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THE 2O15

1O1 MOST INFLUENTIAL LATINOS

IGNACIO SALAZAR A LEADER FOR JOBS AND CORPORATE DIVERSITY

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IS FOR DIVERSITY:

www.latinoleaders.com July / August 2015 Vol. 16 No. 4 Display until 09 /10/2015

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS WITH FIVE GLOBAL C.E.O.’S


CONTENTS JULY / AUGUST 2015

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COVER STORY:

A BAND APART It’s not just a list. It’s the list. Here are the top Latinos in the country who are really the most influential. They are trendsetters, visionaries or just plain hard workers. Some have money, others don’t, but all influence many lives. This is the definitive list of the most 101 most influential Latino Leaders in the country.

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CONTENTS JULY / AUGUST 2015 6 Publisher meets: Jorge Ferráez talks about the

new era of the Association of Latino Professionals for America (ALPFA).

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8 Editor’s letter: Joseph Treviño tells us why the

101 matters. Pablo Schneider shares his influences from the top Latinos in the country.

10 Pep talk:

George Acevedo, of JP Morgan, pumps us up and tells us how to stay motivated in our careers.

16 Never give up:

Jim Alaniz of Travelers shows us why it is so important to give your best day in, day out.

22 Every person is important:

Ignacio Salazar, the head of SER, has committed his life in helping Latinos reach their goals

24 The new women’s movement:

The indomitable Nely Galán is back and on a roll. Her Adelante movement has a bold goal: to create a new Latina movement.

26 The diversity chronicles:

Five of the top CEO’s in the world discuss diversity and what it really means. Roger Crandall, Bob Moritz, Brian Moynihan, Gerald Hassell and Rosalind Brewer discuss in-depth the state of diversity in America and how we can move forward.

58 Step by step:

Ethan Aparicio had to cross mountains and countries to reach his destiny. The insurance agent for Northwestern Mutual has a story to tell.

61 Portfolio:

We showcase some of the top Latino nonprofits in the country.

66 Rendezvous with destiny: We cover the Club Leaders of the Future in Dallas, the Latinos Leaders of Atlanta and the CDO roundtable. 77 Caribbean dreams: Anaïs de Melo explores the Riviera Maya in our new and fascinating travel and tourism section like only Latino Leaders Magazine can bring to you. 80 Cheers! We know Jorge Ferráez is always

drinking something special. This wine review is no exception.

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A CONVERSATION WITH THE PUBLISHER

Big things ahead

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A conversation with a CEO of Fortune 500 Corporation is an opportunity that is not easy to get. Imagine getting five for the same edition! First of all I’d like to recognize the leadership and will to make things happen of Charles Patrick García, the Chief Executive Officer of the Association for Latino Professionals for America, best known as ALPFA. Charlie is taking over this organization and leading an impressive and energetic change, which I would say is to be expected of him. I knew Charlie García several years ago, while he was leading Sterling, a financial firm based in Florida. Latino Leaders interviewed him at his home and the conversation was both inspiring and visionary. After the interview, Charlie and I started to see each other at important events and I began to have him as a valuable advisor for Latino Leaders. Leadership is a quality that can be seen from a distance and that is what I always perceived in my encounters with Charlie García. But probably the most impressive chat we had took place a few months ago in Miami, when he starting talking to me about the plans he had for ALPFA; visionary, smart and sense making ideas were discussed in that conversation. From that moment, I hoped Latino Leaders could become a good supporter of that mission. Today, I’m proud to say that ALPFA and Latino Leaders have started a great collaboration, whose beneficiaries will be every Latino who wants to advance, lead and develop a professional career that will take the best out of him or her. In the upcoming editions we will develop content, cover important events and interview great leaders, which is part of our mission. So, coming back to the my initial statement: Latino Leaders has had the privilege of interviewing five of the most relevant Corporate leaders in the Country: Rosalind Brewer, CEO of Sam’s Club, Bob Moritz, Chairman and Senior Partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Roger Crandall, CEO of Mass Mutual, Gerald Hassell, CEO of BNY Mellon and Brian Moynihan, CEO of Bank of America. The conversations are full of an element that only this caliber of people can have: corporate wisdom. I not only learned a great deal of CEO perspective, but for some few minutes during the interviews, I was able to “enter” their minds and understand their visions. What a great experience!

CHARLIE GARCÍA, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR LATINO PROFESSIONALS FOR AMERICA, BEST KNOWN AS ALPFA.

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MATURE, BUT NOT OBSOLETE THE 101 IS SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST A LIST

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Publisher Jorge Ferraez

Ah, the 101. It is the list of lists. The who’s who. If you are on it, it means you are the real article. Rich or poor, you have arrived. This is the eighth year that Latino Leaders chooses the 101. It is a venerable tradition that comes from our sister publication in Mexico, “Líderes Mexicanos;” they select 300. One thing I noticed as we picked the 101 is that though there are quite a few Millenials –the generation that was born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s, most are from the Baby Boomer generation or from my tribe: Generation X. So what does this mean? Well, it means, to quote that rascally father of my generation, Arnold Schwarzenegger, that we are old, but not obsolete. Yes, all the hoopla regarding the upcoming generations and their innate technological talents is a good thing. But if for a moment some of us older Latinos were wondering what would become of us old hacks still grinding away, I think that it is safe to say that we are not ready for retirement yet, despite the fact that Boomers belittled or ignored us (I suspect that most, deep down, did this because the were jealous of us) and we are practically invisible to Millennials. But enough of the culture and generation wars. Today, we will give peace a chance and celebrate, because it is right to celebrate. This month, we rejoice the first time I have taken part in the full production, planning, research, note making and execution of producing the list for our 101 most influential Latinas and Latinos. This list has become a yearly aggregate of individuals who excel in the fields of politics, non-profits, government, health, science, sports and entertainment. Each of the individuals is handpicked for their impact not only in their own field but also in our society. 
As always we want to recognize each individual’s best. In this type of philosophy, in recognizing excellence, we are old school. In the classical, pre-21st Century, nebulous and pallid world, we are all about sameness, of clapping at our kids just because they were able to graze their soccer balls, at celebrating being part of the crowd, of not rocking the boat. Not us. Here at Latino Leaders, we unabashedly congratulate those who thrive on excellence, those who strive on being different, go-getters who are wild-eyed about reaching their goals and being the best of the best. So here is a cheer for the people who made it to our 101 list. Keep on trucking.

President and CEO Raul Ferraez

Editor-in-Chief: Joseph Treviño jtrevino@latinoleaders.com Director of Journalism: Mariana Gutierrez mariana@latinoleaders.com Director of Communications & Special Events Yol-Itzma Aguirre yaguirre@latinoleaders.com National Sales Director: Robert Bonnet Director of Administration: Christina Bacon Circulation Manager and Editorial Assistant Stephanie Rivas srivas@latinoleaders.com Washington, D.C. Sales Associate and Representative Deyanira Ferraez dferraez@latinoleaders.com Art Director: Fernando Izquierdo ferdiseno@latinoleaders.com Editorial Art & Design: Rodrigo Valderrama Carlos Cuevas Luis Enrique González Human Resources Manager: Susana Sanchez Administration and Bookkeeping: Claudia García Bejarano Executive Assistant to the Publishers: Liliana Morales Circulation System Manager: Raúl Hernández For advertising inquiries, please call 214-206-4966 x 225.

Joseph Trevino Editor-in-Chief

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Latino Leaders The National Magazine of the Successful American Latino 15443 Knoll Trail, Suite 210, 75248 Dallas, TX, USA Phone: (214) 206-4966 / Fax: (214) 206-4970


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Community servant George Acevedo, of JPMorgan, is a big believer in helping people follow their dreams The reason Acevedo feels blessed is because he was mentored by greats of the industry. Now, his goal is to help others in their careers. So what is the secret of his success? What did he do to get where he is at and what advice does he give other Latinos? “Have goals. Long-term goals. Think big. You work together with your manager so you can come up with a good plan on how to get to the next step,” he says. “You’ve got to make sure you do your job very, very well. A lot of people focus on their next opportunity; they forget that the main thing is that you do your job very well because that’s what’s going to prepare you to move to the next level.”

George Acevedo Senior Vice President of the Southeast Region for JPMorgan

“HAVE GOALS. LONG-TERM GOALS. THINK BIG. YOU WORK TOGETHER WITH YOUR MANAGER SO YOU CAN COME UP WITH A GOOD PLAN ON HOW TO GET TO THE NEXT STEP.”

Courtesy photos

-George Acevedo’s advice for employees in all fields.

