lawrence p.m. Sundays; Books & Plymouth Congregational Public Library, 707 Vt. Babies, 10:30 a.m. Mondays Lawrence-Douglas County Church, 925 Vt. and 9:30 a.m., 10:10 a.m. and Spanish class, beginner and Planning Commission meeting, 10:40 a.m. Wednesdays, 707 intermediate level, 7 p.m. to 8 6:30 p.m., City Hall, Sixth and Vt. Lawrence Public Library p.m., Plymouth Congregational Massachusetts streets. Douglas County Commission bookmobile schedule (open to Church, 925 Vt. Wild Horse Ensemble, Tuesmeeting, 6:35 p.m., Douglas the public): 9-10 a.m. Monday, day Concert Series, 7:30 p.m., County Courthouse, 1100 Prairie Commons, 5121 ConLawrence Arts Center, 940 N.H. Mass. gressional Circle; 10:30-11:30 Interfaith prayer vigil on Jazz Wednesdays in The Jay- a.m . Monday, Babcock Place, hawker, 7 p.m., Eldridge Hotel, 1700 Mass.; 9-10 a.m. Wednesimmigration issues, 8-8:30 p.m., Plymouth Congregational 701 Mass. day, Brandon Woods, 1501 Conroy’s Trivia, 7:30 p.m., Church, 925 Vt. Inverness Drive; 10:30-11:30 Teller’s Family Night, 746 Conroy’s Pub, 3115 W. Sixth St. a.m. Wednesday, Presbyterian Sky Smeed Band, 9 p.m., The Manor, 1429 Kasold Drive; 1-2 Mass., 9 p.m.-midnight Tuesday Night Karaoke, 9 Granada, 1020 Mass. p.m. Wednesday, Drury Place, Broken Mic Night, 9:30 p.m., 1510 St.Andrews Drive; 11:15p.m., Wayne & Larry’s Sports Bar & Grill, 933 Iowa. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Mass. noon Friday, Vermont Towers, Tuesday Transmissions, 9 Dollar Bowling, Royal Crest 1101 Vt.; 1:30-2:30 p.m. Friday, Bowling Lanes, 933 Iowa, 9:30 Peterson Acres, 2930 Peterson p.m., Bottleneck, 737 N.H. Live jazz at The Casbah, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Road.

22 TUESDAY

23 WEDNESDAY

El Paso 83/55

Cold

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

Detroit 59/34 Chicago 60/40

Apr 17

As of 7 a.m. Sunday

Minneapolis 53/36

DILBERT

WEATHER TRIVIA™

by Scott Adams

How long are the vertical rays of the sun north of the equator?

Six months; from the first day of spring until the first day of autumn.

Last

7:24 a.m. 7:33 p.m. 10:29 p.m. 8:09 a.m.

City Commission candidate forum, sponsored by the North Lawrence Improvement Association, 7 p.m., Peace Mennonite Hall, 615 Lincoln. Cooking class: Natural Foods Cooking Basics — The Savory Side, 7-9 p.m., The Merc, 901 Iowa. Lecompton City Council meeting, 7 p.m., Lecompton City Hall, 327 Elmore St. Baldwin City Council meeting, 7:30 p.m., City Hall, 803 S. Eighth St. Sky Smeed Band, 9 p.m., The Granada, 1020 Mass. Country Mice, 9 p.m., Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Mass. Open mic night, 9 p.m., the Bottleneck, 737 N.H. Dollar Bowling, Royal Crest Bowling Lanes, 933 Iowa, 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. Karaoke Idol!, with “witches, wizards, & magic” theme, 10 p.m., The Jazzhaus, 926 1/2 Mass.

Best Bets

A:

Today

Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

Building collapses in downtown Sedalia SEDALIA, MO. (AP) — Inspectors are looking into what caused a building to collapse in downtown Sedalia. Sedalia Police Sgt. Kelley Casto says no one was inside the building when the front portion gave way Thursday night. The K&K Restaurant Fixture Company owns the building. Business owner Brad Kindle said the building was used for storage, and it had not shown signs of damage or stress prior to falling down. An engineer was at the scene Friday. Mike Valentine, of Kansas City-based Norton & Schmidt Consulting Engineers, says a preliminary assessment of the building will be provided to the city early this week. He told The Sedalia Democrat that the report will likely recommend the rest of the structure be demolished. Sedalia is about 90 miles west of Kansas City, Mo. It is the site of the Missouri State Fair.

to all of our community members who attended the 2011 Lawrence Area Partners In Aging Senior Resource Fair hosted by Dillon’s on 23rd Street and to our vendors

National Champion Klapsych Elegance was honored Jan. 21 by the United States Equestrian Federation in Lexington, Ky., as National Champion Arabian Halter Horse 2010. She was bred and raised by Karen Heeb of Lawrence and is being shown by Kristin Moore of San Antonio. Heeb and Moore submitted the photo.

Lawrence Memorial Hospital Visiting Nurses of Douglas County Pioneer Ridge Retirement Community Midland Care Douglas County Senior Services Criticare Home Health Services Inc. Bridgehaven Jayhawk Area Agency on Aging Vintage Park Tonganoxie Vintage Park Baldwin City Dillon’s Pharmacy Commerce Bank Coalition to Honor End-of-Life Choices (CHEC) Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home Lawrence Presbyterian Manor Bill Fair and Company Lawrence Therapy Services Advanced Homecare CornerBank-Trust & Investment

Medicalodges Eudora A Helping Hand Home Health Care Douglas County District Attorney’s Office Richmond Healthcare and Rehabilitation Home Instead Senior Care ComfortCare Homes of Baldwin Brandon Woods of Alvamar Caregivers Home Health Kaw Valley Senior Monthly Drury Place at Alvamar Trinity In-home Care Neuvant House Compassionate Care Hospice New York Life Stephens Real Estate Grace Hospice Baldwin Healthcare and Rehabilitation ReBath Kansas Blackwell Hearing Center Independence, Inc.


Monday, March 21, 2011

KansasBUYandSELL.com

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Announcements Help for PTSD program, led by Iraqi war vet Scott Shigley @ Calvary Bible Church, 518 W. Insley Bonner Springs. 6PM Sundays, 3/13 to 3/27. Contact Pastor John Rink (913) 441-1604 or jrink@kc.rr.com.

Over 75 pre-owned pianos! Baldwin, Kimball, Yamaha, Kawai, Steinway, Wurlitzer and many more! See us at piano4u.com 800-950-3774

North Lawrence Improvement Association is having a City Commissions Candidate Forum. Monday March 21, 7pm. at Peace Mennonite Church, 615 Lincoln, North Lawrence. All welcome. Info. 785-842-7232

Career Training

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Auction Calendar MOVING AUCTION Sun., Mar. 27, 2011- 11 AM 218 Debra Street Lansing, KS 66043 D & L Auctions 785-766-5630 www.dandlauctions.com ESTATE AUCTION Sat., Mar. 26 - 9:30AM Dg. Co. Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper, Lawrence, KS Jim Kennedy Estate Elston Auction Company Mark Elston 785-218-7851 www.KansasAuctions.net PUBLIC AUCTION March 26th, 2011 - 10AM 4226 Indiana Road Centropolis, KS Mrs. Owne (Fern) Brooks EDGECOMB AUCTIONS 785-594-3507 www.kansasauctions.net/ edgecomb AUCTION Fri., Mar. 25, 2011 - 10AM Monticello Auction Center 4795 Frisbie Road Shawnee, KS ACE HARDWARE LINDSAY AUCTION & REALTY SERVICE 913-441-1557 www.lindsayauctions.com REAL ESTATE AUCTION Sat., Mar. 26, 2011, 1:30PM 11149 E 39th St., Perry KS Countrywide Realty, Inc. Darrell Simnitt Terry Simnitt Simnitt Bros, Inc. 785-231-0374 www.simnittauction.com

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AdministrativeProfessional

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AdministrativeProfessional Secretary Legal Services for Prisoners seeks a secretary for placement in a KU Law School clinical program to assist 3 attorneys and 15-20 students with secretarial and administrative needs. Duties: answering phone, processing mail, maintaining database, helping with court filings. Flexible hours, 3/4 time, $18,000 with insurance. Send cover letter and resume to Jean Phillips, KU Law School, 1535 W. 15 Street, Lawrence, KS 66045 or phillips@ku.edu.

University of Kansas Theatre

seeking Manager/AdministratorThe University of Kansas, University Theatre, is seeking a full-time Manager/Administrator. The position is available beginning July 1, 2011.

Customer Service

General

Hotel-Restaurant Milton’s Coffee

Now Hiring Inbound Customer Service • computer experience necessary • paid training • benefits package Need self-motivators with great communication skills.

Apply in person at 1 Riverfront Plaza Suite 101 Lawrence, KS 66044

DriversTransportation Drivers: Dedicated. Great Pay/Benefits. CDL-A Tanker end. Clean MVR—good work history 3 yr. OTR exp. preferable tanker. Mechanical aptitude/ good people skills. Must have passport. Don: 800-878-0662

Now hiring Baristas, Hosts, Breakfast cook/prep cook. Apply within at 920 Mass. Lawrence

The Merc is Hiring Food Services Manager We are looking for someone to lease our Food Services department. Mr. Goodcents & Pasta This person would overHiring General Manager see the managers of Deli for Lawrence location, Counter, Kitchen, Bakery monthly cash bonus, pd. and Cheese. This person vacation. Send resume must have a least 5 to dean8993@gmail.com years of previous professional, high-volume food preparation experience & at least 3 years of Office-Clerical management experience. Servsafe certificaFront Office tion a plus. Most imporReceptionist tantly, this person must have a passion for high Full time. Bilingual is a quality natural & organic plus. Evenings and weekfood. Please come into ends required. Fax resume to the store and fill out an 785-842-7433 application and drop off a cover letter & resume. 901 Iowa. Seeking Part-time Bookkeeper for small downtown Lawrence business. Health Care Min. 3 years experience with bookkeeping, QuickBooks, and payroll. Must be self-directed, highly motivated, reliable. Please submit resume via fax 785-856-1227or nick@barbevcontrol.com. Assisted Living

The Manager /Administrator (of AudiTRUCK DRIVERS Needed for ence Services) serves as local hauls. Must have exthe chief operator and perience and Class A CDL. manager of the compuApply between 7AM & 3PM terized ticketing system at Hamm Companies, 609 in the University Theatre Perry Place, Perry, KS. EOE Box Office located in Murphy Hall. EngineersAlso serves as the Technical Manager/Coordinator LPN for all events sponsored Part time (one or two by the University Theatre weekends a month) E n g i n e e r i n g insuring the safety and Great Place To Work, Technician comfort of audiences. Competitive Pay. Ee also serves as hospi- Riley County, KS - Primary Drug Test Required. tality and logistical coor- duties include: prelimiAPPLY IN PERSON dinator for special nary design and survey 1429 Kasold guests and events. work utilizing AutoCAD to Lawrence, KS Bachelor’s degree in the- develop plans for public atre or business re- works projects. Two years quired. in civil engineering and Review of applications three years AutoCAD will begin on April 1, drafting required. Starting 2011. Please apply online pay range is $19.40 - $21.44. Case Manager at https://jobs.ku.edu, To apply and for position search for position details visit Riley County, Immediate opening for a full time RN or LBSW in #00064079. Kansas website: the Healthy Families EO/AA Employer www.rileycountyks.gov Douglas County program. Duties include General providing education and Automotive case management support services for pregnant and parenting teens South Star Chrysler in their homes to inis looking for an crease healthy outExperienced comes. Prefer individual Service Technician. with experience in comWe offer factory training, munity work and workexcellent working condiCleaning Person ing with pregnant and tions, generous pay, PerImmediate Opening parenting families. formance Bonus and up Sun. 8AM - 4:30PM weekly: Spanish language skills to four weeks vacation. $8 - $9/hour. Apply at 939 desirable. Send resume Call 785-242-5600 Iowa or call 785-842-6264 to Kim Ens, Lawrence-Douglas Tire/Lube Technicians (2) County Health DepartF u l l T i m e C a s e M a n a g e r & Automotive Service ment, 200 Maine St., Would you love to help Technician (1). Flat rate Suite B, Lawrence, KS children/adults with 66044 or email resume to with a guarantee. pay rate jobs@ldchealth.org. Pocommensurate with expe- Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities sition open until filled. rience, training, and ASE shape their own future? EOE. certification. 4 day work week, health insurance, This position coordinates, paid vacations. Apply in monitors and ensures deEXCITING person only at EN-TIRE Car livery of services and reOPPORTUNITY!! Care Center, 1801 West sources. Self motivation 31st St. in Lawrence. & organization a must. BA Brookside Retirement in related field with 6 mo. Community is accepting experience or approved applications for full time Banking substitution. Good drivand part time C.N.A.’s ing record & computer and C.M.A.’s to join our skills a must. winning team! Applicants must love working Apply at Cottonwood, Inc. in eldercare and the de2801 W 31st St. Lawrence sire to experience culor at www.cwood.org ture change. EOE INTRUST branches in Please apply on-line at Lawrence are in need of www.brooksideks.com eeded: Mill Harvest- or come by 700 W. 7th, qualified candidates for Help Ne various banking posi- ing, Forklift/Truck driving Overbrook, KS.. experience preferred, not tions. required. Flexible availability, multi shift. Please ON THURSDAY, MARCH call 785-841-6016 x0 for 31st WE WILL BE more info. CONDUCTING INTERVIEWS FROM 10:00am TO 5:00pm. Full Time CMA CALL 913-385-8270 TO Evening shift SCHEDULE AND SECURE 2-10:30PM AN INTERVIEW TIME SLOT. Great Place To Work, River City Pulse Competitive Pay. Current available posiDelivery Routes Available Drug Test Required. tions: Tellers; Personal APPLY IN PERSON Banker New Accounts; Call Anna 1429 Kasold Personal Banker Loans. Lawrence, KS 785-832-7121 High School Diploma or equivalent experience in retail business. Requires good interpersonal and customer service skills. Needs to be organized and able to work within a small group.

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All routes require: valid drivers license, proof of insurance, reliable transportation, and phone number. • No collection required •Routes delivered before 6am

Seasonal Apartment Turnover Maintenance

person needed. Duties will include: painting, cleaning, and other maintenance items. Must have reliable transportation. Apply in Person at: 1501 George Williams Way Lawrence, KS 66047

SPRING FEVER

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Regents Court

Applecroft Apts.

19th & Iowa Studios, 1 & 2 Bedrooms Gas, Water & Trash Paid

19th & Mass

Furnished 3 & 4BR Apts August 2011 W/D included

785-842-4455

785-843-8220

chasecourt@sunflower.com

Call for Specials!

Ceramic tile, walk-in closets, W/D, DW, fitness center, pool, hot tub, FREE DVD rental, Small pets OK. 700 Comet Ln. 785-832-8805

www.firstmanagementinc.com

Chase Court Apts.

Ad Astra Apartments

1 & 2 BRs from $390/mo. Call MPM for more details at 785-841-4935

Aspen West

Half Month FREE

Excellent Location 6th & Frontier Spacious 1 & 2 BRs Featuring: • Private balcony, patio, or sunroom • Walk in closets • All Appls./Washer/Dryer • Ceramic tile floors • Granite countertops • Single car garages • Elevators to all floors • 24 hour emergency maintenance Clubhouse, fitness center, and pool coming soon. Contact Tuckaway Mgmt. 785-841-3339

2BRs - Near KU, on bus route, laundry on-site, water/trash paid. No pets. AC Management 785-842-4461

1 & 2 Bedrooms

Campus Location, W/D, Pool, Gym, Small Pet OK Security Deposit Special! 785-843-8220 chasecourt@sunflower.com

NOW LEASING!

* Luxurious Corp. Apt. * 1BR, 1 Bath * Fully Furnished * Granite Countertops * 1 Car Covered Parking

Parkway Terrace 2340 Murphy Drive

GREAT Location! GREAT Rates for Fall!

Lease Today!

Large 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

785-841-1155

YOUR PLACE,

YOUR SPACE

Remington Square 785-856-7788

1BR/loft style - $495/mo.

Pool - Fitness Center - On-Site Laundry - Water & Trash Pd.

Bob Billings & Crestline

785-842-4200

Now Leasing for

Summer and Fall 2011 Over 50 floor plans of Apts. & Townhomes Furnished Studios Unfurnished 1, 2 & 3 BRs Close to KU, Bus Stops See current availability on our website

www.meadowbrookapartments.net

———————————————————————————

www.ironwoodmanagement.net

430 Eisenhower Drive Showing by Appt. Call 785-842-1524

www.mallardproperties lawrence.com

One Month FREE 2BRs, 2 bath starting at $747.

Limited Time Offer Free Carport, full size W/D, extra storage, all electric, lg. pets welcome. Quiet location: 3700 Clinton Parkway. 785-749-0431

Cedarwood Apartments

2411 Cedarwood Ave.

Beautiful & Spacious

S"rin& 'ever?

* Near campus, bus stop * Laundries on site * Near stores, restaurants

Itch to Move? Stop By& See What We Have to Offer. LAUREL GLEN APTS

1BRs starting at $400/mo. 2BRs, 1 bath, $495/mo.

w/electric only, no gas some with W/D included

* Water & trash paid.

CALL TODAY!

Mon. - Fri. 785-843-1116

1, 2, or 3BR units

Call 785-838-9559

Income restrictions apply Sm. Dog Welcome EOH

To apply submit a cover letter and resume to hrapplications@ljworld.com Background check, preemployment drug screen, and physical lift assessment reEOE quired. Sales/Marketing National firm expanding in the Kansas City and Lawrence area. Seeking 2 sharp people for sales and marketing. $150,000/yr + Car Bonus. Call (888) 858 6272

Lawrence Journal-World is hiring for positions in our Distribution Center. These are full-time positions and candidates must be available to work between the hours of 7 p.m. and 5 a.m. daily. DISTRIBUTION SUPERVISOR

Apartments

Furnished needed for growing home health agency. RPT, OTR, SLP - Immedi- Lawrence Suitel - Special ate part to full-time Rate: $200 per week. Tax, openings for Registered utilities, & cable included. Physical Therapist, Reg- No pets. 785-856-4645 istered Physical Therapist, Speech-Language Virginia Inn Pathologist. Be part of a Rooms by week. All utils. comprehensive team & cable paid. 785-843-6611 providing therapy to all ages. Flexible working hours. Must have own car. Mileage paid in ad- Apartments dition to wage. Qualifi- Unfurnished cations: eligible to practice in Kansas, 1 year experience preferred. 1, 2 & 3BR Apartments on E-mail resume to KU Campus - Avail. August janicej@kansasvna.org, Briarstone Apartments fax to (785) 843-6439, or 1008 Emery Rd., Lawrence mail to Douglas County 785-749-7744 Visiting Nurses, Rehabilitation & Hospice, 200 Maine, 3rd Floor, Lawrence KS 66044. EEOE Hotel-Restaurant Baymont Inn Suites

Now Hiring 1st shift Front Desk. Must have experience. Apply: 740 Iowa St.

2BR remodeled duplex. 2119 Pikes Peek. 2 Bath AC, DW, W/D hookups. $765/mo. no pets. Call 785-842-7644

Clubhouse lounge, gym, garages avail., W/D, walk in closets, and 1 pet okay.

