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GENE MEYER: BUILDING A HOSPITAL TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY VOLUME 2, NO.2

2ND QUARTER 2012


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IN THIS ISSUE: CO N T R IB U TORS : VOLUME 2 NO. 2 2ND QUARTER 2012

FEATURES:

PUBLISHER: LAWRENCE BUSINESS MAGAZINE LLC

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LAWRENCE FARMERS’ MARKET BUSINESS SINCE 1976

MANAGING EDITOR: DEREK HELMS

40 LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL GENE MEYER: COMMUNITY VISION

CREATIVE EDITOR: ANN FRAME HERTZOG

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THE BUSINESS OF PARKS & RECREATION

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SPACES MOBILE OFFICES

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BABY BOOMING BUSINESS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

ART DIRECTOR: DARYL BUGNER BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: JOE RYAN FEATURE WRITERS: MARK FAGAN,

ANNE BROCKHOFF, DAISY WAKEFIELD, DEREK HELMS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: ALEX DELANEY, LINDA JALENAK, SARAH WILLIAMSON, EILEEN HAWLEY, TJ EVERETT, MEGAN GILLILAND, JACKIE EVANS, JESSICA BEESON, KRISTI HENDERSON, KATE BLOCKER

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: STEVEN HERTZOG, ARTEM BAGIEV

INQUIRIES & ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT: info@lawrencebusinessmagazine.com

IN EVERY ISSUE: 12

PROFESSIONAL SPOTLIGHT

15

FINANCIAL

18

TECHNOLOGY

24

NON-PROFIT SPOTLIGHT

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LIVE IT LOCAL

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MANAGEMENT

Website: LawrenceBusinessMagazine.com Lawrence Business Magazine 1617 St. Andrews Dr. Lawrence, KS 66047 785.766.5669 (P) 785.856.1995 (F)

ON THE COVER: LEFT TO RIGHT: ROGER J. DREILING, MD, CARDIOVASCULAR SPECIALISTS OF LAWRENCE, GENE MEYER, PRESIDENT & CEO, MICHELE BENNETT, MD, LAWRENCE OB/ GYN SPECIALISTS

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DOWNTOWN TO U R O F LAWR ENCE by DEREK HELMS

As the peleton speeds past the crowds in Downtown Lawrence, newcomers to the spectacle of cycling often have the same reaction: whoa. Take the heat and humidity of a July day in Kansas; combine the multi-colored blur created by a pack of cyclists; and the sheer power generated by the pounding of the pedals. The result, experienced for the first time, can quite literally push people back. “I hear it every year,” laughs Dan Hughes, owner of Sunflower Outdoor and Bike Shop in Downtown Lawrence. “I’ll be outside watching part of the downtown criterium and the peleton will pass a group of people. The wind created will blow their hair or tip their balance and the look of surprise on their face is always fun to see.”

In 3 short years, The Tour of Lawrence has become a staple of the summer To Do calendar. The three-day affair (held this year June 29-July 1) manages to include Lawrence’s most marketable attributes: Downtown Lawrence, the University of Kansas campus and family friendly events. Starting Friday night with the Laird Noller Automotive Street Sprints, the Tour of Lawrence will include sprints, a street dance, circuit races across the KU campus, a running race, kids’ fun zone and the Free State Brewery Downtown Criterium. Bob Sanner, Director of Sports Markets for the Lawrence Convention & Visitors Bureau, hopes Lawrence businesses also exhale with a collective ‘whoa’ when the annual event is finished. “That’s the goal,” Sanner explains. “Our entire office works toward the goal of first getting people to Lawrence, and then getting them to spend some money here.” The event evolved from Sanner’s work with the Collegiate National Championships. The championships were held in and around Lawrence from 2006-2008. “The collegiate championships were a great event,” Sanner says. “That was a 3-year deal and it really set the stage for us to do our own event by introducing the idea of hosting a competitive cycling


I N FOCU S

photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

event in Lawrence. Our work there gave us a familiarity of what we would was needed to pull it off. I started talking to some of the more serious cyclist in town and we began planning Lawrence’s own event.” Traditionally, the 4th of July is a dead time for local businesses. People tend to buy their fireworks, grab some beer and head to the neighbor’s. Sanner and his crew at the Visitors Bureau identified Independence Day as the perfect time to host the races, hoping it would give folks a reason to stay in town. “Anything we can do to help fill hotel rooms on the 4th of July is a victory,” says Susan Henderson, Marketing Director at Lawrence Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Independence day has never really been a good time for hotels or downtown businesses.” “We were confident we’d be able to get the city on board with the plan,” Sanner says. “We identified the biggest challenge, and maybe the most important obstacle, was getting KU to sign off. The campus sets up beautifully for a cycling circuit race, and we wanted to feature it as much as we could.”

Sanner says KU was “almost instantly” supportive of the race. When the university signed on, the real planning began. “We knew how to set up and run the downtown criterium, but planning a route through campus was challenging,” Sanner says. “We went back and forth with the Provost’s office and KU’s public safety officials on different routes involving various street closings and bordering neighborhoods.” The campus course covers nearly 4 miles and stretches from 9th & Emery Road south to 17th & Indiana, weaving through Jayhawk Boulevard, Memorial Drive and Sunnyside on campus. “It’s a great route,” Dan Hughes says. “In Lawrence we don’t have much of a chance for long, steady climbs, but the campus circuit route is fast and tough with steep climbs. It’s a challenging ride that has many strategic areas for riders to attack.” Working with KU has been effortless, Sanner says. “As long as we pick up after ourselves, we don’t anticipate any problems in our partnership with KU.”

DOWNTOWN IN FOCUS

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“I think the location of the downtown races is great,” Burnside says. “But our involvement certainly isn’t predicated on the location of the finish line.” Corporate sponsorship is essential to the prosperity of the Tour of Lawrence, Sanner explains. The monetary contributions provide the race the opportunity to increase the prizes for racers. The bigger the payout for places, the better the field of racers. “Nobody is getting rich from riding the Tour of Lawrence,” Sanner says. “But if we can offer the 12th place finisher in a race $45, well that might be enough motivation for someone to drive from Colorado or Arkansas to spend the weekend in Lawrence and race.” “The first few years we lost money,” Sanner admits. “We went to work to gain more sponsors and increase the level of sponsorships. The event is now financially self-sufficient. Almost all of the sponsors from year one are still with us now, which I think is very important.” Brad Burnside, Lawrence Market President for US Bank, says the bank is unwavering in their support of the Tour of Lawrence. The bank was one of initial sponsors of the event and has been thrilled with the execution and community involvement. This will be the third year US Bank is the presenting sponsor of the event. “Because of the dollar amount we contribute, the decision is made on the corporate level, with our input,” Burnside says. “We have strongly encouraged our continued support of the event. It encompasses all the things US Bank thinks are great about the Lawrence community: great competition, showcasing the beauty of downtown and the university campus and offering family friendly activities. When you consider the involvement of our largest corporate client (KU), and many of our community business partners, we’re thrilled to be a part of the event. Bob really does a fantastic job.” Sanner identified US Bank and possible presenting sponsor early in the planning process. “We knew the start/finish line would be at 9th & Mass, which just happens to be right outside their front door,” Sanner jokes.

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Hughes says Sunflower’s involvement is a no-brainer. “We support the Tour with financial contributions,” Hughes says. “But I think we are most valuable to Bob with advice and strategic planning of races. Our staff is full of great riders, many of whom race that weekend, and we offer whatever we can to help the event run smoothly.” Hughes is in a unique position. As a cycling enthusiast and operator of a cycling store, the appeal of 650 cyclists spending the weekend in Lawrence is undeniable. But as a downtown business owner, he is sensitive to the realities of closing Massachusetts and neighboring streets for a day. Independence Day falling on or around a weekend was serendipitous the first three years of the Tour. Hughes says, since most downtown businesses are closed on July 4th, the races haven’t created much of a business headache. This year’s downtown criterium is on Sunday, July 1. “I know downtown merchants complain about closing streets for any reason,” Hughes says. “I understand that. I get frustrated sometimes with the number of parades we have rolling by our door. But I really think the Tour of Lawrence offers businesses a chance to be creative and bring in new customers. Parking is still available and a lot of these riders are coming with their families and are looking for something to do between races.”


According to Susan Henderson, last year’s tour brought in $175,000 in direct spending to the Lawrence economy. “Those are hard numbers we can attribute directly to the riders coming from 16 different states,” Henderson says. “There are multiple different equations we can use to calculate the affect of those numbers. But the Tour of Lawrence is a win.” Though business is brisk during the Tour, Hughes says he sees more traffic after the event is over. “We get a lot of people coming in after the Tour, asking when the bike races are coming back.” Sanner is excited for this year’s Tour, and thinks the new dates will help rider involvement and community support. “Since the Tour doesn’t conflict with the holiday, we’re hopeful even more people will get out and experience it,” Sanner says. “This

is our biggest event of the year. We’ve worked hard to offer great options for families. You can have a beer and watch the sprints on Friday night. Have a picnic and watch races Saturday on campus. Sunday is great because it’s a full-day of activity. We start with the Mass Street Mile and the kids’ bike race. While the downtown criterium is happening, the kids’ fun zone is open and free for play. It’s an encompassing event that brings thousands of people to Lawrence.”

2012 TOUR OF LAWRENCE JUNE 29- JULY 1 www.touroflawrence.com


BUSINESS ON T H E H I L L

by JOE MONACO, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

DONORS COMMIT $612 MILLION TOWARD $1.2 BILLION GOAL FOR FAR ABOVE: THE CAMPAIGN FOR KANSAS Building on four years of record private giving, the University of Kansas Endowment has publicly launched Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, a $1.2 billion fundraising campaign to support the aspirations of the University of Kansas and The University of Kansas Hospital. Alumni and friends have committed $612 million to date since July 2008, when major priorities were identified. The campaign is scheduled to conclude in June 2016. The $1.2 billion goal reflects the sum of strategic priorities, as well as fundraising strength to date. “The campaign’s name, Far Above, reflects our goal to elevate KU to new heights,” Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little says. “We seek to be recognized as a top-tier research university and academic medical center. The success of this campaign for Kansas’ flagship university will benefit people in every corner of our state and region.” The campaign seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth. These priorities were established through broad consultation with leaders throughout the university and hospital, says Dale Seuferling, president of KU Endowment. “We are fortunate to be working with a strong cadre of campaign leaders,” Seuferling says. “With their help, I’m confident we will achieve our goal.” Campaign chairs are Kurt and Sue Watson of Andover. Co-chairs are Tom and Jill Docking of Wichita, and Mark and Stacy Parkinson of Potomac, Md. They are joined by 19 other members of a steering committee representing alumni and friends from across the nation. “There is tremendous loyalty to KU among alumni and friends,” Kurt Watson says. “It is up to us to ensure that KU’s stature can continue to rise. To seize the opportunities for the future, we must bolster support for our students, faculty and staff so they can marshal their talents in service to Kansas, our nation and around the globe.”

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BUSINESS ON THE HILL

Bob Page, president and CEO of The University of Kansas Hospital, says the campaign will help the hospital expand and enhance its leading-edge programs and its nationally recognized quality care. “The hospital serves patients from every county in Kansas, so supporting our needs impacts Kansans everywhere,” Page says. Major campaign goals include $400 million for students (scholarships, fellowships and opportunities outside the classroom), $325 million for programs (academic, research, clinical and community engagement initiatives), $300 million for faculty (professorships, recruitment of exemplary faculty and staff) and $175 million for facilities (construction and renovation of facilities for learning and patient care). Since the start of Far Above in 2008, donors have established 246 scholarships and 14 professorships at KU in a wide range of disciplines — from the humanities to business to engineering. Moreover, several projects have been completed or are under way thanks to private philanthropy. These include support for The University of Kansas Cancer Center’s quest to achieve designation from the National Cancer Institute; a new educational pavilion at the Lied Center of Kansas; and a new School of Medicine in Salina and expansion of the school’s Wichita campus. At the hospital, cancer care and radiation oncology pavilions were created and named for donor Annette Bloch and her late husband, Richard Bloch. The university’s last campaign, KU First: Invest in Excellence, concluded in 2004, surpassing its original goal of $500 million to reach $653 million. Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas is managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU.


BUSINESS ON THE HILL


by JESSICA BEESON & KRISTI HENDERSON, COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES PLANNING A LANDMARK ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT CENTER Chesapeake Energy Corporation, based in Oklahoma City, has pledged a $5 million gift to fund an interactive high-tech auditorium to anchor the new $28 million Energy and Environment Center at the University of Kansas. The center, a future addition to Lindley Hall, will create a unique team approach to teaching the next generation of geologists, engineers and environmental scientists. The 40,000-square-foot expansion at the corner of Naismith Drive and Jayhawk Boulevard will be funded by private gifts raised through KU Endowment. In the past six months, KU alumni and friends have already committed $17 million toward its construction.

“Collaborative discovery is the future at KU. Designed specifically around that idea, this building has unlimited potential to foster the next generation of revolutionary energy and environmental solutions,” says Danny Anderson, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Chesapeake’s pledge ensures the advanced interactive auditorium will be one of the most technologically sophisticated classrooms in the nation. The KU Energy and Environment Center and the interactive auditorium will be designed to provide an enriching, stimulating academic environment to prepare KU students for positions in the energy industry. “It will create a cutting-edge, highly interactive learning space that provides an opportunity to co-train engineers, geologists and environmental scientists,” Anderson says.

The Center will create a unique team approach to teaching the next generation of geologists, engineers and environmental scientists. Students will train side-by-side using industry standard technology, including software and equipment, ensuring a seamless transition into the workforce for both graduate and undergraduate students. LINDLEY HALL - PHOTO BY STEVEN HERTZOG

The energy industry has been integral to the Kansas economy for more than a century from rudimentary wells in the 1860s to horizontal drilling in 2012. Today, with new drilling techniques re-opening domestic operations, companies large and small are hungry for well-trained geologists and environmental scientists. Thousands of jobs are available now, with more projected in years to come as a top-heavy labor force begins to retire. The Center will also provide critical collaboration space for faculty from across campus. Highly flexible, multi-user research labs with cutting-edge instrumentation will allow faculty in many disciplines to collaborate on experiments. A 3D visualization room will unlock possibilities for architects, artists, geographers, and geologists alike. Powerful computing facilities will allow innovative modeling projects.