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eorge Acevedo has one mission: to make JPMorgan Chase shine. That, he already has helped accomplish as the Senior Vice President of the Southeast Region, which encompasses branches in Florida and Georgia. But now, the seasoned financial ace wants to help rush in the new technology era to better serve its clients. In addition, Acevedo, who has worked for Chase for 27 years, is a big believer in partnerships, in mentoring Latinos within the firm and giving them the keys to succeed. “I just feel blessed that I am part of this organization,” says Acevedo. 10 • July / August 2015

A real community bank Born in the Dominican Republic, Acevedo grew up in New York, lived in Texas and for the past six years he has lived in Florida with his family. Working with the community has always been an organic part of work and life for Acevedo, he says. He believes that serving the surrounding community is not only a good thing in and of itself, but that it pays off. He recalls that when he started with Chase, Spanish-speaking customers would often take their own children to have him help with their resumes or to find a new job. He did it because he wanted to help, but it led to a deep, genuine community involvement. “People started coming,” he recalls. One of the organic ways that Chase helps is by doing community work: helping clients get a loan, start a business or own a home. Or by aiding them in becoming entrepreneurs. “That’s where we truly add value, not just by taking a deposit for a customer,” he says.


Latino Leaders, in partnership with ALPFA

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She’s on a roll the Staff of Latino Leaders Photo Aponte Studios Stories by

ALPFA changed Karen Vergara’s life, for the better.

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he loves sports, she enjoys travel and her career as an accountant has taken off. Karen Vergara, a twenty something audit senior assistant with Deloitte in Orlando, credits part of her career success –FICPA Magazine selected her as one of their “26 Under 36” List- to the Association of Latino Professionals for America (ALPFA). As Vergara tells it, she grew up in the Orlando area dreaming of one day working for Deloitte. But as she puts it, she didn’t know how to get there. “Because of ALPFA, all of a sudden I got placed in front of the recruiters. There were things that happened to me that I could have never dreamed of. They were all just because of ALPFA,” she says. “I still remember the day I visited a Deloitte office for the first time— it was June 2007 and I was attending a high school summer program by the Florida Institute of CPAs. I was only a junior in high school, but it was on that day that I decided two things: I would

“BECAUSE OF ALPFA, ALL OF A SUDDEN I GOT PLACED IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITERS. THERE WERE THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO ME THAT I COULD HAVE NEVER DREAMED OF,”- KAREN VERGARA.

If you go •What: ALPFA, 43rd Annual Convention. •Where: New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019. •When: August 6-10. •Information: http://convention.alpfa.org/next/ 14 • July / August 2015

become a CPA and I would work at Deloitte. I did not know how I would get there, but little did I know it was only a matter of time.” Vergara, who is originally from Colombia, was a sophomore in College when she became president of the University of Central Florida’s ALPFA chapter. She applied for and received the Deloitte Latina of the Year Scholarship at the 2010 National Convention in Orlando. Then Chief Diversity Officer, John Zamora, interviewed Vergara during the convention. The firm later offered her an internship in which she spent a month in South Africa. In South Africa, Vergara got to meet good, lifetime friends, get to know the Deloitte culture and the stay gave her a global perspective, she says. “Seven years later I am now a Senior Audit Assistant at Deloitte and I’m a licensed CPA,” Vergara says enthusiastically. “Both of my dreams came true thanks to ALPFA— my $10,000 scholarship paid for my studies and I was recruited into my dream firm. All during a single convention.” Vergara’s career has taken off. But come this August, she plans to be in New York for ALPA’s yearly convention. She says: “I can honestly say that my life has truly changed after joining ALPFA and no matter where my professional and personal life takes me, I will always be proud and extremely grateful to be part of.”


Leading

the good path By the Staff of Latino Leaders Photo: Courtesy photo

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Jim Alaniz, regional Vice President of Travelers, says the recipe for success is giving it all every day

any would say that nabbing a Vice President job at a top corporation like Travelers would be something like saying you have arrived. Not Jim Alaniz. Having been with the company for 31 years, he wakes up every morning with one goal: to commence anew. “I start my day with zero equity. That means I have to re earn my role as a leader, my role as an employee, as a family man, as a human,” Alaniz says, from Tampa, Florida, where he heads the local Travelers office. “Hopefully at the end of the day I can say, ‘I did the best I could to earn my right to be a father, a good husband, a good leader, a good person in the community.” Alaniz is a respected mentor in the business Latino community. As the Regional Vice President of Travelers in the Tampa, St. Petersburg’s region, he is known for instilling in others that coaching is for personal excellence, about doing the best every single day. “There isn’t a prescription on how you treat everybody. Everybody has something special,” he says. “I don’t know why you wouldn’t do it? Why wouldn’t you want to do it every day? Who doesn’t want to leave a positive footprint?” From Texas to Florida Alaniz has been leaving footprints ever since he began his career in

Life is worth living To get to where you are suppose to arrive in your career, you have to build a strong foundation, Alaniz says. That means giving it all every day for years, without expecting rewards: being tenacious, yet patient.

“I start my day with zero equity. That means I have to re earn my role as a leader, my role as an employee, as a family man, as a human. Hopefully at the end of the day I can say, ‘I did the best I could to earn my right to be a father, a good husband, a good leader, a good person in the community.” Texas, just outside Corpus Christi. First he joined the Army, upon a stint there he headed to Texas A&M University and from there going to work for Southwestern Bell in Houston. He did a stint in communications in the oil industry. Then, 31 years ago, he joined Travelers, where he has remained, crediting the philosophy, work culture and serving others ethos of the venerable insurance agency. “At one point you have to decide what makes you feel good about a profession that you select,” he says. One of the reasons he chose to go with Travelers is because he believes that the company is out there to help, especially during people’s most trying times. Large-scale examples can be seen whenever there is a major catastrophe, like when tornados have ripped through Alabama or hurricanes have blasted the coast of Texas, folks from Travelers have been there to aid, he says. But support from Alaniz and company is there not only when big natural setbacks happen, on a daily level as well. “People take a lot of risks in their lives; we try to help them manage those risks. On the life insurance side, protecting their families, their assets. To me that’s something I could say, ‘o.k. I feel good about what I do,’” he says. 16 • July / August 2015

“I’ve run into a lot of mid-career folks who say, ‘I’ve done all that.’ I say, ‘no, you haven’t done all that. You never, ever stop learning,’” he says. “I don’t know any company that doesn’t want the best talent. Why would somebody not reward the best talent? It’s counterintuitive.” Still, Alaniz’s goals may be very high, but he finds inspiration not on well-known celebrities or famous people –though he can admire them as well- but on common folks who do extraordinary things. “I’m influenced by the unsung heroes, by the guy who toils every day, works real hard, with maybe little advantages, yet is a happy person inside, comes home and is a family person,” Alaniz says. “At the end of the day you say, ‘I helped people maximize their personal performance. If the answer is yes, you sleep better at night.”


LEADERS

MONITOR

Courtesy photo

BUILDING THE PROFESSIONAL, AND ENTREPRENEURIAL MEXICAN COMMUNITY

Dr. Guido Lara, President of AEM, talks to the group during an event in April, in Washington, D.C.

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ASHINGTON- The Asociacion de Empresarios Mexicanos (Association of Mexican Entrepreneurs (AEM) - Washington chapter, recently held a workshop aimed at building the professional, and entrepreneurial Mexican community in Washington D.C. The workshop aimed to increase the network opportunities of AEM members in the city as well as to identify and promote projects and initiatives that could improve Mexican communities in the United States. Guido Lara, Gabriel España, Francisco Gonzalez-Cos, Javier Arreola, Deyanira Ferraez, Lorena Montesdeoca, Amy Glover, Adriana Arizpe, Herbert Francisco Curry and Karen Manzanilla, did a wonderful job recruiting over 100 Mexican entrepreneurs and professionals. The Asociacion de Empresarios Mexicanos AEM is dedicated to helping Mexican Nationals who arrive in the U.S. as investors and entrepreneurs to more easily understand and adapt to American culture and the American way of doing business as well as to helping Americans who want to do business in Mexico.