Successful candidates will ——————————————————————————— have solid experience in Also, Check out our Luxury online media sales; mini- 1-5BR Apts. & Town Homes! mum two years experi- Garages - Pool - Fitness Center ence in sales, marketing Ironwood Court Apts. and/or advertising; demPark West Gardens Apts. onstrated success with Park West Town Homes prospecting and cold call785-840-9467 ing; excellent verbal and written communication 2BR & 3BR, 1310 Kentucky. skills; networking, time CA, DW, laundry. $595 management and inter- $800/mo. $100/person depersonal skills; proficient posit. Call 785-842-7644 in Microsoft Office applications; and a valid 2BR — 1030 Ohio Street. 1 driver’s license, reliable bath, 1st or 2nd floor, CA. transportation with cur- $550/month. No pets. Call rent auto insurance, and a 785-841-5797 Professional Comfort Care clean driving record. Now seeking CNAs & HHAs. Certified & valid Driver’s li- We offer an excellent ben- 2BR — 2406 Alabama, in 4cense. Call 785-832-8260 efits package including plex. 2 story, 1½ bath, CA, health, dental, 401k, paid DW, W/D hookup. $550 per mo. No pets. 785-841-5797 time off and more!

Immediate opening for a full time registered nurse to staff health department clinics and provide a variety of public health services to clients. Experience in an office-based medical practice or public health clinic is preferred. Spanish language skills desirable. Must have license to practice nursing in Kansas. Send resume to Kim Ens, Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department, 200 Maine St, Suite B, Lawrence, KS 66044 or email resume to jobs@ldchealth.org. Position open until filled. EOE

2BR — 934 Illinois, avail. now. In 4-plex, 1 bath, CA, DW. $490/mo. No pets. Call 785-841-5797

3BR, study, appls. in lovely home. 1028 Ohio, near KU/ downtown. $1,350/mo. Low utils., parking. 785-979-6830

DEPOSIT SPECIAL

1, 2, & 3BR Luxury Apts.

The World Company Account Executives are responsible for selling and maintaining online advertising for LJWorld.com, KUsports.com, Lawrence .com and other company websites and digital products. Our online sales team will sell clients a platform of digital products including online advertising, web banners, and event marketing sponsorships. The Account Executives are accountable for meeting or exceeding sales goals, prospecting new clients and making initial contact by cold- calling either in person or by phone. They are responsible for developing and building relationships with potential clients to build a large advertising client list. Sales opportunities include Lawrence and Manhattan, KS and surrounding communities.

2BR — 1214 Tennessee. In 4plex. 1 bath, DW, CA. $450 / mo. No pets. 785-841-5797 www.rentinlawrence.com

Apartments Unfurnished

2BR, upper in 4-plex, 1745 Tennessee. $485/mo. Has Lg. 2BR w/very nice patio. DW. Quiet & clean. No pets. $630/mo.,water & gas pd. Avail. now. 785-218-3616 9th & Avalon 785-841-1155

CANYON COURT ONLINE MEDIA SALES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

2BR — 3423 Harvard, CA, 1.5 bath, garage, W/D hookup, DW, $550. 785-841-5797. No pets. www.rentinlawrence.com

1BR - $660, 2BR - $725, 3BR - 2BR, nice garden level, 1028 $900. Water, Trash, Sewer, Ohio, near downtown/KU. and Basic Cable Included. Appls., private parking, low 6 Month leases available. utils. 785-979-6830 fox_runapartments@ hotmail.com 2BR — 1016 E. 27th, 1 story, 1 bath, CA, W/D hookups, Apartments, Houses & garage. $530/mo. No pets. Duplexes. 785-842-7644 Call 785-841-5797 www.GageMgmt.com

Part-Time Part-Time Seasonal Leasing Associate

Apartments Unfurnished

7 locations in Lawrence

785-841-5444

Responsible for ensuring the processing and bundling of newsprint products from the press to distributors; oversee mailroom activities, including the labeling, sorting, mailing and preparation of outgoing newspaper products; troubleshoot machinery; and supervise and train team members. Successful candidate will have supervisory experience; experience operating machinery and maintenance skills preferred; strong communication skills; good attention to detail and able to multi-task; able to lift up to 70 lbs., stand for long periods of time and frequently twist and bend; and proficient with MS Office products. DISTRIBUTION TEAM LEADER Responsible for handling the processing and bundling of newsprint products from the press to distributors; troubleshoot machinery; and assist with supervising and providing training to team members. Successful candidate will have leadership experience and be a team player; experience operating machinery and maintenance skills preferred; strong communication skills; good attention to detail and able to multi-task; able to lift up to 70 lbs.; stand for long periods of time and frequently twist and bend; and proficient with MS Office products. TO APPLY: Submit a cover letter and resume to hrapplications@ljworld.com. We offer an excellent benefits package including health insurance, 401k, paid time off and more! Background check, preemployment drug screen and physical lift assessment required. EOE


2" MONDAY, MAR", 21, 2011 Apartments Townhomes Unfurnished

Lawrence

VILLA 26 APTS. Fall Leasing for

1 & 2 Bedrooms plus 2 & 3BR townhomes

& 3BR Avail. Now.

Move-in Specials!

Quiet, great location on KU bus route, no pets, W/D in all units. 785-842-5227

Duplexes

Sunrise Place Sunrise Village Apartments & Townhomes

½ OFF Deposit Call for SPECIAL OFFERS Available Now

1BR duplex near E. K-10 access. Stove, refrig., off-st. parking. 1 yr. lease. $410/ mo. No pets. 785-841-4677 Apartments, Houses & Duplexes. 785-842-7644 www.GageMgmt.com 2BR duplex, remodeled unit. New carpet, 1 car, W/D hookup, DW. No pets. Avail. now. $545/mo. 1021 W. 29th Terr. 785-841-5454 2BR - Like new! Luxurious! 1 bath, vaulted ceilings, nice kitchen appls.,laundry rm., covered patio, lg. 1 car, lawn care. $725/mo. 785-393-4322 2BR - Older means more space! Split-level means more privacy! Central location, W/D hookups, $565 /mo. Sm. pet? 785-841-4201

2, 3 & 4BRs up to 1,500 sq. ft.

from $540 - $920/month

OPEN HOUSE 11AM - 5PM Mon.- Fri.

785-841-8400

www.sunriseapartments.com

2 & 3BR Homes available. $800/month and up. Some are downtown Lawrence. Call Today: 785-550-7777 2, 3, 4BR Lawrence homes available for August. Pets ok. Section 8 ok. Call 816-729-7513 for details

1BR In N. Lawrence. Refrig., stove, carport. New paint 2BR, 2719 Ousdahl, 1 bath, & furnace. Energy efficient. W/D hookup, microwave, $525/mo. Call 785-841-1284 garage w/opener, $635/mo. avail. now. 816-721-4083 Apartments, Houses & Duplexes. 785-842-7644 2BR, AC, DW, W/D hookup, www.GageMgmt.com sm. yard, 1 car garage w/ opener, quiet st. $625/mo. Avail. now. 785-218-1413 1st Class, Pet Friendly

Townhomes

Compliment your new home with a beautiful grand piano! Ebony, Mohag., Walnut, etc. Mid-America Piano 800-950-3774 piano4u.com

Mobile Homes OWNER WILL FINANCE 3BR, 2 bath, CH/CA, appls., Move in ready - Lawrence. Call 816-830-2152

Mclouth

Houses

14 Acres, old homestead (no house) near Lake Perry, Old barn, utils., wooded w/ deer & wildlife. Repo, Must sell. Assume owner financing, no down payment from $600/mo. Call 785-554-9663

Beautiful 154 Acres

Houses & Apts.

2BR, 2 bath, fireplace, CA, W/D hookups, 2 car with opener. Easy access to I-70. Includes paid cable. Pets under 20 pounds are allowed. Call 785-842-2575 www.princeton-place.com

Four Wheel Drive Townhomes 2859 Four Wheel Drive

FALL Leasing Now & 1 Unit is Avail. Now! 2BR, 2 bath, all elect., W/D, lots of cabinet space, & cathedral ceiling with skylight . Water & trash paid.

Move In Special: $685/mo. Pets ok.

785-842-5227

!"##$%&'(()

625 Folks Rd., 785-832-8200 2BR, 2 bath, 1 car garage.

O+%'$",# .(/,0%

5245 Overland Dr.785-832-8200 2BR, 2 bath, 2 car garage. 2 & 3BR Townhomes, starting at $760/mo. Avail. Aug. Fireplace, Walk in closets, and private patios. 1 Pet OK. Call 785-842-3280 3BR, 2.5 bath, all appls. + W/D, FP, 2 car garage. Pet ok. 1514A Legends Trail Dr. $900/mo. 785-218-1784 Available now - 3 Bedroom town home close to campus. For more info, please call: 785-841-4785 www.garberprop.com Newly decorated 3BR, 2 bath townhome - 1,477 sq. ft., all appls., blinds, 2 car. 2732 Coralberry Ct. Great W. location, Backs to park & lake, bike path, 1/2 mi. to Sunflower grade and SW middle schoos. Lawn care & snow removal provided. $950/mo. 785-842-7073 LUXURY LIVING AT AFFORDABLE PRICES

RANCH WAY TOWNHOMES on Clinton Pkwy.

3BR, 2 bath, $820-$840 2BR, 1 bath, $750/mo.

$300 Free /Half Off Deposit Gage Management 785-842-7644 www.gagemgmt.com

AVAILABLE NOW

3BR, 2 bath, major appls., FP, 2 car. 785-865-2505

BRAND NEW TOWNHOMES AT IRONWOOD * 3BR & 4BR, 2 LR * 2-Car Garage * Kitchen Appls., W/D * Daylight/Walkout Bsmt. * Granite Countertops Showing By Appt.

Call 785-842-1524

www.mallardproperties lawrence.com

LUXURIOUS TOWNHOMES * 2 BR, 1,300 sq. ft. * 3 BR, 1,700 sq. ft. Kitchen Appls., W/D 2-Car Garage * Small Pets Accepted Showings By Appointment

www.mallardproperties lawrence.com Call 785-842-1524

PARKWAY 4000

CALL FOR SPECIALS!

• 2 & 3BRs, with 2 baths • 2 car garage w/opener • W/D hookups • New kitchen appliances • New ceramic tile • Maintenance free 785-832-0555/785-766-2722

PARKWAY 6000

• 2BR, 2. bath, Gas FP • Walkout bsmt., Balcony • 2 car garage w/opener • W/D hookups • Maintenance free Call 785-832-0555 or after 3PM 785-766-2722

Brand New 4BR Houses

Avail. Now. 2½ Bath, 3 car garage, 2,300 sq. ft. Pets ok w/deposit. $1,700. Call 785-841-4785 www.garberprop.com

1 MONTH FREE RENT!

2 - 3 Bedrooms starting at $595/mo! 2 Lawrence Locations 785-749-2200

Dog House: Large size $20. Call after 4PM at 785856-0175 or 785-832-1049 .

Love piano music

but can’t play? Let the piano play for you! Player pianos from $16,888 piano4u.com 800-950-3774 Over 75 pre-owned pianos! Baldwin, Kimball, Yamaha, Kawai, Steinway, Wurlitzer and many more! See us at piano4u.com 800-950-3774

Farms-Acreage

Antiques

STEINWAY MODEL M

4 to choose from! Ebony, Walnut, & Mahog. For more details call 800-950-3774 piano4u.com Too many Steinways! Get yours today at Mid-America Piano and save thousands! 800-950-3774 piano4u.com USED YAMAHA CLAVINOVA High-end digital piano Loaded with tons of Features! Only $2400! 800-950-3774 piano4u.com

NOW OPEN Past & Present Office Equipment Treasures. Antiques, collectible and other unique Brothers Laser Printer items. Now open in Eudora HL2040, used only twice, 729 Main Street Wed-Sat $100. 785-550-9289 10am-6pm Sun 11am-4pm

Appliances

Mobile Homes

Buckets: Several 5 gallon plastic buckets with lids, as many you like FREE. Call 785-749-0846

412-477-9200, 612-810-9814

4BR, 2 bath lg. farm house NE of Oskaloosa. Office, pantry, DR. $750/mo. + deposit & utils. 913- 796-6642 4BR, new, NW, executive 2 story home. 2,400 sq. ft., 4 bath, 2 car, finished bsmt. $1,900/mo. 785-423-5828

Miscellaneous

Jefferson Co. on Hwy 59, N. of Oskaloosa, an hour from MCI. Terraced. Has waterways & 2 ravines. 35 acres tillable; 40 acres of timber & brush, balance of acreage is grass. All for only: $385,000.

3BR, 1.5 bath NW of Law1, 2, 3BRs NW - SW - SE rence. Finished attic, lg. 20 Acre farmstead 10 mi. W. $375 to $900/mo. No pets. yard, lawn care provided. of Lawrence near 40 Hwy. More info at 785-423-5828 Pond & pasture. Additional $995/mo. 785-393-0399 acreage avail. - including 2 & 3BRs for $550 - $1,050. 3BR, 1 bath, W/D hookup, 1 Morton bldgs, barns, silos, 4BR farmhouse $1,200/mo.. car. Good condition. 212 N etc. Owner will finance, Leasing late spring - Aug. Minnesota. Great, quiet lo- from $727/mo. No down 785-832-8728 / 785-331-5360 cation. No thru traffic. $790 payment. 785-554-9663 www.lawrencepm.com /mo. Call Ed 785-842-3487 Apartments, Houses & Duplexes. 785-842-7644 www.GageMgmt.com

Bobcat Trencher Attachment 2 yrs. old, 15 hrs., LT414, 4’x6” cup carbide teeth. Heavy duty. Asking $4,795. Over $7,500 New. Call 785-221-7668

Vegetable Oil: 100 gallons of used vegetable oil, FREE. 3BR Raised Ranch, 2 bath, Please call 785-749-0846. Has new roof, CA/CH, & more. On 10 acres, squared, Music-Stereo with stock pond, 50’ x 30’ barn, & 24’x40’ shop. Asking (3) Spinet Pianos w/bench. $239,950. Call 913-724-1419 Lester $625, Baldwin Acronsonic $525, Lowery $425. Price includes delivAcreage-Lots ery & tuning. 785-832-9906

www.vintagemgmt.com 785-842-1069

1, 2, & 3BR townhomes avail. in Cooperative. Units Spacious 2 & 3BR Homes for Aug. Walk-in closets, starting at $375 - $515/mo. FP, W/D hookup, 2 car. 1 Water, trash, sewer paid. pet okay. 785-842-3280 FIRST MONTH FREE! Back patio, CA, hard wood floors, full bsmt., stove, 3BR near KU & LHS. 1 bath, 1 refrig., W/D hookup, gar- car, CA, 2121 Mitchell. bage disposal, Reserved Available Now. $730/mo. parking. On site manage- No pets. Call 785-832-9906 ment & maintenance. 24 hr. 3BR, 1 bath, 1 car garage, emergency maintenance. fenced yard, lots of trees, Membership & Equity Fee 3805 Shadybrook, quiet SW Required. 785-842-2545 area. $850/mo. 785-842-8428 (Equal Housing Opportunity)

Machinery-Tools

3BR, 1 bath, 2 car, lg. corner lot across from elementary school. Lots of upgrades: newer Pella windows, roof, bath, more. Great home or investment -only $180,000. 785-841-9428

Sports-Fitness Equipment

Refrigerator/Freezer: 62” Rebounder - Mini Trampohighx30” wide. Runs good. line. with steady bars, $30. Will deliver for $5. foldable & in great shape! 785-760-1931. $45/offer. 785-727-9107

Bicycles-Mopeds

w.a.c.

Trek Mountain Bike: Rock Shox (2008) Series 4500, RENT TO OWN 16” Silver/black color. Ex. 3BR, 1989, very nice 14 x cond. w/minor scratches 80, 1 bath. $225/mo. Gas- Includes Kryptonite Ulock, light Village. 785-727-9764 quality odometer, silver bottle cage, $450 cash only. call leave a message at 785-691-5102 Roommates

Ticket Mart

Cars-Domestic

Mens Final Four $525-$575 $17,921. STK#18863A. for 2 tickets. Have 2 or 4 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 together. Will send COD. www.dalewilleyauto.com Call 615-776-5901.

Want To Buy

starting at $13,222. Rates as low 1.9% on GM Certified cars! 29 MPG! Hurry for Best Selection! Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Chrysler 2009 Sebring FWD, 4cyl., 30MPG, cruise con- www.dalewilleyauto.com trol, power equipment, great for commuting. 44K Cars-Imports miles. STK#17180. Only $12,995. A BIG Selection of Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com Hybrids in Stock-

Pinball Machine Wanted Looking to buy a pinball machine. Preferably a 3BR, Right next to KU, 1322 Building Materials solid state machine from Valley Ln. 2BRs - $400/BR, 1980 and newer. 1BR - $375. W/D, LR, FP, FREE Country Barn built 913-558-4279 deck, porch, 913-269-4265 DODGE 2008 Caliber SRT4, about 1928 - suitable for FWD, 6-SPD manual, Lots restoration. Must pay for of power, Black on Black! moving. 785-842-7375 Baldwin City Leather, Navigation, CD player, and so much more! 4BR, 2 bath townhome on WON’T LAST LONG, ONLY cul-de-sac, avail. now. Silent Auction - Doors! $17,995! 36K MILES, W/D hookup, CA, garage & Local Apt. complex is unSTK#12420A deck. $1000/mo. dergoing an exterior renoD a l e W i l l e y 7 8 5 8 4 3 5 200 785-214-8854 vation. Available to the www.dalewilleyauto.com highest bid: 40 six-panel Pets solid wood (some metal) Eudora exterior doors (slab only, AKC-Cavalier King not pre-hung) are availaCharles Spaniel Pup3BR nice 1997 mobile home, ble to the highest bid. pies. Two Beautiful Blen2 bath, new carpet, CH/CA, heim Puppies (2 males ) you are interested W/D hookup. $645/mo. + If ready March 22th. please drop off your bid in Refs., deposit. 913-845-3273 marthamurphy a sealed envelope at: (NOSPAM)42 at yahoo dot 2401 W. 25th St. #9a3, com Lawrence, KS Tonganoxie Dodge 2007 Magnum SXT Bids will be accepted - Must be seen ... Hasn’t Springer Spaniel Pups until 5:00 p.m. been on the street at all Spacious 1, 2, & 3 BRs AKC Springers. Black & on March 31, 2011 this winter, & it shows. White, males. Great pets & W/D hookups, Pets OK All bids will be opened at hunters. 9 weeks. $300/ Drives amazing. Looks GREAT SPECIALS the same time and the best offer. 785-764-0782 like it just came off the Cedar Hill Apts. highest bid will win. show room. Interior super 913-417-7200, 785-841-4935 Please include contact inclean, sports car red formation with bid. Care-Servicespaint, great chrome tires. custom dual exhaust. 38k Supplies Office Space miles. $13,990, well below Clothing Blue Book price. No loan Pet Taxi: Large size. 36” L X on car, clear title. Car is 1311 Wakarusa - office 24” W X 26” H. $50 cash. PH in Lawrence - You are space available. 200 sq. ft. Jean Jacket embroidered 785-842-1247 welcome to come see it in - 6,000 sq. ft. For details with “Kansas Jayhawks” person. My name is Josh. call 785-842-7644 and a Jayhawk on back. You can call me at Very good condition. Stu785-691-5369 dent Union brand, large. Office Space Available Please Contact at 5040 Bob Billings Pkwy. imagine.roberts@gmail.com. 785-841-4785 Dale Willey Automotive

Computer-Camera Retail & Commercial Space Computer Monitor. 18 Bicycles-Mopeds 2859 Four Wheel Drive • Studio/office, Wi-Fi avail., private bathroom, 697 sq.ft. • Climate controlled garage — 503 sq. ft., shared bath 785-842-5227 for more info

FURNISHED BEAUTY SALON

AVAILABLE FOR LEASE Wakarusa Marketplace 1540 Wakarusa, Suite I Block Real Estate Services Kim Bartalos, 816-412-8466 KBartalos@BlockLLC.com