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BUSINESS ON THE HILL

“As a KU graduate, I am particularly pleased to present this pledge from Chesapeake to move the center closer to becoming a reality,” says Steve Dixon, Chesapeake chief operating officer and executive vice president of Operations and Geoscience. “Environmental responsibility is taken seriously at Chesapeake, and we constantly seek to enhance our techniques and processes to promote safe and continuously improving exploration and production. We look forward to the discoveries, insights and ideas that will emerge from


the students in this program, ideas that will help Chesapeake meet the challenges posed by the increased demand for energy around the globe. We consider this pledge an investment in our industry’s future leaders and in the advancement of America’s vibrant energy industry, as well as an extension of the successful relationship we have with KU and our commitment to the state of Kansas.” University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little expressed appreciation, noting the pledge will help carry out KU’s strategic initiative: Sustaining the Planet, Powering the World. “This will heighten research opportunities at KU to address critical energy and environmental issues today and in the future,” she says. “Ultimately, this pledge will benefit Kansas and the world as we strive to produce energy to fuel growing global economies while improving sustainability practices.”

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BUSINESS ON THE HILL

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P R OFES S I ONA L SPOTLIGHT J E FF HATFIEL D R E A L ESTATE AP P RAIS ER E N T R E P R ENEU R L B M : How d o you reward exce lle nt wo rk p e r for m an ce? JH: We have a graduated income scale based on billings. The longer and harder you work the more you are rewarded incrementally. The more you bill, the more you make. L B M : How d o you m an ag e p oor p e r formance? JH: Luckily that’s not an issue we’ve had to deal with. We are all State and Federally licensed. We haven’t had any issues with any appraisers.

L B M : Wh at is th e b ig g est ch alle n g e your com pany faces? JH: Without question it’s congressional regulation. What’s Congress’ next move going to be to correct mistakes of the past? Licensing modifications have helped regulate the industry, but we can’t control what legislation passes.

LBM: Wh at i s you r co m pa ny ’s m ost impo r tant com m odi ty o r ser v ice? JH: We provide fair accurate market values on homes and properties.

L B M : How m any p e op le d oes you r b u siness e m p loy? How m any of th ose live in L awrence? Does you r com pany e n cou rag e p e op le to live in L awre n ce? Wh at is th e b e n efit? JH: We have 11 appraisers and an office manager in our Lawrence office.

LBM: Ot h e r t h an mo n eta r y, w h a t is yo u r co mpa ny’s m ost i m p o r ta nt p r io r ity? JH: We pride ourselves on being as efficient, effective and methodical and possible to provide an accurate value on someone’s largest investment. We are all from Lawrence and have a combined 125 years of experience, so maintaining our good reputation is very important.

LBM: Wh at h ave b e e n th e m ost im p o r ta nt as pects of you r s u ccess?

It’s incredibly important for our appraisers to know the Lawrence market. It doesn’t matter how many appraisers you have if they aren’t familiar with the unique Lawrence market. One house may be valued at $200,000, while a house a few blocks away is $500,000. If you aren’t familiar with the neighborhoods, you will have no idea why.

LBM: What would you change about doing business in L awre n ce? JH: Not much. Lawrence has been great to my family. My son is the 6th generation of my family to live in Douglas County.

JH: Working with my father for 12 years and working with Hal Crady is invaluable. I know I have resources I can respect and admire and get consistent answers to my questions. LBM: How do you re lieve th e d ay-to -d ay stress of yo ur wo rk? I have a lot of fun at work, and I love hanging our and cheering on my kids. That’s a great stress relief.

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L B M : How d oes you r b u sin ess m ake a posit ive im pact on th e L awre n ce com m u n ity? JH: If we do our job, it allows people to stay in our community. If they are given an accurate appraisal, they’ll know if they can add on that extra bedroom or remodel their kitchen. Our appraisals have a direct impact on the interest rates on loans. Also, we help people understand the dollar for value on their investments.


LBM: You ope rate i n a ver y co m p et itive industr y. H ow h ave yo u m a n a g e to rem a in relevant an d p rofi tabl e? JH: We’re directed by Congress. Appraisals must be done, by law. We have been fortunate and pride ourselves on fair and accurate reports both parties can understand and relate to. LBM: Ove r t h e cou rse of yo u r ca reer, w h a t has be e n t h e s i n gl e la rg est c h a n g e in th e Lawren ce bu s i n ess env iro n m ent? JH: The biggest change has been Congressional mandates. I think it’s been good for our industry. It’s eliminates the chance of undue influence or manipulation in the value applied in an appraisal. LBM: Wh at d o you fo resee a s b ein g t h e b ig gest ch al l e n ge to t h e Law ren ce rea l esta te market? JH: The real estate market in Lawrence has struggled some. Obviously that has a direct impact on our billing. Things seem to be looking up some. We are all very optimistic.

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FINANCIAL TAXES

PLANNING NOW FOR THE TAX MAN

by LINDA JALENAK & SARAH J. WILLIAMSON, CPA

USE AN ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE PACKAGE, SUCH AS QUICKBOOKS FOR DAILY BOOKKEEPING TASKS An accounting software package will keep your bank records, payroll records, general ledger, accounts payable and accounts receivable organized. Most packages are easy to set-up and use. For the day-to-day work, you can use it yourself, train a family member, hire a bookkeeper, or use your tax accountant. SCAN YOUR RECEIPTS AND OTHER PAPERWORK There are many systems available for purchase that will convert your paper receipts into images to be stored on your computer. Some software systems will import the information from receipts directly into your accounting system, eliminating the need for entering the information from the receipt. This reduces your amount of paperwork to keep on file while retaining the hard copy. You can save these images, tax returns and other important documents onto a flash drive that is stored off-site or kept in a fire-proof safe. You should also keep a recent back-up copy of your accounting software on a flash drive in a similar location. DON’T USE CASH IF POSSIBLE; USE CHECKS, DEBIT OR CREDIT CARDS Make it easy on yourself. The use of checks and debit or credit cards allows you to have a paper(less) trail of your transactions. Cash payments force you to remember every transaction. A forgotten cash transaction will prevent you from the maximum tax deductions. Establishing credit also allows businesses to strengthen their credit score, which can be beneficial for obtaining financing in the future.

from personal accounts and vice versa. If you have personal expenses to cover from the business, write yourself a check from the business, and deposit it into your personal account first. That transaction can clearly be labeled as an ‘Owner Draw’ and classified as such for tax purposes. KEEP TRACK OF MILEAGE: PERSONAL, BUSINESS AND CHARITABLE Mileage adds up fast and you need to be able to deduct the cost if possible. Find a phone app that makes tracking easy and convenient; there are hundreds available and many are free. Just find one that is easy for you to use, and provides the detail that you need. Don’t forget miles driven for charitable purposes. You can always use written records, but they are more time consuming to maintain and are often neglected. MEET WITH YOUR CPA TWICE A YEAR. IF YOU DON’T HAVE ONE, CONSIDER IT. A good CPA can save you hundreds, sometimes thousands of dollars in missed tax credits or improper submission of tax forms. CPA’s are savvy in “tax-speak”, they are comfortable communicating with the IRS and stay current on complicated tax legislation affecting small businesses. Hiring an outside accounting firm to prepare your taxes will not guarantee maximum return unless you communicate with the firm periodically. The most detrimental action a small business can do is to turn over their books to their accountant at year end and hope for the best. To get the most out of your tax professional, set up meetings at least twice a year, in June and December. Before you meet, have a list of questions prepared to ensure you are well informed walking out of the meeting.

KEEP PERSONAL ACCOUNTS SEPARATE FROM BUSINESS ACCOUNTS Depending on your business’ legal structure, the use of business funds for personal expenses ranges from inadvisable to illegal. Keep the boundaries clear by always paying for personal expenses

UNDERSTAND YOUR BUSINESS STRUCTURE AND ENSURE IT IS BEST FOR YOUR BUSINESS SITUATION Businesses change. Employees come and go. Your business structure and business plan might have been perfect ten years ago upon

FINANCIAL

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start up, but now could be hindering your business from running in the most cost effective manner. Your CPA should be able to discuss your current situation and compare it to the business plan you have in place. CPAs can determine if a change in business structure or a change to your business plan would be beneficial. For example, if you are a sole proprietor, and are growing at a rapid pace, it might be advantageous to form an S-Corp and pay wages, reducing your tax liability. CONTACT YOUR CPA PRIOR TO A SIGNIFICANT LIFE CHANGE OR BUSINESS DECISION Being proactive is the key to making smart business decisions. Before you make a significant business decision, discuss the tax implications with your accountant. Your tax professional will be able to advise you which year to make a purchase. For example, a 179 expense deduction allows small business to expense large capital purchases in one year instead of depreciating over several years. A CPA can assist you in preparing for the sale of a capital asset, depending on current legislation and capital gains rates. And last, your accountant can help you decide how to make cost effective purchases depending on your business (rent or lease). ASK HOW A TAX DEFERRED VEHICLE CAN WORK FOR YOU AND YOUR BUSINESS If you have extra cash, want to reduce your tax liability or would like to boost employee morale, learn about how tax deferred vehicles can work for you and your business. Many employee benefit plan options are available to business owners, such as a 401(k), SEP, and SIMPLE retirement plans or a health savings plan. Each plan contains varying rules specifying how much one can contribute for yourself and your employees. In most cases, contributions to these plans reduce your taxable income. Talk to your CPA or financial adviser about which plan might be right for your small business. TAX PLANNING AND CASH RESERVES: IMPERATIVE IN GOOD TIMES AND IN BAD Tax planning is necessary every year, regardless if you are rolling in the dough, or tightening your purse strings. If your business is profitable, you may have extra cash to invest in a large capital purchase or growth activities. Before investing however, make sure you have a “reserve� in place at all times. A cash reserve is useful if you suddenly run into a year where you are paying additional taxes on unforeseen profit. In our volatile economy, extra money set aside can assist businesses in overcoming a slump or riding through cyclical/ seasonal profits. Being disciplined about building and maintaining a cash reserve is essential for every small business.

FINANCIAL FINANCIAL

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THE 5

W’s OF

GETTING THE RIGHT I.T. As our world becomes more obsessed with the collection, examination and storage of information, the need for technology to process through it becomes more important. The trickle down of leading edge technology to the needs of small businesses has become more sophisticated and specialized. That can add strain to already burdened small business owners. It is important to have an expert in the field on your staff. Because most small businesses can’t afford to hire someone full-time they often need to find someone to fill that role on a consulting basis. When you hire a technology consultant, there will be contact with your critical information, so being selective is imperative. HERE THE FIVE W’S OF FINDING AN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS PARTNER. WHO?: Who are you, and who are you clients? Whomever you hire will be responsible for maintaining the integrity of your data as well as your hardware and security. You need to have a certain level of rapport and trust with them. Remember: this is who you will turn to when all else fails on your server/network/ personal computer. You want to love them. Knowing their client base will tell you how busy your prospective technology professional currently is. It can also help you decide if they have the level of experience for which you are looking. You may be able to see if they have clients with similar needs or business models as yours. More than anything, it’s like asking for a resume from someone that you are forming a trusting relationship with; it gives you work experience and references. Feel free to ask if you can call these clients. WHAT?: With what technologies are you most familiar? Too often I have seen an IT Professional open shop after working for a large organization and started consulting with small businesses, not understanding that they have very different needs. The products an enterprise level company uses are vastly different than ones used on the small business level; you should know the level with which the consultant is most comfortable. Also, are they a re-seller for this product? Is this consultant selling you a product because they believe in it, or are they looking to make a commission on it?

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TECHNOLOGY

by ALEX DELANEY PRINCIPAL, INDEPSYS

WHERE?: Where have you come from, and where are you going? How long have you been around as a business? Where do you see your business in 5 years? These are important questions to ask because this company will be responsible for confidential information. You need to know this is someone that you can count on. Does the company that you are about to hire do this as a hobby or are they a small growing business like yours that will be around to help you expand into the future? More importantly, are they dedicated enough to stay current in the rapidly changing business world for years to come? WHEN?: When can I expect to see you again? For one reason or another, IT specialists have a reputation for being less than reliable. Ask the perspective vendor “How often will I see you?” You need to know that when a problem arises this is someone you can get a hold of within a reasonable time frame. Make sure you have a plan in place to give you regular updates on how your equipment and IT Department are performing. WHY?: Why are you important to me? As an IT professional, I understand small business owners have limited resources. These resources are better used running the business than navigating the complex world of technology. It is important to allocate these responsibilities to a trained professional. You need to make sure that your prospective IT professional understands the same. Ask them to regularly prove that. Most technology consulting businesses are small businesses. They should have a good idea what it’s like to be in your shoes, and they should be able to tell you why they’re relevant. If you have the answers to these 5 questions you should feel confident that the relationship you are about to form will be an effective, lasting partnership. Refer to these W’s to assure that your IT professional is also staying up-to-date, and that you have a strong foundation for the future.


TECHNOLOGY

19


R I S I N G A BOV E L AWR E N C E ’S E X PA N D I N G H Y D R O E L ECTR I C P OW E R V E N T U R E S E TS TH E STAG E FO R F U TU R E E N E R GY POT E N T I A L by MEGAN GILLILAND

As energy costs continue to rise, business leaders look for new and innovative ways to produce energy in an efficient, yet sustainable manner. In Lawrence, a local landmark that has been a mainstay in the community since 1874 is quickly transforming the way that we think about water and the possibilities for utilizing water’s force and strength.

Because it's the right thing to do!

In June 2011, Lawrence’s local hydroelectric power plant, The Bowersock Mills and Power Company (BMPC), broke ground on a $25 million expansion facility which will triple the production of renewable energy harnessed from the waters of the Kansas River. The current South Powerhouse produces approximately 11 million kWh of hydroelectric power and, when finished, the North and South Powerhouses combined will produce approximately 33 million kWh. That an increase in providing power to 1500 homes to approximately 4500 homes. BMPC has signed an agreement with the Board of Public Utilities in Kansas City, Kansas to purchase the power generated for 25 years. Once completed, BMPC will lead Kansas in producing hydroelectric power. “Every day we see examples of why it is important for the U.S. to develop clean, renewable, domestic energy,” said Sarah Hill Nelson, owner/operator of BMPC. “People don’t think of the Midwest as a having hydro potential, but there is potential for small hydro everywhere. This project in Lawrence can serve as an example for other communities that clean, domestic energy is an achievable goal.”