SERVICES OF LATINO LEADERS

In 1991, he established the Danny Villanueva Scholarship Endowment to recognize New Mexico State students Story by Services of Latino Leaders Magazine who excel in leadership and community AS CRUCES, N.M. — Danny Villanueva, who was a Spaninvolvement. The endowment has paid ish-language television pioneer and one of the NFL’s for more than 40 scholarships. first Latino kickers, passed away. In 1999, New Mexico State awarded He was 77. Villanueva an honorary doctorate. Family members and officials at New Mexico State UniverHe also was a member of the National sity, where Villanueva was a member of the athletic hall of Hispanic Hall of Fame and the Hispanic fame, confirmed he died on June 18. He suffered a stroke Sports Foundation for Education Inc.’s Danny Villanueva in an undated photo earlier that week. National Hispanic Hall Of Fame. from the 1960s, before he became a pioneer in television for the old Born to migrant missionary workers in eastern New Mexico, University athletic director Mario Spanish International Network (SIN, Villanueva went on to attend New Mexico State on a football Moccia called Villanueva a true legend. the predecessor of Univision), Danny Villanueva was a pioneer in Football, scholarship. After graduating in 1961, he played for the Los AnCheryl Harrelson, president of the becoming one of the first Mexican geles Rams, where he was nicknamed “El Kickador.” BullfightNew Mexico State University Foundaplayers for the Los Angeles Rams. ing music was played whenever he walked onto the field. tion, said Villanueva believed that everyone deserved an education. Villanueva also played with the Dallas Cowboys. His last game ended up being “Danny will live on forever in our hearts and throughthe championship against Green Bay at Lambeau Field in 1967. He and his teammates suffered through the brutally cold temperatures that day in Wisconsin. out our campus,” she said. “We are a better university Villanueva started his broadcasting career with KNBC in Los Angeles and bebecause of him, and that will never be forgotten.” came the president and general manager of KMEX. He was a part-owner in a Advertisement Spanish-language chain that would later become Univision. Villanueva was also one of the founding owners Officials at New Mexico State said Villanueva leaves behind a lifetime of successes as of the L.A. Galaxy. He served as president and general manager of the club until 1998, when AEG purwell as a legacy of giving. Villanueva, who lived in Southern California, was a longtime chased the team. booster for his alma mater, having donated several million dollars to the university. “The LA Galaxy are in mourning after the announce“Danny Villanueva was an outstanding Aggie, a great football player and a generous philanthropist,” university president Garrey Carruthers said. “He came ment of the passing of the club’s first president Danny from a small town in New Mexico and rose to become a very successful entrepreVillanueva Sr.,” the cub said on its website. neur in both television and real estate.” The Galaxy will hold a moment of silence for Villanueva before Saturday night’s match against the Villanueva co-founded the investment firm Bastion Capital in 1992 and co-founded Philadelphia Union. Rustic Canyon/Fontis Partners, an investment firm aimed at helping family businesses.

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latinoleaders.com


Jarret Barrios

A champion for helping others.

JARRETT BARRIOS, CEO OF THE AMERICAN RED CROSS, AT THAT ORGANIZATION’S CENTER IN LOS ANGELES.

“A leader is someone who can distill the values of a people or a group and bring people together to push for those values in their daily lives, sometimes in politics, work, the environment, the arts, culture, music.”


STORY AND PHOTOS BY CÉSAR ARREDONDO

ords matter for Jarret Barrios. So do languages. On a recent morning, his scheduled interview starts with a “Buenos días” from a reporter; the American Red Cross official jovially responds in an impeccable Spanish. After pleasantries and introductions and for practical purposes, the two men agree to continue in English. Barrios, 47, is the chief executive officer of the ARC Los Angeles Region that serves 10 million people in 100 cities in Southern California. When asked about the biggest challenges of running the Red Cross’ second largest region in U.S., he politely states with a hint of enthusiasm, “I prefer to see opportunities.” That optimism, coupled with his bilingual skills serve Barrios well leading a vast region that he describes as the nation’s most prone to disasters–think earthquakes, drought, fires, and floods— all smack in the middle of where Latinos make up nearly half of population. “The LA Region is the third or fourth in loss of lives and property,” he says in a more subdued tone. A recent analysis by the multinational reinsurance company Swiss Re places Greater Los Angeles on ninth place among the top –10 cities in the globe for the number of people potentially affected by a natural disaster– the only American metropolis on the list. So far, with a year and a half on his Southern California job, Barrios has not faced any large-scale catastrophe or earthquake–except for the fictional “Big One” that hit the region in the greatly exaggerated and factually inaccurate blockbuster film “San Andreas” this summer. Barrios previous job with the ARC in Massachusetts was a different story. Two year after becoming the CEO of the Bay State’s American Red Cross in 2011, Barrios faced a pair of major disasters only two months apart; a tragic February blizzard and the Boston Marathon terrorist bombings. “Those events were critical for my profession and an opportunity to recommit to the humanitarian mission of the Red Cross,” Barrios says. “In GETT KNOW ING TO Boston, there was an opportunity to lead many people who were really JARRE TT hurt through a very difficult time.” A year after the disasters, he received Jarrett is The CEO the 2014 American Red Cross Presidential Award for Excellence. of the A m Barrios does not consider himself a traditional leader, which he in Los A erican Red Cro ngeles. ss describes as one “often seen as sitting in a corner or managing lots of His spe A n cialty is all arou people or big budgets.” He rather states that “A leader is someone who and hasnd expert in the can distill the values of a people or a group and bring people together experien R ce in po ed Cross to push for those values in their daily lives, sometimes in politics, work, litics. the environment, the arts, culture, music.” Mr. Bar rios is Barrios chose jurisprudence, public office and activism. Tampa, originally from But work e Represe d in Massac Florida. A descendant of Cuban immigrants who worked in cigar factories husetts ntatives in th and in the late 1800s and early 1900s, he grew up in West Tampa, the Red the Senate, be e House of C ro ss in 201 fore joining Florida and moved to Massachusetts to study at Harvard College 1. and Georgetown University Law Center. While a law student, he helped run a homeless center and also assisted immigrants with paperwork during the immigration reform signed by President Ronald Reagan in 1986. He eventually decided to enter politics and in 1998 was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Among his achievements there, he cites a bill requiring interpreter services for non-English-speaking immigrants at hospitals. Four years later he would make history by becoming the first Latino and first openly gay man elected to the state Senate. Not wanting to be the only Hispanic senator, he founded ¿Oíste?, the first statewide political organization to help elect more Latinos to public office at all levels. “Locally, it was very difficult to make our voice heard,” he recalls. For him it became very personal. “I did not want to be alone in the state legislature,” he recalls. Today, two Latinos serve in the Senate and half a dozen in the House of Representatives. Latinos also hold elected office in city councils, boards of education and more throughout the state. Barrios resigned to the state Senate in 2007 to join the nonprofit sector. He joined the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation to focus on health issues and later was hired as the president of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, GLAAD–the only bilingual leader of a national LGBT organization. Now at the American Red Cross in disaster-prone Los Angeles, Barrios is focused on what the Red Cross might do best, sending its troops of volunteers to aid those in need and training communities in preparedness for emergencies of all sorts. Understanding the diversity of those communities and speaking their language goes a long way to serve them best, he says. “In the case of a disaster like a major earthquake, we know that not everyone will get a response,” Barrios explains with a sober tone but immediately adds more optimistically, “So our goal is to help them prepare themselves for that disaster so they can take care of themselves until help arrives.”


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A TRADITIONAL INNOVATOR Storie by

Yol-Itzma Aguirre

Courtesy Photo

Angela Mastrofancesco of Comerica Bank believes that the way to succeed in corporate America and technology is by living a balanced, family life

Angela Mastrofrancesco Comerica Bank’s Florida Market President.

“I WAS WILLING TO DO ANY JOB OR TASK. I SAW THAT AS AN OPPORTUNITY VERSUS, ‘OH, NOBODY WANTS TO DO THAT JOB.’ IT REALLY OPENED THE DOORS.” -

ANGELA MASTROFRANCESCO

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n innovator, by definition, is “a person who introduces new methods, ideas, or products,’ Angela Mastrofrancesco, Comerica Bank’s Florida Market President, is the very embodiment of an innovative leader. Born in Cuba’s capital city Havana, Angela’s family took a leap of faith and made their way to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida in order to provide her a better opportunity; as Angela recalls, “to my family, it was family first.” It is this strong sense of family unity, along with her fierce work ethic that have served as guiding forces along her journey, especially in those early years. “I was willing to do any job or task. I saw that as an opportunity versus, ‘oh, nobody wants to do that job.’ It really opened the doors,” she recalls. “From there I saw that if there was something that I needed to do, no matter what it was, I looked at it as an opportunity to grow.” An opportunity is exactly what would come knocking on Angela’s door. With a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Barry University, and only prior experience in real estate, Angela broke into a new frontier, entering the banking industry. “Twenty-nine years ago it was very much a male dominated world…that was probably one the biggest barriers in the beginning, but I don’t see that now, we’ve come a long way, there’s a lot more female leaders today than when I started my career,” she says.

Mastrofrancesco goes on to say: “I think Comerica has really done a phenomenal job of embracing the culture and diversity in the workplace…I have been very blessed to have wonderful mentors at the bank.” As one of only two Latina market presidents, what does a typical day look like for this tremendous innovative leader? Well, busy. “I am up around 5am and run every morning. Run three miles every day, then in the office between 7:30 and 8 am. It’s very quiet at that hour, it’s the perfect hour to prepare for the day,” she meditates. Angela has found one of the keys to her success is the art of balance, “my personal life is a priority. Life is so precious that there has to be a balance between work and my personal life, which is critical.” She adds: “taking care of yourself. Eating right as much as possible. It’s about keeping a balance.” A true servant to her community, Mastrofrancesco is a part of Florida; a past secretary of the Weston Philharmonic Society, board member of many different organization, such as: NSU Planned Giving, American Lung Association and West Broward Estate Planning Council. In recent years, she has been honored by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Broward County as Business Woman of the Year and has also been named a Trust Banker of the Year by the Florida Bankers Association. For Mastrofrancesco, family is still the fruit of her heart; mother of three, grandmother of two, and president of one of the most respected and prestigious financial institutions in the country, she still finds time to visit her elderly parents, every single day. Keeping traditions alive like the ones she grew up are also part of her priorities, “celebrating Noche Buena (Christmas Eve) with the family, going on Sundays to grandma for family dinner. Number one rule: we only speak Spanish. Playing dominoes, the music playing.” She says: “I have been blessed.”