Office/Warehouse

inches. Asking $15. please Bike: 12” girl’s Rawley bike, call 785-550-4142 like new, pink bicycle, includes training wheels, Firewood-Stoves helmet, and handle bar purse. $50. Please call Buy Now to insure quality 785-550-6829 seasoned hardwoods, hedge, oak, ash, locust, RV's hackberry & walnut. Split, stacked & delivered. Travel Trailer: 2009 Wild$160/cord. 785-727-8650 wood by Forest River. 26ft, w/2doors, Dinette slide. Rear bedroom w/door. Full Seasoned Hedge, Oak, Lo- Bath. Gas cook top, oven. cust & mixed hardwoods, Microwave. 2door refrigerstacked & delivered, $160. ator& freezer. Front couch. for full cord. Call Landon, Awning. Electric hitch 785-766-0863 w/stabilizer bars. Lots of storage. Low miles. $14000. 785-865-2584/785-249-5738 Furniture

10,000 sq. ft. warehouse with 1,200 sq. ft. office on N. Iowa St., Lawrence. Lg. storage yard included. Call First Management, Handmade Hutch. 4 drawInc. - 785-841-7333 or email ers, 4 doors, very spabobs@firstmanagementinc.com cious! Shelving space and top storage. Very nice. Wood. $25. 6 ft long, 5 ft Office/Warehouse for lease: 800 Comet Lane high. 785-727-9107

approximately 8,000 sq.ft. building perfect for service or contracting busi- Hide-a-bed: Nice, no tears, Cars-Domestic ness. Has large overhead $50. Call after 4PM: 785Become a Fan of Dale doors and plenty of work 856-0175 or 785-832-1049 . Willey Auto on Facebook and storage room. and You could Win! Bob Sarna 785-841-7333 Mattress Sets: Factory rejects, new in plastic. Save Buick 2004 Century Custom up to 70%. All sizes. very clean, great family car, 3400 V6 with gas mile785-766-6431 age up to 30MPG. STK#371821 Only $6995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Holiday Decor www.dalewilleyauto.com

Area Open Houses OPEN HOUSE

Sun., Mar. 20th, 1-3PM 2217 Riviera Drive Lawrence, KS

Beautiful, open floor plan, one level living, remodeling allowance. Reduced to $275,000. Stop by or call 785-218-2206

Christmas in March! Tree, lights, bulbs and more! All the decorations you’ll need! $40 for the whole kit & kaboodle! 785-727-9107

Lawn, Garden & Nursery Snapper 26” steel deck, high wheel, walk mower, self propelled. Swivel front wheels, 6HP Robin engine. $950. Superior condition, barely used. 785-550-1794

Cars-Domestic

Cars-Imports

Cadillac 2004 XLR convertible, WOW! You have got to see this car! Luxury and handling beyond belief. Only 23K miles, local trade, very nice!! $30,745. STK#12545A Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Jeep 2002 Grand Cherowww.dalewilleyauto.com kee 4x4 EXCELLENT Honda 2003 Accord EX-L, CONDITION! 4 Dr, 4WD, auto, leather, 4cyl, 119K Chevrolet 2008 Impala LS, Alloy Wheels, Luggage miles, V6, power, FWD, 5 year Rack, Towing Package, $8900 warranty, only 41K miles, Bucket Seats, Power View pics at very smooth. $13,450. Door Locks, Power Mirwww.theselectionautos.com Dale Willey 785-843-5200 rors, Power Seats, Rear 785.856.0280 www.dalewilleyauto.com Defrost, Tinted Windows, 845 Iowa St. Anti-theft, CD Player, InLawrence, KS 66049 Chevrolet 2007 Impala LT, formation Center, KeyFWD, V6 engine, heated less Entry, For more Info Honda 2009 Accord EXL, leather seats, dual front please call 785-331-9664 FWD, 4cyl. 44K miles, alloy climate control, CD, GM wheels, sunroof, leather Certified, 5 YEAR WARL O W ! L O W ! L O W ! heated seats, CD changer, RANTY, 63K MILES, ONLY Interest Rates on all used Premium sound, side air $11,651, STK#421091 vehicles available bags, 30MPG. A great comDale Willey 785-843-5200 only at muter car with plenty of www.dalewilleyauto.com Dale Willey Automotive dependability. STK#14388 Only $19,715. Chevrolet 2007 Impala LT, LOW! LOW! LOW! D a l e W i l l e y 7 8 5 8 43-5200 FWD, V6 engine, heated Interest rates on all used www.dalewilleyauto.com leather seats, dual front vehicles available climate control, CD, GM Only at Dale Willey Honda 2009 accord LX-P, Certified, 5 YEAR WARAutomotive! FWD, 4cyl. 33K miles, alloy RANTY, 63K MILES, ONLY wheels, power equipment, $11,651, STK#421091 AM/FM/CD stereo, Lot of Dale Willey 785-843-5200 quality and dependability! www.dalewilleyauto.com Only $17,995. STK#470221. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Chevrolet 2010 Impala LT. www.dalewilleyauto.com FWD, V6, 5 year warranty, GM Ceritifed, Dual climate Honda 2009 accord LX-P, 1 zones, CD Player, Power owner, smooth ride, very Oldsmobile 2004 Alero windows/Locks, 34K Miles, reliable, only $17,995. GLS, auto, FWD, sunroof, ONLY $15,741 STK#13729 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 58k miles, $7500 Alero Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com GLS, auto, FWD, sunroof, www.dalewilleyauto.com 58k miles, $7500 Honda 2009 Accord LX-P, 1 View pics at owner, smooth ride, Very Chevrolet 2010 Impala LT, www.theselectionautos.com reliable, ONLY $17,995. FWD, alloy wheels, remote 785.856.0280 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 start, GM CErtified, 34K mi845 Iowa St. www.dalewilleyauto.com les, power equipment, Lawrence, KS 66049 save thousands over new! Only $14,749. STK#18220. Pontiac 2001 Grand Prix GT, Honda 2004 Accord V6, 4Dr, Dale Willey 785-843-5200 in sheer silver. Clean Au- Loaded, 119K, 2nd Private www.dalewilleyauto.com toCheck history, BOSE au- owner, $8,500 or best offer. dio, moonroof, heated Oskaloosa, 785-817-0766 Chevrolet 2010 Impala driver seat, and heads up Honda 2004 Civic EX How LT,V6 power, 5 yr. war- display. Nice clean car and about up to 29MPG hiway? ranty, FWD, heated leather a great price- $5,200. See Very nice, automatic, seats, Bose premium website for pics. moonroof, newer tires, alRueschhoff Automobiles sound, jsut like new, only loy wheels, PW, PL, CD, r u e s c h h o f f a u t o s . c o m $18,845. cruise. Nice clean car in 2441 W. 6th St. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 champagne tan. 785-856-6100 24/7 www.dalewilleyauto.com Rueschhoff Automobiles rueschhoffautos.com Pontiac 2007 G6, V6, sedan, Chevrolet 2002 Impala, 1 FWD, w/29MPG, panaromic 2441 W. 6th St. owner, V6, power, ONLY sunroof, alloy wheels, one 785-856-6100 24/7 71K miles, CD player, Dual owner local trade, very climate zones, power nice! STK#379251 only Honda 2008 FIT 4cyl. FWD, locks/windows, Fresh and $10,995. Manual, one owner, alloy clean, PRICE CUT - $8,450 wheels, keyless remote & Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 cruise control. What a www.dalewilleyauto.com www.dalewilleyauto.com great commuter car at Saturn 1996 SL1, 4 door, 4 34MPG! STK#13136A1. only Chevrolet 2009 Impala SS, cylinder, 5 speed, 199k mi- $13,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 V8 power, 5 year warranty, les, new clutch, 34 mpg, www.dalewilleyauto.com heated leather seats, sun- $2700 M i d w e s t M u s t a n g roof, dual climate, GM cer749-3131 Honda 2010 Insight EX Hytified, move fast it won’t brid Auto factory warranty last long, only $19,784. Special Purchase! 09-10 Johnny I’s Cars Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Pontiac G6, Selection of 12, 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 www.dalewilleyauto.com Starting at $12,315. Financwww.johnnyiscars.com ing Rates as Low as 1.9%. Chevrolet 2009 Mailbu LT, Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Honda 2010 Insight EX HyFWD, 4cyl., steering wheel www.dalewilleyauto.com brid Auto factory warranty controls, ABS, traction Johnny I’s Cars control, cruise control, 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 “ W E B U Y C A R S ” made right here in Kansas www.johnnyiscars.com city! Support your local economy! STK#18394 Only Honda 2007 Pilot EXL, FWD, WE WILL GIVE YOU $16,250. leather, sunroof, ABS, THE MOST MONEY V6, Dale Willey 785-843-5200 alloy wheels, CD changer, www.dalewilleyauto.com FOR YOUR LATE keyless remote, 67K miles, Only $20,995. STK#18084 MODEL CAR, Chevrolet 2010 Malibu LTZ Dale Willey 785-843-5200 TRUCK, VAN OR 4cyl. FWD, leather heated www.dalewilleyauto.com SPORT UTILITY seats, remote start, alloy Johnny I’s Auto Sales wheels, Bose Sound sysVEHICLE. 814 Iowa tem, On Star, GM Certified, IF YOU WANT TO 785-841-3344 side air bags, STK#18365A. www.johnnyiscars.com SELL IT, WE WANT Only $20,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 TO BUY IT. Kia 2010 Soul FWD, autowww.dalewilleyauto.com CONTACT ALLEN matic, alloy wheels, CD/XM/FM stereo, power OR JEFF AT Chrysler 2009 300 AWD equipment, 26K miles, like Touring only 30K miles, 785-843-5200 new, only $16,995. leather, Pwr equip, Black SALES@DALEWILLEYAUTO.COM STK#17383. on Black, ABS, XM CD RaDale Willey 785-843-5200 dio, Premium alloy wheels, Special Purchase ‘09 & ‘10 This is a lot of car! Only G6’s 9 to choose from www.dalewilleyauto.com

2840 Iowa Street (785) 843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Seven to choose fromCall or Stop by

Johnny I’s Cars 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 www.johnnyiscars.com

Acura 2002 TL 3.2L Type-S, FWD, Auto, 4dr., 197K miles, $6500 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049

Audi 2003 A6. 4dr., 3.0L, AWD, auto, leather, moonroof, 73K miles, $11,900 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049

Audi 2004 Allroad station wagon, AWD, Lots of luxFind us on Facebook at ury, heated leather, sunwww.facebook.com/dalewil roof, premium sound, and more. Only 62K miles. leyauto $14,890. Stk#339561. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Ford 2010 Fusion Hybrid, moonroof , back-up camera, 1 owner, 17K miles, $25,900 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049 Ford 2000 Mustang GT, manual, 95K, AM/FM/ CD radio, black interior leather seats, silver exterior, newly replaced clutch, brakes, spark plugs, & oil change, AC/heater works well, Runs great! Asking $7,800 or best offer. This car must go!!!! Call 785-550-9116 or 785-550-6282 email me at Bosslady20111@hotmail.com

Ford 1998 Mustang, V6 Power, 2DR Coupe, Power Locks/windows, keyless entry, CD player and cassette, 73K miles, ONLY $6,450 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Buick 1999 Park Avenue, V6 www.dalewilleyauto.com Power, ONLY 73K miles, smooth ride, power GM Certified? locks/windows/seat, casis not like any other settee player. $7,995 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Dealer Backed Warranty. www.dalewilleyauto.com Don’t let the other dealers tell you any different. Dale Willey Automotive Cadillac 2001 Deville is the only Dealer leather dual power seats, in Lawrence that alloy wheels, complete GM Certifies its cars. luxury 84K miles and up to Come see the difference! 27MPG, Very nice only Call for Details. $8,995. STK#18717. 785-843-5200 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Ask for Allen. www.dalewilleyauto.com

BMW 2001 325i auto, Premium, leather, 4dr., 110K mmiles, $9,900 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049 Dodge 2008 Caliber SRX4, 5spd., Only 36K miles, alloy wheels, rear spoiler, Navigation, leather, ABS, very sporty!!! STK#12420 Only $16,754. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Find out what your Car is Worth - NO Obligation - NO Hassle

Get a Check Today Johnny I’s Cars 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 www.johnnyiscars.com

Get your Car covered from the tires to the roof from Bumper to Bumper, 0% Financing available on all Service contracts. No Credit Checks! GMC 2007 Sierra SLT, 4WD, crew cab, duel heated power seats, leather, ABS, alloy wheels, GM Certified, Bose Sound, On Star, one owner, 5.3 liter, V8! Only 29K miles. What more could you ask for only $28,995. STK#48251. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Cars-Imports

Sport Utility-4x4

Toyota 2004 Camry XLE, ONE owner NO accident car in beautiful condition. Also have a 2003 Camry SE, loaded, two local owners. NICE. Check website for photos. Financing available. Rueschhoff Automobiles rueschhoffautos.com 2441 W. 6th St. 785-856-6100 24/7

Chevrolet 2011 HHR LT, Only 8669 miles, Why pay for New when you can get this GM Cerified and Save Money! STK#17583. $17,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Chevrolet 2010 Silverado, 4WD, LT 1500 crew cab, Only 21K miles, 5.3 liter, V8, ABS, remote start, alloy Toyota 2009 Prius, Local wheels, running boards, car, 50MPG, side air bags, On star, GM Certified, STK#548191. Sage Metallic. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Johnny I’s Cars www.dalewilleyauto.com 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 www.johnnyiscars.com

GM Certified?

VW 2003 Jetta GLS, auto, 4dr., FWD, leather, Monsoon sound, white 125K miles, $6900 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049

Crossovers Audi 2004 Allroad AWD, 2.7 quatro wagon get the luxury of a sedan and the rougedness of an SUV!! This vehicle is unbelievable, leather, sunroof, Bose Sound, 63K miles and much more only $$14,890. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Rueschhoff Automobiles rueschhoffautos.com 2441 W. 6th St. 785-856-6100 24/7 Saturn 2009 Aura XE FWD 3.5 V6, leather heated seats, alloy wheels, ON Star, keyless remote, and much more! Only $13,994. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Chevrolet 2010 HHR LS 3.5K miles, 4cyl. FWD, automatic, ABS, CD, cruise control, Power windows & locks, Only $13,995. STK#19566B Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Get the Car Covered

Toyota 2008 RAV4 Limited FWD, 3.5 V6, sunroof, ABS, cruise control, CD changer, alloy wheels, 21K miles, STK#51433A1. Only $20,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Subaru 2006 Legacy Out- www.dalewilleyauto.com back Wagon, 1 owner, 57K AWD. We are now your Johnny I’s Cars Chevrolet Dealer, 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 Call us for your www.johnnyiscars.com

785-856-0280

“We can locate any vehicle you are looking for.”

Jeep 2008 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon, Navigation, heated seats, both tops, 1 local trade-in. Johnny I’s Cars 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 www.johnnyiscars.com

Truck-Pickups

Dodge 2001 Ram SLT Laramie Ext. cab. one owner, only 13K miles, Tow pkg, cruise control, power seat, Tonneau cover, Lots of extras!!! Only $13,265. Stk#542192. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com Dodge 2001 RAM SLT, truck, extended cab, 1 owner, Only 13K miles! JVC stereo system.$13,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Ford 2004 F250 FX Lariat ext cab. diesel, leather heated seats, Tow pkg, running boards, CD changer, 65K miles, Only $19,725!! Stk#17233. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Honda 2008 CRV EXL, FWD, 2.4Lt. 4cyl., leather sun- www.dalewilleyauto.com roof, cd changer, AM/FM/XM/Stereo, alloy Ford 2006 F250, FX4 XLT, wheels, side air bags. 4WD crew cab, 55K miles, bedliner, tow pkg, alloy STK#349131 Only $21,456. wheels, power seat, very Dale Willey 785-843-5200 affordable at $21,845 www.dalewilleyauto.com STK#589273. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Honda 2007 Element SC. Black, auto, low miles, side www.dalewilleyauto.com airbags. Ford 2004 F-250 Lariat exJohnny I’s Cars tended cab, V8 turbo die814 Iowa 785-841-3344 sel, 4WD, heated leather www.johnnyiscars.com seats, only 64K miles, $20,415. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

1994 Subaru Legacy, 4 door sedan, 4 cylinder, 5 speed, 230k miles, new clutch, runs & drives great, $1900, Midwest Mustang 749-3131

Premium selected automobiles Specializing in Imports www.theselctionautos.com

Jeep 2008 Commander Limited 4WD, Hemi V8, 33K miles, 3row seating, alloy wheels, sunroof, leather heated memory seats, Boston Premium Sound, STK#12581. $29,450. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Chevrolet 2007 Impala LT, 5 Year warranty, GM cErtified, heated leather seats, dual climate, Power locks/windows, CD only $11,650 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Chevrolet 2009 HHR LT,5 www.dalewilleyauto.com year warranty, heated leather seats, fire engine Chevrolet 2010 Malibu LTZ, red, GM certified, FWD, CD 5 year warranty, FWD, GM player, and more! 32K mi- certified, heated leather les! JVC stereo system, seats, very nice ride! 26K miles. $20,995. $13,756. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com www.dalewilleyauto.com Chevrolet 2006 Silverado Chevrolet 2007 HHR LY LTI crew cab, 2W, 50K miFWD, 4cyl5SP, Great gas les, alloy wheels, Tow pkg, mileage@30MPG, one power equipment, GM Cerowner, Power equipment, tified, Only $19,444. cruise control, STK#10362 AM/FM/XM/CD radio, Dale Willey 785-843-5200 leather. only $12,450. www.dalewilleyauto.com STK#566532 Chevrolet 2007 Trailblazer Dale Willey 785-843-5200 LS, ONLY 35K miles, sunwww.dalewilleyauto.com roof, front dual zone cliFord 2009 Escape XLT 4x4, 1 mate control CD PLAYER, owner, side airbags, SAT. Power Locks/windows and radio, 6 disc changer. much more! ONLY $15,421. Johnny I’s Cars STK#371241 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.johnnyiscars.com www.dalewilleyauto.com

Hyundai 2007 Tucson Saturn 2008 Outlook FWD, V6, 4WD, 88k miles, XE, only 45 miles! This is $12,995 the buy you’ve been lookView pics at ing for! This is an 8 paswww.theselectionautos.com senger vehicle that does 785.856.0280 not cramp you and it gets 845 Iowa St. 24MPG! and you won’t find Lawrence, KS 66049 a price like this anywhere else! Only $17,914. STK#16743. Nissan 2003 Friontier super Dale Willey 785-843-5200 cab, 4x4, XE, off Road www.dalewilleyauto.com package, auto V6 nly 56K miles. Scion 2010 TC with under Johnny I’s Cars 1000 miles! Super clean 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 one owner, automatic. www.johnnyiscars.com Why buy new? Awesome alloy wheels, 160W Pioneer Protect Your Vehicle audio, Dual moon roof. See with an extended service website for more info and contract from photos. Dale Willey Automotive Rueschhoff Automobiles Call Allen at rueschhoffautos.com 785-843-5200. 2441 W. 6th St. 785-856-6100 24/7 Special Purchase of 2010 Scion 2006 XA Auto Pearl Chevrolet Cobalts LT’s 3 to Blue Package III, Local car choose from Hurry for Best Selection, Priced at $13,995 - great mpg. and with 37 MPG they Johnny I’s Cars won’t last long! 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.johnnyiscars.com www.dalewilleyauto.com Special Purchase of 2010 Pontiac Vibe’s 3 to choose Subaru 2006 Forester. AWD, from Hurry for Best Selec- side airbags, 67K, auto Twilight tion, Priced from $13,444. transmission, Great Financing Options Pearl Grey. Johnny I’s Cars are available. 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.johnnyiscars.com www.dalewilleyauto.com

The Selection

Hummer 2010 H3, 5cyl., 4WD, only 7600 miles, running boards, alloy wheels, sun roof, On Star, and more! Only $29,576. STK#10278. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Chevrolet 2010 Equinox LT, FWD, 5 year warranty, GM certified, Only 1 owner, very clean, 14K miels, $22,845. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Lincoln 2007 Navigator www.dalewilleyauto.com 4WD, V8, sunroof, DVD, Navigation, 20” wheels, 3rd Chevrolet 2010 Equinox LTI, row power seat, heated 4cyl., FWD, automatic, al- and coolded seats, power loy wheels, ABS, running boards and much CD/XM/FM stereo, GM Cer- more! STK#51233A3. Only tified! StK#314781 Only $29,412. $22,845. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com www.dalewilleyauto.com

from the tires to the roof from bumper to bumper. 0% Financing available Mini 2007 Cooper FWD, 68K on all service contracts miles, Ultra sunroof, No credit checks. heated seats, alloy wheels, Dale Willey 785-843-5200 power equipment and www.dalewilleyauto.com more. Come live a little! Only $15,450. STK#319811. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 GMC 2008 Envoy SLT, 4WD, www.dalewilleyauto.com 4.2 6cyl., 46K miles, sunroof, heated leather seats, Mini Cooper 2007, 1 owner, running boards, tow pkg, very nice car, 37MPG, high- alloy wheels, steering way, heated seats, sun- wheel controls, On Star, roof, CD player, ONLY GM certified, STK#11159. $15,450 Only $21,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com www.dalewilleyauto.com MINI COOPER 2004 Very low mileage at 21,450. Gold with black top. Moonroof. Automatic with black leather interior. Lower front bumper has damage, and drivers’ door has some door dings, otherwise is in excellent condition. May deal to compensate for damage. $10,800. 785-856-0718

is not like any other Dealer Backed Warranty. Don’t let the other dealers tell you any different. Dale Willey Automotive is the only Dealer in Lawrence that GM Certifies its cars. Come see the difference! Call for Details. 785-843-5200 Ask for Allen.