(785) 749-0904

(800) 749-0904


“This p roj e ct i n Law rence can se r ve a s a n exam p l e for other com m u n iti es t ha t clea n, d om est i c energ y i s an a chieva b le g oal .� - Sa ra h Hi l l Ne l so n

Construction of the North Powerhouse is estimated to take 18-months to complete. The project has steadily grown from a 40-foot cavity carved out of bedrock and is now a highly visible structure that is taking shape on the banks of the Kansas River. Anyone exiting or entering Lawrence from the north

21


has seen the North Powerhouse’s progression over the past 11 months – bedrock removed, piles driven, steel structures taking shape. Today, crews busily work to create an earthen dam to hold back the churning waters of the Kansas River. Soon, a new rubber dam will be installed across the decades-old dam which will replace the plywood flash boards previously in use. A dam is essential for the operation of the power plant, as well as other services including the city’s water intake system. Together with BMPC, the City of Lawrence will complete necessary repairs to the dam and install a durable rubber dam. The rubber dam is considered an improvement for production at the power plants but also, over time, will improve maintenance and reduce costs. Through this partnership, the city will receive a more efficient, environmentally preferred method of maintaining the upstream water pool for the same cost. The Bowersock Mills expansion is an example of a Lawrencebased business that is working to create clean, renewable hydropower which can stand as an example for other river communities across Kansas and the Midwest. Together, with the support of the city, BMPC will continue to produce renewable energy that benefits the local, regional and state economies and achieves goals for expanding sustainable, renewable energy in Lawrence and the State of Kansas.


Entering the Lied Center of Kansas’s administrative offices seems pretty straightforward: open the glass door, walk in. But in actuality, those who enter do so to a time machine, a sophisticated movement of operations that happens in manifold time periods. For Tim Van Leer, Executive Director of the Lied Center, this means that he moves in between three seasons at any given time. A presenting season is from September to April, so he is currently finishing up the 2011/2012 season. He’s already completed all the bookings of the 2012/2013 season, which he started working on in January 2011. And this past January of 12, he started working on the 2013/2014 season. And then there’s Megan Poindexter, Director of Development, who operates between a performance calendar (September to April), a fiscal calendar (July to June), and a donation calendar (January to December). Welcome to the business of performing arts, where what you see is only a fraction of what is really going on backstage. HISTORY OF THE LIED CENTER The Lied Center was founded in large part through the Lied Foundation Trust, whose benefactor, Ernst F. Lied, attended the University of Kansas from 1923 to 1925. Former aide to Lied, Christina Hixson, became the trustee upon Lied’s death, and has overseen the dispersion of the trust’s funds to varied causes throughout the state. Another Lied Center for Performing Arts exists at the University of Nebraska, where Lied graduated.


THE LIED CENTER

PERFORMING FOR ART, EDUCATION, AND QUALITY OF LIFE by DAISY WAKEFIELD

NON-PROFIT

25


Since opening its doors in 1993, the center has been home to performances, university and community events and presentations. The main auditorium seats 2000. In 2011, another $2.5 million project was completed which provided an expansion of the lobby, as well as the Lied Center Pavilion, a smaller, more versatile space for workshops, classes and receptions. ECONOMICS AND PERFORMANCE ART The Lied Center is funded through ticket sales, support from KU, facility rentals, endowment funds, grants and private donations. Gross revenue for the fiscal year 2011 was almost $2.5 million, with ticket sales at $575k.

“Friends of the Lied” is the private donation vehicle that allows businesses and individuals to contribute to the Lied Center. These donations comprise about 15% of overall revenue and help to keep the ticket prices at an affordable rate to the general public. These funds also allow the Lied Center to offer educational programs for free or discounted rates. “We feel strongly that arts shouldn’t be a hoity toity thing; it should be accessible to anyone in any economic situation,” Poindexter says. “In 2010/2011, Our Friends of the Lied donors contributed

26

NON-PROFIT

$240k, through individual and business contributions.” As with any other business, the Lied has been affected by the recession. The booking process has been more difficult than usual, as artists were concerned about committing to tours. And while the number of donors has not decreased, there have been adjustments in how much they donate. “That indicates to me their commitment, as well as their caution,” says Poindexter. “But we have made sure that ticket prices have stayed in a place where people could afford it, adjusting each season in accordance. We were careful with our budget and accessed endowed funds to do this.” EDUCATION AT THE LIED CENTER From insect life span performances for 2nd graders in the district, to teaching artists interacting with students at the Baker Wetlands, students in USD 497 are on the receiving end of performances and educational partnerships with the Lied Center. The center’s School Performance Series provides free performances to each student in the district. These performances are divided by age groups and are used to support classroom curriculum. In recent years, this program has been expanded to include students in Baldwin, and private schools in Lawrence, charging a minimal amount per student.


Visiting artists also may offer Master Classes before or after performances, sometimes staying for a week just to interact with the community. This is where the new Pavilion is put to good use, as it can be turned into a space for Master Classes, small concerts, lectures or dining area. “We look for artists that look to pay it forward,” Poindexter says. “At least half do at least something of a master classes. Jin Xing, the first transgender person in China, did dance classes when she was here, and was able to interact with the LGBT community. And Intergalactic Nemesis, actors who do a live action graphic novel, did stuff with KU theatre students.” THE LIED CENTER’S IMPACT ON LAWRENCE When confronted with the notion that the economic impact of arts is subjective, Van Leer animatedly objects. He pulls out an Arts & Economic Prosperity study that states, “…nonprofit arts are a $33.5 million industry in Lawrence — one that attracts audiences, spurs business development, supports jobs and generates government revenue.” Besides the fiscal impact of revenue and 15 full-time and numerous part time jobs, Poindexter emphasizes that the existence of the Lied Center is an enhancement to Lawrence as a community. “Having access to the arts encourages creativity, and creativity is good for economic well being of our society, through job creation, and innovation,” she says. “I see this also in that our corporate sponsors tell us that it matters to them that they are sustaining a nice quality of life for their employees and customers through their support.”

NON-PROFIT

27


WEST MID D LE SCH OOL

T H E GAR D E N B USI NESS written by TJ EVERETT mentored by STEVEN HERTZOG, KERN GROUP/CREATIVE ROAD STUDIO

As an eighth grade student at West Middle School, I applied for my first job. This paid position was more than a cashier or food server, I was applying for a Student Gardener position through a newly formed on-site school garden at West. After three years with the project, it’s safe to say that when I started working on the Growing Food Growing Health gardens, I had no idea how it would change my life. I had never been particularly interested in gardening before this project; stepping into the garden at home only when my parents asked me to work. Not often was it that I tasted organically grown vegetables or other organic foods. Today, my interest for agriculture, locally grown foods, and educating my community has grown into a passion. Planting and caring for your own food comes with gratifying feelings of self-satisfaction. Working with your peers to overcome agricultural barriers, meet goals, and teach others is even more rewarding. Feeding your crops to the entire school is absolutely empowering. After experiencing two seasons of growing, I feel obliged to share and educate others about gardening and about where their food comes from.

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Gardening has instilled a sense of accountability within me. If we don’t constantly maintain our space, there is an easily noticeable change in quality within the garden. Being personally accountable for the life of crops has made me feel much more purposeful in life. Working with others to achieve a mutual goal has improved my teamwork, something that nearly all employers look for in their employees. It has also taught me patience, as crops don’t yield vegetables overnight. School gardens are capable of teaching much more than just the standard classroom will. Garden projects prepare students for life. Growing Food, Growing Health is more than weeding, watering, planting and harvesting. We run our gardens like a business, selling our produce through a farmers’ market, subscription vegetable service, and The Merc Grocery Co-op to bring revenue back into the project. On top of an exciting and atypical learning environment for students, Growing Food, Growing Health offers job training and real world business education.

GROWING FOOD, GROWING HEALTH INFO:

Growing Food, Growing Health is a dynamic and multifaceted school garden project created by the Community Mercantile Education Foundation. Three on-site school gardens at West Middle School, Sunset Hill Elementary, and Hillcrest Elementary are cared for by dedicated and inspiring Student Gardeners. Students are employed as a job training and leadership development program through The Merc Coop. The beautiful, sustainably grown produce is sold to raise money for the project and used in the cafeteria while school is in session. Growing Food, Growing Health is a representation of fabulously supportive organizations and community members.

Square feet under cultivation:

10,000 Students in our schools who now have access to living classrooms:

1,300 Pounds of food harvested in 2010 and 2011: 3,600 Dollars raised in 2010 and 2011 by selling produce: $8,425


Student Gardeners are hired by The Merc and treated as any other employee. I went through application and interview process, new hire orientation, customer service and natural foods training, used employee discounts, and got a pay check every other Friday. I learned the importance of customer service through our markets and garden tours, and was able to improve my skills through regular performance evaluations. My involvement in the Growing Food, Growing Health School Garden Project has had significant positive impacts on my life. Through this project, I have been educated about what makes up the food I eat and I have had first-hand work experience in producing food for my community. I eat healthy, locally grown vegetables on a regular basis, and I encourage others to indulge as well. School gardens have changed my life by educating me about the wondrous world that is agriculture.

More information contact: Nancy O’Connor 901 Iowa St Lawrence, Ks 66044 785.843.8544 cmef@themerc.coop DONATE ONLINE: www.themerc.coop/donate-tocmef.cfm Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/GrowingFood

Scott Thellman Juniper Hill Farm 8 Miles MIles to The Merc

This Year More Than

Local

40 Farmers

ith

Will Supply The Merc W

Fresh, Local Produce The Merc Community Market & Deli 901 Iowa · Lawrence · 785 843 8544 www.TheMerc.Coop

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LAWRENCE

FA RM E RS’

MARKET D OIN G BUSI NESS SI N C E 1 976

www.lawrencefarmersmarket.com

$ CASH or DEBIT

TUES THUR SAT 4p - 6p VERMONT ST BETWEEN 10TH & 11TH

4p - 6p

7a - 11a

1121 WAKARUSA WEST SIDE

NEW HAMPSHIRE BETWEEN 8TH & 9TH


by ANN BROCKHOFF photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

Saturday mornings at the Lawrence Farmers’ Market (LFM) have an easy feel. Shoppers buy spinach, honey and eggs and nibble cinnamon rolls. Vendors swap recipes with customers and banter about the weather, while kids dance to steel guitar music. Still, there’s serious purpose behind the fun. “It makes for good business,” Kevin Irick of Irick Farms says of the atmosphere. “People like to feel connected to who they’re buying from.” That connection dates back to 1976, when Lawrence launched the first farmers’ market in Kansas. Now, the LFM operates three weekly markets. Almost 100 vendors sell everything from vegetables, meat and flowers to emu oil, mushrooms and rosewater lemonade. And the LFM has proven to be good for business, the local economy and the community.

GOOD FOR BUSINESS More than 3 million people shop at the nation’s 7,103 farmers’ markets, according to the Farmers Market Coalition. That adds up to an estimated $1.3 billion in consumer spending, the advocacy group says. “Ninety percent of what we sell, we sell here,” says Mike Glass of Whispering Cedars Farm & Gardens, whose family produces beef, vegetables and flowers. The LFM is what market coordinator Pam Bramlett calls “a genuine farmers’ market,” in that every product must be grown or made within 50 miles of Lawrence by the vendor selling it. The selection on any given day reflects the season, and shoppers know what they’re buying is fresh and local. “That’s why the Lawrence market is so special,” says Irick, whose stall this spring was stocked with basil, poblano chili, tomato and other plants. “We grow all our own stuff.” But it’s not just about farmers. There are hand-made processed foods like jam, wine and breads; freshly made tamales and sausage biscuits; and artisan crafters selling yarn spun from wool produced by their own sheep and hand-painted lavender-filled dryer pouches. “Kathy makes every product by hand from lavender we’ve tilled, harvested, dried and stripped,” says Jack Wilson, who co-owns Washington Creek Lavender with his wife, Kathy Wilson. Selling face-to-face encourages customer feedback—instant mar-

31


“EVERYBODY HAS MARKET’S BEST INTEREST AT HEART,” MARKET COORDINATOR PAM BRAMLETT SAYS.

“THIS MARKET’S BEEN AROUND A LONG TIME AND HAS REALLY BECOME AN

ANCHOR IN THE COMMUNITY.” ket research, if you will—and builds long-term relationships that generate repeat sales. Gathering with other vendors also fosters community and collaboration. “It’s critical to our sense of community,” Jack Wilson says. “It’s critical to the soul.”

GOOD FOR THE LOCAL ECONOMY Saturday market attendance runs between 2,500 to 4,000 people, and the dollars they spend circulate throughout the economy long after the closing bell rings. Vendors tend to hire local employees and buy groceries, gasoline and other supplies locally. And all of it generates sales tax. “The impact of local food on the local economy is huge,” says Ellie Garrett, a community developer contracted to coordinate the LFM’s promotional efforts. “Just over 80 percent of the money spent with a local farmer ends up staying in the community.” The LFM also attracts visitors from Topeka, Kansas City and elsewhere, further boosting spending and sales tax revenue. Enough of them liked what they found last year that The Pitch, a weekly Kansas City arts and entertainment newspaper, named the LFM its Best Farmers’ Market for 2011. Still, there are challenges. The Saturday morning market operates from April through November, while the Tuesday and Thursday season is slightly shorter.

32

The LFM’s struggled to increase traffic at its weekday markets, perhaps due to the strength of the Saturday session, some vendors suggest. There’s also increased competition from other area farmers’ markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs) and grocery stores like Checkers and Hy-Vee, which have added more local products in recent years. The LFM is now working on a new promotional strategy that will better utilize social media and reach families, seniors and lowincome residents. Market staff hopes membership in Downtown Lawrence Inc. will also generate more cross-promotional opportunities, and that regular activities hosted by the nearby Lawrence Arts Center will draw more families with children to the market. “I would like every farmer to sell out at every market,” says Jozie Schimke, chair of the LFM board and co-owner of Earth Flowers.