To IGNACIO SALAZAR, the president of SER, every worker counts

Every life is precious

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Courtesy photo

T’S BEEN A LONG ROAD for Ignacio Salazar, one that has taken him from Texas, to Michigan and back to Texas. His family started as migrant farm workers, making the long trip north. Back then, few would imagine that Salazar would one day become the head of one of the largest non-profit, employment training agencies in the country that serves Hispanics. SER, which stand for Service, Employment and Redevelopment (it also means “to be” in Spanish), has programs for training not only employees of all ages, but also helps families with their children’s studies across 18 states. Innumerable people, according to government entities like the Department of Labor, have been helped in their job skills and employment by SER. “Now we start from birth all the way to the last person who is ready to call it the end of the line,” Salazar says. Last year, SER celebrated 50 years. In addition to the myriads who have emerged from SER’s programs, there have been many alumni’s like Congressman Joe Baca, who worked for its Los Angeles office; over a million people go through the SER offices every year. “That’s a big step from where we first began,” Salazar says.

Michigan

Salazar recalls that his family, which did the long trek from Texas up north, stayed in Michigan by accident. An aunt became ill while the family worked in the fields, so the group had to scrounge some money amongst them to pay for the high-cost surgery. “That changed the course of everyone’s life. They didn’t just stay there, they ended up permanently living there,” Salazar says. In time, Salazar ended up in college, attending the University of Michigan, where he became assistant director of admissions and scholarships. Along the way he worked with farmworkers until in 1975, a friend asked him to take over SER in Detroit, which was in trouble of going under. “I ended up being the director of an organization that didn’t have anything,” evokes Salazar. “We had funding for about a month.” There were seven employees who were without direction, the partially burned building had no heat and it was already November in Michigan, where the Winter months are notorious for their bitter cold. “We had staff looking at you like ‘what are we going to do?’ and you’re looking at them, ‘I don’t know,’” recalls Salazar with a chuckle. Somehow, Salazar and his team managed to keep the place afloat by renewing a contract with the city and the heat was fixed, thanks to insurance protection. With the help of some friends, he managed to meet then mayor, the barbed-mouthed Coleman A. Young, who helped out SER. 22 • July / August 2015

The non-profit was saved and it flourished, at one point reaching a 70-million yearly budget and counting 1000 employees, expanding to many states, including Texas, Illinois, Arkansas and New Mexico. Initially, Salazar wanted to remain in the university, hoping to reach higher in the academic world. Alas, it was not to be. “I found my calling,” he says, referring to his work in social and administrative work with SER.

To help and to serve

In 1980 he moved to Texas to become the Vice-President of SER national. Four years later he moved back to Michigan, to head the local office there. In 2002, SER chose Salazar to be SER’s national president and CEO. SER, at a national level, was in trouble, almost bankrupt, so it was time again for Salazar to do what he has proven best at: get things working again and make them flourish. So what motivated Salazar to dedicate 40 years of his life working at SER? What drives him? Salazar mentions that when he was growing up, his father, who did not make it past the seventh grade, had gotten a job where, in order to become a foreman, he had to learn more mathematics. He asked his son, who was then in the 10th grade, to help him. “It was a situation where he had to throw away his pride, as father of the family,” Salazar says. “Like I was able to help my father, I want to help others in a way they don’t have to feel humbled by that experience.” From the child who is attending elementary school to the senior who is struggling to learn new skills or polish old ones, everyone is important to SER, Salazar says. He believes that society has somehow lost the view that everyone matters, but not at SER, he adds. “If you work marble, over time it’s going to perish,” Salazar says. “But when you touch somebody’s life, that’s the most precious thing you can do. It lasts forever.”

“IF YOU WORK MARBLE, OVER TIME IT’S GOING TO PERISH. BUT WHEN YOU TOUCH SOMEBODY’S LIFE, THAT’S THE MOST PRECIOUS THING YOU CAN DO. IT LASTS FOREVER.””

Ignacio Salazar presently serves as Board Chair of Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR)


L AT INO LE A DE R S

“IT WAS A SITUATION WHERE HE HAD TO THROW AWAY HIS PRIDE, AS FATHER OF THE FAMILY. LIKE I WAS ABLE TO HELP MY FATHER, I WANT TO HELP OTHERS IN A WAY THEY DON’T HAVE TO FEEL HUMBLED BY THAT EXPERIENCE.”


Story by Joseph Treviño

Photos by Courtesy photos

Fast-forward Legendary media mogul Nely Galán is starting a new women’s movement by showing Latinas how to become entrepreneurs

For decades, she was known as the epitome of Latina success.

Hailed by observers as a human dynamo, a force of nature and a visionary all rolled into one, Nely Galán became America’s first Latina media mogul, appearing in the cover of the New York Times Magazine, heading Telemundo and producing TV shows from the East Coast to Latin America. Wealthy and living comfortably from real estate ventures, Galán decided to take a sabbatical and go back to school and earned a degree in clinical psychology about the same time the recession decimated a chunk of the national economy. During those days, she joined the Coca-Cola board. “I asked why am I on this board?” Galán recalls. Someone answered her: “Because Latinas are the fastest-growing entrepreneurs in America.” Her dissertation on Latinas in the U.S. caught the attention of Coca Cola, which led to a partnership that created Adelante, a movement geared toward empowering Latinas into becoming entrepreneurs. “A lot of our husbands had lost their jobs in the bad economy and Latinas were rising to the occasion, starting businesses. But we really didn’t have the proper training or information, we didn’t know there were government contracts for us or diversity suppliers, or franchisers that wanted us,” Galán recalls. In 2012, Galán launched the Adelante Movement, which is geared toward empowering Latinas by helping them become businesspersons. In addition to giving talks herself, Galán brought in well-known heavyweight figures like Rigoberta Menchú and Sandra Cisneros, giving everyday Latinas the chance to hear powerful speakers that otherwise they would not have access to.

The making of a Latina mogul Long before she became the leader of an empowerment Latina movement, Nely Galán started out as a young, Cuban-American girl interested in media. She was born Arnely Álvarez in Santa Clara Cuba; her parents brought her to the states in 1965, when she was two years old. She grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey. Her fist written piece was published by Seventeen Magazine on why not send a young lady to an all-girls Catholic school, which led her parochial school to kick her out but garnered her valuable experience as that publication’s youngest editor. At 22 she was working hard at a New York TV station as its youngest manager, she recalls, “killing myself like we all do” when she learned that the company was being sold. She calls it her “aha moment.” “Young lady, those are my chips. Go get your own chips,”

24 • July / August 2015

Galán recalls her boss telling her. “I was so angry at him. But in fact, he did me a favor.” Galán realized that if she was going to succeed, she was going to have to outright take over the next business she landed on. She did.

The new women’s movement In 2008, Galán, who is a mother of Lucas Rodriguez (son of actor and comedian, Paul Rodríguez), went back to school. After getting her doctorate, in 2012 she began the Adelante Movement with the help of Coca-Cola, the venerable company that is currently embarked in enabling the economic empowerment of five million women by 2020 via their program 5by20. For Galán, who lives in a colorful home in Venice, CA and is currently working on three TV shows and has an upcoming book for 2016, the Adelante Movement is personal, she says. A self-made mogul who was mentored along the way by some of the most famous entrepreneurs of the last decades, Galán believes that it would be a waste not to let her instill that knowledge to other Latinas. “What’s the point of living those lives if we don’t get to share those lives with our own people,” Galán says. “Latinas are less interested in celebrities, because not everybody grows up to be JLO or Salma Hayek.” In fact, Galán, like most projects she has done in the past, is bold: to create a new women’s movement. Unlike mainstream women who’s goals are mostly career oriented or to become well off, Latinas are geared to think and act towards improving their families, she says. “I think that when you hear that it is possible to be fully Latina and keep your values and care about your family and be successful and that those things are not mutually exclusive,” Galán says. But what about the other half of the equation: men? Not to worry, Galán says, Latino men should support their women, so that both can get to their entrepreneurial goals. She says: “I believe that being Latina in the U.S. is the best of both worlds. And we should have both worlds.”