Service or Sales Needs! 785-843-5200

Motorcycle-ATV

Honda 2006 CBR1000RR FOR SALE. In excellent condition. With 4742 miles. $6000/offer. Contact Toyota 2003 Avalon XL Se- 913-231-9815/913-609-7784 dan. Luxury - Great condition, V6, FWD, 4dr, AM/FM radio, CD player, Cassette Protect Your Vehicle player, pwr windows, pwr with an Extended locks, white body, tan Service Contract from leather interior. 70K miles, D a l e Willey Automotive. $9,900. Private sale! This Call Allen or Tony at one won’t last long. 785-843-5200 785-766-4055

GMC 2008 Envoy SLT, 5 year warranty, heated leather seats, wood trim interior, very nice ride, ONLY $21,995 Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com GM Certified is not like any other Dealer backed warranty. Don’t let the Other Dealers tell you any different. Dale Willey Automotive is the Only dealer in Lawrence that GM Ceritfies their cars. Come see the difference! Call for Deatils. 785-843-5200 Ask for Allen. GMC 2007 Sierra reg. cab. work truck, 5.3 V8, one owner, local trade, tow pkg, 37K miles, ready for any job! STK#333062. only $15,844. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com GMC 2010 Sierra SLE 4WD, rew cab Z71, Only 5K miels, 5.3 liter V8, tow pkg, alloy wheels, ABS, steering wheels, On Star, GM CErtified, CD/FM/XM/radio, flex fuel, & more. STK#569461. Only $31,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com GMC 2002 Sierra 1500, work truck - one owner. V-8 engine, AC power steering, power brakes, LINE-X bed. highway miles. Truck is in excellent condition. $4,000. Call 785-749-3920. Mazda 2003 B3000 2WD, pickup, V6, 5 speed, regular cab, 80K miles, very clean inside and out, $5,900. Midwest Mustang 785-749-3131 “WE BUY CARS” WE will give you the most money for your late model car, truck, van or Sport vehicle. If you want to sell it, We want to buy it. Contact Allen or Tony at 785-843-5200 sales@dalewilleyauto.com

What is GM Certified? 100,000 miles/5 year Limited Power Train Warranty, 117 point Inspection, 12month/12,000 mile Bumper to Bumper Warranty. 24 hour GM assistance & courtesy transportation during term or power train warranty. Dale Willey Proudly certifies GM vehicles.


Truck-Pickups What is GM Certified? 100,000 miles/5year Limited power train warranty, 117 point inspection, 12 month/12,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty, 24 hour GM Roadside assistance and courtesy transportation during term or power train warranty. Dale Willey proudly Certifies GM vehicles.

Vans-Buses Chrysler 2010 Town & Country Touring, room for the whole family, DVD player, heated leather seats, sirius satellite radio, just like new, only $24,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com GMC 2008 Acadia SLE, 7 passenger, GM Ceertified, On Star, Great gas mielage at 24MOG, Pleanty of room for the Family! STK#388601 Only $23,995. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com Honda 2006 Odyssey DVD, leather, sunroof, 1 owner, Ocean Mist Blue, 52K. Johnny I’s Cars 814 Iowa 785-841-3344 www.johnnyiscars.com

Vans-Buses

Public Notices

Public Notices

Special Purchase! 09-10 Pontiac Vibes, 4 to Choose from, Starting at $13,444. Dale Willey 785-843-5200 www.dalewilleyauto.com

Bastemeyer; United States of America, Internal Revenue Service ; USA/IRS (local service) ; Donald Simpson; Ronald R. Simpson, Defendants.

shown by the recorded plat CIVIL DEPARTMENT thereof, commonly known as 2804 Wildflower Drive, The Bank of New York MelLawrence, KS 66047 (the lon, as Trustee for CIT “Property”) Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-1, by Vericrest Finanand all those defendants cial, Inc. as attorney-in-fact who have not otherwise Plaintiff, been served are required to vs. plead to the Petition on or Ashley D Kranitz, Will J before the 19th day of April, Kranitz, Jane Doe, John Doe, 2011, in the District Court of and Mortgage Electronic Douglas County, Kansas. If Registration Systems, Inc., you fail to plead, judgment et al., and decree will be entered Defendants in due course upon the Petition. Case No. 11CV112 Court No. 1 NOTICE Pursuant to the Fair Debt Title to Real Estate Involved Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b), no inforPursuant to K.S.A. §60 mation concerning the colNOTICE OF SUIT lection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given STATE OF KANSAS to the directly to the debt collec- above named Defendants tor or the express permis- and The Unknown Heirs, exsion of a court of compe- ecutors, devisees, trustees, tent jurisdiction. The debt creditors, and assigns of collector is attempting to any deceased defendants; collect a debt and any in- the unknown spouses of formation obtained will be any defendants; the unused for that purpose. known officers, successors, trustees, creditors and asPrepared By: signs of any defendants South & Associates, P.C. that are existing, dissolved Jeremiah Jones or dormant corporations; (KS # 21163) the unknown executors, ad6363 College Blvd., Suite 100 ministrators, devisees, Overland Park, KS 66211 trustees, creditors, succes(913)663-7600 sors and assigns of any de(913)663-7899 (Fax) fendants that are or were Attorneys For Plaintiff partners or in partnership; (125020) and the unknown guardi_______ ans, conservators and trustees of any defendants that are minors or are under any (First published in the Law- legal disability and all other rence Daily Journal-World person who are or may be March 7, 2011) concerned:

Public Notices (First published in the Lawrence Daily Journal-World March 21, 2011) NOTICE OF HEARING Toyota 2006 Sienna LE, auto, AWD, pwr side doors, 163K miles, $11,175 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049

Auto Parts Tire: Cooper Touring Tire CS4, size P205/65R15, excellent tread depth. Mounted on wheel from 1996 Toyota Avalon. You can have both tire and wheel for $10. Located in Lawrence, near KU. 785-749-0670

Autos Wanted Buying Cars & Trucks, Running or not. We are a Local Lawrence company, Midwest Mustang 785-749-3131

Place your ad

Honda 2003 Odyssey EX, auto, FWD, Power sliding doors, 114K miles, $8900 View pics at www.theselectionautos.com 785.856.0280 845 Iowa St. Lawrence, KS 66049

Air Conditioning

Air Conditioning Heating/Plumbing

930 E 27th Street, 785-843-1691 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/chaneyinc

ANY TIME OF DAY OR NIGHT

@ kansasbuyandsell.com

KansasBUYandSELL.com

Automotive Services Need a battery, tires, brakes, or alignment?

Lawrence Automotive Diagnostics

www.lawrenceautodiag.com

785-842-8665

Auctioneers

Hiaat Auction Full service auctions since 1990 www.hiattauction.com

Automotive Services Bryant Collision Repair Mon-Fri. 8AM-6PM We specialize in Auto Body Repair, Paintless Dent Repair, Glass Repair, & Auto Accessories. 785-843-5803 bryantcollisionrepair@msn.com. lawrencemarketplace.com/ bryant-collision-repair Buying Junk & Repairable Vehicles. Cash Paid. Free Tow. U-Call, We-Haul! Call 785-633-7556

Tires, Alignment, Brakes, A/C, Suspension Repair Financing Available 785-841-6050 1828 Mass. St lawrencemarketplace.com/ performancetire

Full Service Gas Station 100% Ethanol-Free Gasoline Auto Repair Shop - Automatic Car Washes Starting At Just $3 2815 W 6th St | 785-843-1878 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/westside66

Carpet Cleaning Kansas Carpet Care, Inc.

Your locally owned and operated carpet and upholstery cleaning company since 1993! • 24 Hour Emergency Water Damage Services Available By Appointment Only

785-842-3311

For Promotions & More Info: http://lawrencemarketplace .com/kansas_carpet_care

Carpets & Rugs

785-749-1904

A New Transmission Is Not Always The Fix. It Could Be A Simple Repair. Now, Real Transmission Checkouts Are FREE! Call Today 785-843-7533 atsilawrence.com

Dale and Ron’s Auto Service

Family Owned & Operated for 37 Years Domestic & Foreign Expert Service 630 Connecticut St

785-842-2108

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U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-3 Plaintiff, vs. Craig Bastemeyer; John Doe (Tenant/Occupant); Mary Doe (Tenant/ Occupant); Jill Roe (real name unknown) unknown spouse, if any, of Craig

Computer/Internet Computer too slow? Viruses/Malware? Need lessons? Questions? techdavid3@gmail.com or 785-979-0838

Concrete

Decorative & Regular concrete drives, walks, & patios. 42 yrs. exp. Jayhawk Concrete 785-979-5261 Driveways, Parking Lots, Paving Repair, Sidewalks, Garage Floors, Foundation Repair 785-843-2700 Owen 24/7

Construction

FREE INSTALLATION

100’s of carpet colors. Many IN STOCK for quick service and 0% financing

125,000 Sq. Ft.

of Beautiful Flooring in your Lawrence Warehouse TODAY! Jennings’ Floor Trader 3000 Iowa - 841-3838 FloorTraderLawrence.com

Custom Design & Fabrication Mobile, Fast, affordable repairs On-site repairs & installation Hand Railings & Steel Fences http://lawrencemarketplace. com/trironworks Phone 785-843-1877

Looking for Something Creative? Call Billy Construction Decks, Fences, Etc. Insured. (785) 838-9791

• Decks • Gazebos • Framing • Siding • Fences • Additions • Remodel • Weatherproofing & Staining Insured, 20 yrs. experience. 785-550-5592

Electrical

Electric & Industrial Supply Pump & Well Drilling Service

Motors - Pumps Complete Water Systems 602 E 9th St | 785-843-4522

http://lawrencemarket place.com/patchen

Across The Bridge In North Lawrence 903 N 2nd St | 785-842-2922 lawrencemarketplace.com/ battery

Hite Collision Repair

“If you want it done right, take it to Hite.” Auto Body Repair Windshield & Auto Glass Repair 3401 W 6th St (785) 843-8991 http://lawrencemarket place.com/hite

K’s Tire

Sales and Service Tires for anything Batteries Brakes Oil Changes Fair and Friendly Customer Service is our trademark 2720 Oregon St. 785-843-3222 Find great offers at

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Child Care Provided

Get Lynn on the line! 785-843-LYNN www.lynnelectric.com

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Employment Services

Licensed Day Care, 2 Openings - birth & up, 1st aid, CPR, SRS. 4 slots for 5 - 11 yr. olds. 785-764-6660

Cleaning Bird Janitorial & Hawk Wash Window Cleaning. • House Cleaning • Chandeliers • Post Construction • Gutters • Power Washing • Prof Window Cleaning • Sustainable Options Find Coupons & more info: lawrencemarketplace.com/ birdjanitorial Free Est. 785-749-0244 House Cleaner Adding new customers. Years of experience, references available, Insured. 785-748-9815 (local)

Garage Doors

Eagles Lodge

Banquet Room Available for Corporate Parties, Wedding Receptions, Fundraisers Bingo Every Friday Night 1803 W 6th St. (785) 843-9690 http://lawrencemarketpla ce.com/Eagles_Lodge

• Garage Doors • Openers • Service • Installation Call 785-842-5203 or visit us at Lawrencemarketplace.com /freestategaragedoors

General Services

785-843-2174

1388 N 1293 Rd, Lawrence

Bankruptcy, Tax Negotiation, Foreclosure Defense - Call for Free consultation. Cloon Legal Services 888-845-3511 “We are a federally designated debt relief agency.”

Christensen Floor Care LLC. Wood, Tile, Carpet, Concrete, 30 yrs. exp. 785-842-8315 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/christensenfloorcare

Kitchen/Bath Remodel Carpet ,Tile, Wood, Stone Showroom 4910 Wakarusa Ct, Ste B (785) 843-8600 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/wildgreen

Martin Floor Covering

Linoleum, Carpet, Ceramic, Hardwood, Laminate, Porcelain Tile. Estimates Available 1 mile North of I-70. http://lawrencemarketplace. com/martin_floor_covering

NOT Your ordinary bicycle store!

Graphics

Lawrence’s Newest Sign Shop

• Full Color Printing • Banners & Decals • Vehicle Graphics • Yard Signs • Magnets • Stationary & Much More!! 785-856-7444 1717 W. 6th

JAYHAWK GUTTERING

Seamless aluminum guttering. Many colors to choose from. Install, repair, screen, clean-out. Locally owned. Insured. Free estimates.

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jayhawkguttering.com

Enhance your listing with

MULTIPLE PHOTOS, MAPS,

EVEN VIDEO!

1-888-326-2799 Toll Free

KansasBUYandSELL.com

www.foundationrepairks.com

Furniture

Apply at eapp.adecco.com Or Call (785) 842-1515 BETTER WORK BETTER LIFE lawrencemarketplace.com/ adecco

Temporary or Contract Staffing Evaluation Hire, Direct Hire Professional Search Onsite Services (785) 749-7550 1000 S Iowa, Lawrence KS lawrencemarketplace.com/ express

• UPHOLSTERY • REFINISH • REPAIR • REGLUE • WINDOW FASHIONS Quality Since 1947 Murphy Furniture Service 785-841-6484 409 E. 7th www.murphyfurniture.net http://lawrencemarketplace. com/murphyfurniture

Place your ad

ANY TIME OF DAY OR NIGHT

@ kansasbuyandsell.com

KansasBUYandSELL.com

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

Lawn, Garden & Nursery

D& S Home Improvements 30 yrs. Experience Reasonable Senior. Discount Licensed Insured Quality 913-208-6478/913-207-2580

MB Mowing

Call for Quality Lawn care 785-893-4128 www.mbmowing.com

MLS - Mowing w/Out Contracts Res/Com. Spring Cleanup Mulch-Stone/Tree Removal 785-766-2821 Free estimates mikelawnservice@gmail.com Mowing...like Clockwork! Honest & Dependable Mow~Trim~Sweep~Hedges Steve 785-393-9152 Lawrence Only

Painting

Handyman Services All phases of work, Kitchen, Bath, Tile, Carpet, Decks Interior/Exterior Call Eric 913-742-0699 JASON TANKING CONSTRUCTION New Construction Framing, Remodels, Additions, Decks Fully Ins. & Lic. 785.760.4066 http://lawrencemarket place.com/jtconstruction

Supplying all your Painting needs. Serving Lawrence and surrounding areas for over 25 years.

Locally owned & operated.

Free estimates/Insured.

REMODELING & HANDYMAN SERVICES

• Baths • Kitchens • Rec Rooms • Tile • Windows •Doors •Trim •Wood Rot Since 1974 GARY 785-856-2440 www.winston-brown.com Licensed & Insured

Heating & Cooling

Renovations Kitchen/Bath Remodels House Additions & Decks Quality Work Affordable Prices

(785) 550-1565

mmdownstic@hotmail.com Lawrencemarketplace.com/tic

“Your Comfort Is Our Business.” Installation & Service Residential & Commercial (785) 841-2665

“Call for a Free Home Demo” www.MuttsandManners.com

http://lawrencemarketplace. com/rivercityhvac

Lawn, Garden & Nursery Air Conditioning/ & Heating/Sales & Srvs. Free Estimates on replacement equipment! Ask us about Energy Star equipment & how to save on your utility bills.

Roger, Kevin or Sarajane

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www.scott-temperature.com www.lawrencemarketplace. com/scotttemperature

AAA Mowing Commercial /Residential Insured Senior Citizen Dis. 785-727-3941

Curb Appeal Lawn Care Experienced 1 man crew Caleb Shaffer 785-608-7553 Curbappeallawrence@ yahoo.com

Carpenter, retired - Home repairs: Int./Ext.; Decks: Repair, Power wash, stain, seal; Garden tilling (Mar. & Apr.); & more. 785-766-5285

15 yrs exp, Mowing, Yard Clean-up, Tree Trimming, Snow Removal All jobs considered. 15% Sr. Discount. 785-312-0813, 785-893-1509 Love’s Lawncare & Snow Removal Quality Service Free Est. & Senior Discounts 60 & up. Bonded & Insured Call Danny 785-220-3925

Bradley R. Finkeldei #19470 ________

Roofing

Hail & Wind Storm Specialists

We Work With Your Insurance Inspections are FREE

785-766-7700 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/allcore

We’re There for You!

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Since 1982

Call 785-841-0809

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I COME TO YOU!

Dependable & Reliable Pet sitting, feeding, overnights, walks, more References! Insured! 785-550-9289

Locksmith

Prompt Superior Service Residential * Commercial Tear Off * Reroofs

Free Estimates

Plumbing

Insurance Work Welcome

785-764-9582

Lawrencemarketplace.com/ mclaughlinroofing

Residential & Commercial Standard & High Security Keys Full Service Shop 840 Connecticut St. 785-749-3023 lawrencemarketplace.com/ mobilelocksmith

“When You’re Ready, We’re Reddi” •Sales •Service •Installations •Free Estimate on replacements all makes & models Commercial Residential Financing Available

Painting A. B. Painting & Repair Int/ext. Drywall, Tile, Siding, Wood rot, & Decks 30 plus yrs. Refs. Free Est. Al 785-331-6994 albeil@aol.com

Inside - Out Painting Service

Complete interior & exterior painting Siding replacement

785-766-2785

inside-out-paint@yahoo.com Free Estimates Fully Insured Lawrencemarketplace.com/ inside-out-paint

Int/Ext/Specialty Painting Siding, Wood Rot & Decks

Kate, 785-423-4464

www.kbpaintingllc.com

Recycling Services

12th & Haskell Recycle Center, Inc. No Monthly Fee - Always been FREE! Cash for all Metals We take glass! 1146 Haskell Ave, Lawrence 785-865-3730 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/recyclecenter

Lonnie’s Recycling Inc. Buyers of aluminum cans, all type metals & junk vehicles. Mon.-Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-4, 501 Maple, Lawrence. 785-841-4855 lawrencemarketplace.com/ lonnies

Re-Roofs: All Types Roofing Repairs Siding & Windows FREE Estimates (785) 749-0462 www.meslerroofing.com

ROOF REPAIRS

Leaks, Flashing, Masonry. Residential, Commercial References, Insured.