GOOD FOR THE COMMUNITY Farmers’ markets directly impact a community’s health by improving access to fresh fruit, vegetables and other foods, but the indirect effect is just as significant. Markets are an ideal place to teach consumers—especially kids— where food comes from and connect them with the people who grow it. Then, the LFM shows them what to do with that food once they get it home. The LFM kicked off its 2012 season in May with a cooking demonstration by Kenneth Baker, the executive chef and owner of Pachamama’s. Michael Beard, chef at 715, will follow in July, but there will also be more basic offerings teaching market-goers how to select, combine and prepare fresh foods. “It’s got to be simple,” says Garrett, who also helped start Back Door Bakery to showcase how ingredients from the LFM can be used. But if there’s one message Garrett wants to communicate, it’s that consumers of all income levels are welcome at the LFM.

cipients to use their Kansas Vision debit cards at farmers’ markets. Vision cardholders can purchase $1 market tokens and use them to buy breads and cereals, fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, poultry and dairy products from vendors, as well as food-producing seeds and plants. Other shoppers can use the wireless system to buy $5 market tokens with their credit or debit cards. The LFM and Cottin’s Hardware Farmers’ Market, also in Lawrence, are also participating in a two-year pilot project that allows participants in the Lawrence Douglas County Women, Infants and Children Special Supplemental Nutrition (WIC) program to buy fruit and vegetables from approved vendors. Volunteers for Just Food, a program administered by the East Central Kansas Economic Opportunity Corporation, glean surplus food from vendors for distribution through its food pantries. The LFM also works with Homegrown Lawrence, which supports Farm-to-School programs in Lawrence schools, and collaborates with Douglas County Master Gardeners.

The LFM is one of 15 state-wide participating in the Kansas Farmers Market EBT project, which allows Food Assistance Program re-

33


“It’s critical to our sense of community,” says Jack Wilson, co-owner of Washington Creek Lavender.

“It’s critical to the soul.”

Such efforts help bridge the gap between urban and rural populations and build a healthier Lawrence. “A sustainable local food system is an important community resource,” Garrett says. “We have to make it accessible.”

GOOD GOVERNANCE But none of it happens without good governance. The LFM operates much like a non-profit; indeed, Bramlett says it recently applied for 501(c)(3) status. Its 10-member board of directors includes six vendors and three community representatives, and there are two annual membership meetings.

facebook.com/lawrencefarmersmarket Twitter @lawrencefresh

IMPORTANT DATES: 10/6

Fall market season begins (hours change)

10/31 Weekday markets end 11/17

Saturday market ends

12/8

Annual Holiday Market at the Holiday Inn Holidome, 200 McDonald Dr.

34

Only LFM members can sell at its markets. Annual membership dues are $40, and first-time members pay a non-refundable $25 inspection fee. There’s also a $50 advertising fee per stall (some members have more than one) that goes toward signs, advertising and other promotional materials, and a stall fee. Stall fees vary depending on the day, stall location and type of pass. In 2012, a one-day stall pass for Tuesday or Thursday cost $9; a season-long corner stall at the Saturday market ran $280. The LFM’s $44,000 annual budget covers business liability insurance, promotions and other costs, and three part-time paid positions: the market director, market assistant and marketing coordinator. LFM members volunteer on committees that tackle issues like whether to add additional winter sessions. Bramlett manages day-to-day operation such as registering vendors, collecting fees and assigning stalls. A market assistant helps with the Saturday market and runs the Tuesday and Thursday sessions. This is Bramlett’s first season on the job, although she previously managed the Brookside Farmers’ Market in Kansas City and owns Lulu’s Garden, a wholesale herb farm. So far, she’s impressed with the LFM’s operations. “Everybody has the market’s best interest at heart,” Bramlett says. “This market’s been around a long time and has really become an anchor in the community.


FARMERS’ MARKET FAME OPENS DOORS TO NEW STOREFRONT The bonds of love, friendship, and loyalty between dogs and

Now, after following a long-

their owners has spanned across millennia. Lawrence is a

time dream, Rajani has cre-

town full of happy dogs and proud owners. In recent weeks,

ate her own store, Lucky

they have all been gathering at Lucky Paws Bakery & Unique

Paws

BARKtique—located at 729 ½ Massachusetts Street, Ste. 202

BARKtique, where dogs can

(Above Francis Sports) in downtown Lawrence’s historic House

sample a variety of treats

building. Dogs and their owners are welcome, and once they

ranging from grain and al-

step inside, dogs are greeted with love and fresh-baked treats

lergy free varieties, to Piz-

made from organic and locally-grown ingredients. All the

za, CheezBARKer and even

treats are hand mixed, rolled and cut by Raven Rajani, owner

an endurance/performance-

and CBB (Chief Biscuit Baker). Raven is an avid dog lover and

inspired PAWer Ball treat.

“rescuer”, with 6 furkids in her pack, including the bakery’s

But that’s not all Raven and

logo girl, Shakti, a blue pit bull rescued out of Arkansas. Raven

Lucky Paws Bakery have to offer - The “BARKtique” show-

began baking healthy, organic treats for her dogs in the early

cases one-of-a-kind dog-inspired art, jewelry, unique feeders,

1990’s and over the years, that led to weekend sell-outs at the

accessories, clothing and vintage pieces—all functional and

Lawrence Farmer’s Market, and supplying her delectable goods

conversation-worthy—from artists both locally and nationwide.

to local grocers and pet suppliers.

Lucky Paws plans to stay open late on Final Fridays, featuring

Bakery

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local artists and their ‘dog art’! facebook.com/luckypawsbakery

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LIVE IT

LOCAL

LIVE IT LOCAL

FUEL FOR THE LOCAL ECONOMY by MARK FAGAN

Among Lawrence residents who have jobs, nearly one in three travel outside the city limits to work — whether it’s to state agencies in Topeka, software firms in Johnson County or anywhere else employers issue paychecks for services rendered. Now some Lawrence residents and business leaders are accelerating efforts to slow the flow of money leaving town, educating commuters in the broad benefits of purchasing items and services large and small right here at home. “It would be the equivalent of bringing in a new manufacturing plant, or numerous businesses to town,” said Harry Herington, a Lawrence resident and “buy local” advocate who commutes to his job as CEO of NIC Inc. in Olathe. “You’re already spending the money; spend it at home. Benefit your neighbors. Take care of your own streets. Take care of your own parks. The best way to do that is just to think for a second: ‘If I’m getting gas, if I’m getting milk, if I’m buying a car — whatever — do it at home.’ ” Herington could very well be the face of “Live It Local,” a campaign from the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce to build support for hometown folks doing all they can to support the businesses, governments and, in turn, quality-of-life attributes that make Lawrence the livable place that it is. Raising awareness among commuters is among the effort’s most essential components. The concept is simple: People who commute for work should think twice before filling up their gas tanks in Topeka, stopping by the grocery store in Overland Park, or picking up a shirt, refrigerator or even another car anywhere else. That’s because keeping such spending at home makes a difference. Direct revenues make their way into the pockets of fellow Lawrence residents in the forms of employee wages, business profits and suppliers’ sales, money that then can turn over — and over pour into Lawrence City Hall, paving the way for nearly $3 million a year in road repairs, sidewalk upgrades, snow-removal operations and other basic needs.

Dropping $45 on a tank of unleaded across the state line in Missouri might be a convenient stop during a lunch break, but waiting instead until getting back into Lawrence can pump even more money into Lawrence’s economic, social and governmental engines. Brian Watson knows the math. As assistant finance director for the city of Lawrence, he understands what a difference dollars spent in town can make for municipal government and all the residents, businesses and other institutions that depend on its services and projects. He feels better knowing that when he puts together budget information at City Hall, his own financial contributions — while stopping in for gas, taquitos, a 52-ounce Coca-Cola and other essentials at least twice a week along 23rd Street in southeast Lawrence — are adding up. While Watson himself lives 55 minutes away, in Raymore, Mo., he’s confident that Lawrence residents increasingly will buy into the “Live It Local” message, once they understand what’s at stake. “If you’re paying that tax,” Watson says, “it’s going back into the roads you’re using.” But simple awareness won’t be enough to keep spending at home. Businesses still need to overcome close-to-work conveniences favored by commuters. Take it from Lawrence resident Steve Kelly, who does his best to spend money at home. He’ll fill up the fuel tank of the family car during the weekend, and hit the grocery store close to home. But Kelly works in Topeka, as deputy secretary for business development at the Kansas Department of Commerce — where he’s responsible for economic-development programs and efforts that have helped draw International Speedway Corporation to invest $650 million in a new racetrack in Kansas City, Kansas., and to spur that much and more of retail and entertainment development in adjacent Village West.

LIVE IT LOCAL

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Competition in business is a reality, and Kelly acknowledges that he finds himself stepping out on Wanamaker Road in Topeka to pick up clothes, compare prices on appliances and see what else might be available to fit his family’s needs. Face it: He’s in Topeka during the work day. It’s up to Lawrence businesses, he figures, to offer the products and services and hours of operation to convince him to keep his money in his wallet until he gets home. “I understand the push for shopping locally,” Kelly says. “(But) to think you’re going to keep all the dollars in town, it’s wishful thinking. It’s just not realistic, because of proximity, and because of convenience.”

HARRY HERINGTON CEO, NIC INC.

Businesses in Lawrence need to think of commuters’ needs, he says, if they want to secure commuters’ spending. A good place to start: Being open for commuters when they’re home.

Harry Herington may work in Olathe, but he keeps plenty of business right here at home in Lawrence. The CEO of NIC Inc. recently welcomed all nine corporate directors and another 30 of his managers from across the country to this building in North Lawrence, which doubles as home for Herington’s Ride4Cops charitable organization and as a showplace for his personal fleet of Harley-Davidson motorcycles. That’s right: Leaders of a company that last year banked $180 million of revenue gathered to enjoy Evan Williams catering while talking shop in a renovated garage. “I brought them here because I’m a strong ‘Buy Local‘ guy, and I wanted to show off Lawrence,” Herington says. “Have your business meetings here. Bring your friends. It’s a tremendous opportunity.”

“Remember, they’re not just competing with people in their market,” Kelly says, acknowledging Lawrence’s placement between expansive offerings in Topeka to the west and Johnson County and the Kansas City metro area to the east. “They’re competing with all these other folks. A lot of people, like me, have a limited amount of time to deal with. If you’re closed, I’m not going to work too hard to get around that.” Jean Milstead couldn’t agree more. A retired banker and former chairwoman of the Lawrence chamber, Milstead now serves as the organization’s interim vice president for economic development. She’s familiar with businesses throughout the community, including many that could use a financial boost from commuters who might be spending elsewhere. Some of those shops are closed on Sundays, which can be a frustrating sign for folks looking for a place to buy after working hard elsewhere all week. “It’s fine to encourage people to buy local,” Milstead says. “But if they’re not open to people when they’re here, they can’t spend their money.” Dale Willey isn’t taking any chances. The CEO of Dale Willey Automotive expanded his dealership on South Iowa Street nine years ago, with particular attention paid to expanding service bays and hiring additional employees to address the needs of commuters. His Express Service department is open from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each weekday, plus another seven hours on Saturday, to help accommodate folks who want to keep their dollars — and service records — at home. “Now we’re seeing people who normally hadn’t,” Willey says. “It all adds up.” Scott Zaremba has added commuter-friendly fare at some of his Zarco stations in the Lawrence area. His Scooter’s Coffeehouse locations provide coffee for those on the go, and he and Peach Madl are partnering on Sandbar Subs to offer fresh food.

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LIVE IT LOCAL


His plan: Provide “better products, better services and better people” for all of his potential customers, including those who might be driving 22 or 45 or 63 miles each way, each day, to a workplace outside of town. “If you look at the big picture, what the whole impact is, it makes sense to spend your money here,” says Zaremba, whose company has 70 employees. “The reason you live here is you like the community. Otherwise, you’d live in Kansas City or Topeka. Everybody looks for lifestyle, the quality of life. That’s what we have here.” And that’s why folks like Zaremba, Willey, Milstead and others are working to see that “Live It Local” picks up speed in Lawrence, especially among commuters. Local spending means local benefits. Herington is convinced he’ll see more of his neighbors keeping their money at home in the coming months, as word of the campaign — and its benefits — spreads. “For most people it never dawns on them, so there has to be communication,” says Herington, whose company’s systems process $70 billion in electronic transactions each year on behalf of 27 state governments and two federal agencies. “There has to be education: It’s beyond just buying a product. Where does that money trickle

down to? It improves our streets. It improves our schools. It improves our neighbors, because they’re working at those facilities. And it’ll help the overall economic growth of Lawrence.” Buying into the “Live It Local” approach isn’t difficult or even inconvenient, Herington says. It simply means changing one’s mindset, a shift he and the chamber are looking forward to seeing Lawrence commuters embrace.

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GENE MEYER:

BUILDING A HOSPITAL TO S E R VE T H E C O M M UN I T Y by DAISY WAKEFIELD


A

hospital is a study in paradox. It depends on sick people, but charged to get them well. Its success measures are judged by auditors and academies, but consumers and third parties pay it. It is in necessary affiliation with local practices and doctors, but is subject to strict regulations for any fiscal collaboration. These factors, not to mention looming health care reform, make the running of a hospital an immensely complicated business. Gene Meyer does not seem fazed. He is alert and informed. The CEO of Lawrence Memorial Hospital (LMH) is focused on running the community hospital he aims to make one of the best in the country. By all counts, Meyer seems to be succeeding. Success can be measured by a 95% patient satisfaction rate, a cardiology service line that is in the top 5% of heart attack care nationally, an oncology service line that has 150 clinical trials and a long-term bond rating upgrade from A2 to A1 from Moody’s. In his 15-year tenure as CEO, Meyer has been heralded as the visionary that took LMH from a small town hospital to an acclaimed regional medical center. While his strategy from the outside seems to be procurement — expanding the hospital campus, developing satellite clinics, acquiring local practices — Meyer disputes the dictum “bigger is better,” and says instead — better is better. “Community hospitals cannot and should not be all things to all people,” Meyer says. “We have to carefully assess the needs of our population and look very closely at what our capabilities are in meeting those needs. Our philosophy has been if LMH cannot do things well from a quality, safety and outcome standpoint, then we probably shouldn’t do it. We look to provide services that meet a community need, in which we have the talent and expertise to provide the service, and there is a sufficient volume necessary to do those services well.” At its core, LMH is a community hospital, driven by the needs, resources and input of Lawrence and surrounding areas. The quality of services and collaboration between employees are interwoven into the culture. That is a direct benefit to the residents in the community in terms of quality of life, but it also serves as a business and people recruitment tool.

photos by STEVEN HERTZOG


What that has meant for LMH in recent years is expanding and cultivating certain service lines, particularly cardiology and its related disciplines. In November 2009, when Cardiology Consultants, a Kansas City-based practice affiliated with St. Luke’s Health System, pulled out of Lawrence, LMH maintained four of the doctors and began its own practice, Cardiology Specialists of Lawrence. They recruited two more cardiologists to join the team and enfolded the Lawrence Vein Center. In January of this year, a new pulmonary practice began at LMH. Along with two new pulmonologists due to arrive in August, LMH is also expanding its cardiovascular-pulmonary laboratory. This full cardiovascular/pulmonary line means that all the business that used to go to St. Luke’s is now staying in Lawrence. Along with cardiology, LMH is the employer for the practices of Lawrence Ob/ Gyn Specialists, Lawrence General Surgery, Lawrence Neurology Specialists, Lawrence Wound Healing Center, The Oncology Center, Vascular Surgery Associates, Mount Oread Family Practice, and as of July 2011, the Internal Medicine Group. As well, LMH is part investor in Lawrence Surgery Center. LMH also operates four satellite clinics, in McClouth, Tonganoxie, Baldwin, and a newly built clinic in Eudora. These clinics employ a handful of physicians and support staff. For the 43 physicians who are employed directly by LMH, the system can provide a house of support to manage the bureaucracy of regulations and reimbursement issues. “Doctors didn’t go to medical school to learn to run complicated businesses; they want to take care of patients,” says Janice Early, Director of Community Relations at

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“WE HAVE A SPECIFIC STRATEGY WITH THE SATELLITE CLINICS,” MEYER SAYS. “WE WANT TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO CARE THAT IS UNPARALLELED IN THOSE COMMUNITIES.”