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D Latino Leaders Magazine begins a Diversity Initiative in partnership with ALPFA

is for Diversity

Stories by Jorge

Ferráez

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iversity, the “D” word is starting to become a reality for many in Corporate America. The concept that years ago was just an illusion or a good goal to have, a politically correct posture, has started to move from plans and wish lists to organizational charts and business campaigns. Everyday, more and more companies realize the value of Diversity. Either propelled by their Board of Directors or by a visionary CEO, the benefits and actual needs to become diverse are clear and present. It is usually in two directions: one that goes to the inside; establishing a Diversity Office, working the H.R. departments to recruit and get diversity suppliers, making the C-Suite a more “multicolored” pack and establishing policies and strategies to secure a continuity. The second is an exterior route, which means multicultural marketing efforts, with the basic simple principle of “mirroring the market they serve,” conquer underserved minority markets and probably most importantly; understanding the Hispanic markets. For many corporations, expanding to these markets is not only a way to grow, but it may also mean their only way to grow. Today, Latino Leaders Magazine is making a pledge to promote and cover Diversity at all levels, because it is directly related to the advancement of Latinos and the community at large. As one of the most relevant publications in the Hispanic market, we will start devoting space and content through initiatives like this, to talk, cover, publish and promote actions from corporations directed to grow Diversity levels. 26 • July / August 2015

“TODAY, LATINO LEADERS MAGAZINE IS MAKING A PLEDGE TO PROMOTE AND COVER DIVERSITY AT ALL LEVELS, BECAUSE IT IS DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE ADVANCEMENT OF LATINOS AND THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE.”

We will keep this initiative until the concept of Diversity is no longer an issue for corporations, because it is already the norm, not the exception. As part of our Diversity Initiative, Latino Leaders has partnered with ALPFA, the Association of Latino Professionals for America, one of the most dynamic and relevant organizations promoting and establishing strong foundations in diversity. Founded in 1972, ALPFA supports over 48,000 Latino students, professionals, and entrepreneurs through its 43 professional chapters across the country. In addition, ALPFA has more than 145 student chapters at major colleges and universities. Its mission is to empower and develop Latinas and Latinos as leaders of character for the nation, in every sector of the global economy. As one of the first steps toward our collaboration, we were able to interview the following five C.E.O.s from five of the companies that support ALPFA and it’s mission. The privileged access Latino Leaders was granted to this collection of Corporate Captains has no precedent in the Hispanic print industry and resulted in a series of fantastic conversations about Diversity for all of them and their corporations. Their visions, lessons and experiences are a treasure in journalistic terms. We truly appreciate the opportunity speak with them and the concepts we were able to discuss with them.


LATINO LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ®

MASS MUTUAL’S GROUNDED LEADER

Roger W Crandall, CEO of the insurance giant, believes that their key to diversity lies in making partnerships with organizations like ALPFA

Empowering Latino Leaders

Roger Crandall, CEO of Mass Mutual

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orward thinking President/CEO Roger Crandall centers himself before Well aware of the ‘Latino potential’ Mass Mutual his day begins with exercise and meditation; it makes perfect sense for is dealing with the overall trend of Americans being the leader of Mass Mutual to set the standard for health and clarity beunderinsured. “It’s estimated that 35 million housefore addressing the myriad of duties that accompany the two top spots. holds do not have any life insurance. That’s millions of With MM since 1988, Crandall assumed the CEO-ship in 2010 after being families who could face financial hardship should their president for two years prior. Crandall’s 27 years with MM accounts for over half main breadwinner die unexpectedly. This is particularly important in the Latino culture, which values, family of his life; only 50, he is invested in every sense. Strategically open-minded, Roger above all and wants to make sure their loved ones are Crandall’s belief in getting as many qualified opinions and information direct from secure.” Aggressively sourcing agents Mass Mutual has the source has resulted in the most diverse board of the top tier firms; with half of the grown their “Latino financial professionals by nearly board comprised of women and people of ‘diverse ethnicity’. The Mass Mutual Way; 20 percent over the last five years.” With that comes a hands-on management technique begins with a huddle; his executive leadership the delicate issue of forming an authentic connection. team does that weekly. Leading by example, Crandall’s layered chair titles include “We’re getting a better understanding of the Latino “chairman of Mass Mutual’s diversity leadership council.” Now, that’s official. market, as well as where and how Latinos want to be Intensely practical, Mass Mutual CEO and long-time champion of diversity, reached so that we can have a greater impact.” CranRoger Crandall looks for synchronicity in alliances. ALPFA resonates with Mass dall’s grip on the importance of the Latino business is Mutual’s “lean and productive” philosophy. absolute. “Latinos are our next generation of families, “Our partnership is very important because we share many of the same goals and breadwinners, and business owners; we’re doing our values, ALPFA is committed to improving the quality of life for Latinos through education and leadership development, which aligns strongly with our purpose to help share to help build a stronger economy in the future.” Americans achieve financial security. At Mass Mutual, we focus on providing people To that end, it’s a top down strategy, and has been with the education, tools, and solutions they need to take action and prepare for for a while at Mass Mutual. the future. We also recognize that Latinos are the fastest growing segment of our “It’s only through diversity of thought, background and experience that we can attract and repopulation at 54 million strong. It’s Mass Mutual’s responsibility to anticipate and tain better talent, better understand the needs of respond to their financial needs. We’ve been able to do this on many fronts thanks our customers and develop better strategies and to our relationship with ALPFA. We’ve worked with them both nationally and locally solutions to meet those needs. For us, diversity and on just about all aspects of our strategy to reach the Latino market; this includes recruiting, mentoring, professional development, financial education, and enhancing inclusion starts with our Board of Directors. We have the effectiveness of our employee resource groups.” one of the more diverse boards on the Fortune 500. “Some of our most senior executives – including our chief financial and chief Our directors represent a variety of industries and diversity officers – also sit on ALPFA’s national boards, providing strategic guidhalf are either women or people of color. We have ance and support. In all, we’ve had a very productive relationship with ALPFA diversity in many different facets, all of which leads during the last five years, and we’re excited to do more in the future to work to better outcomes for our policy owners.” When it with the Latino community. comes to decisions, the Wharton grad is infinitely “Mass Mutual has led the diversity marathon well before this became a “must,” pragmatic. “The best piece of advice I ever got was Mass Mutual has long retained one of the most desirable board mavens at their table; the “70 percent solution,” which helps avoid ‘analysis paralysis.’ You can’t always wait to have all the Patricia Diaz Dennis. As chair of Girl Scouts of America, which recently took the lauded information before you make a decision. So stance for total inclusivity, Diaz-Dennis’ diversity legacy is forever leveraged. “Patricia is our longest serving board member take in 70 percent of the information and BOARD MEMBER: with more than two decades at Mass Mutual, and she’s been then make a decision. Great leaders take Patricia Díaz Dennis a tremendous asset. In addition to her professional experiaction. It may not be perfect action, but One of the most sought ence as a lawyer and the perspectives she brings as a woman they take action and adjust along the way, after board members. She and a Latina, Patricia has served on the boards of both private and in that 70 percent get diverse perspecsits on the board of Mass Mutual. tives. If you have more diverse thinking and public companies and non-profit organizations. All of Patricia Díaz Dennis, the curaround a problem, you’ll typically end up this gives her insights that make us a better board, and I’m rent chairperson of the Girl with a much better solution.” grateful for her leadership and contributions” Scouts sits on the board of Mass Mutual. She is one of the most sought after board members in the country.

latinoleaders.com


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DIVERSITY’S KNIGHT Bob Moritz, of PricewaterhouseCoopers, believes that diversity involves sponsoring employees to further heights Bob Moritz, Chair and Senior Partner, of PricewaterhouseCoopers.