KW Service 785-691-5949

Sewing Service & Repair Bob’s BERNINA

Sewing and Vacuum Center

2449 B Iowa St. 785-842-1595

M-F 9-6, Th 9-8, Sat 9-4 CLASSES FORMING NOW Servicing Most Model Sewing Machines, Sergers & Vacs www.lawrencemarketplace. com/bobsbernina

Tree/Stump Removal Arborscapes Tree Service Tree trimming & removal Ks Arborists Assoc. Certified Licensed & Insured. 785-760-3684 www.KansasTreeCare.com

BUDGET TREE SERVICE, LLC. 913-593-7386

Repairs and Services

Trimmed, Shaped, Removed Shrubs, Fenceline Cleaned

No Job Too Small Free Estimates

Licensed - Insured hm 913-268-3120

Green Grass Lawn Care

Home Improvements

STEVENS & BRAND, L.L.P. 900 Massachusetts, Suite 500 P. O. Box 189 Lawrence, KS 66044 (785) 843 0811 Attorneys for Plaintiff

Specializing in: Residential & Commercial Tearoffs Asphalt & Fiberglass Shingling Cedar Shake Shingles

24 emergency service Missouri (816) 421-0303 Kansas (913) 328-4437 Haul Free: Salvageable items. Charge; other movLandscape Cleanup ing, hauling, landscaping, Spring cleanup and mulch Weekly weeding available home repair, clean inside & out. 785-841-6254. CheapScapes http://www.a2zenterprises. 785-979-4727 info/ Lawn Mowing Weedeating included STARVING ARTISTS MOVING All monies go toward 15yr. locally owned and college tuition operated company. Call Connor 785-979-4727 Taking Care of Professionally trained Lawrence’s Plumbing staff. We move everythNeeds for over 35 Years ing from fossils to office Low Maintenance (785) 841-2112 and household goods. Landscape, Inc. lawrencemarketplace.com Call for a free estimate. 1210 Lakeview Court, /kastl 785-749-5073 Innovative Planting Design http://lawrencemarketplace. Construction & Installation com/starvingartist www.lawrencemarketplace. com/lml

midwestcustompools.com

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Garrison Roofing

Signal Ridge Mowing Quality Lawn Mowing $25 per lawn. 785-248-9572 signalridgemow@yahoo.com

Moving-Hauling

Plan Now For Next Year • Custom Pools, Spas & Water Features • Design & Installation • Pool Maintenance (785) 843-9119

SHERIFF OF DOUGLAS COUNTY

Complete Roofing

Landscaping

785-550-5610

On this 3rd day of March, 2011.

Tearoffs, Reroofs, Redecks * Storm Damage * Leaks * Roof Inspections

PineLandscapeCenter.com Find us on Facebook Pine Landscape Center 785-843-6949

mow, mulch, rake, tree/shrub trimming Marty Goodwin 785-979-1379

together with all fixtures, appurtenances, etc. thereunto pertaining; said interest in real property is levied upon as the property of defendants, and all other alleged owners and will be sold without appraisal to satisfy said Order of Sale.

Pet Services

785-764-2220

SPRING YARD CLEANUP

6 acres off the East Side of the South 24 acres of the West 64 acres of the Southeast Quarter of Section 19, Township 12 South, Range 20 East of the 6th P.M., in Douglas County Kansas (commonly known as 1466 N. 1700 Rd., Lawrence, Kansas 66044)

Allcore Roofing & Restoration

ROCK-SOD-SOIL-MULCH

1783 E 1500 Rd, Lawrence

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of an Order of Sale issued by the District Court of Douglas County, Kansas in the case above numbered, I will offer for sale at public auction and sell to the highest bidder for cash in hand at the Jury Assembly Room of the Douglas County Courthouse in the City of Lawrence in said County and State on the 31st day of March 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on said day, the following described interest in real estate situated in Douglas County, Kansas, to-wit:

Roofs, Guttering, Windows, Siding, & Interior Restoration

Guttering Services

CONCRETE INC Your local foundation repair specialist! Waterproofing, Basement, & Crack Repair

Mudjacking, waterproofing. We specialize in Basement Repair & pressure Grouting, Level & Straighten Walls, & Bracing on Walls. B.B.B. FREE ESTIMATES Since 1962 WAGNER’S 785-749-1696

MONDAY, MAR", 21, 2011 /" Public Notices

(Published in the Lawrence Daily Journal-World March attorney-in-fact, praying 21, 2011) for foreclosure of certain NOTICE TO BIDDERS real property legally described as follows: Separate sealed bids will LOT NINETEEN (19) IN be received by the City of BLOCK ONE (1) IN HOLIDAY Lawrence, Kansas, in the HILLS, AN ADDITION TO THE office of the City Clerk, 6 CITY OF LAWRENCE IN East 6th Street, until 2:00 DOUGLAS COUNTY, KAN- pm, Tuesday, April 5, 2011, SAS. Parcel #: following purchase: 067-35-0-20-10-020.00 ROOF REPLACEMENT for a judgment against deTRAFFIC BUILDING fendants and any other interested parties and you Mandatory pre-bid meetare hereby required to ing: March 29, 2011. plead to the Petition for Copies of the Notice to BidForeclosure by April 18, ders and specifications 2011 in the District Court of may be obtained from BG Douglas County, Kansas. If Consultants, Inc., 1405 you fail to plead, judgment Wakarusa Drive, Lawrence, and decree will be entered KS 66049. in due course upon the request of plaintiff. The City Commission reserves the right to reject MILLSAP & SINGER, LLC any or all bids and to waive By: informalities. Lindsey L. Craft, #23315 lcraft@msfirm.com City of Lawrence, Kansas Kristin Fisk Worster, #21922 Jonathan Douglass kworster@msfirm.com City Clerk Chad R. Doornink, #23536 ________ cdoornink@msfirm.com Aaron M. Schuckman, (First published in the Law#22251 rence Daily Journal-World aschuckman@msfirm.com March 7, 2011) 11460 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 300 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF Leawood, KS 66211 DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS (913) 339-9132 (913) 339-9045 (fax) FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN, a Kansas banking ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF corporation, Plaintiff, MILLSAP & SINGER, LLC AS vs. ATTORNEYS FOR The Bank JMC CONSTRUCTION, INC, of New York Mellon, as et al Trustee for CIT Mortgage Defendant. Loan Trust 2007-1, by Vericrest Financial, Inc. as Case No. 2011 CV 0012 attorney-in-fact IS ATDiv. No. 1 TEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMAProceeding Under K.S.A. TION OBTAINED WILL BE Chapter 60. USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ________ Title to Real Estate Involved

Home Improvements

Full Remodels & Odd Jobs, Interior/Exterior Painting, Installation & Repair of: Decks, Drywall, Siding, Gutters, Privacy Fencing, Doors, & Trim.

Public Notices

cial, Inc. as

913-488-7320

785-841-9222

Quality work at a fair price!

Public Notices

Insured 20 yrs. experience

Recycle Your Furniture

Office* Clerical* Accounting Light Industrial* Technical Finance* Legal

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Mortgage Foreclosure has been filed in the District Court of Douglas County, Kansas by The Bank of New York Mellon, as Trustee for CIT Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-1, by Vericrest Finan-

Steve’s Place

Banquet Hall available for wedding receptions, birthday parties, corporate meetings & seminars. For more info. visit http://lawrencemarket place.com/stevesplace

Foundation Repair

785-887-6936 http://oakleycreek.com For All Your Battery Needs

Events/ Entertainment

Foundation Repair

Oakley Creek Catering

Family Owned & Operated

You are notified that a Petition has been filed in the District Court of Douglas County, Kansas, praying to foreclose a real estate Millsap & Singer, LLC mortgage on the following 11460 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 300 described real estate: Leawood, KS 66211 Lot Thirty-Five (35) in Block (913) 339-9132 Two (2) in Wakarusa View (913) 339-9045 (fax) Estates No. 2, a Subdivision in the City of Lawrence, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF Douglas County, KANSAS Douglas County, Kansas, as

Decks & Fences

Catering

- Full Service Caterer Specializing in smoked meats & barbeque - Corporate Events, Private Parties, WeddingsOn-Site Cooking Available

NOTICE OF SUIT THE STATE OF KANSAS, to the above-named defendants and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any deceased defendants; the unknown spouses of any defendants; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of any defendants that are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of any defendants that are or were partners or in partnership; the unknown guardians, conservators and trustees of any defendants that are minors or are under any legal disability; and the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors and assigns of any person alleged to be deceased, and all other persons who are or may be concerned.

Flooring Installation

Stacked Deck

Limited time offer...

Pursuant to K.S.A. Chapter 60

Financial

www.billyconstruction.com

C & G Auto Sales

Rentals Available! Quality Pre-owned Cars & Trucks Buy Sell Trade Financing Available 308 E. 23rd St. Lawrence

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS CIVIL DEPARTMENT

1-888-326-2799 Toll Free

Westside 66 & Car Wash

Homes, Farms, Commercial Real Estate, Fine Furnishings, Business Inventories, Guns

(First published in the Lawrence Daily Journal-World March 9, 2011)

Quality work at a fair price!

Fastest Way To Liquidate Your Assets

Call Dan Hiatt 913-963-1729

Diane Stoddard Assistant to the City Manager _______

CONCRETE INC. Your local concrete repair specialists Sidewalks, Patios, Driveways

AUCTION Auto • Farm • Estate Construction • Business Also consider Buyouts

Take notice that on the 5th day of April, 2011, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, the Governing Body of the City of Lawrence, Kansas, will convene in the Commission Meeting Room, 1st Floor, City Hall, 6 East 6th Street, Lawrence, Kansas, at 6:35 pm for the purpose of conducting a hearing on the request to create a Neighborhood Revitalization Area on the property located at 1040 Vermont in the City of Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas.

Case No. 11CV33 Court Number: 1

Public Notices

Shamrock Tree Service

Professional Painters Home, Interior, Exterior Painting, Lead Paint Removal Serving Northeast Kansas 785-691-6050

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Water, Fire & Smoke Damage Restoration • Odor Removal • Carpet Cleaning • Air Duct Cleaning •

One Company Is All You Need and One Phone Call Is All You Need To Make (785) 842-0351

We Specialize in Fine Pruning If you value your tree for its natural shape and would like to retain its health and beauty in the long term, call on us!

785-393-2260


4C MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2011 Public Notices Public Notices (First published in the Law- Meridian, in Douglas rence Daily Journal-World County, Kansas, which March 7, 2011) point is 40 feet West of the Southeast corner of said IN THE SEVENTH Southwest Quarter as a JUDICIAL DISTRICT point of beginning; thence DISTRICT COURT, DOUGLAS North 1320 feet parallel COUNTY, KANSAS with the East line of said PROBATE DEPARTMENT Southwest Quarter, thence West 250 feet parallel with In the Matter of the the South line of said Estate of: Southeast Quarter, thence DONALD R. CARBAUGH, South in a straight line to a Deceased. point on the South line of said quarter section, which Case No. 2011PR34 point is 490 feet West of the Southeast corner of said NOTICE OF HEARING Southwest Quarter, thence East on the South line of The State of Kansas to All said Southwest Quarter to Persons Concerned: the point of beginning, containing in all 10.6 acres, You are hereby notified more or less; also less a that a petition has been tract BEGINNING on the filed in this Court by Donna West line of the Southwest J. Baker, one of the heirs of Quarter of Section 26, at a Donald R. Carbaugh, de- point 536 feet North of the ceased, praying that de- Southwest corner thereof; scent be determined of the thence East 691.5 feet, personal property and the thence North 315 feet, following described real es- thence West 691.5 feet to tate owned by the dece- the West line of said Southdent at the time of his west Quarter; thence South death, and that it be as- along said West line 315 signed to the persons enti- feet to the point of beginning; in Township 13 South, tled thereto. Range 19 East of the 6th Meridian; and The following described Principal real estate in Douglas also less the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest County, Kansas, to-wit: Quarter of Section 26, The Southwest Quarter of Township 13, Range 19; and Section 26, Township 13 also less the East one-half South, Range 19 East of the of the Southwest Quarter of Sixth Principal Meridian, Section 26, Township 13 less a tract beginning at South, Range 19 East of the the Southwest corner of 6th Principal Meridian, less BEGINNING at a said section; thence East a tract: on the South line of said point on the South line of section 850 feet; thence the Southwest Quarter of North parallel with the Section 26, Township 13 West line of said section South, Range 19 East of the 536 feet; thence West paral- 6th Principal Meridian, in lel to the South line of said Douglas County, Kansas, section 850 feet to the West which point is 40 feet West line of said section; thence of the Southeast corner of South on the section line said Southwest Quarter as point of beginning; 536 feet to the point of be- a ginning; also less a tract thence North 1320 feet parBEGINNING at a point on the allel with the East line of South line of the Southwest said Southwest Quarter, Quarter of Section 26, thence West 250 feet paralTownship 13 South, Range lel with the South line of Southeast Quarter, 19 East of the 6th Principal said

Public Notices

Public Notices

thence South in a straight line to a point on the South line of said quarter section, which point is 490 feet West of the Southeast corner of said Southwest Quarter, thence East on the South line of said Southwest Quarter to the point of beginning, containing in all 10.6 acres, more or less.

the point of beginning 661.43 feet, more or less, containing in all approximate 2 acres, more or less.

The following described real estate in Leavenworth County, Kansas, to-wit:

in hand, Lower Level of the Judicial and Law Enforcement Center, Douglas County, Kansas, on April 7, 2011, at 10:00 AM, the folYou are required to file lowing real estate: your written defenses thereto on or before the Unit Three-F (3F) as shown 31st day of March, 2011, at by Plat of Survey of Wood10:15 o’clock A.M. of said creek Townhouses, filed in day, in said Court, in the Condominium Book 1, Page City of Lawrence, Douglas 60, in the office of the OfCounty, Kansas, at which fice of the Register of time and place said cause Deeds of Douglas County, will be heard. Should you Kansas, in City of LawDouglas County, fail therein, judgment and rence, decree will be entered in Kansas , commonly known due course upon said peti- as 255 North Michigan, #3-11, Lawrence, KS 66044 tion. (the Property) Donna J. Baker, Petitioner to satisfy the judgment in the above-entitled case. The sale is to be made THOMAS P. MITCHELSON without appraisement and MITCHELSON & subject to the redemption MITCHELSON period as provided by law, 6005 Johnson Drive and further subject to the Mission, Kansas 66202 approval of the Court. For (913) 432-2300 more information, visit Supreme Court No. 12017 ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER www.Southlaw.com. ________ Kenneth McGovern, Sheriff (First published in the LawDouglas County, Kansas rence Daily Journal-World March 14, 2011) Prepared By:

Beginning at a point on the East line of the East one-half of the Southeast Quarter, Section 15, Township 11 South, Range 20 East of the Sixth Principal Meridian 660 feet North of the Southeast corner of said Quarter Section; thence West parallel with the South line of said Quarter section 660 feet; thence North parallel with the East line of said Quarter Section 660 feet; thence East parallel with the South line of said Quarter Section 660 feet; thence South along the East side of said Quarter Section 660 feet to the point of beginning, subject however, to an easement 20 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF feet in width across the DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS CIVIL DEPARTMENT Northeast corner of said tract and subject further to U.S. Bank, N.A. the reservation of the life Plaintiff, estate by grantor, Minnie L. vs. Carbaugh, for and during Lee A. French, et al. her natural life. Defendants. Beginning at a point which is 1321.73 feet North and 665.45 feet West of the Southeast corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 15, Township 11 South, Range 20 East of the 6th Principal Meridian, Leavenworth County, Kansas, thence West parallel with the South line of said Quarter Section 131.71 feet, thence South parallel with the East line of said Quarter Section 661.43 feet, thence East parallel with the South line of said Quarter Section 131.71 feet, thence North to

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

2011, then publicly opened in the Courthouse, 1100 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence, Kansas.

($10.00) non-refundable deposit is required per proposal, which includes a copy of the contract documents and specifications. The contract documents and specifications become the property of the prospective bidder and are not returnable. Copies of the contract documents and specifications are on file and open for public inspection at the Office of the County Engineer.

(First published in the Law- (First published in the Lawrence Daily Journal-World rence Daily Journal-World March 21, 2011) March 14, 2011)

Douglas County Project 2011-6 consists of 141,616 square yards of 2” milling, placing approximately 16,844 tons of HMA-Commercial Grade (Class A) (Surface), 2,730 tons of HMA-Commercial Grade (Class A) (Patch), 2,753 tons of Aggregate Shouldering (AS-1), setting 20 monument boxes and Traffic Control. This project is located on Douglas County Route 1061 from N200 Road (56 Highway) to N1200 Road south of Eudora, Kansas. Route 1061 shall be opened to unrestricted traffic each evening, No detour of traffic will be permitted. Flaggers and/or pilot vehicles shall be used to carry one lane traffic through construction.

All bids must be submitted on forms obtainable at the Office of the Director of Public Works/County EngiSouth & Associates, P.C. neer, 1242 Massachusetts Kristen G. Stroehmann Street, Lawrence, Kansas or (KS # 10551) Demand Star at 6363 College Blvd., Suite 100 www.demandstar.com, and Overland Park, KS 66211 are open for public inspec(913)663-7600 tion. Proposals shall be (913)663-7899 (Fax) submitted in sealed enveAttorneys For Plaintiff lopes, addressed to the Of(121740) fice of the County Clerk, _______ Courthouse, 1100 Massachusetts, Lawrence, Kansas Case No. 10CV804 (First published in the Law- 66044, upon which is clearly Court Number: 5 rence Daily Journal-World written or printed March 21, 2011) “Proposal for Douglas Pursuant to K.S.A. County Project No. 2011-6”, Chapter 60 DOUGLAS COUNTY, and the name and address KANSAS of the bidder. Any bids reNOTICE OF SALE PROJECT NO. 2011-6 ceived after the closing BID #11-F-0010 time will be returned unoUnder and by virtue of an NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS pened. Order of Sale issued to me by the Clerk of the District Notice is hereby given that Copies of the Contract DocCourt of Douglas County, sealed proposals for the uments and Specifications Kansas, the undersigned performance of the con- are available from the OfSheriff of Douglas County, tract above noted will be fice of the Director of PubKansas, will offer for sale at received in the Office of the lic Works and County Engipublic auction and sell to Douglas County Clerk until neer of Douglas County, the highest bidder for cash 3:00 P.M., Monday, April 11, Kansas. A Ten Dollar

All bids must be accompanied by a CERTIFIED CHECK, CASHIER’S CHECK or a BID BOND for not less than Five Percent (5%) of the base bid as a guarantee that if awarded the Contract, the bidder will enter into a Contract and give bond as required. Said check or bond shall be made payable to the Board of County Commissioners, Douglas County, Kansas.

Public Notices

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS

In the Matter of the Estate of DEAN ROBERT SYVERSON, deceased.