LMH. “And younger physicians have more of a commitment to a balance of family/work - it’s a different style than older physicians. They don’t want to work all those hours and be on call all the time. By being in an employment arrangement, they can spend their time doing what they do best.” For LMH, the satellite clinics and practices are not exactly all-winno-loss. The hospital takes on the pressures of dealing with the regulations and red tape of individual practices and physicians. As well, all of the satellite clinics, and several of the individual practices, show a net loss for 2011.

small towns, but also the eastern edges of Topeka and outlying Kansas City. Serving these communities creates a symbiotic relationship between those populations and the hospital: the communities gain greater options for excellent healthcare, and LMH draws in their business to the main campus. “We have a specific strategy with the satellite clinics,” Meyer says. “We want to provide access to care that is unparalleled in those communities. Does Tonganoxie need an additional two primary care physicians in that community? Probably not. But because we want to support the healthcare of people in Tonganoxie, we have staffed 2 physicians there to provide excellent options. Does it cost us? Yes. Does it come back to LMH in revenue from patients that we previously did not serve? Absolutely.”

But the practices and satellites send MEYER AND CHARLES C. YOCKEY, MD, LAWRENCE PULMONARY SPEpatients to LMH for lab work, tests CIALISTS REVIEW PLANS FOR THE PULMONARY EXPANSION AT LMH. and surgeries that generate income across the wider financial picture of the hospital. They spur name recThe strategy Meyer touts is working. In 2011, LMH’s net operatognition and brand loyalty to LMH. For bedroom communities, the ing income was $9.5 million, up 15% from the previous year. existence of an LMH clinic encourages them to find physicians closer The profit includes $10.5 million in charity care charges (up 33% to where they live rather than closer to where they work. from 2010) as well as $19 million in bad debts (up 15% from 2010). With its non-operating income, including investments, Part of the purpose of the satellite clinics is to draw the community LMH’s total net revenue in 2011 amounted to $12.2 million. line in a bigger circle than just around Lawrence. The hospital aims to serve districts on all sides of Lawrence, drawing people from not only

43


Meyer attributes the 20% increase in net revenue partly to sound financial management and partly to more astute practices in receiving payment. “Much of the way we charge government and insurance companies is based on complete and accurate documentation of the services we provide,” Meyer says. “In the last couple of years, we’ve improved the way we document the services that we rightly should be paid for. We are doing a better job of coding and documentation that allows us to be paid appropriately. The key to that is accurate documentation.”

“Provision of healthcare insurance in some fashion is a positive,” Meyer says. “How we pay for that and the requirements that that places on community hospitals is extraordinary. Community hospitals are going to see reductions in what they get paid for the services they provide. While we may be fortunate to have the resources locally to attempt to meet these requirements, the increased burdens will put tremendous pressure on the LMH’s of the world and other community hospitals.”

The accurate documentation created several new positions in the last year. With healthcare reform, meeting regulatory requirements is becoming a significant challenge. Within the next three years, Meyer foresees 10 new positions will be created to manage it. While these jobs have obvious benefits, Meyer says that he would rather see jobs that create new revenue streams and support the hospital’s duty as caregivers, rather than contribute solely to overhead expense. When it comes to healthcare reform, Meyer does not shy from sharing his opinion. He says that healthcare reform is more about providing health insurance for 32 million uninsured Americans, rather than the healthcare delivery system. In Douglas County, this would mean that 10-15k people would be new healthcare consumers under the reform. While Meyer expresses humanitarian sympathies for the uninsured, the administrator in him asks how hospitals can possibly deliver medical care to an opened floodgate of millions of new consumers with no change in the delivery of care. Especially for a standalone community hospital like LMH that does not have a wider health system to spread costs over, health care reform implies a massive impending load of financial and delivery pressures.

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Another pressing worry is the shortage of primary care physicians. There is already a local and national supply pinch in primary and family medicine. Meyer points to the financial incentive discrepancies between a primary care physician and a specialist as the main reason. Primary care physicians see more patients with less internal resources, and they bear the brunt of reimbursement and regulation issues.


THIS IS MEYER’S ADVOCACY BOX — TO REFORM NOT JUST

HEALTH INSURANCE, BUT HEALTHCARE

DELIVERY, TO CIRCUMVENT A

BREAKDOWN OF

SUPPLY AND DEMAND.


With the uninsured population using between 40-45% of healthcare that the insured population uses, the current healthcare infrastructure simply does not have the wherewithal to meet an exponential rise in demand. This is Meyer’s advocacy box — to reform not just health insurance, but healthcare delivery, to circumvent a breakdown of supply and demand. “Our country has become accustomed to access, convenience, and I-want-it-now when it comes to healthcare,” Meyer says. “What should we expect from healthcare reform? Get used to waiting. We can’t add 32 million more Americans into our environment and not increase providers and expect the same convenience and access you have before.” Meyer says that he welcomes a better system of health insurance provision for the uninsured. But to stop there would be to sabotage the health care industry and patients. Reform to health care delivery must accompany the potential colossal changes to health care insurance. “Our health care industry is the world’s 16th largest economy, and now we’re saying that we’re changing the way that this Titanic is moving,” Meyer says with pensive hope. “That’s not easy. The changes in the next 7-10 years will be more monumental than the changes in the last 50.” Meyer’s advocacy for community hospitals and changes in healthcare delivery supports his actions in running LMH. As a nonprofit hospital, $110 million of net income over the past 5 years has been reinvested into LMH to build the system to meet community demand. The physical campus has been increased by 1/3, with an enlarged ER, laboratories, parking and food service. Significant investment has been made into the informational technology system of the hospital, which has put LMH in the top 7% of hospitals nationwide for technology. That future, in terms of healthcare, is still being written. Meyer continues to position LMH in such a way that the community hospital will be able to meet the increased utilization need, with community collaboration and sound financial management as priorities.

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COMPANIES FAIL TO INNOVATE

WITHOUT TOP EMPLOYEES by KATE BLOCKER, CO-OWNER, EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS LAWRENCE, KANSAS

One of the most challenging economic downturns in recent history left many companies adjusting to new business road blocks. Companies had to adapt and innovate – and do more with less – in order to be successful. With a shortage of talent, employers were confronted by one of the top threats facing businesses today: the inability to innovate. According to an Aberdeen Group Study, 83% of companies surveyed said the No. 1 pressure felt in 2011 was having a shortage of talent. Without top talent, how can you respond to changing business needs? Without innovative thinking and strategic planning how do you ensure your company’s longevity? One of the most apparent causes of this threat is turnover. Retaining top talent can be hindered by the lack of employee incentive plans and benefits, competitors stalking your top talent and an over-worked core staff. It takes an average company 67 days to fill a high-skilled position. By the time you hire a candidate you could be losing another, creating a revolving door of turnover. And with a constant flow of employees, how can you rely on your staff to be innovative? Implementing employee incentive plans is vital to employee retention. Business leaders need to know top talent will always have other opportunities. With today’s employment trends, workers are less loyal to particular companies. According to an Ouch Point survey from Opinion Research, 80% of currently employed respondents would consider leaving their current job if presented with other opportunities. In fact, 25% of those respondents said they have plans to leave their present employer once the job market stabilizes. The age bracket most likely to switch jobs is between ages 18 and 34. During the recent economic downtown, most companies were lucky to even keep employees on payroll. The most common costcutting measure was incentive plans and benefits. According to a recent Gallup Poll, 22% of workers leave a job because of pay and benefits alone. With other companies offering more competitive incentives, it will become even more difficult to retain the cream of the crop. Another aspect that is hindering retention is the fact other companies are pursuing your top talent. According to a Jobsite sur-

vey, 95% of companies plan to recruit through social media, and even more alarming, 66% of companies plan to recruit from competition. Cyber prowlers – recruiters headhunting through social networking sites – have changed the way companies obtain talent. Individuals not looking for employment are the number one target for cyber prowlers. They are well versed in the particular industry and bring other workforce knowledge to the table. Recruiting passive individuals is the primary strategy for contending against competition. According to Forbes, 74% of workers would consider leaving their employer if approached with another offer. Not only is your competition watching your corporate actions on social networks, they are also stalking your talent. The final issue companies are facing with retention is an overworked staff. To combat the economic woes companies faced at the end of the past decade, employers were forced to lay off a large percentage of workers, leaving the remaining staff members with an increased workload. According to a Hiring Trends survey by Express Employment Professionals, 68%of business leaders reported higher workloads since the recession. To crawl out of such a crisis, there were certain necessary sacrifices employers and employees had to make. Now that the economy is improving, employees have new skills and experience for which other companies will be recruiting. According to a Deloitte survey, 59% of your workforce feel more is demanded from them. Without a proper balance of work and free time, employees are inclined to seek further opportunities elsewhere. With the new economy comes a new game plan. Companies that are staying relevant see the importance of innovation. More to the point, companies understand true innovative value is found in their employees. Jac Fitzenz, author of ROI of Human Capital explained it by saying “…people are the only element with inherent power to generate value…all other variables offer nothing but inert potential.” The revolving door epidemic of turnover leaves employees out of the loop and unable to lead your business to new heights. Your company has an unlimited potential for success, but the connection between potential and actualization is found in your top talent. Not focusing on retention will only leave your company with an inability to innovate. MANAGEMENT

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THE BUSINESS OF:

PARKS & REC by ANNE BROCKHOFF

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THE LAWRENCE PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT IS ESSENTIAL TO THE LAWRENCE COMMUNITY. If you want to figure out how any organization works, follow the money. When it comes to the Lawrence Parks and Recreation Department (LPRD), following the money takes you not only to familiar parks, paths and pools, but also to tennis courts, a ballroom, dog parks, disc golf courses, classrooms, skateboard parks, basketball courts, softball fields, nature areas, major street intersections, cemeteries and more.

“Very few people know the scope of what we do,” says Ernie Shaw, the LPRD’s interim director. That scope has grown tremendously since the department was established in 1946. It now accounts for about 5 percent of the city’s total $174.6 million budget. Given today’s recessionary climate, is it worth the cost?

Absolutely, city officials say. The LPRD not only manages extensive outdoor and recreational resources, it improves Lawrence’s quality of life, creates an attractive business climate and facilitates economic growth. “Sometimes it looks like it’s just kids playing,” says Mark Hecker, the LPRD’s assistant director. “But don’t forget this is an essential service.”

photos by STEVEN HERTZOG


“SOMETIMES IT LOOKS LIKE IT’S JUST KIDS PLAYING,” SAYS MARK HECKER, THE LPRD’S ASSISTANT DIRECTOR. “BUT DON’T FORGET THIS IS AN ESSENTIAL SERVICE.”

Perhaps the most visible aspect of that service is the LPRD’s parks system. Its four divisions manage 54 parks encompassing more than 3,500 acres and nearly 70 miles of hiking, biking and walking trails. Some are well-known, like Centennial Park and South Park, while others are neighborhood favorites, such as the one-acre Robinson Park overlooking the Kansas River. Some seek to preserve a bit of nature in the city, like the 25-acre Naismith Valley Park and the Pat Dawson-Billings Nature Area, both south of 23rd Street.

“That aesthetic quality speaks to who we are in Lawrence,” Schumm says. “That’s very important for business people to feel that and see that when they’re looking at expanding or locating here.”

Still others are surprising in their scope. Take Clinton Lake Park. The LPRD has leased 1,500 acres from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers since 1995, making it home to sports fields, shelters, a sand volleyball court, model airplane field, the future Sesquicentennial Point and more. The 994-acre Riverfront Park was once a landfill bordering the Kansas River. It now sports a 10-mile levy trail, off-leash dog park, disc golf course, boat ramps, 120 acres of native grassland, wild bird habitat and mountain bike trails. Natural resource management doesn’t stop at park boundaries, however. The LPRD also mows, tends trees (Lawrence has been designated a Tree City USA for 33 years) and landscapes major intersections, parking lots and streets throughout the city. Attractive green spaces—especially downtown, which the LPRD refers to as a linear park—do more than create a pleasant ambiance, says Lawrence mayor Bob Schumm. They tell residents and visitors alike that Lawrence is an energetic city that cares about quality of life.

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ERNIE SHAW (LPRD INTERIM DIRECTOR), MAYOR BOB SCHUMM, & MARK HECKLER (LPRD ASSISTANT DIRECTOR)

When businesses do come to Lawrence, LPRD resources ensure their employees can enjoy healthy, active lifestyles. There are four swimming pools, including indoor and outdoor aquatic centers, the Carl Knox Natatorium and the South Park Wading Pool. The 80-acre Prairie Park Nature Center offers nature camps, bird watching programs, nature trails and a live animal displays. There are three recreation centers and three community centers, hosting everything from tap dancing and prenatal yoga to bridge, drivers’ safety and guitar lessons. Other resources include adult sports leagues, the Eagle Bend Golf Course, 43 athletic fields, 21 multi-use courts, 19 tennis courts, picnic areas, fishing spots, batting cages and three cemeteries. It adds up to as many as 50 activities and classes on any given day.