early thirties. We’ve always employed large numbers of young people—historically, the assumption has been that most hires will eventually move on to other firms or other careers, while a few will be promoted all the way up to partner.” Ah, but possibly in the welcoming environment of PwC, the culturally more stability-conscious Latino youth may prove more loyal. ricewaterhouseCoopers’ Chair and Senior “In this business of levering people, there are two things you need to do—get Partner, Robert “Call me Bob” Moritz is a the best and the most diverse; the more diverse you have in thinking, the better off celebrity COB for all the right reasons. He you are to insure the loyalty.” blogs eloquently about diversity on Huff For successful corporate to non-profit partnerships, Moritz has very clear, if post, Fortune, Harvard Business Rebroad, guidelines “There are lots of things of things that you have to look at, incluview, LinkedIn, sits on panels with Bill Gates, has siveness being one of them, we spent a lot of time looking at orgs that would help us interviewed Bill Clinton, tweets (@Bob_Moritz), and to understand and extend our brands, so we’re not just talking the talk but bringing has his own webcasts; “PwC Talks”. He rides a motorthe most diverse group to mirror our clientele and what society overall is going to cycle, and plays the drums. Like a corporate Jon Stewlook like; what ALPFA does is gives us all of those things— and then some.” art, he’s got the ‘direct thing’ going on; he’s ready to say This where ALPFA has found traction. the difficult things. For a C suite guy, he’s pretty cool. “Attending events that ALPFA has sponsored is really useful especially when it For a guy that started out as an accountant, he’s very comes to either confirming points, or finding an additive point of view. We’re focused on making sure that we have is a mutually beneficial relationship with ALPFA.” cool. Moritz’s bright blue eyes glow as he talks about One insider in Moritz’s ring of seven is María Castañón Moats, U.S. Chief Dithe relentless search for the brightest talent and best versity Office and Assurance Partner. A first generation Mexican-American, Maria practices. His highly innovative management has him is one of fourteen on PwC’s U.S. Leadership team and reports directly to Moritz. at the epicenter of inclusiveness where inviting slogans She’s set strategy and deployment of PwC’s U.S. diversity and inclusion efforts. abound; be yourself, be different, why PwC is HeForShe, attracting the millennials like free iwatches, Clearly, Maria’s been successful; PwC gets consistent high rankings and awards from as PwC thrives on. “Working Mother” magazine, the Human Rights Campaign and the Great Place to Staying hyper-relevant is Moritz’s true north. Work Institute. She’s armed with over 24 years of professional accounting and auditing experience; a graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, she is a licensed CPA. Nobody can accuse him of shirking the diversity elephant in the room; in fact he embraces it. “Race is a Moritz hired her and gave her terrific leeway. conversation that’s difficult but if we don’t talk about “I told her she had different responsibilities; not just to do the diversity role; but I it we’ll never make the progress that’s necessary.” assured her that she would do a great job because she was bringing in a different perspective on every issue be they bottom line, human capital, regulatory, or whatever And he’s not keeping it general. “When you look at the case may be, but my expectations were that she would speak about every issue, the numbers of diverse senior executives, the numbers become embarrassingly small.” and be a catalyst for every job she took on. She’s done a great job.” This brings us to Moritz and ALPFA. In his apMoritz sees the full person; he was born to inspire and lead. “The responsibility pealingly direct New York style, frankly speaking of a leader is to maximize the potential in the individuals beyond their own imaginations—to push them beyond their own envelope. Moritz also has a great take on about the imperative of finding Latino millennials mentoring, that nebulous professional term. and the huge role of Latinos, Moritz “You don’t need to be their mentor you need to be their makes it crystal clear that he’s all C.D.O. sponsor—you need to put forth personal capital to enable about diving into ALPFA’s talent them to take full measure of their success-there’s a big differand knowledge pool. Maria Castañon Moats ence between a mentor and a sponsor; a mentor gives good “The history with ALPFA is a long advice—but a sponsor puts their political capital on the line one; at PwC we have one major asMaria Castañón set we’re a people machine— PwC’s for those individuals—in a leadership team that reports to Moats is one of workforce is strikingly young: Bethe president—if the president is not those people’s sponsor sixteen on PwC’s U.S. Leadership cause we recruit approximately 8,000 he or she is not doing their job. The leaders must create a safe team and reports directly to the graduates annually from college and environment for brainstorming, candid conversation, pushSenior Partner. Since 2011, she back, appropriate, respectful challenge--and if not you’re not university campuses, two-thirds of has served as the Chief Diversity Officer— setting strategy and pushing the envelope hard enough.” our people are in their twenties and

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deployment of PwC’s U.S. diversity and inclusion efforts.


LATINO LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ®

Empowering Latino Leaders

A DOWN TO EARTH DIVERSITY CHAMPION Bank of America’s Brian Moynihan is bringing a sobering light to the workforce

Brian Moynihan

He has been hailed as the sobering leader who helped saved Bank of America from one of its direst moments after the housing market crash. Brian Moynihan, 55, the CEO of the venerable banking institution since 2010, is a back to basics leader who is lauded as getting Bank of America on track. He is also the head of that institution’s Global Diversity and Inclusion Council. In fact, Moynihan, who has implemented traditional banking programs like growing with existing customers, staying clear of hard-hitting sales strategies and generating plans for raising funds for customers, says that one of his main goals is to make sure Bank of America, which has over 200,000 employees, is a diverse organization.

of ALPFA, has worked directly with Bank of America, Moynihan says, giving the bank valuable pointers. “Charlie has been a great partner of ours and his organization has been terrific,” Moynihan says with enthusiasm. In his diversity efforts, Moynihan is far from alone in trying to achieve that goal. The board, which includes African-Americans and four women –including “WE EMPLOY 200,000 PEOPLE, WE HIRE 30,000 PER YEAR. IT two Mónica Lozano, a legend of the Latino media worldIS CRITICAL THAT WE GET THE BEST TEAMMATES.” are pivotal in making real diversity happen, he says. “It reflects our desire to be the best place for One of Bank of America’s key initiatives has been to partner with the Associaour teammates to work and to do that you have to tion of Latino Professionals for America (ALPFA), the largest organization of its be diverse, you have to let people be themselves kind for business pros. when they come to work each day and feel that Growing up in an Irish family in the Southeast sector near West Virginia, Moynithey can do anything,” he continues. “If they start han believes that bank employees, its culture and ethos, must reflect those of in an entry level job they can have my job someday. their clients. That has been part of his plan from the beginning, of having the The only thing standing in the way is their desire, bank mirror its diverse clientele while offering them first-rate service. motivation and capabilities. Nothing in the company can stand in the way of that.” “Because we are Bank of America, we will always reflect who our customers The outstanding board has learned over time are. Our customers continue to change over time and we continue to move that diversity is more a part of their core activities with them as they change,” Moynihan says. “We employ 200,000 people, we hire than some sort of special initiative. He injects that 50,000 people per year including external and internal placements. It is critical the key to success is to learn from their customers that we get the best teammates.” in order to serve them. Latinos are an essential part of the bank, Moynihan remarks. He adds that “This is not a small part of America, this at least 25 per cent of its new checking customers are Hispanic. is a big part of America,” Moynihan relates. BOARD MEMBER: So, how did he do it? How did he reThe diversity CEO vive Bank of America, one of the country’s Mónica Lozano Board member of Bank To ensure that Bank of America is serious about promost emblematic institutions? What is of America moting Latino professionals, there are several groups Moynihan’s leadership and work style? within the organization that actively work on this, in“Never rest on what you did yesterday. Mónica Lozano cluding HOLA (The Hispanic-Latino Organization for Always be learning, have a healthy fear of sits in the board of Leadership & Advancement) which is celebrating its not being relevant to your customers and Bank of America. As the former CEO of Impremedia and the 10 year milestone this year, and the Hispanic-Latino not being important. That’s the drive,” he publisher of “La Opinión,” the Leadership Council, which has focused on this for says. “It all comes down to a willingness to largest Spanish-language daily the last three years. In addition, Charlie García, CEO keep learning.” in the country, she needs no introduction. She is a shining star on whatever board she sits in.

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LATINO LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ®

Empowering Latino Leaders

THE RIGHT MINDSET Gerald Hassell, CEO of Bank of New York Mellon, says that the venerable institution looks toward serving the Latino community