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF Shane Lee Nelson to change his name to: Shane Lee Garvin

Case No. 2011-PR-50 Division No. 1 Pursuant to K.S.A. Chapter 59 NOTICE TO CREDITORS THE STATE OF KANSAS TO ALL PERSONS CONCERNED:

You are hereby notified that on March 15, 2011, a Petition for Issuance of Letters of Administration under the Kansas Simplified Estates Act was filed in this Court by LESLIE ARTHUR SYVERSON, an heir of the Contracts will be awarded estate of DEAN ROBERT only to such bidders as are SYVERSON, deceased. on the list of Pre-Qualified Contractors for the Kansas All creditors are notified to Department of Transporta- exhibit their demands tion on the date estab- against the Estate within lished for receiving and four months from the date opening of bids. of the first publication of this notice, as provided by The Board of County Com- law, and if their demands missioners of Douglas are not thus exhibited, they County, Kansas reserve the shall be forever barred. right to reject any or all bids and to waive techniLESLIE ARTHUR SYVERSON, calities, and to award the Petitioner contract to the bidder that the Commission deems PREPARED AND best suited to accomplish APPROVED BY: the work. STEVENS & BRAND, L.L.P. 900 Massachusetts, Ste. 500 PO Box 189 DOUGLAS COUNTY Lawrence KS 66044-0189 PUBLIC WORKS (785) 843-0811 Keith A. Browning, P.E. Attorneys for Petitioners Director of Public Works _______ Date: 3/16/11 _______

Case No. 2011 CV 146 Division 1 PURSUANT TO K.S.A. CHAPTER 60 NOTICE OF HEARING-PUBLICATION THE STATE OF KANSAS TO ALL WHO ARE OR MAY BE CONCERNED: You are hereby notified that Shane Lee Nelson filed a Petition in the above court on the 10th day of March, 2011, requesting a judgment and order changing his name from Shane Lee Nelson to Shane Lee Garvin. The Petition will be heard in Douglas County District Court, 111 E. 11th St., Ste. 100, Lawrence, Kansas, on the 2nd day of May, 2011, at 1:30 p.m. If you have any objection to the requested name change, you are required to file your responsive pleading on or before April 25, 2011, in this court or appear at the hearing and object to the requested name change. If you fail to act, judgment and order will be entered upon the Petition as requested by Petitioner. /s/ Shane Lee Nelson Petitioner, Pro Se _______

KansasBUYandSELL.com

This March, we shall be a kingdom and this man shall be our king.

Published April 5, 2008, KUsports.com Photo by Thad Allender Kansas fan Jeremy DeNoyelles, from Wichita, celebrates from the stands after the Jayhawks beat North Carolina on Saturday, April 5, 2008 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Tx.

2011 TOURNAMENT COVERAGE J O I N FA N S A C R O S S T H E C O U N T RY F O R T H E B E S T O N L I N E P L AY- B Y- P L AY F R O M T H E L E A D E R I N K U S P O R T S C O V E R A G E

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Refusal to meet boyfriend’s mother shows immaturity

Dear Sad: Annette is too immature to get married. Life is complicated, and if she lacks the courage to face these situations, it will only get more difficult. And meeting Mom is harder now because she has put it off for two years. Unless Mom has done some-

pack, carton or month, but to quit right now. If I don’t smoke that first cigarette, I won’t be able to smoke the second. This February marked the 23rd anniversary of my quitting. That partial pack of cigarettes is still in my kitchen. Unfortunately, I didn’t quit soon enough. I developed emphysema and C.O.P.D. (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). It’s no fun being hooked up to oxygen. I anniesmailbox@creators.com also have poor circulation in thing unforgivable, Annette is my lower legs, but surgeons being both childish and stub- won’t operate due to my damborn. We know mothers can be intimidating for the faint of heart, but Annette should be willing to meet your entire family, not only because it is what committed couples do, but because she respects you.

Annie’s Mailbox

Marcy Sugar and Kathy Mitchell

Is celebrity a blessing or a curse? In the case of Kirstie Alley, star of “Cheers” and now a contestant on “Dancing with the Stars” (7 p.m., ABC), it’s begun to look a lot like the latter. She’s starred in one of the most successful sitcoms ever as well as “Star Trek II” and those hugely popular “Look Who’s Talking” movies. Heck, she even had a decent run on “Veronica’s Closet.” Most mere mortals would consider that a lifetime of attention. But for some, too much is never enough. In 2005 Alley lampooned her largerthan-life image in “Fat Actress.” Not remotely funny. Five years later, she tried to do the same in a reality format with “Kirstie Alley’s Big Life.” She spent most of her time complaining about her treatment in the tabloids. Big bore was more like it. Which brings us to her role on “Dancing with the Stars,” one of the most tabloid-attentive shows of all. It’s also the most formulaically cast. Alley will be playing the presumably out-ofshape middleaged character, pioneered by John O’Hurley on the show’s first season. Anything she does short of dying on live television will be considered a victory for people of her age and size. Per usual, “Dancing” will feature some professional athletes, including boxer Sugar Ray Leonard, NFL star Hines Ward and professional wrestler Chris Jericho. It also has two talk show personalities, Mike Catherwood from radio and TV’s Wendy Williams. Most seasons bring a fresh young face from ABC’s cable cousin the Disney Channel, and this time Chelsea Kane (“Fish Hooks”) fills that bill. This year’s model Petra Nemcova hopes she doesn’t follow season four’s Paulina Porizkova’s example and become the first to be evicted. Every season brings a dollop of softcore sleaze, and this time it comes in the shape of Kendra Wilkinson, star of the depressing and banal Hugh Hefner series “The Girls Next Door.” The world of rap music brings us Romeo. And Kirstie Alley is not the only 1980s fixture featured here; she’ll be joined by Ralph Macchio, star of the “Karate Kid” movies. Good luck to one and all. ● “Triangle: Remembering the Fire” (8 p.m., HBO) documents the 1911 conflagration that claimed the lives of 146 garment workers, mostly young women. It also recalls a time when unions were considered criminal organizations, government regulations dismissed as “socialism” or worse, and when immigrants were denounced as a menace. We’ve come so far since then.

Tonight’s other highlights ● A homeless patient resists prognosis on “House” (7 p.m., Fox). ● Thomas confides in Sophia on “The Event” (8 p.m., NBC). ● FBI interference causes static on “The Chicago Code” (8 p.m., Fox). ● A would-be superhero expires on “Hawaii Five-O” (9 p.m., CBS). ● A friend in need on “Harry’s Law” (9 p.m., NBC). ● A case comes to resemble a soap opera on “Castle” (9 p.m., ABC). Cult choice The lives of Turkish immigrants in Germany intersect in unexpected ways in the 2007 film “The Edge of Heaven” (7 p.m. Sundance).

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 21, 2011

might be worthwhile. Tonight: Working late. Cancer (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Take a hint from Gemini. You might even decide to work from home or call in sick. Truth be told, you might gather more information that way. Tonight: Brainstorming session. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Get a head start on your day. Get into work; return calls; schedule a meeting for the morning, if you can. Tonight: Mull over something you heard. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ An insightful question helps you deal with a new situation at work. Someone you meet today or in the near future could easily sweep you off your feet. Tonight: Catch up on a friend's news. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You feel great in the morning, as if you can deal with nearly anything. That feeling will be challenged early in the day. Tonight: Deal with what is on your mind. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ The tendency this morning is to want to close your door or do some solid thinking alone, despite others. By the afternoon, you'll feel much better. Tonight: The only

ACROSS 1 “I’m such a klutz!” 5 “Purple” writing 10 Canaanite deity 14 “That was close!” 15 Glove material 16 Otherwise 17 “The Auld Sod” 18 Lit 19 A bit more than a trot 20 Is indifferent 23 Spot to graze 24 Bit of gym attire 25 Mauna ___ jacquelinebigar.com 28 Win out 32 Binary base answer is "yes." 35 Brilliance of perforSagittarius (Nov. 22mance Dec. 21) ★★★★★ Investilist gate new possibilities with 37 Chore heading the knowledge that you 38 Object on might be alone in instrustage menting them. Have meet- 39 Overwhelmed gift recipient’s ings in the morning and comment reach out for others. 42 National Tonight: Do some muchMall trees needed thinking. 43 Unit of Cambodian Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. currency 19) ★★★★ Demands and 44 Layabout responsibilities take up a 45 Bad-mouth, lot of your time. You wonin slang der when you can start 46 Go against wishing for more of what the grain you want. Tonight: Where 48 Santa ___ winds people are. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 49 “Jack and the 18) ★★★★★ Use your Beanstalk”

time wisely. Do research quickly and effectively. Making strong decisions is always easier if you have as much information as possible. Tonight: Take a stand. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★★ Deal with a partner directly as only you can. It is obvious that you understand each other. You also might need to talk about what ails you and what is going on. Tonight: Explore; do something new.

— The astrological forecast should be read for entertainment only.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Al Freeman Jr. is 80. Violinist-conductor Joseph Silverstein is 79. Actress Marie-Christine Barrault is 67. Singer-musician Rose Stone (Sly and the Family Stone) is 66. Actor Timothy Dalton is 65. Singer Eddiie Money is

CONTRACT BRIDGE By Allen Loggia

3/21

— Please e-mail your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to Annie’s Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190 Chicago, IL 60611.

JACQUELINE BIGAR’S STARS For Monday, March 21: This year, you'll have opportunities to interact with others differently. Note a steady stream of people coming toward you with various needs. If you are single, many people would like to be yours. Which one will you choose? If you are attached, the two of you will enjoy a stronger connection. Scorpio reads you cold. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You'll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult Aries (March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Just as you get used to the fact that your audience is many people, later in the day, you find that you are playing for one person. Tonight: Talk over dinner. Taurus (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Plug into work with an eye to accomplishment. Your imagination takes you on a new adventure, especially involving work and a friendship. Tonight: Seek out friends. Gemini (May 21-June 20) ★★★★ Your creativity flourishes as you lazily get work started. You might be slightly indulgent, yet it

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© 2011,Universal MONDAY MARCHUclick 21, 2011 5C www.upuzzles.com

aged lungs. Two of my friends tried my method of not smoking that “next one” and managed to quit. There are better ways to spend your money than on hospitals and medicine, plus you’ll live longer and be healthier. — Proud Quitter

Dear Annie: This is for “Grumpy Quitter,” who promised to stop smoking. I was a heavy smoker for 40 years. When I started as a teenager, cigarettes were 11 cents a pack. They now cost more than $5. In 1984, I got hit in the mouth with a pole and ended up losing all my teeth. One evening, due to my cigarette cough, my upper false teeth popped loose. That’s when I decided to quit. Much to my surprise, I did. My secret was not to quit at the end of the

Kirstie Alley dances downhill

3/20

additive 12 Kraits’

62. Rock singer-musician Roger Hodgson (Supertramp) is 61. Rock musician Conrad Lozano (Los Lobos) is 60. Comedy writer-performer Brad Hall is 53. Actor Gary Oldman is 53. Actor Matthew Broderick is 49. Comedian-talk

exclamation word 50 “What a pleasant surprise!” 52 Beach Boys’ tune 61 Suggest strongly 62 Language of Sri Lanka 63 Fit of temper 64 Black Friday event 65 Bobber’s quest 66 Sicily’s famous volcano 67 Cut like a letter opener 68 High-tech beam 69 Water testers DOWN 1 Oil gp. 2 Akron’s home 3 South American nation 4 Peachy 5 Twodimensional 6 Flotation device 7 Suffix with “narc” 8 Day’s “will be” 9 Elbow grease 10 The beauty of “Beauty and the Beast” 11 Skin-lotion additive 12 Kraits’

cousins 13 Cask dregs 21 Sub measurement 22 It’s inside creels? 25 Vandalized, as a car 26 Potential cause of a food recall 27 Reunion attendees 29 Decorative toiletry cases 30 Short-tailed rodents 31 Discombobulate 32 Refrain syllables 33 Spun 34 Lincoln Center production 36 Burro’s cousin 38 Advanced deg. 40 Type of rug

41 Church donation 46 Carried out 47 “Whether ‘tis ___ ...” (“Hamlet”) 49 Group of naval vessels 51 Beginning 52 Wimpy type 53 Kind of exam 54 Tangelo relative 55 Barcelona bar bite 56 Dennis the Menace types 57 Shower floor piece, often 58 Excited about 59 Theater in Spain 60 Passengers’ concerns, briefly

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

3/20

© 2011 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ALFTU ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

PDORO CMOINE ORSDYW

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

Dear Annie: I have been dating “Annette” for two years, and we are inseparable. I love and appreciate her. We both still live with our families and spend the majority of our time at her house. Annette often talks about moving in together and getting married, but after two years, she still refuses to meet my mother. She has met my father and a brother, but when it comes to my mother, her anxiety gets the better of her. Because of this, she never comes to my house. Annette says she won’t meet my mother until I propose. I have told her that I don’t feel comfortable taking things to the next level until she meets my mother. I am afraid this is going to end our relationship. Obviously, we will not be living with our parents when we get married. But my family is still important, and I feel if she wants to be a part of it, she ought to spend time with them. How should I approach this? — Sad and Confused.

and the Beanstalk”

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:

nnell show host Rosie O’Don is 49. Rock MC Maxim (Prodigy) is 44. Rock musician Andrew Copeland (Sister Hazel) is 43. Hiphop DJ Premier (Gang Starr) is 42. Rapper-TV personality Kevin Federline is 33.

Saturday’s

(Answers tomorrow) TRUTH RADIAL TYCOON Jumbles: PIECE Answer: What the math teacher did when he wrecked his car — HE TOTALED IT

!"#$"% O( !%)*+"


6C

COMICS

| Monday, March 21, 2011

NON SEQUITUR

HI AND LOIS

BEETLE BAILEY

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

SHERMAN’S LAGOON

WILEY

PLUGGERS

GARY BROOKINS

GREG BROWNE/CHANCE WALKER

MORT, GREG & BRIAN WALKER

JIM DAVIS

STEPHAN PASTIS

FAMILY CIRCUS

PICKLES

BORN LOSER

PEANUTS

SHOE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DOONESBURY

BIL KEANE

OFF THE MARK

MARK PARISI

BRIAN CRANE

CHIP SANSOM/ART SANSOM

CHARLES M. SCHULZ

JEFF MACNELLY

J.P. TOOMEY ZITS

BLONDIE

L AWRENCE J OURNAL -WORLD

DEAN YOUNG/JOHN MARSHALL

CHRIS BROWNE

GARRY TRUDEAU

MUTTS

BABY BLUES

GET FUZZY

JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN

PATRICK MCDONNELL

JERRY SCOTT/RICK KIRKMAN

DARBY CONLEY


75 CENTS

MARCH 21-27, 2011

INSIDE

4

IT MUST BE MAGIC Lawrence, K.C. performers plan benefit for Lawrence Arts Center.

LJWORLD.COM

6

VACATION READS Lawrence librarians make their spring break book recommendations.

STEPS IN THE FAMILY MORE

PEW research shows how remarriage has shaped relationships. Page 8 School values Double Take

Fix-It Chick

Megan Stuke considers competitive learning for toddlers. Page 10

Building raised beds is an efficient way to create a garden. Page 14

Daughter’s spring break plans trigger some fears. Page 11

Vol.160/No.80 16 pages

Energy smart: The Journal-World makes the most of renewable resources. www.b-e-f.org


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{ Contact Us }

DRESS FOR SUCCESS (FOR LESS) BY CHANSI LONG

609 N.H. (offices) 645 N.H. (News Center) Lawrence, KS 66044 (785) 843-1000 Suggestions? E-mail go@ljworld.com, or use the feedback form on our web site, www.ljworld.com/site/feedback. Dennis Anderson, managing editor, 832-7194, e-mail: danderson@ljworld.com Christy Little, Go! editor, 832-7254, e-mail: clittle@ljworld.com Trevan McGee, features editor, 8327178, e-mail: tmcgee@ljworld.com Sarah Henning, staff writer, 832-7187, e-mail: shenning@ljworld.com Chris Bell, circulation manager, 832-7137, e-mail: cbell@ljworld.com Tamara Hand, corporate advertising director, 832-7111, e-mail: thand@ljworld.com THE WORLD COMPANY Dolph C. Simons Jr., chairman Dolph C. Simons III, president, Newspapers Division Dan C. Simons, president, Electronics Division Suzanne Schlicht, chief operating officer Dan Cox, president, Mediaphormedia Ralph Gage, director, special projects

ON THE COVER: Christina Maki, Lawrence, has a close relationship with her stepfather, Shawn Roe, of Olathe. Kevin Anderson/Journal-World Photo

A

mber Jackson left home sharply dressed: a brown skirt, a shortsleeved suit jacket with a camisole underneath, a pair of brown heels and a gleaming pair of stud earrings. She didn’t wear a watch, or a bracelet, but she spritzed on a light coat of body spray — nothing too strong. When she was happy with her appearance, she climbed into her car and shuttled to St. Louis for two back-to-back job interviews. Jackson, a strategic communications major at Kansas University, interviewed at a couple of well-known advertising agencies: Fleishman-Hillard and BernsteinRein. She attended both interviews dressed to the nines. “The people who were interviewing me were probably a little more casual than I was,” says Jackson, “but that’s OK. I would prefer to be more dressed up than too casual.” Jackson reaped most her outfit at an affordable price. “My whole outfit comes from JC Penney,” Jackson says. “It was definitely affordable.” Dressing professionally on a budget can be a challenge, but according to Jeremy Cooper, executive director of Pinnacle Career Institute, it’s not only possible, it’s essential. “As a hiring manager, I can say that it is an (employers’) market,” Cooper says. “I’m interviewing MBAs for entry-level positions. And one of the things our students personally struggle with is how to look like

Richard Gwin/Journal-World Photo

FROM LEFT, Crysta Redwine, assistant director of admissions at Pinnacle Career Institute, talks with Shirley Mathes and her daughter Ashley Mathes 15, both of Lecompton, at a Dressing for Success seminar March 12 at PCI, 1601 W. 23rd St. a million bucks without having a lot of money to spend.” It’s here that Cooper points to his own outfit as exhibit A: His shirt is a Salvation Army special; his shoes were purchased off of eBay. It’s hard to tell that Cooper’s clothes came from consignment shops. His shirt is crisp, his pants well-ironed, and his leather shoes are slick and clean. The entire outfit looks fresh and new. The good news is it’s possible for all of us to dress as professionally and as cheaply as Cooper does without being obvious. Earlier this month, PCI gave a presentation on dressing professionally without tearing through a paycheck. The presentation stressed the importance of shopping at the right stores. Discount retail stores — T.J. Maxx, Wal-Mart, Target — can be good

places to buy inexpensive professional clothing. So can local retailers, especially during sales. Even thrift shops are good resources, says Crysta Redwine, assistant director of admissions at Pinnacle Career Institute. Redwine pointed to a display of suitable clothing choices that she and staff had arranged in a classroom: a white longsleeve shirt tucked under a grey corduroy jacket, a red blazer next to a batch of black skirts draped on hangers. The clothing examples were donations from the Salvation Army. All were professionally appropriate, and each had a price tag of less than $10. Clothing doesn’t have to be expensive, to look nice, says Redwine. Outfits should just look clean, crisp and presentable. And there are two cheap tools that come in handy when accomplishing this goal: an iron and a lint roller. “Don’t sell yourself short by not ironing or not using a lint brush,” Redwine says. Redwine also suggests that women wear light makeup like lip gloss and blush, but nothing too extreme. Just subtle colors that brighten natural features. But makeup isn’t a necessity, says Megan Hill, associate director of Career Networks at KU. “You don’t have to get fancy by any means,” Hill says. “You want to be you.” Purses should be small and conservative and match the shoes, which should be leather or fabric without exposing the toes. “Appearance is essential to success in a job interview,” Hill says. “I think there are plenty of places where you can find affordable, professional attire.”


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M O N DAY, M A R C H 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

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Pet Sitting Stress-free, in-home sitting

Dog Walking Great for while you’re away for the day

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CYNTHIA SHAW is a birder and member of the Jayhawk Audubon Society.