“We deal with people from birth to death,” Shaw says. “In between, we want to give people every opportunity to be active.” The Wee Folks Scholarship Fund guarantees kids especially have access to those opportunities. Created in 1996, the fund annually awards more than $19,500 to youth participating in LPRD recreation programs. The scholarship fund is partly supported by the Annual Bill Self/LPRD Golf Classic. Individuals and businesses also contribute to the LPRD’s mission through the Friends of the Park program, which has raised more than $500,000 since 2002. Other sponsorship opportunities include events such as the LPRD’s two Easter egg hunts, sports field banners and even naming rights to the South Park Wading Pool.

ed resources from preventative to immediate maintenance needs and restructured responsibilities of its full-time staff after losing a handful of positions in recent years. “We have become much, much more efficient the last few years,” Hecker says.

“Our marketing division keeps doing more, and it’s good for everyone,” says Hecker. The LPRD’s total budget for 2012 is $9.46 million, according to Shaw, most of which comes from three main areas: the city’s general operating, recreation and special recreation funds. The general operating fund, which also pays for essentials like the fire and police departments, contributes $3.2 million toward LPRD expenses. That includes all administrative costs, as well as maintenance and development for city-owned parks, trails, cemeteries, recreation buildings, pools, athletic fields and other LPRD spaces. Renovation of the skateboard park at Centennial Park? Development of the Burroughs Creek Park & Trail? Sandblasting, patching and painting the outdoor pool? It all comes out of the LPRD’s share of the general fund. “The general fund pays for a lot of things that don’t produce revenue,” Hecker says. The department’s biggest challenge going forward, according to the city’s 2012 budget report, is absorbing rising fuel, utility and vehicle maintenance costs even as stagnant economic growth creates a “lack of flexibility” in the general fund operating budget.

The department has in recent years done more outsourcing, shift-

The recreational fund contributes another $4.3 million to the LPRD’s budget, generated largely through user fees and sales tax, including a portion of Lawrence’s share of a county-wide one-cent sales tax implemented in 1994. As of 2012, the department’s recre-


ation fund receives no property tax revenue. Staffing, scheduling and all operational aspects of recreational programming are paid for from the recreation fund. In return, fees, aquatic programs, building rental, concessions, field rent, class enrollment and other resources are expected to bring in $1.82 million in 2012, a 4 percent increase over 2011.

municipal course that opened near Clinton Lake Dam in 1998. The course is expected to generate almost $900,000 in user fees in 2012, or the bulk of its $1.2 million budget. The funds not only keep the course open, but go towards upgrading the existing ryegrass turf with Zoysia and maintaining wildlife habitat. “Whatever we make, we can spend,” Hecker says of Eagle Bend. “If we don’t make it, we can’t spend it.” The third major component of the department’s budget is the special recreation fund, which receives most of its $730,077 from liquor taxes. Some of that goes to outside agencies that provide arts services, such as the Lawrence Arts Center and the Arts Commission, but a portion of the funds are also used to upgrade parks, facilities, athletic fields and playgrounds.

“We deal with people from birth to death,” says Ernie Shaw, the LPRD’s interim director.

“In between, we want to give people every opportunity to be active.”

Part of that growth comes from the Carnegie Building, an historic structure at Ninth and Vermont streets that features a large ballroom and a number of smaller meeting rooms. Hecker says the LPRD has been “pleasantly surprised” by the strength of its bookings. The city also renegotiated its concessions contract and continues adding more recreational classes. Still, it’s not easy to meet the maintenance needs of aging facilities and equipment, or to manage rising fuel, chemical and utilities costs. “We have to make money to operate,” Hecker says. “It’s very much a business-oriented portion of the department.” That’s even more the case at Eagle Bend Golf Course, an 18-hole

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So what does Lawrence get in return for its investment in parks and recreation? Employment, for one thing. The LPRD employs 66 full-time staff and hundreds of part-time workers. The number fluctuates seasonally; by mid-April, there were 712 people on the department’s payroll, Hecker says. Not everyone gets paid—another 750 volunteers contribute some 35,000 hours annually, doing everything from coaching baseball and caring for wildlife at the Prairie Park Nature Center to planting flowers at the Lawrence Union Pacific Depot. Of those on the payroll, many are young part-time employees, hired as summer lifeguards, camp counselors, sports umpires and the like. And, for many, it’s their first experience learning basic work skills such as arriving on time and customer service, Hecker says. “For a significant number of the people we hire, this is their first job out of high school,” he says. “We’re probably the biggest employer of youth in Lawrence.” The LPRD also employs dozens of hourly contractors, such as plumbers and electricians, and service companies like those that


print t-shirts for sports teams or supply flowers for the downtown planters. The LPRD also contracts with seven mowing companies to maintain the city’s parks, right-of-ways and other green spaces, thereby reducing its own equipment, fuel and other costs. It’s not just about cost-cutting, though. Since most of the LPRD’s employees and contractors are Lawrence-based, it follows that their paychecks and taxes also stay local. “Almost all the money that’s budgeted and expended on parks and recreation stays in the community,” Hecker says.

The LPRD also attracts outside revenue by hosting volleyball tournaments, swim meets, golf tournaments and other events that bring visitors to the community. “All those people come here and spend money,” Hecker says. While it’s difficult to quantify exactly how much money out-oftown participants in LPRD sporting events spend here, overall fig-

ures are available. According to the Lawrence Convention and Visitors Bureau, 722,016 visitors spent $60.2 million on lodging, food and shopping in 2011, generating $1.5 million in local sales tax and $1.2 million in transient guest tax. Even more visitors, with a more powerful economic punch, may be on the horizon. The city is now in talks to create what’s being called a “sports village” in west Lawrence that would generate additional local recreational opportunities while attracting regional or even national youth sports tournaments. Such tournaments could bring as many as 50 or 60 teams to Lawrence at a time, generating several days’ worth of hotel, restaurant and other spending for team members and the 2.5 persons youth competitors typically travel with, officials say. The impact goes beyond economic, however. “Just the notoriety for the city of being a major league amateur sports center helps us sell the quality of life here,” Schumm says. “It’s a big opportunity.”

LPRD IN NUMBERS Year established: 1946 2012 budget: $9,461,897 Employees: 66 full-time staff and 646 part-time (as of mid-April) Volunteers: 750, contributing 35,000 hours annually Daily classes, activities and events: up to 50 a day Wee Folks Scholarship Fund: awards more than $19,500 annually Number of years designated a Tree City USA: 33

The Lawrence Parks and Recreation Department operates, manages and maintains: 54 parks and open spaces, measuring more than 3,500 acres Nearly 70 miles of biking, walking and hiking trails 3 recreation centers 3 community centers 4 swimming facilities 1 golf course 1 nature center 43 athletic fields 21 basketball/multi-use courts (indoor/outdoor) 19 picnic areas 3 cemeteries 30 playgrounds 19 tennis courts 2 skate parks 2 off-leash dog parks 2 disc golf courses (Source: LPRD)


“If you have an eight-court (basketball) facility that is possibly what people refer to as state-of-the-art, well, there are very few of those in the Midwest,” Sanner says. Negotiations are ongoing, but, as of mid-May, the Lawrence City Commission was considering annexation of 146 acres plus adjacent public right-of-way property on the northwest corner of West Sixth Street (Highway 40) and K-10 Highway. The facility itself would be located on 51 acres donated by Steve and Duane Schwada; development of hotels, restaurants, gas stations and other support services would likely take place on the surrounding acreage. Two developers—the Schwadas and the Thomas Fritzel family— have submitted concepts for consideration, Schumm says. While no plan had been approved at press time, a news release issued by the city on March 8 outlined a fieldhouse-style facility with multiple basketball courts that could be converted into half courts or volleyball courts; a large arena; indoor track; indoor turf area; health and wellness center; fitness facility; concessions; trails and walking areas; parking and other amenities. The University of Kansas is also in talks with developers to build an outdoor track and field facility and possibly relocate events to the site, Schumm says. There may also be an outdoor soccer stadium, he says. A facility of that scale would not only meet Lawrence’s own recreational needs, but make the city a draw for basketball, volleyball and other tournaments sanctioned by bodies such as the Amateur Athletic Union and United States Specialty Sports Association, says Bob Sanner, director of sports markets for the Lawrence Convention and Visitors Bureau.

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The facility’s construction, development and management will likely be a public-private partnership between the city, Bill and Cindy Self ’s Assists Foundation and developers, according to the news release. Schumm estimates the city can contribute $13 million to the project without raising taxes. Lawrence would own the 51 acre-site and lease the completed facility. After 20 years of lease payments, it would also own the building. The LPRD would manage all programming. Once an agreement has been reached between the partners and the property has been annexed, the city will address zoning and other issues. Not in the least of these is hosting public meetings to ensure Lawrence residents have the opportunity to voice their concerns and opinions, Schumm says. Developers may break ground this year and complete the facility in 2013, Schumm says. “Everything’s there, and there’s the desire to make something happen quickly,” he says. And the LPRD? Its staff can’t wait to have another top-quality resource to offer Lawrence residents. “This is very exciting, not just for our department, but for the city as a whole,” says Shaw.


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BY GUEST DESIGNER JACQUELINE EVANS BA/MA Interior & Architectural Design and Owner, Designer, Artist of Evans Design Firm www.evansdesignfirm.com

Our local police force and fire department gave me a tour of their office spaces and a glimpse at how they are equip to deal with the realities of working in a constantly changing and high pressure environment.

Imagine tree-lined panoramas, leisure jaunts through residential areas, daily exposure to the charming downtown night life, front row seats to major community parades and events while at work. These are some of the perks of spending 95% of your work time in a mobile office. However, In an instant relaxing views turn into torrential downpours and perhaps rescue missions, residential neighborhoods become scenes of accidents and neighborhood disputes, the charming nightlife might include unruly intoxicated civilians. Those highly populated community events become elaborately planned logistical efforts involving backto-back shifts and added personnel.

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The local police force has 30-35 patrol vehicles which are rotated and shared among officers. Each of these mobile offices cost approximately $50,000. The Crown Vic base price starts at $21,000, and then add almost $30,000 of equipment including a video system, the MDC touch screen (mobile data computer), ticket writer and printer, light bar, evidence crime scene kit, slide rack and AED heart system are just a few of the patrol vehicle necessities. Sounds luxurious and exciting, right? Wrong! Wearing a safety vest covered by a neck-to-toe polyester uniform, adding a 30-pound gear belt, sitting next to a computer system that runs at up to 110 degrees on a hot summer day, can become anything but luxurious. But this equipment keeps the officers in the community, safe and with the ability to respond and assist situations quicker and faster. “In a nutshell better vehicles equals’ better law enforcement” explains Sergeant Trent McKinely.

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One of the biggest challenges is the amount of paper work and data required by both the fire department and police departments. Ever notice a patrol car parked as close to the shade as possible, no they aren’t scanning speeders or talking on their cell phones they are working many times thru their one half hour break (required by the state) logging detail after detail of calls, stops, tickets etc. But by doing a large amount of the paper work from their vehicles, they are still in the community, visible to the public and have the ability to respond quickly to a call that might come in.

The fire department has both mobile and stationary office space. But even their static space is different from what most people have at their offices: a gym, well used kitchen and sleeping quarters. These spaces in addition to the conference and meeting areas where they prep, learn and strategize procedures, provide the fire personnel an area to be ready at a moments notice to respond to life threatening situations. However, the mobile space is where the good stuff is, including a fascinating


LAWRENCE POLICE DEPARTMENT 4820 BOB BILLINGS PARKWAY

$1.5 million dollar mega machine built to save lives. The Quint, contains a 100 foot platform, a trench digging mechanism and computers linked to necessary community enforcements. The Quint is built to not only put out fires but aid in rope rescue, trench rescue, extraction and structure collapse. Referred to as the tool box on wheels, Alex Wolf considers his truck “the best office space in town.�

At the end of each tour I left with one final question, is their anything the community should know? Similar to the design of any space, better vehicles have the potential to improve the quality and abilities of our servicemen and therefore our community. The job responsibilities and daily requirements of our local fire and police departments are extensive, they depend heavily on the efficiency of their vehicles. Simply stated, like any organization, the better equipped the mobile office becomes the better and more efficient their performance.

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by DEREK HELMS

BABY BOOMING BUSINESS BUILDING A BETTER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY According to the American Medical News, in 2010 America’s 78 million baby boomers began turning 65 at a rate of one every 10 seconds. The city of Lawrence is considering taking dramatic steps to recruit retirees to town, banking on the potential economic impact an influx of new retirees could have on the local economy. By marketing what Lawrence has for seniors, local leaders think the River City could become a retirement hotspot.

If anyone in Lawrence would know what retirees and seniors are looking for, it would be Rick and Judy Garner. The couple work as Rental Managers at Meadowlark Estates. Having lived in Lawrence for nearly a year, Rick and Judy are consistently impressed with the community. “We moved here from a property in Southern Pines, North Carolina,” Rick explains. “You would think, with the availability of firstrate golf (Pinehurst) and the moderate weather, that the community would be a great destination for seniors. But the community doesn’t do the simple things that older people really look for. I mean, the town doesn’t have sidewalks or streetlights. Those simple things go a long way.” The Garners typically live in a community for 10-18 months, helping establish new properties. The job has taken them across the country and to England. Judy says she and Rick were “instantly impressed” with Lawrence, despite early reservations. “Because of our job, we move to a new community every year or so,” Judy says. “To be honest, we didn’t really know what to expect

when we learned we were moving to Lawrence. Unfortunately the perception of Kansas is flat and dry. Obviously Lawrence is not like that at all. Rick and I were both surprised with how wonderful Lawrence is.” Rick and Judy site the cultural opportunities in Lawrence as a major draw for seniors. The communities’ efforts to support the arts, and of course, Jayhawk athletics, help keep citizens engaged and active. “The new Lawrence Community Theater being built next door is absolutely fabulous,” Rick says with a smile. “Our residents are very excited about being able to walk to the theater.” Lawrence’s location, Rick says, is also a major draw. “This community is great because it has nearly everything you could want or need,” Rick says. “But being so close to a major metropolitan area is really invaluable. Most of our residents aren’t comfortable living a day-to-day life in a major city, but being able to visit for an afternoon or evening is perfect.”

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Meadowlark Estate’s average resident is 83 years-old. According to Rick, that shouldn’t affect a communities’ perception of their activity. “Seniors in general are more active than they’ve ever been,” Rick says. “Increasingly, people who move into retirement homes are not doing so because they are unable to live on their own. They are choosing to live closer to family and friends. Maybe they just don’t want to maintain their house anymore and are choosing to use that time to enjoy their communities more. People are living longer, more productive lives. Any community should embrace seniors as an absolutely boost to both the economic and cultural aspects of their town. THEATRE LAWRENCE And I think Lawrence is doing 4660 Bauer Farm Dr. a great job of that.”