With Hassell is Joe Echevarria, CEO of Deloitte, and board member of Bank of New York Mellon. His comments begin below and are attributed to him. “New York and ALPFA have a ten year partnership; we are delighted to be associated with ALPFA and proud to be the chair of the committee; it’s the first Gerald Hassell, time ALPFA has met in New York as well.” CEO of Bank of New York Mellon “Taking a step back, we are a huge, huge believer [in diversity] all the way from our board members to rank and file, to senior leadership. Clearly, when you hat a life! Gerald Hassell was barely bring people of different gender, different nationalities into an equation to solve legal when he joined America’s oldest complex financial problems it results in a better answer, it results in a better situation for our constituents…everyday we’re putting our shoulders, money and rebank, founded in 1784 by Alexander source groups into the development of individuals personally, and in our board.” Hamilton, 1st Secretary of the Treasury. “The challenges are several fold, making sure the culture in your company is acA mere 21, in 1973, fresh from cepting of people, no matter where they come from, or what they look like. It’s Duke University, Hassell began as a management important to extend the opportunity for them to be valuable members and accelertrainee, and worked his way up, up, up the corporate ladder to the very top. Along the way, Hassell ate their careers. Too often large companies promote vertically – the person who’s earned an MBA in Finance from Stern School of ‘next in line’... and people tend to promote people who look and sound like themselves, so you’ve got to break through that unconscious barrier to promote – that’s Business and held numerous positions in the credit one thing. If you have the right culture and mindset in a company; however, in and corporate banking divisions. many cases you have to go out of your way to create that opportunity. “ He patiently paid his dues; Hassell held spots as a “We have a somewhat diverse board, not as much as we’d like it to be. We’re senior executive vice president and chief commercial banking officer. At 46, he was named president always looking for expertise in technology, government affairs; we’re lucky to and a member of the board. During his faithful tenhave Joe [Joe Echevarria, CEO of Deloitte and NY Bank Board of Directors ure he’s been involved in the formation and operaMember] who brought not only diversity but incredible expertise in a number of tion of the bank’s Communications, Entertainment things, it’s a fantastic fit from my point of view.” & Publishing Division, and was responsible for stra“There are all sort of market segments that we think about, for example, one tegic planning and administrative services. of the largest markets we serve is the Latin American market; we have been for He was also a member of the bank’s Senior Policy over 100 years as an institution. It’s a large market for us. The Latino community Committee, and is the former chairman of the Board of domestically is a one of increasing wealth; we’re trying to develop products and Visitors of The Fuqua School of Business at Duke Unistrategies business wise, to service that marketplace. We approach from lots of versity; a member of The Financial Services Roundtable different segments making sure our products and services meet their needs. We and Financial Services Forum; a member of the board still have a long way to go. It’s a huge and growing market for us. It would be difficult to approach the Latino market without having Latinos inside the company to of Private Export Funding Corporation; and Vice Chairman of Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New guide us. Our company is focused on investments; we’re York. Working with communities gives finding that we need to tailor our products to serve the BOARD MEMBER: Gerald great enjoyment, and it is evident needs of those communities. We’re trying to adjust to the that he relishes the new challenge of the growing Latino market. We’re all challenged with how to Joe Echevarria CEO of Deloitte and growing Latino market, and working improve growth in a slow growth market. We’re all chalboard member of Bank lenged by the question— how do we handle technology to with ALPFA. It is not a new alliance, but of New York Mellon reach our clients in a more friendly way?” a loyal one that has lasted a decade. “I admire ALPFA for promoting the work of the Latino Hassell’s gentle voice is what you “I would remind all Latinos to hold onto their community, and creating visibility for the Latino profeswould expect of a man who has spent culture; that’s what makes sionals around the country, and for what they are doing to his entire career in the most prestiAmerica great. To be successful gious bank in the nation. His enthuhelp companies find great talent and pulling up everybody doesn’t mean giving up your siasm comes as a wonderful surprise. as part of the process.”

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Empowering Latino Leaders

CLUB LEADER

Rosalind “Roz” Brewer, President and CEO of Sam’s Club, shows the meaning of diversity With all of that on her plate, Roz did not withdraw. Very much about ‘giving back’, Roz serves as the Chair of the Board of Trustees of Spelman College. She has Rosalind Brewer, served as the President of Georgia’s Non -Profit Board of Directors Network, and CEO of Sam’s Club was the First Chairperson of the Wal-Mart President’s Council of Global Women Leaders. Today, Wal-Mart’s market share stands at a whopping 57.40%; well above umber 65 on the Forbes 100 Most Target and Costco. Powerful Women, [Just behind TaySAMS’S CLUB and ALPFA share a love of Latino entrepreneurs and associates. lor Swift who’s #64], is Rosalind “In terms of why ALPFA is important for both Wal-Mart and Sam’s, our associate “Roz” Brewer, President and CEO of base must reflect member base we know that our members want to see and interact with people like themselves so we’re always looking for qualified candidates. Sam’s Club, Wal-Mart Stores. We have 600 Sam’s clubs in the US, 100 of these are in neighborhoods that So much more than a highly successful corporate exec, Roz is a symbol of hope for anyone who are predominately Hispanic; and we have roughly 250 employees per club so is wondering if they should risk a major career you can see that there is room for a number of Hispanic associates and employees to join the company.” change after investing years in a good job. She is an Brewer continues: “The question asked with regard inspiration for women of color to pursue their educational dreams--even when the money’s scarce. to diversity is always how can we drive innovation and They Stay With Sam’s She’s an enlightened breadwinner, encouragthe diversity we need to accelerate growth?” Sam’s Club CEO Roz ing wives and husbands to fearlessly exchange Brewer is also focused on e-commerce growth, Brewer knows that in a world of business inequity traditional roles. And certainly Wal-Mart sharegiving members the convenience of shopping anyin the workplace she’s an holders would agree that she’s just plain awesome where, anytime. exception. The breakdown as their top manager. “In the communities they live in we also know as the of employees is 52% female to 48% male and Clever implementation of technology has boosted population continues to expand, that we will address this a whopping 24% of their Brewers numbers along with a series of financial at market level; we need to understand clearly. Sam’s was employees stay from 5 to product offerings and innovations. If Shonda Rhimes started to support small businesses--a large number of 9 years with 18% lasting 10 to 19 years. made a drama show about a gutsy American retailer, our members small businesses are Latino run.” climbing the corporate ladder, Roz would be her muse. Brewer is known for building strong teams, inspiring mentoring networks, and having a passion for improving communities.“I’ve Here’s what happened: graduating from Spelman College in Atlanta with a B.S. in Chemistry probably have done as much in the community as I’ve done the companies that Roz plowed through her education, completing the I work for” Advanced Management Program at Wharton, and “The board for Sam’s club is also diverse with more Latinas in it, Aida Alvarez graduating from Director’s College at the Universihas been on the board for ten years. We have both racial diversity reflected on the ty Of Chicago School of Business/Stanford School Of woman on our board…we have various backgrounds and is truly a compliment Law. She began her career as a chemist for Kimberto the work that we do.” ly Clark where she worked for 22 years in various Brewer never loses sight of the basis for Sam’s existence, “Sam’s started 32 managerial capacities before landing the regional years ago to support small businesses and a large number of our small businesses vice president gig at Walmart in 2006. members that shop at our clubs everyday are from the Hispanic community.” As Sam’s Club CEO in 2012, Roz hit a double; as Her advice to any CEO is “Being visible” visible in the community and within the first woman and first Africanthe company because that way you are known and people American to lead a Wal-Mart direcognize that they can come to you for suggestions and BOARD MEMBER: vision. Sam’s Club banks $58 bilimprovements. Roz knows how to listen. Aída Álvarez lion in revenues and its 100,000 “Talent comes in a lot of different packages by that I mean employees work in the warehouse right now even diversity of thought is very important for us The first Latina to club’s 648 locations in the U.S. not only racial or gender diversity the diversity of thought hold a presidential and Puerto Rico. makes us stronger.”

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cabinet post, is now a board member or Wal-Mart.


A BAND APART THE 2015 LIST OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL LATINOS IN AMERICA They come in all shapes and sizes. But they all share one thing: an almost fanatical commitment for excellence in their fields. They may be ordinary Latinos, but their work passion is extraordinary. With our eight edition, we celebrate exemplary individuals who embody the pinnacle of those in our society who have not only risen to the top, but also have dedicated their lives to education, culture and the success of generations to come. It is with gusto that we list the achievements of those who have pushed beyond the boundaries of their fields and of the expectations placed on them. They already have formed legacies. These individuals, who inspire others, have not only revealed the keys that unlock their feats, but have also begun to pass that along to a younger Latinos. With each year, the list matures, and this year, we are proud to give you a deeper insight to our leaders by showing the Latin American countries and cultures represented, the online impact they have, their origins and their education. It is also with utmost pride that we introduce the 101 most influential Latinos of 2014 as demonstrated by their excellence in government, activism, finance, business, health, science, arts and entertainment and the athletics arena.


MEXICO ENERGY + BUSINESS FORUM PRESENTED BY

We cordially invite you to find out the latest developments in Mexico’s dynamic energy sector. Our panels of US and Mexico experts will provide information on business opportunities, research findings and highlight the major breakthroughs, as well as challenges facing the industry today.

Please join us for a breakfast and panel sessions. Register at MXE-FORUM.EVENTBRITE.COM at no cost and reserve your seat. Space is limited.