W

she says. In 1970, Shaw and a small group of local birders formed the Jayhawk Audubon Society; she served as the first board’s recording secretary. In 1980 she married her second husband, Ed, “who loves all things biological,” and he shares her passion for birding. They’ve both served on the JAS Board and continue to participate in as many activities as they can. They’ve been involved in the annual Eagles Day since its 1997 inception. “The work for Eagles Day is time-consuming but worthwhile,” Shaw says. “Preparations begin in August. It’s great to see so many folks, including young people, involved in it. The first bald eagle to return to Kansas came to Clinton Park, and it now has its own nest at Perry.” They also participate in the winter bird count. “Groups of us go out together around a 15-mile radius of Lawrence,” she says. “We identify and count all the different birds we see in one day. It’s truly amazing what people see.” Despite her now limited walking ability, Shaw continues active birding from her car and in her backyard. “Kansas has two of the best bird places in the world — Cheyenne Bottom, Great Bend, and Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, near my birthplace, Sterling,” she says. “People come from all over the world to Kansas for the birds. Ed and I get to observe and interact with some of these beautiful birds in our own yard every day.” — Eileen Roddy can be reached at eileenroddy@sunflower.com.

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NURTURED BY NATURE here birds are concerned, Cynthia Shaw was a child prodigy. At 2 she could identify and name nearly every bird in Kansas. By 3, her achievements were recorded by several newspapers, including one in Hot Springs, where the family vacationed. “My grandfather (W.J. Blackhall) was a passionate birder,” Shaw says. “He showed me the different birds in his book collection and taught me their names. Then he took me around the area so I could identify and name the birds when I saw them fly by.” Shaw didn’t consider her ability unusual. “It wasn’t a big deal to be because I’d always been able to do it and I loved birds,” she says. “But I didn’t tell the kids at school about it in case they’d think I was weird or laugh at me.” Born in 1935 and raised on her parents’ farm in Sterling, Shaw had many opportunities to spot her feathered friends. “I loved being outdoors,” she says. “I’d sit very still for hours and observe the birds.” Shaw graduated from Sterling High School in 1953, accepted a scholarship to Kansas University and did various jobs, including stints as a receptionist, to support herself through college and buy her first good pair of birding binoculars. She received her teaching degree from KU in 1962, then taught at Sunset Hill School before becoming a stay-at-home mom. Shaw returned to teaching at Broken Arrow, Wakarusa Valley and Centennial schools before spending 15 years at Cordley. She retired in 1993. She delighted in teaching her son and pupils about birds. “Sadly none of them became birders,”

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M O N DAY, M A R C H 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

MAGIC ACT

Lawrence, K.C. performers will stage benefit for Lawrence Arts Center

BY MARGIE CARR

MASTERS OF MAGIC

S

What: Performances by the International Brotherhood of Magicians Kansas City Ring

wallowing fire. Sawing bodies into pieces. Escaping from a straitjacket while hanging upside down ... these will be just a few of the amazing feats to be performed Saturday as the International Brotherhood of Magicians makes an appearance in Lawrence for a show to benefit the Lawrence Arts Center. “Every year we partner with a charity,” says club president and Kansas City’s 2010 Magician of the Year, Steve Steiner, who will perform during the show. “The past two years we have helped raise funds for the historic Farris Theater in Richmond, Missouri, but this year we wanted to do something in Kansas, so we called Gene.” That would be Lawrence resident Gene Kean, aka “Lawrence’s King of Magic” and known in an earlier life as “Claudini.” Kean, who will serve as Master of Ceremonies, says, “The shows benefit programs for children and youth. With money for arts programs facing budget cuts in the state, we thought this was good timing.” Kean sees a strong connection between magic and the arts and sciences. “Magic is an art form,” he says. “But my interest in it grew out of my love of science and history. At the beginning of the world,

When: 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday Where: Lawrence Arts Center, 940 N.H. Tickets: $8 for children 14 and under, $10 for adults, all in advance. Call 843-2787 or visit www.lawrenceartscenter.org. Seating is limited. Benefits: Lawrence Arts Center scholarship program for children and teens everything was magic. When lightning flashed, that was magic. ... So when I read about history and the earliest cavemen, I realized it was those who tried to understand and describe the magic who became the thinkers of the human race. The astrologers became the astronomers.” Kean has been performing since he was 12 years old. “Our sixth-grade teacher had a talent show, and instead of playing the piano, I decided to do a magic show,” he says. “I picked coins out of the air and made some FROM TOP LEFT, Gene Kean, Lawrence, performs his guillotine act on Woodlawn School principal Jeanne Fridell as fourth-grade students Cole Phillips, left, Shakarah Barfield and Lexie Lockwood watch below. AT NEAR LEFT, Kean performs with magic rings at Woodlawn School. Wednesday’s show was part of a series of performances Kean is giving ahead of the Masters of Magic benefit show Saturday at the Lawrence Arts Center. Kevin Anderson/Journal-World Photos


M O N DAY, M A R C H 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

crayons disappear. The kids loved it, and I started getting phone calls from clubs and other organizations.” That was the beginning of a passion that has lasted more than 60 years. Kean’s act included sleight of hand, levitations and escaping from a milk can, a trick made famous by Houdini. After graduating from high school, he traveled with the “TV AllStar Review,” performing at state fairs with other entertainers including Eddie Peabody, a highly regarded banjo player of the time. His father convinced him that a college education was in his best interest, and Kean graduated from KU with a degree in journalism. After working as an army engineer, a helicopter pilot and a college administrator at Baker University, he went to work for Allen Press and stayed for 23 years until his retirement several years ago. Entertaining children and families is important for Kean because, like many others who share his passion, his love of magic and performance began in his childhood. Such was the case for Lawrence resident, attorney and ventriloquist Bonita Yoder, who bought her first magic kit when she was a child. She later took up ventriloquism and became proficient enough to support herself through law school by performing at conventions and corporate

LAWRENCE MAGICIAN Gene Kean, center, performs magic with help from two teachers at Woodlawn School. Wednesday’s performance was one of a series at Lawrence schools this week, relating performing arts to various areas of curricula. It precedes a benefit show by the International Brotherhood of Magicians Kansas City Ring, of which Kean is a member, that will be Saturday at the Lawrence Arts Center, 940 N.H. events. She will share the stage with “Flip” the Penguin. Also taking the stage Saturday will be Steiner, who also discovered magic as a youngster.

“I slowly built an act and did shows at churches and birthday parties,” he says. “I did a few shows when I went to college, but gradually the tricks all went into a box.” Only after becoming mayor of Blue

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Springs, Mo., in 2004, did magic reappear in his life. “I was asked to say a few words to a group of students,” Steiner says, “and I got to thinking about those magic tricks and pulled out three or four.” After that experience, he realized he still had the performance bug. Putting together his act this time around was a little easier for Steiner, who used to rely on books and catalogs for material. “Youtube has changed everything,” says Steiner, who has used the online resource. But despite the availability of the Internet, Steiner recommends that anyone interested in pursuing magic find a mentor. “This is why clubs such as the International Brotherhood are so important,” he says. “We get together once a month and learn from each other.” Other members of the International Brotherhood performing Saturday include Rod Sipe, “America’s Premier Fire-eating Magician”; Duane Fields and his live birds, escape artist Matt Gurley, light magician Al Sawyer and Jordan Byrd, the youngest performer in the group, and who graduate from high school later this spring. “This will be a fun afternoon an evening of family entertainment,” Steiner says, “featuring some of the best magical entertainers performing on the same stage.”


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GREAT VACATION READS Check out library recommendations for some spring break entertainment J - W S TA F F R E P O R T S

A

good book can brighten any student’s spring break, whether there’s downtime while traveling or just a lot of goof-off time at home. Rebecca Power, young adult specialist for Lawrence Public Library; Kim Fletcher, youth services coordinator, and Megan Hoover Swicegood, teen services assistant, offers some book suggestions to fill vacation time or perhaps an upcoming rainy day. SEVENTH- THROUGH 12TH-GRADE READS “Grace,” by Elizabeth Scott Grace, 16, has spent her entire life training to be what her people call an Angel, a suicide bomber sent to deliver a message to their government. That government, led by extremist dictator Keran Berj, maintains a state of terror by severely limiting the freedoms of its people. At the moment she is supposed to set off her bomb, Grace decides she doesn’t want to die. But will she be able to escape her ideals and a country bent on destroying her? “A Spy in the House,” by Y. S. Lee Orphan Mary Quinn, facing a bleak future with few prospects in Victorian, England, jumps at the chance to join The Agency, a secret detective unit. In her first assignment, she goes undercover at a local merchant’s house to listen in on his business

affairs. Her investigation takes her into the gritty underbelly of London, but will her eagerness to solve the mystery jeopardize the case, her safety and bring down The Agency? If you like this one, there’s a second in the series: “The Body at the Tower.” “White Cat,” by Holly Black Cassel Sharpe is the youngest member of a crime family of curse workers and the only “nonworker” in the family. Believed mentally unstable, and with his brothers acting strangely, Cassel beings to doubt his own memories and the family that has always taken care of him. In order to save his own life, he must use his gifts as a con artist to unravel the truth behind the mysterious death of his childhood friend, a powerful crime lord’s daughter. Part dark fantasy, part mystery novel, “White Cat” is sure to leave you panting for the second book in The Curse Workers series, “Red Glove,” hitting bookshelves on April 5. Also available in audiobook. “Incarceron,” by Catherine Fisher The prison is alive. In order to save herself from an arranged marriage, Claudia, the

warden’s daughter, defies her father and her future mother-in-law, the Queen, by entering the futuristic prison to help a young boy escape. Full of mystery and intrigue, “Incarceron” is unlike anything else out there — a dark dystopian tale that will have you turning the pages as fast as you can. Also available in audiobook. “Spanking Shakespeare,” by Jake Wizner Shakespeare Shapiro uses his senior memoir to try to justify his unusual name and its obvious role in the total disaster of his childhood and adolescence. Along with his two best friends, the bathroom- and bowel-movement-obsessed Neil and the foul–mouthed Katie, Shakespeare tells his side of the story, and no topic is off-limits. Wildly funny, “Spanking Shakespeare” is the perfect spring break read and comes highly recommended by some of the guys who hang out at the Teen Zone. Also available in audiobook. THIRD- THROUGH SIXTH-GRADE READS “A Week in the Woods,” by Andrew Clements

When Mark moves to a new town, he is certainly not happy to be there. He had to leave his old school with a few weeks left in the school year, and he knows that he won’t be there forever. So when Mark’s class goes on their fifth-grade class trip, he is not expecting to really put his survival skills to the test. If you are a fan of Gary Paulsen, you might enjoy this book also. Also available in audiobook. “Chasing Vermeer” by Blue Balliett Calder and Petra are in the same sixth-grade class in their Chicago school. They become fast friends because of their deep appreciation for their teacher and their love of art. When strange, unrelated events start to happen and a precious Vermeer painting disappears, they work together to solve an international art scandal. Can they catch the thief? Also available in audiobook. “The Penderwicks : A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy,” by Jeanne Birdsall. In this 2005 National Book Award winner, four lovable sisters go on vacation with their widowed father in the Berkshire

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Mountains. They meet the boy next door and strike up an instant friendship, then include him in their many adventures, much to the dismay of his snobbish mother. This is the first book of a series of great books for the whole family to read together. Available in audiobook. “Ivy + Bean,” by Annie Barrow Seven-year-old Bean did not expect to make friends with her new, across-the-street neighbor, Ivy; she looked too “nice.” But when Bean plays a mean trick on her sister, she finds unexpected support for her antics from Ivy, who is less boring than Bean first suspected. This is the first in a series of many adventures that Ivy and Bean will take you on. “Gregor the Overlander,” by Suzanne Collins Who expects laundry to be such an adventure? When Gregor and his 2-year-old sister are pulled into a strange underground world by way of their laundry room grate, they trigger an epic battle involving men, bats, rats, cockroaches and spiders. They are sent on a quest foretold by ancient prophecy, but will they find what they are looking for? Find out in this book full of adventure. Available in audiobook.

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‘Bliss’ a spooky read When I first received my copy of “Bliss” by Lauren Myracle, I was a little nervous. All the reviews by the professional critics said that the book was scary (in a very nice and complimentary way), and I do not like scary books. “Bliss” takes place in 1969 in Atlanta. Bliss starts school at Crestview High School, which used to be a convent. On her first day, she hears a voice in her head whispering morbid things. She is scared at first but decides to ignore it. Soon, Bliss befriends a girl named Sandy, who invites Bliss to go along with her to a nursing home, where they meet a resident, Agnes. With Sandy’s assistance, Agnes tells the story of Liliana, a nearly invincible girl who lived at Crestview when it was a convent. Liliana was punished and forced to stay in a very small, dark room all day long. After a while, she killed herself there, but her spirit lives on. Agnes has been serving it, and soon Sandy will, too. “Bliss” is not an extremely scary book, except for a small part at the end (which does not end in a scary way). However, because of the content, I would recommend this book only to mature teenage readers. — Naomi Grant is an eighth-grader at Southwest Junior High School.

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CHRISTINA MAKI, Lawrence, clowns around with her stepfather, Shawn Roe, She has a stronger relationship with her stepfather than her biological father, she says.

STEPS I

Kevin Anderson/Journal-World Photo

PEW research shows how remarriage has shaped relationships BY CHANSI LONG

T

he person Christina Maki, 26, calls dad is not her biological father. Rather, it’s her stepfather, Shawn Roe, to whom she gives the title. It’s Shawn who she considers the patriarch of her family. He’s the one who receives Father’s Day card and the one she will ask to walk her down the aisle when and if she decides to marry. “I have a great relationship with Shawn,” Maki says. “In fact, it’s really kind of odd for me to even call him Shawn or refer to him as my stepdad. I typically only do so during explanations of my family dynamic. Otherwise, he’s Dad to me.” Step relatives, like Maki’s stepfather, are more common today than ever before. A survey by Pew Research Center reports that four in 10 American adults have at least one step relative. The pervasive presence of step relatives has reshaped the framework of the American family. For Maki it means having an enduring father figure even after her biological father had ceased contact. Maki and her biological father haven’t talked in years. Two years ago, about a week after Maki’s 24th birthday, she received an e-mail from her father wishing her a happy 25th birthday. “I think having to be corrected on the birth date and year of his only biological child cowed him into some

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IN THE sort of self-imposed ostracism,” Maki says. Maki was 6 years old when her mother remarried. At first she held her heart back, reluctant to lavish a different man with the same sort of love she was used to giving her biological father. “I think it just took awhile for me to figure out that it was OK for this other guy to have the same relationship with me that my biological dad should have had and that they didn’t need to be mutually exclusive,” Maki says. But Maki’s stepfather, Shawn, was introduced while Maki was young enough to accept a new relative into her family. Dennis Karpowitz, professor of marriage theory at KU, says that younger children tend to be more welcoming to step relatives. “It depends on the age of the child,” Karpowitz says. “Very young children tend to be quite accepting, not showing much resistance at all.” Ashley Trunnell, Lawrence, was about 5 when her mother remarried. Growing up, Trunnell lived with her mother and stepfather, visiting her dad on the weekends. Now 24, she has a healthy relationship with both her biological father and her stepfather. She calls them both dad. “There’s really not a term for calling your stepdad,” Trunnell says. “I would say I do have a better relationship with my biological father for personality reasons. But I give the same kind of attention to both of them: Father’s Day and birthdays. The kind of effort I put toward the

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on FAMILY the

Step relatives, like Maki’s stepfather, are more common today than ever before. A survey by Pew Research Center reports that four in 10 American adults have at least one step relative. relationship is very similar.” Trunnell calls her stepfather “dad,” unless she is talking about him, at which point she calls him by his name to avoid confusion. Not all children call stepparents “dad” or “mom.” And if it doesn’t happen naturally, Karpowitz says parents shouldn’t push, even though there’s not a friendly term for stepparents, the qualifier “step” being pejorative. “Think of all of the old stories about the wicked stepmother,” he says. Every family is different, but older children are more likely to reject step relatives, says Karpowitz, because teenagers are busy crafting their own identities and growing away from biological parents; they’re not primed to welcome new family members when they’re pulling away from existing ones. Lynne Moeller, 46, was a teenager when her mother remarried. “We already had four kids in our family, and then we added three more,” Moeller says. “It wasn’t good. My full siblings and I felt like we weren’t getting any attention, like we

were lost in shuffle. And my stepsiblings, I saw them more as enemies. It wasn’t like we welcomed them into our lives.” Moeller ended up moving out at 17 to get away from the commotion that comes with having seven children in one house. Some children recalibrate easily and welcome new step relatives with open arms and fixed grins. Others buck and wail to keep new stepparents from sticking around, something Moeller experienced later, when she married a man who has two children. “I was considered an intruder,” Moeller says. “There was a lot of resistance. We dated for 10 years before we got married because of his kids and how rotten I thought they were.” Eventually Moeller’s stepchildren grew up, made it through their teenage years, and now they have warmer relationships. Her stepdaughter Julie usually calls or gives a present on her birthday. And they talk by phone often enough. The PEW Research study also found that people tend to have a weaker sense of obligation for step relatives versus biological family members. But Maki is on the other end of the spectrum, feeling a strong sense of loyalty for her stepfather, Shawn. “If Shawn needed anything at all, I would do everything in my power to help,” says Maki. “If he was in the hospital, I’d be there to see him every day. ... I love him, and I know he would do the same for me.”

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Reassessing my values: school matters So

I was sitting at lunch with two of my girlfriends and their offspring the other day. We are all close in age, and we all have only one child. We all three possess graduate degrees, all waited until later in life to have children, and have all worked or do work in social services. We share similar politics, taste in music, jokes and movies. If there are two women in the world, then, from whom I’d take parenting advice, these girls are it. So, when they started talking about day cares and preschools and private vs. public schools, I perked up. I am sure they’ve done their research and have loads of important thoughts on the topic. I wanted to hear what they had to say. And, sure enough, most of what they said made sense to me, seemed smart and rational, didn’t make me want to go screaming into the woods. Still, there were a few things that I found myself kind of shrugging my shoulders over. And those things? They are odd. Because they are things that an educator like myself, you would think,

would be salivating over. Like, one of my friends was singing the praises of one school and explaining that her friend’s boy is only 6 but reads at a fifthgrade level, thanks at least in part to this school. And I thought about the little day care where my son (18 months, for crying out loud) goes and wondered if they were “educational� enough or if they were “pushing� him enough, and then I felt sad for having those thoughts. And I started to wonder what was wrong with me. Why don’t I worry about stuff like this? Why don’t I care if my 3-year-old can read? So what if he’s not reading above grade level by the time he’s 6? Don’t they sort of level off anyway, based on ability and parental involvement? And finally, after hearing all the praises for this school and that, I came to my own conclusions. A) Even with my years of teaching and subbing and degrees in education, I still don’t really know what

“I value intelligence, and I value social skills, and all of those things will come. And frankly, I don’t care what school he goes to, he’ll get all that stuff, because I know who is raising him.� method is best. B) I don’t care so much if my son reads way above grade level when he’s 6. What I do care about, what I want most for my son, is that he be a good person. I care if he is comfortable talking with and interacting with all kinds of people. I care if he shows grace under pressure, shows kindness to his enemies, and shares and plays nice with others. Of course I also want him to be academically successful. I want him to love to learn and enjoy books and seek understanding of his world. But do I care so much if he is the top of his class, the best of the best? No. Do I care if he can do his multiplication tables by the time he’s 7?