300 seats around 3 sides of stage Large parking lot Bar Meeting Rooms Classrooms Fully Accessible Outdoor Patio Senior Touring Group Volunteer Activities

Dennis Domer is passionate about retirement. Or, more accurately, he is passionate about the changing idea of retirement. The director of graduate studies at the University of Kansas Department of American Studies and former associate dean at the School of Architecture wants people to rethink their thoughts on baby boomers. Children of the Greatest Generation are not working to 65 and moving to the beach, he says.

“The entire idea and perception of traditional retirement is being completely turned on its head,” Domer says. “BoomExpected Completion: Summer 2013 ers do not want the same thing as their parents. For the most part, they don’t want to move to Boca Raton, Florida and drive around a golf cart community with people they don’t know in a town thousands of miles from their families and friends. The cities that understand that, and make a genuine effort to give them what they want, stand to be incredibly successful.” Funded primarily (97%) by private donors and foundations, (3%) city and county

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Domer cites studies of Baby Boomers that rank weather, the #1 reason Arizona and Florida are traditional retirement destinations, far down on the list of what they want. Proximity to family, cultural stimulation and the opportunity for an encore career top the list. “People want to be close to their kids and grand kids,” Domer says. “They don’t want to move to a new city and start over. Where they are starting over, is in the work force. In increasing numbers, Boomers are choosing to work past 65, and then begin an encore career. Those careers might be mowing grass at the golf course or starting a new business. Either way, America is seeing a revolution in our cultural conception of what aging and the last quarter of life can be.” Domer and City Commissioner Hugh Carter agree that the University of Kansas is in a position to create a community of alumni that are looking to retire, but aren’t looking to settle down. They cite Oak Hammock, a retirement development in Gainesville, Florida, as an example of what is possible in Lawrence. Oak Hammock, while not owned by the University of Florida, is fully integrated with the university through a series of affiliation agreements with various colleges within the university. Oak Hammock members have campus privileges similar to those of university faculty and alumni – including access to libraries, athletic facilities and cultural activities. They also have the opportunity to interact with, mentor and offer advice to UF students, many of whom work parttime for Oak Hammock or come to Oak Hammock to complete their clinical, internships, research projects or rotations.* University of Florida officials estimate their endowment has increased nearly $20 million from contributions of Oak Hammock residents alone. “That’s just money to the University of Florida,” Carter says. “I can’t imagine the money pumped into Gainesville’s economy.” Domer doesn’t understand why Lawrence isn’t already building its own Oak Hammock. “This isn’t a flash-in-the-pan idea,” he says. “Maybe 40 or 50 other universities across the county have very similar properties, and I haven’t heard of any of them failing. When you combine the access to continued learning at the university, the community of likeminded people, the integration of different age groups and cultural diversities, I think it becomes a no-brainer for Lawrence. KU has more than 400,00 alumni, if 1% of those had an interest in the developed community, it would be an economic windfall for Lawrence.”


Commissioner Carter is spearheading the city’s Retiree Attraction & Retention Task Force. The task force was established by joint City and County Resolution in July 2011 and charged with developing recommendations which will assist in retaining and attracting retirees to Lawrence.

“Everything we can do to be more senior friendly should be done,” Carter says. “All of the things we can do to make Lawrence even more attractive to seniors will make Lawrence better for everyone. Safer streets, better transportation, increased cultural and neighborhood options will all make Lawrence better for all demographics.” Carter says the task force recommends creating a centralized portal for seniors to find relevant information. “Information is crucial in any situation,” Carter says. “When you’re dealing with all the different city and county agencies that deal with seniors, we really need to find a way to streamline the available information.”

Plans for the new Theatre Lawrence opening in 2013.

“When I was thinking about running for city commission, I identified retiree attraction as a campaign issue,” Carter says. “I met with Aron Cromwell, who has also campaigned on the idea, and we agreed to make it a priority. I read a study that found that for every 2 retirees in a community 1.2 jobs are created. Considering that economic impact, and the immeasurable about of time and effort retirees donate to local charities, it is absolutely a no-brainer for Lawrence do to all it can to recruit and retain folks 65 and older.” Carter says Lawrence has the infrastructure, cultural attractions and steady economy needed to become a destination for seniors and recent retirees. All efforts to be more senior friendly should be made.

The biggest obstacle for Lawrence to become a premier destination for retirees is housing. Carter and Domer agree that the Oak Hammock model would work well in Lawrence. “Lawrence has everything boomers are looking for,” Domer insists. “Well almost everything. Where are they going to live? Most boomers are still wary of a retirement home, but they don’t want to move to Lawrence and buy a 2500 square foot home. Leaders in Lawrence need to work together to get a housing area created.” “We need to look at all options,” Carter says. “If we need to address zoning issues, let’s get it done. If we need to work with private contractors to take an interest, we can address that. I think this is idea of a retirement community tied with the university is an absolute home run. The longer we wait to get to work on it the more potential revenue we miss.”


LAWRENCE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BUSI N ESS H I G HLIGHT by EILEEN HAWLEY - VP OF OPERATIONS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Lawrence is home to a broad range of businesses, from unique art galleries to large manufacturing companies. Each business contributes to the quality of life enjoyed by residents and visitors. As Lawrence grows and diversifies, businesses are working to create new technologies to adapt to the changing technology industry. At Motorola a small group of engineers design and develop innovative new technologies. At the Motorola office in Lawrence, some of the top software engineers in the country create what they call the “converged experience.” Lawrencians share in that experience every day, even if we didn’t know it had a name. Essentially, it’s the technology that allows us to consume content—like broadcast television, Internet video and home management applications—in an increasingly connected world. “Our vision of converged experience is making sure our clients can bring all this content into your home and deliver it anywhere, easily and efficiently,” Jason Rogers, Director of Software Engineering at Motorola Mobility, says. Motorola, which traditionally has been considered a hardware company, is one of the leading developers of software for next-generation content consumption, be it interactive TV guide experiences using HTML5, streaming video applications for mobile devices and social TV interfaces. Its customers include major telecom companies and cable providers. “The technology you use to consume content is evolving in a variety of ways,” Rogers says. “It’s not just to a set-top box on the counter anymore. It’s going to your tablet, your phone and your PC.” Motorola works to ensure access to that content anywhere and at anytime. Its DreamGallery product, for example, allows consumers to navigate broadcast television with an HTML5 interface similar to an Internet browser, and with accompanying content like social media feeds and show recommendations. Rogers’ team also works on Tel

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evation, the industry’s only multi-screen media solution that lets people stream their full cable subscription, live, from their set-top box on a tablet or phone, while other programming plays on the television. Motorola’s Converged Experiences group, however, has a broader focus than just enabling new ways to consume video content. Rogers and his colleagues are working on new connected home services that are making the long-awaited vision of the smart home a practical and affordable reality for most of the country. The Motorola Lawrence team develops products such as 4Home, Home Center and Edge that allow service providers to offer subscribers applications to automate and secure their home and manage their energy consumption. Last year, Verizon led a national roll out of Motorola’s technology in select cities, marking the first massmarket offering of these services in the United States. Rogers’ team is currently working with service providers, utilities, hardware manufacturers and retailers to engineer the framework and systems that will define how we interact with our homes in the future. Motorola Lawrence is a leading case in point for local efforts with a global impact. “We are like a small company that lives within a larger company,” Rogers says. “We are aligned on a vision and we have the ability to execute that vision rapidly. As a software engineer, I want a place with smart people, learning new technology and working in emerging markets. I don’t think any other company can offer the breadth of technology we have here.” Rogers said the Midwestern values of “always doing your best, doing a quality job, focus and a desire to help your peers” is part of what makes the Motorola Lawrence team successful. “The culture, combined with Lawrence, is a good fit.”


HABITAT HOOPLA

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LMH HEARTS OF GOLD BALL


VALOR GOLF TOURNAMENT

LEADERSHIP LAWRENCE CLASS OF 2012


KU RELAYS DOWNTOWN


NE WS M A K E RS

P EOP L E O N THE MOV E. SEAMLESS HIRES

DATA

CLIENT

SYSTEMS RELATIONS

REPRESENTATIVE Seamless Data Systems is pleased to introduce Bobette Puderbaugh as their new Client Relations representative. Puderbaugh works out of Seamless Data System’s Lawrence location at 123 West Eighth BOBETTE PUDERBAUGH Street, Suite 202, in the Standard Mutual Building downtown. She obtained her MBA, with an emphasis in marketing, from the University of Kansas. Ms. Puderbaugh represents Seamless Data Systems by introducing the company’s broad technical knowledge base, attributes and abilities, and personable engineers to prospective clients. She also provides continual follow up and communication to ensure complete customer satisfaction. Ms. Puderbaugh has lived in and around Lawrence since 1971 and has been active in many associations and on committees and boards in Lawrence and in the State of Kansas. She also participates in raising funds for several local nonprofit organizations. Seamless Data Systems was founded in 2000 in Emporia, Kansas, by the owner, Jim Belford. Seamless prides itself as being a highly ethical business specializing in a variety of data solutions, working with Kansas businesses, government agencies and individuals to provide a competent local option for computer/data support.

STEPHENS REAL ESTATE HIRE MARKETING AND TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR Stephens Real Estate is pleased to announce the recent addition of Ashlee Roll-Gregory as the Marketing and Technology Coordinator. Ashlee brings to Stephens nearly 10 years of marketing experience. In this newly created position, she will coordinate print advertising, website content, and social media for Stephens Real Estate.

ASHLEE GREGORY

“We are excited to have Ashlee join our outstanding support staff at Stephens” says President Doug Stephens. “Her tremendous experience and creativity will provide another great benefit to our clients and agents alike.” Ashlee comes to Stephens Real Estate from the Lawrence Convention and Visitors Bureau, where she served as the Assistant Marketing Manager for over six years. Prior to the Convention and Visitors Bureau, she managed the marketing and web presence at Hines Commercial Real Estate in Atlanta, Georgia.

KANSAS INSURANCE ADDS CONSULTANT Kansas Insurance is pleased to announce that Sara Dawson has joined their team of insurance professionals. As an Insurance Consultant Sara will ensure that you, your family and/or your business are well protected. Kansas Insurance offers a wide variety of insurance coverage. She has extensive experience in the construction field including, Surety Bonds.

SARA DAWSON

Prior to joining Kansas Insurance Sara held the Surety Manager position with Charlton Manley/Willis Insurance Agency for 7 years. She was responsible for the Surety programs for the Lawrence, Topeka, Kansas City and Wichita locations in Kansas and the Lincoln, Nebraska location as well.

Sara maintains an active involvement in several local community service organizations. She is a member of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce and is on the Envoy Committee for the Chamber. She is the incoming PTO President for the ’12-’13 term at Langston Hughes Elementary School. She served on the Lawrence Humane Society Board from ’10-‘12. Sara is a 2007 graduate of Leadership Lawrence and a graduate of the Kansas Community Leadership Initiative. Sara welcomes you to contact her for your personal and/or your business insurance needs on the web at www.kansasins.com or give call the office at 785-331-3607.

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NEWSMAKERS


THE CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER WELCOMES DR. MAGGIE HUNSICKER Board certified by the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners and licensed in the state of Kansas, Dr. Maggie Hunsicker received her Doctor of Chiropractic Degree at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa.  As a fourth generation graduate, Dr. Maggie is committed to promoting optimal health and vitality to patients of all ages.   MAGGIE HUNSICKER

Dr. Maggie believes that chiropractic care is essential for all ages.  She is currently pursuing her certification through the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association.  She has a strong affection for pregnancy and pediatric patients.  Dr. Maggie Hunsicker›s mission is to enrich and  enhance the lives of this and all future generations through the power of the chiropractic adjustment and wellness lifestyle.      The Chiropractic Health Center is located at 3320 Clinton Parkway Court, Suite 100 in Lawrence, Kansas.  New patients are welcome, and most insurances are accepted. To schedule an appointment, please call (785) 843-0367.  

LAWRENCE HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HIRES COMMUNITY OUTREACH COORDINATOR

LINDSEY SLATER

Lawrence Habitat for Humanity has named Lindsey Slater as its first-ever community outreach coordinator.

passion for Habitat and energy make her the best fit as our Community Outreach Coordinator. She has hit the ground running and we are very excited to have her as part of our team!”

Ms. Slater will help develop and enhance Habitat’s relationships in the community. She will also develop strategies to engage community residents in housing related issues. Ms. Slater will serve as a link between Habitat for Humanity and the Lawrence community.

Ms. Slater says she’s excited to work for a non-profit that is so ingrained in the Lawrence community. “Habitat for Humanity is an amazing organization that can really thrive in a city with such generous residents,” says Slater. “I can’t wait to expand Habitat’s reach and engage with the Lawrence community.”

“We are thrilled to have Lindsey join our team. Our Board of Directors, volunteers and the community are excited that she has brought great experience to Lawrence Habitat,” says Habitat’s executive director, Tracie Howell. “Her community connections,

Before joining Habitat for Humanity, Ms. Slater spent over two years as the K-12 education reporter for the Lawrence JournalWorld and 6News Lawrence. She spent the previous two years as the 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. news producer for 6News Lawrence. She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

TWO ADMITTED AS SHAREHOLDERS - MIZE HOUSER Mize Houser & Company P.A., Certified Public Accountants, is pleased to announce that Audrey M. Odermann, CPA and Jerry J. Robke, CPA have been admitted as shareholders in the practice of public accounting.

JERRY ROBKE

Odermann is a graduate of North Dakota State University, with a Bachelor of Science in Accounting. She has focused her career on providing consulting and auditing services to cities, school districts and various other municipalities in both Kansas and Missouri. She serves as a special review committee member for the Government Finance Officers Association and is on the board of editors for the Kansas Municipal Audit Guide. Audrey is also an active volunteer for Harvesters Community Food Network and her children’s PTO. Audrey and her husband, Kyle, have two children. Robke is a graduate of Emporia State University, with a Bachelor of Science in Accounting and Business Administration. He joined Mize Houser in 1992 and has focused his efforts on serving McDonald’s owner/operators across the country. His areas of expertise include consulting and tax planning. Jerry and his wife, Jill, have two daughters and are actively involved in their church. Mize Houser is a regional accounting and information technology firm with offices in Topeka, Lawrence and Overland Park, Kansas.