Not really. I value intelligence, and I value social skills, and all of those things will come. And frankly, I don’t care what school he goes to, he’ll get all that stuff, because I know who is raising him. And if the school he attends helps him to be a little more patient, a little more color-blind and a little more respectful of people who are less fortunate than us? I think they’re doing everything they need to do, at least for now. I don’t mind that his day care is a little shabby around the edges. I don’t mind that maybe they don’t do a strict “curriculum� all day. I know that his teachers love him, the kids in his class are all from different kinds of families with different colors of skin, and I know that he toddles to his chair every morning and reaches for a piece of paper and a crayon and can’t even be bothered to look over his shoulder and say good-bye to his mommy, for he is so content and happy to be there. — Read more of Megan Stuke’s parenting blog at Wellcommons.com.

BRIEFLY Bowl for Kids’ Sake The annual Bowl for Kids’ Sake is just three weeks away. It is the largest fundraiser for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Douglas County, which matches adult volunteers with children who tend to live in single-parent, low-income families.

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The organization’s annual budget is between $350,000 and $400,000. Last year, Bowl for Kids’ Sake raised $82,000. Cathy Brashler, executive director, hopes to top that.

visit douglas.kintera.org or call Brashler at 843-7359. Each team is encouraged to raise $750 to help serve one child for an entire year. All money raised by bowlers goes toward supporting children.

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Daughter’s spring break plans seem trustworthy

Q

: Recently my near-18-year-old daughter asked whether she could accompany her boyfriend, his dad and his sister to spring break 2011 at South Padre Island. This is work related for the dad, but is actually a week before our local spring break. I am inclined to say no because I've Googled the spring break site and see lots of drinking, but have not yet answered. If I do say yes, I would suggest a powwow where the parents set up terms with respect to curfew, sleeping, activity, drugs, alcohol, safe spots, etc. What do you think? Ben: A few months ago, I got into my first car accident. Drops of freezing rain were falling as I was driving down Clinton Parkway, and I was trying to stop behind another car at a red light. A strip of black ice thought I shouldn't. The man I hit was very forgiving, and the damage was hardly fatal, but I was shaken up, all the same. However, I've driven down that street many times since then without an incident. After all, Clinton Parkway didn't cause me to hit anybody; I did that myself. Many

Double

rules and establish some accountability, but there is no need to veto the trip unless your daughter's past actions testify against her.

TAKE

Wes: I’ve written on this topic most springs since Double Take began, and my usual advice is simply DON’T DO IT for anyone under 18. There are very few places on earth less teen-friendly than spring break destinations in March, at least from a parent’s perspective. However, the one method I’ve suggested in the past is for a parent or group of parents to accompany their 17-year-olds and offer the same level of supervision they would if the kids remained in Lawrence on say, prom night. By the way, more than one parent has written to say that this plan made all the difference in the world when the inevitable crisis hits. I do agree with Ben however, that the issue is more about your daughter, her boyfriend and his dad. While I’m not a big believer in trust in the teen years, I did some additional Q&A on this particular situation and learned that the daughter has a long and verifiable history of forethought and good judgment. She is not a

BEN MARKLEY AND WES CRENSHAW drivers, either wiser or luckier, passed through that light without a hitch. My unwariness of my surroundings got me in trouble, not the surroundings themselves. Your question is not a matter of location. What it boils down to is the responsibility of your daughter and whether you trust her. It would certainly be a good idea to talk to the boyfriend's dad to discuss some ground

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consumer of drugs and alcohol and just wants to go for the music scene and to spend time with her BF. You’ll notice I said “verifiable.” Most teens can (and will) beg for their parents’ trust, but far fewer have shown themselves capable of the limit stretching this reader described. Her daughter appears to be one who can handle the responsibility. I suggest you run the plan, confer with the dad until you’re comfortable, stay in touch with your daughter and strictly advise her take precautions against spiked drinks (e.g., only consume bottled soft drinks with screw-on lids that she broke the seal on and never leave them sitting on the table). If all this checks out, then things will probably turn out OK. However, other readers need to make a determination for their own children. — Dr. Wes Crenshaw is a board-certified family psychologist and director of the Family Therapy Institute Midwest. Ben Markley is a senior at Free State High School. Send your questions about adolescent issues (limited to 200 words) to doubletake@ljworld.com.


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Mass Street CHIC CAITLIN DONNELLY

MARTHA STEWART INTRODUCES TEXTURED PAINT FINISHES

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“(Citrus chartreuse) is a refreshing shade of lime green, named after the French liqueur of the same hue. Pair your chartreuse clothing items with bright whites for a super crisp look.”

Now at Home Depot you can find new specialty paints in the Martha Stewart Line that come in three varieties: Precious Metals, Potter’s Clay and Light Strokes, all available in 21 colors. The difference lies in the apparent texture. Precious Metals, of course, captures metallic luster; Potter’s Clay offers texture that

adds dimension to your walls; and Light Strokes reflects light differently depending on the direction of your brush stroke. The specialty paints come in quarts and gallons and prices range from $14.98 to $40.49. — McClatchy Newspapers

Try on some new trends in spring color schemes

T

his spring, relinquish your all black-and-white clothing mentality. Wave the white flag and make amends with the enemy — color! Your look can be instantly transformed from season to season by making simple adjustments and selecting clothing of different colors. I have previously offered some tips regarding spring color trends. Read on for more spring outfit ideas and color combinations that make for fresh, fun spring dressing.

Christophe Ena/AP Photo

DRIES VAN NOTEN ready to wear spring/summer 2011 collection presented in Paris.

COLOR CUES: Get a speedy spring wardrobe makeover simply by adding a few fresh colors to your daily wear. Look out for separates and accessories in shades of cream, seashell pink, light-mustard yellow and my favorite — citrus chartreuse. Not familiar with the shade? It is a refreshing shade of lime green, named after the French liqueur of the same hue. Pair your chartreuse clothing items with bright whites for a super crisp look. For a few exam-

ples, consult Christopher Kane Spring 2011 Ready-to-Wear. PATTERN PLAY: If you love classic nautical style but are sick of so many navy blue stripes, wide-leg trousers and white accessories, reinterpret this look for an equally chic update. Use similar color combinations to maintain a pleasant color palette or trade out one color for another. For a sporty, nautical look, insert a clean, turquoise green (keep matching accessories simple and clothing shapes traditional). Still resemble a sailor? Take one step further by utilizing patterns and prints. For a perfect example, check out Rodarte Spring 2011 Ready-toWear. In this collection, the traditional designs and white and blue color combinations of traditional Ming vases are reflected onto the clothes. LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD: For a more modest use of color in your spring wardrobe, layer separates of similar shades

— not too matchy-matchy, but definitely a conscious dressing decision. Right now I love the combination of whites and greys with metallic accessories and, oftentimes, a few subtle feminine pieces mixed in, like a soft mauve blouse. For another light color palette, I use colors like tan, beige and pale green. See Dries Van Noten and Jill Stuart Spring 2011 Ready-to-Wear for good examples of these color combinations. STYLING TIPS: Regardless of the color of your outfit, don’t neglect other important elements that create successful personal styles overall. Utilize seasonal fabrics while you can, like lightweight knitwear and sheer lace garments. Also, keep clothing shapes modern — trade your skinny jeans for some wideleg pants and try wearing a skirt in the hippest new length, right above the ankle.

Louis Lanzano/AP Photo

— Caitlin Donnelly can be AT RIGHT, the Jill Stuart reached at go@ljworld.com. spring 2011 collection.

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Family weekend left to Chance

River City Jules

O

ur family finally had a free weekend. No practices, work, games or anything else forcing us to leave the house. We slept in, we watched TV, we did nothing worthwhile, and it felt great. But after a few hours of living la vida lazy, we were bored. “How about Monopoly?” Amelia suggested. Like H-O-R-S-E, I have always enjoyed Monopoly, yet never had the skills to win. The potential for that streak to end was too alluring to pass up. It should be noted here that, while my husband and I love each other deeply, we are two highly competitive people who really should not play in the same sandbox. From picking a movie to guessing who will get kicked off “American Idol,” we know how to suck the fun out most anything that has potential to, at some point, result in someone winning. Duh. My husband got off to an early lead by winning the roll-off to start the game, Amelia, Caroline, Luke and I followed close behind. Our oldest daughter chose to observe from her bedroom for the first few rounds of play. We bought a few lots, made a few trades and helped Caroline run the bank. Amelia and I took over all the railroads, and Luke did his best to stay out of jail, a trend I can only hope he continues throughout his life. But as the day rolled on, the competition intensified. My husband found a loophole and skipped out on paying Amelia rent. Caroline was fired as the banker. Luke had moved on to Angry Birds, and Ellie took over his top hat. And then, while brokering a deal with Amelia that would guarantee him income from Kentucky Avenue to Marvin Gardens,

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my husband revealed his business plan. “Amelia, I’ll give you all the free rent you want, I’m just trying to beat your mom.” Game now on, I cruised through his occupied territory via B&O Railroad and erected more hotels than Leona Helmsley from St. Charles to New York, a stretch my prisonhopping husband seemed to frequent. One by one, we dismantled our children, unapologetically repossessing their mortgages and kicking them out in the cold, leaving just his cannon and my iron on the board. Frothing at the mouths like bitter rivals, we battled, we bought, and we paid each other thousands. Our children had grown bored (or afraid) and abandoned us. Our knees locked as we sat cross-legged before the coffee table, neither one willing to relinquish the lead and tend to our now homeless offspring, who tried unsuccessfully to get our attention (something about being hungry) until the Cannon finally landed on a pimped-up Virginia Avenue. The $2,700 rent was too steep for the Cannon, and he conceded just in time to catch Luke, who had loaded a bowl of ice cream for dinner. It was 8:30 at night. Iron and Cannon, parents of the year, fed their glassy-eyed children and put them to bed without passing Go, and they all looked forward to soccer season starting soon.

BUY NOW, PAY OVER TIME.

36 MONTHS NO INTEREST. Heat Now, Pay Later. Think You Can’t Afford Perfect Indoor Air? Think Again. RELIABLE, ENERGY EFFICIENT, CLEAN AIR FOR THE HOME. Consumer Purchase Period/Wells Fargo Approval: March 15 - June 15, 2011 Installation Period/Funding from Wells Fargo: March 15 - June 30, 2011

785.842.2258 or 800.559.2258 www.cloudhvac.com CALL NOW FOR NO INTEREST ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY TRANE EQUIPMENT.

Join Brandon Woods at Alvamar Alvamar,, Advanced HomeCare and Visiting Nurses for

MARCH MEDICARE MADNESS: Coaching you through the Medicare System. Join our Lawrence Medicare Expert Team for three jam-packed sessions on the ins and outs of Medicare coverage. MARCH 16 MARCH 23 MARCH 30

The Quarterfinals: Facility Care and Home Health The Semi-finals: Home Health and Home Medical Equipment The Finals: Pharmacy and Hospice

Douglas County Visiting Nurses Rehabilitation and Hospice Care

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm The Smith Center at Brandon Woods at Alvamar. Hors d’ouevres provided. RSVP to 785-838-8000. Limited seating

843-3738 • www.vna-ks.org Your hometown hospice since 1981.

Follow us on facebook. Find us on wellcommons AGENCY


}

14

M O N DAY, M A R C H 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

Wedding Checklist

Fix-It Chick

Custom Invitations

Save the date cards Bridal Registry Custom Napkins Wedding Albums Guest Books It’s all at:

2329 Iowa • 841-2160

Wine Club!

Memberships include two to three bottles of wine (750 ml.) per month accompanied by detailed tasting notes on the featured wines, wineries and growing regions. Members also receive 10% off all purchases, all the time, plus exclusive “members-only” email offering.

“Good wine is a necessity of life for me.” –Thomas Jefferson

Need wine for book club?

LINDA COTTIN

Raised garden beds easier to maintain

B

uilding raised beds is an easy and efficient way to create a garden. Raised beds are typically easier to maintain than standard garden plots and can extend the growing season by allowing the sun to heat the soil thoroughly. Step 1: Pick a spot for the garden bed that has an accessible water supply, receives at least eight hours of sun each day and has good drainage. Step 2: Determine the size and depth of the bed. Vegetables typically need 6-12 inches of tilled soil to grow in. If the raised bed is at least 12 inches deep, it is not necessary to loosen the dirt below it. If the bed is less than 12 inches deep, use a garden fork or shovel to break up and turn the soil before proceeding. Step 3: Limit pest access to garden vegetables by covering the bottom of the raised bed with hardware cloth. Cut the mesh to lengths 8 inches larger than the garden bed and lay it on the ground. Build the raised bed atop the mesh and then fold up the mesh edges and secure them to the sides of the frame. Step 4: Construct the raised bed out of used building materials such as lumber, stone, cinder blocks or metal. Do not use old pressure treated lumber, as it may con-

tain harmful chemicals that could leach into the soil and be absorbed by the growing vegetables. Instead use rot resistant lumber such as redwood, cedar or even composite lumber. Step 5: Use excess lumber or angle brackets inside each corner for additional support. Using short 4-by-4 posts as corner braces is an easy way to build a secure wooden frame. Beds can be made by simply piling dirt and compost atop the existing ground. If the bed is much higher than four inches it is best to build some sort of frame work to contain the soil. Step 6: Fill the raised bed with a 3:1 mixture of fresh top soil and compost. When using excess ground dirt for the raised bed, have it properly tested and amend it as suggested before sowing any seeds. Step 7: Once plants have been established, spread a thick layer of mulch atop the soil to help retain moisture and discourage weed growth. Consider covering the bed with floating row cover to reduce pest infestation and encourage early and late growing activity. — Linda Cottin can be reached at go@ljworld.com.

We’ll help you read between the wines. CUSTOMER SERVICE: At City Wine Market, shelf tags are never a substitute for friendly, professional service. 4821 W. 6th St. (Next to Dillons at 6th & Wakarusa)

(785) 856-CITY (2489) www.citywinemarket.com Wine lovers wanted. No experience necessary.

Stop by or call today for a tour! Enrolling children 5 months to 6 years. Infant Community • Toddler Community • Primary (preschool) Program 5005 Legends Drive (Off Wakarusa Drive) www.lawrencemontessorischool.com • 785-840-9555


M O N DAY, M A R C H 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

H•I•D•A•T•O

This week’s puzzle

PET POSTS

{15 BRIEFLY Train your dog to not jump on guests If your dog jumps on guests when they come over, this can be embarrassing for you and potentially dangerous if you have a large dog. Mary Burch with the American Kennel Club offers the following tips to curb the behavior: ● Don’t reward inappro-

See answer next Monday!

Last week’s solution

priate behavior. If he jumps on you, just turn your body away. If he continues to try and jump up, walk away. Don’t speak to or look at him. Once he calms down, praise him in a quiet voice. This will teach him that jumping will not get him the reaction he wants. ● Teach him to do something else. Since your pooch can’t do two things at once, try teaching him a behavior that is incompatible with jumping, such as how to sit. As soon as he sits down, give him a treat. Once he has mastered this task, ask a friend to come over. When the person knocks on your door, tell your dog to sit and give him a treat for sitting. If you keep Special to the Journal-World rewarding your dog for sitting when someone MIKO loves to play in the snow. He belongs to Nichole, Taylor and Cameron Doonan, knocks on the door, this of Lawrence. Got a picture for Pet Post? Bring in or mail a Pet Post photo and some should curb the jumping. information about your pet to the Journal-World, 645 N.H., Lawrence, KS 66044 or e-mail it to go@ljworld.com. Photos will be returned after publication. – MCT

Good dental health starts early.

Kelli Henderson, DDS 1425 Wakarusa Dr, Ste D • 856.5600


}

16

M O N DAY, M A R C H 2 1 , 2 0 1 1

The week ahead Spring has officially sprung, and that means mild temperatures and a chance for strong storms this week. Windy conditions will prevail. Highs will range from the 50s to the 70s, but overnight lows will stay above freezing.

TODAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Mostly cloudy

Strong t-storms; mainly cloudy

Sunny and breezy

Partly sunny and breezy

Breezy with clouds and sun

High 73° Low 55° POP: 25%

High 75° Low 45° POP: 65%

High 64° Low 36° POP: 5%

High 55° Low 41° POP: 10%

High 57° Low 40° POP: 25%

Wind SSE 8-16 mph

Wind S 12-25 mph

Wind WNW 10-20 mph

Wind ENE 10-20 mph

Wind S 10-20 mph

POP: Probability of Precipitation

McCook 78/41

Kearney 68/47

Better Health Oberlin 78/45

Grand Island 67/52

Concordia 70/56

Lincoln 69/53 Beatrice 70/56 Sabetha 70/53

Clarinda 70/54

St. Joseph 73/54

Centerville 70/53

Chillicothe 74/54 Marshall 75/55

Look at us now.

Kansas City Manhattan 73/55 Russell Salina 72/54 Goodland Oakley 75/52 Topeka 80/37 70/56 80/43 Kansas City Lawrence The LMH Diabetes Education Center reminds you enough insulin or are unable to produce it, they have72/55In addition the following increased 73/56people are at anSedalia 73/55 that Tuesday, March 22, is the American Diabetes a build upGreat of glucose in the body. This is a problem risk for type 2 diabetes: Emporia Bend Association Alert Day. This day serves as a “wake-up because it leads to a variety of health complications. t People with impaired glucose tolerance 75/56 (IGT) and/ 72/56 73/52 call” asking the American public to take the Diabetes People with uncontrolled diabetes are at a much or impaired fastingNevada glucose (IFG) City Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing Dodge higher-than-average risk for many serious health Chanute t People with a family history of diabetes 76/57 Hutchinson 80/50 type 2 diabetes. conditions, including: 73/58 t People who are overweight Garden City 71/55 Starting on Diabetes Alert Day, you can be part of t Eye Problems 81/45 t People who do not exercise regularly the movement to Stop Diabetes and get your free Wichita Springfield t Heart Disease Pratt t People with low HDL cholesterol or high Diabetes Risk Test by one of several ways: Liberal t Foot Complications Coffeyville 70/55 78/55 Joplin 72/52 triglycerides, high blood pressure t Visit the News and Events page at lmh.org 80/47 73/57 77/59 t Hearing Loss

Mark Your Calendars for Diabetes Alert Day Hays 76/50

t Visit stopdiabetes.com t Call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) t Text JOIN to 69866 (Data and message rates apply) Although Diabetes Alert Day is a one-day event, the Diabetes Risk Test is available year round. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. People with this type of diabetes are either unable to produce enough insulin or their bodies are unable to use the insulin they produce. All of the food we eat is broken down into glucose (sugars). Glucose is the fuel our bodies need to function properly and insulin plays an important role in this process because it helps transport glucose from the blood into the cells. Because people with type 2 diabetes do not have

t Women who had gestational diabetes, or who have

Shown is Disease today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs tonight’s lows. t Kidney hadand a baby weighing nine pounds or more at birth

Diabetes increases your risk for many serious health problems. But according to the American Diabetes Association, with the correct treatment and recommended lifestyle changes, many people with diabetes are able to prevent or delay the onset of complications. Who Should Worry About Type 2 Diabetes? The following segments of the population are at greater risk for having undiagnosed diabetes: t Older Americans: As people grow older, they are at an increased risk for developing diabetes. One out of every four Americans 65 and older has diabetes. t High-risk ethnic populations: African Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

Diabetes Statistics To better understand the serious impact of diabetes the American Cancer Society provides the following statistics: t 25.8 million children and adults in the U.S. have diabetes. t 7 million people have diabetes but are undiagnosed. t Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. t About 65 percent of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage.

PreDiabetes Class Thursday, April 7, Noon-1:30 p.m. This free class is for those who are at risk for developing diabetes or have already been told that they have prediabetes. Topics include preventing or delaying Type 2 diabetes; diet, exercise and weight loss; medications; and avoiding potential complications.

For more information or to enroll, call ConnectCare at (785) 749-5800 or visit lmh.org.


Lawrence Journal-World 3-21-11 revised  

Daily Newspaper

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