AUDREY ODERMANN


PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER SHARI PORTENIER RECEIVES STAGING AND REDESIGN DESIGNATION The Organization People, Inc. is proud to announce that Professional Organizer Shari Portenier has recently completed the Academy of Staging and Redesign program earning the dual designation CSS (Certified Staging Specialist) and CRS (Certified Redesign Specialist). The CSS/CRS designation is awarded to those who successfully complete all rigSHARI PORTENIER orous phases of the course, including the passage of a written exam and the submission of a professional portfolio, judged by a panel of professional stagers and redesigners.  Ms. Portenier, an eight-year resident of Lawrence and member of the National Association of Professional Organizers, works as an independent contractor for The Organization People, Inc. Though the office is located in Parkville, Missouri, with Portenier on the team, The Organization People, Inc. has been able to expand their services to Douglas, Shawnee, and the other surrounding counties. Find out more about Shari Portenier and The Organization People, Inc. on the web at www.theorganizationpeople.com or call the office at (913) 547-2979.

LOCAL REALTOR® ACHIEVES NATIONAL RECOGNITION Toland Hippe of Stephens Real Estate, Inc. has been awarded the Accredited Buyer’s Representation (ABR®) designation from the Real Estate Buyer’s Agent Council (REBAC), from the National Association of Realtors® (NAR). Hippe joins more than 30,000 real estate professionals in North America who have earned the ABR® designation. All were required to successfully complete a comprehensive course in buyer representation and an elective course focusing on a buyer representation specialty, both in addition to submitting documentation verifying professional experience.

TOLAND HIPPE

REBAC, founded in 1988, is the world’s largest association of real estate professionals focusing specifically on representing the real estate buyer. There are more than 40,000 active members of the organization world-wide. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is the world’s largest professional association, representing over 1,000,000 members involved in all aspects of the real estate industry.

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THEATRE LAWRENCE BREAKS GROUND Theatre Lawrence broke ground for their new facility on May 10th. The theatre was founded in 1977with its first show April 5, 1977 at Carnegie Building. Currently located at 15th and New Hampshire since 1985; six to eight mainstage productions have been performed annually with 70+ performances per season. The new facility located at 4660 Bauer Farm Drive will include extensive children’s and senior programs as well as outreach with Boys and Girls Club, schools, Lawrence Housing Authority, and Willow Domestic Violence Center. 400600 individuals help to volunteer each year to contribute to the theatre’s success. The new facility will double stage space and audience seating, provide an education wing, storage, workshops and ample parking. Theatre Lawrence welcomes visitors from out of town and hopes to stimulate businesses in the area.

SEND US YOUR NEWS: The Lawrence Business Magazine invites you to share news of new employees or promotions in 50 words or less. If you would like to submit an electronic color photo no less than 300 ppi, JPGs or TIFs, save on CD or emailed to NewsMakers@ L awrenceBusinessMagazine.com . Because of space and layout considerations, photos are not guaranteed to run. Send CD to: Lawrence Business Magazine, 1617 St. Andrews Drive Lawrence, Kansas 66047 All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reprinted or reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Lawrence Business Magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. Statements and opinions printed in Lawrence Business Magazine are those of the author or advertiser and not necessarily the opinion of Lawrence Business Magazine.


NEW BUSINESSES IN DOUGLAS COUNTY MARCH - APRIL 2012

A SECOND TIME AROUND LLC C/O ECKELMAN LAW OFFICE LLC LAWRENCE, KS 66044

CLB REAL ESTATE LLC 4505 TURNBERRY DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

EXTREME BUS BUILDERS LLP 2718 BLUESTEM DR. LAWRENCE, KS 66047

ACE CLEANING INC. 682 E 1719TH ROAD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006

COMPTON MADE ENTERTAINMENT, LLC 901 NEW HAMPSHIRE LAWRENCE, KS 66044

FIXED.LLC 2506 LAZY BROOK LAWRENCE, KS 66047

AGR LLC 4621 W. SIXTH ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66049

CONTRACTING, INC. 756 HICKORY ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66044

AKD PHOTOGRAPHY AND INVESTMENTS LLC 2725 CONEFLOWER COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047

COSMOS INDIAN STORE LLC 734 MASSACHUSETTS LAWRENCE, KS 66044

ALCON CAPITAL LLC 1501 KASOLD DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

COYOTE FARMS, LLC 4505 TURNBERRY DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

ASPIRE FITNESS LLC 2812 ATCHISON AVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

CRIMSON & BLUE MASSAGE, INC. 906 WESTFIELD COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66049

AUL FARMS, L.L.C. 524 PIONEER RD. LAWRENCE, KS 66049

CRS RENTALS, LLC 4616 HEARTHSIDE DR. LAWRENCE, KS 66049

AUTUMN RIDGE FARM & RANCH, LLC 909 AUTUMN RIDGE DR. EUDORA, KS 66025

D&M SERVICES, LLC 902 W 27TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66046

BARS LLC. 2828 FENWICK RD. LAWRENCE, KS 66046 BAUERLE CONSULTING LLC 2027 E 26TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66046 BEAUTIFUL MUSIC VIOLIN SHOP LLC 900 MASSACHUSETTS LAWRENCE, KS 66044 BIO INSIGHTS SOURCE, LLC 900 MASSACHUSETTS STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 BLACH LLC 109 E HWY 56 LOT 2 BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 BROYLES MOBILE TIRE SERVICE, LLC 1220 SUMMIT BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 C AND J DRYWALL, LLC 1431 ASH EUDORA, KS 66025 CAB COMM, INC. 300 ROCK FENCE PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 CLARK HUESEMANN LC 1906 MARVONNE RD. LAWRENCE, KS 66047

DADS OF DOUGLAS COUNTY, INC. 200 MAINE LAWRENCE, KS 66044 DAVIS & CHURCH, LLC 1021 PEACH STREET EUDORA, KS 66025 DISCOVERFLY SOLUTIONS CORP. 1035 N THIRD LAWRENCE, KS 66044 DYMABAY LLC 1420 WAKARUSA DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 E & PD CONSULTING, INC 2833 LANKFORD DR LAWRENCE, KS 66046 EDIE INSURANCE GROUP, LLC 2600 CENTURY DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 ELITE TREADS, LLC 340 PLEASANT LAWRENCE, KS 66044 ENCORE PERFORMANCE, LLC 808 MASSACHUSETTS LAWRENCE, KS 66044 ESPARZA ENTERPRISES LLC 2126 MASS LAWRENCE, KS 66046 EVERYONE’S CHURCH 3012 W. 29TH ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66047

FORWARD PROPERTIES CORP 330 DEARBORN STREET BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 FSIG/FREESTATE INVESTMENT GROUP LLC. 2318 SURREY DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66046 GALENSON CONSULTING AND ASSOCIATES LLC 3323 IOWA ST LAWRENCE, KS 66046 GIVING TREE FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC 1317 RHODE ISLAND LAWRENCE, KS 66044

JERRY WANG PHOTOGRAPHY LLC 264 PINECONE DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66046 JUDAH WORSHIP CENTER CHURCH 409 E 12 STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 JUST FOOD OF DOUGLAS COUNTY KANSAS, INC. 1211 MASSACHUSETTS STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 JUSTICE WANTED ASSOCIATION 3807 WESTLAND PL LAWRENCE, KS 66049 JUSTIN T MORAVEC AGENCY LLC 4106 W 6TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66049

GREMCO LLC 1504 E 2000 ROAD EUDORA, KS 66025

K&K LAWN AND LANDSCAPE LLC 5218 CARSON PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

HAPPY CAT VENDING LLC 403 N YORKSHIRE DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

KANLAND II LLC RR 1508 LAWRENCE, KS 66049

HARDTARFER MOBILE AUTO REPAIR, INC 2009 RHODE ISLAND ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66046

KANSAS CITY COFFEE C OMPANY, LLC 3429 ELLIE LANE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

HENRIQUEZ CONSULTING GROUP, LLC 1436 E 920TH ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66049

KANSAS COLLEGE CHEM TEACHERS 1251 WESCOE HALL DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66045

HERE, LLC 2103 CROSSGATE CIR LAWRENCE, KS 66047 HIGHBERGER AND ANANDA, LLC 1024 NEW YORK ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66044 HOUSEWORX L.L.C. 2041 N. 1000TH RD. EUDORA, KS 66025

KANSAS DF1, INC. 932 MASSACHUSETTS STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 KANSAS OUTDOOR LLC 222 MICHIGAN LAWRENCE, KS 66044

INSIGHT PEST SOLUTIONS KS 2712 KENSINGTON RD LAWRENCE, KS 66046

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INTEGRITY PRODUCTIONS LLC 2433 W 24TH TERRACE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

LA BORICUA LC 817 LOUISIANA STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

J & E PROPERTY, LLC 506 PIONEER LAWRENCE, KS 66049

LAWRENCE SPEECH THERAPY, LLC 2300 OXFORD RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049

JAYHAWK POWER SYSTEMS, INC. 2617 ATCHISON AVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

MEDI OPTIMIZATION MANAGEMENT, LLC 2709 MEADOW PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66047


MES LEASING, LLC 3400 S IOWA STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66046

RKK INVESTMENTS LLC 1040 NEW HAMPSHIRE STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

TAPTAB LLC 921 N GUNNISON WAY LAWRENCE, KS 66049

WYSONG 5 LLC 3021 RIVERVIEW RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049

MIDWEST ENERGY ADVANTAGE LLC 4008 W 26 TERRACE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

ROBERTS TRUCKING, L.L.C. 2066 E. 100 ROAD LECOMPTON, KS 66050

THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF AFRICAN WOMEN ECONOMISTS 1117 STONERIDGE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

YARD DOCTOR; LLC 311 HALDERMAN STREET LECOMPTON, KS 66050

MR. BACON BBQ PRODUCTS, LLC 2311 S WAKARUSA DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS. 66047 NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN DIABETES FOUNDATION, INC. 16 E 13TH ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66044 NEWELL & ASSOCIATES LLC 641 MISSOURI ST. LAWRENCE, KS 66044 NIGHTSHOES SYNDICATE 1015 NEW YORK LAWRENCE, KS 66044

ROBO PROPERTIES LLC 516 AMES BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 SANDWICH BOWL, LLC 4241 BRIARWOOD DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 SANDY’S SWEET SHOPPE, LLC 1904 W 3RD TERRACE LAWRENCE, KS 66044 SAOIRSE FIREARM PARTS & ACCESSORIES INCORPORATED 634 GREEVER TERRACE LAWRENCE, KS 66046

THE DAVID SNEIDER AGENCY, LLC 707 8 STREET BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 THE GOOD LIFE GROUP CORPORATION 2933 PRAIRIE CT. LAWRENCE, KS 66046 THE PERSPECTIVE GROUP LLC 513 YORKSHIRE DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

SCARLETT PRODUCTIONS LLC 505 ROCKLEDGE RD. LAWRENCE, KS 66049

THE SOCIETY FOR ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN HISTORY IN THE AMERICAS 2306 E 27TH TER LAWRENCE, KS 66046

P.O.’ M.E. LLC 523 JOHN DOY CT. LAWRENCE, KS 66049

SCHAUMBURG PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC 613 N 2ND STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

THE WORD BECAME, INC 1847 BARKER AVE LAWRENCE, KS 66044

PET MINDERS OF LAWRENCE, LLC 2411 LOUISIANA STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66046

SDTOKS, L.L.C. 1136 PARKSIDE CIRCLE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

THIS LITTLE PIGGIE LLC 600 LAWRENCE AVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

PETROLABS USA INC 1900 HASKELL AVENUE LAWRENCE, KS 66046

SECOND WIND CREATIVE, INC. 508 WILMA WAY LAWRENCE, KS 66049

TMH PHOTOGRAPHY LLC 2511 W 31ST LAWRENCE, KS 66047

PIMWIMY.COM, LLC 316 N EATON DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

SHEA MEDIA L.L.C. 932 ARKANSAS ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

TUMBLEWEED LANDSCAPING COMPANY LLC 1553 N 1100 LAWRENCE, KS 66046

PROJECT NIGERIA FOUNDATION 2813 WINTERBROOK DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66047

SHENZHU LLC 4517 GOLDFIELD CT LAWRENCE, KS 66049

QUALITY ANALYTICS CONSULTING LLC 408 W 6 STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044

SILVERBACK ENTERPRISES, LLC 5030 BOB BILLINGS PKWY LAWRENCE, KS 66049

OK PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC 545 COLUMBIA DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

REAL LIFE SOLUTIONS LLC 617 LOCUST ST. EUDORA, KS 66025 REECE & NICHOLS PREFERRED REALTY, L.L.C. 845 COVING DRIVE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 RESTORATION SPECIALISTS OF LAWRENCE AND TOPEKA, INC. 768 N 1750 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 RFI ENTERPRISES, INC. 300 ROCK FENCE PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 RIVER CITY FUTBOL CLUB, INC. 101 STONECREST PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049

SOUTH BALDWIN FARMS, LLC 22 E 1700 ROAD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 STAR FARM BODY, LLC 1316 CONNECTICUT STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 STONEGATE PROPERTY HOLDINGS, L.C. 2701 W 6TH STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66049 SUNDOWN PROPERTIES, LLC 4833 NEVADA ROAD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 SUNFLOWER PAWN LLC 2429 IOWA LAWRENCE, KS 66046

UP NEXT! LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION 562 E. 1850 ROAD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 VANNERS OF OZ VAN CLUB 3428 MORNING DOVE CIR LAWRENCE, KS 66049 VASCULAR ACCESS PLUS, LLC 433 ARKANSAS STREET LAWRENCE, KS 66044 VELOCIRAPTOR MANUFACTURING INCORPORATED 634 GREEVER TERRACE LAWRENCE, KS 66046 VODVILL ENTERTAINMENT COMPANY LLC 408 INDIANA LAWRENCE, KS 66044 WAKARUSA MUSIC GROUP, INC. 545 COLUMBIA DR. LAWRENCE, KS 66049 WOODSMEN COFFEE AND STUDIO LLC 920 DELAWARE LAWRENCE, KS 66044


W H OSE

DES K?

Be the first to correctly guess which local business figure works behind this desk. Winner receives a $50 gift card to 23rd Street Brewery. facebook.com/lawrencebusinessmagazine


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Lawrence Business Magazine 2nd Quarter 2012