AUGUST 19, 2015 8am - 1pm FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 1300 LAMAR ST. HOUSTON, TX 77010

Invited speakers ARTURO HENRIQUEZ | CHIEF PROCURMENT OFFICER (PEMEX) GUSTAVO HERNANDEZ | DIRECTOR OF EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (PEMEX) LOURDES MELGAR | UNDERSECRETARY OF HYDROCARBONS (MINISTRY OF ENERGY) JUAN ACRA | PRESIDENT OF THE ENERGY COMMISSION (COPARMEX) JUAN CARLOS ZEPEDA | PRESIDENT COMMISIONER OF THE NATIONAL HYDROCARBONS COMMISSION FRANCISCO SALAZAR | PRESIDENT COMMISIONER OF THE ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION ENRIQUE OCHOA | CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR THE FEDERAL ELECTRICITY COMMISION (CFE) CARLOS CANTU | GENERAL MANAGER SUPPLIER DEVELOPMENT (PEMEX PROCUREMENT INTERNATIONAL INC. CARLOS DE REGULES | EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR FOR THE SECURITY, ENERGY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY (ASEA) BENIGNO VILLAREAL DEL RIO | GENERAL DIRECTOR, VIVE ENERGIA - ELECTRIC ENERGY CARLOS HUERTA | POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC ADVISOR IN PEMEX COMMITTEE For more information, please contact: JAVIER SENDEROS Mexico City 52 559136 5100 jsenderos@petroleoenergia.com

JOSE ESCOBEDO Dallas 214 206 4966 EXT. 227 jescobedo@latinoleaders.com


001 ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

JESSICA ALBA ACTRESS, MODEL, ENTREPRENEUR

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1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

• Born on April 28, 1981, is married, mother of two, and lives in Beverly Hills

This descendant of Mexican immigrant grandparents rose to prominence starring the sci-fi TV series “Dark Angel,” directed by James Cameron of Titanic fame, for which she won a Golden Globe nomination. Her most well-known films include “Sin City,” “Fantastic Four” and “Machete.” Alba’s sultry looks have catapulted her into an international sex symbol. She is recognized as an environmental activist. In 2012, the mother of two launched her eco-friendly baby and home product line Honest that is now worth about $1 billion. Alba’s fortune is reportedly estimated at $200 million. This year she has lobbied Congress on the environment, made a cameo appearance in the film Entourage and has also worked on several other movie projects. www.honest.com

@jessicaalba

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

RAMÓN BAEZ SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CIO OF HP

• Married: Kelly Baez • Residence: Menlo Park, CA • He is 54 Baez began his career at Northrop Grumman, where he spent 25 years and finished as CIO for its electronics system sensor sector. He was also previously CIO of Kimberly Clark.

Ramón Baez, one of the top CIO’s in the world, serves as the senior vice president and CIO of HP. He is responsible for the global information technology (IT) strategy and all of the company’s IT assets that support HP employees and help drive strategic company priorities. This includes worldwide application development, the company’s private cloud, IT security, data management, technology infrastructure, and telecommunication networks. @ramonfbaez

002 CORPORATE, BUSINESS

MEDIA

LINDA ALVARADO PRESIDENT AND CEO OF ALVARADO CONSTRUCTION, INC.

EMILIO AZCARRAGA JEAN

• She is 64.

PRESIDENT OF TELEVISA

1976 Founded Alvarado Construction 1992 Became first Latino to own a major league baseball team (Colorado Rockies) 2003 Inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame

• Born in 1968, he is married and lives in Mexico City.

Linda Alvarado is the President and CEO of Alvarado Construction, Inc., a commercial and industrial construction firm in Denver, Colorado. She is also President of the Palo Alto, Inc. restaurant company, co-owner of the Colorado Rockies baseball team, and serves on the boards of directors of 3M and of Pitney Bowes. Linda is a trailblazer, wife and mother, and stands out at a strong Latina in the male-dominated arenas of construction, sports, and corporate boards. www.alvaradoconstruction.com

With a wealth estimated in more than $3 billion, this Mexican media tycoon is among the world’s richest people. He is the president and CEO of Grupo Televisa, the largest Spanish-language media company in the world. Here in the U.S., he sits the board of directors of the Spanish-language Univision Network, in which Televisa also owns a stake. Furthermore, he is a board member of Endeavor, an international non-profit organization headquartered in New York that serves entrepreneurs in nearly 20 nations with emerging markets in four continents and through a project in Miami, Florida. www.televisa.com/us

SPORTS

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

POINT GUARD, DALLAS MAVERICKS

CHAIRMAN OF THE LATINO COALITION

• Born June 26, 1984. Youngest of three brothers, Jamie J. Barea and Jason J. Barea. Has a son, Sebastian, with former Miss Universe, Zulekya Rivera.

• Born in 1961. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife Robin and three children.

JOSÉ JUAN “J.J.” BAREA 2001-02 Attended Miami Christian School in Miami and helped his team win a Florida state championship. 2005-06 Became the second all-time leading scorer and leader in asists at Northeastern University. 2006 Made his debut with the senior national Puerto Rican team in the Central American and Caribbean Games where they won the gold medal. 2011 Helped lead the Dallas Mavericks to an NBA Championship 2014-15 After 3 seasons with the Minnesota Timberwolves, Barea re-signed with the Mavericks.

JJ Barea first began to make a name for himself in Puerto Rico as a player for Indios de Mayagüez of the Baloncesto Superior Nacional (BSN). He later moved to the United States attended Miami Christian School in Miami where he helped the team win a championship. After playing basketball for Northeastern University, he joined the Dallas Mavericks in 2006 and became the seventh Puerto Rican to play in the NBA. In 2011, he helped lead the Dallas Mavericks win an NBA Championship, becoming just the second Puerto Rican player to win. José-Juan-Barea

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HECTOR V. BARRETO 2006- present: President & CEO Barreto Inc 20012006 Appointed Adminsitrator of U.S. Small Business Administration 1986-present President of Barreto Insurance & Financial Services 1995-2001 President and Owner TELACU/ Barreto Financial Services

The Honorable Hector V. Barreto is Chairman of The Latino Coalition which is now considered one of the leading and largest latino advocacy groups in the nation. Barreto currently serves as a member of the board of the United States Chamber of Commerce and sits on its council for small business, in addition, he served five years as the Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration. www.barretoinc.com / www.thelatinocoalition.com/ about-us/hector-v-barreto

@jjbareapr

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CONGRESS

LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

FINANCE

U.S. CONGRESSMAN, CALIFORNIA’S 34TH DISTRICT

TEXAS LAND COMMISSIONER

FOUNDER & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, CABRERA CAPITAL

GEORGE P. BUSH

• Becerra and his wife, physician Carolina Reyes, have three children. • DOB: January 26, 1958 1992 Elected to the House of Representatives 19971998 Served as chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus

With more than 20 years of service in the U.S. House of Representatives, Becerra serves as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He is a member of the powerful Committee on Ways And Means and is Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security. http://becerra.house.gov/ XavierBecerra @RepBecerra

• He resides in Austin with this wife, Amanda, and their two sons. • Born April 24, 1976

MARTIN CABRERA, JR. • He is based in Chicago, and is 43 years old.

2011 Served in Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan with the U.S Navy Reserves 2012 Deputy Finance chairman of the Republican Party of Texas 2014 Elected Texas Land Commissioner

2007 Honored by the U.S. Department of Commerce with the Minority Business Advocate of the Year Award 2010: Received the Maestro Award for Leadership from Latino Leaders Magazine 2013 Served just a short four months as the reformer of the United Neighborhood Organization

A member of the Bush family, Bush is the son of Republican Presidential candidate Jeb Bush, grandson of George H.W. Bush, and the nephew to President George W. Bush. Former Rice University undergraduate, he earned his Juris Doctorate at the University of Texas School of Law. He worked as a Florida teacher before serving in the U.S. Naval Reserves in Afghanistan. In 2015, he was overwhelmingly elected Texas Land Commissioner. Bush co-founded several businesses in the Texas area.

Martin Cabrera, Jr. is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Cabrera Capital Markets. He is responsible for overseeing many of the firms activities, including investment banking, corporate debt, initial public offerings and trading. He is also founder of Cabrera Capital Partners. Prior to the forming of Cabrera Capital, he served as a General Principal and Branch Manager of Salomon Grey Financial Corporation and was a Senior Vice President at Amerivet Securities, Inc.

http://georgepfortexas.org/ @georgepbush

www.cabreracapital.com

CONGRESS

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

U.S. CONGRESSMAN, TEXAS’ 20TH DISTRICT

SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; FORMER MAYOR OF SAN ANTONIO

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF LATINO AFFAIRS AND IMMIGRATION, OFFICE OF PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT, THE WHITE HOUSE

• September 16, 1974. Castro and his wife Erica have two children.

• Born in Delano, Calif. Rodriguez grew up mostly at the United Farm Workers headquarters, a small community named Nuestra Señora Reina de la Paz, or Our Lady of Peace, in Keene, in the Tehachapi Mountains.

JOAQUIN CASTRO

JULIAN CASTRO

• He and his wife Anna have a daughter. DOB: September 16, 1974 2012 Elected to the House of Representatives 2013 Named co-president for the House freshman Democrats and Assistant Whip for House Democrats.

As one of two brothers who are among the most high profile Hispanics in national politics, Castro’s respect for public service and involvement in political movements and civic causes developed at a young age. Now in his second term in the House, he was at the forefront in proposing forward-thinking legislative reforms in the areas of mental health, teen pregnancy and juvenile justice. Joaquin and twin brother Julian are rumored to be potential Democratic vice presidential candidates. https://castro.house.gov/ https://www.facebook.com/JoaquinCastroTX?fref=t https://twitter.com/joaquincastrotx

010

JULIE CHÁVEZ RODRÍGUEZ

2009-2014 Mayor of San Antonio 2012 Delivered keynote address at the Democratic National Convention 2014 Confirmed as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

Castro’s focus is ensuring that the Department of Housing and Urban Development is a transparent, efficient and effective champion for the people it serves. Since his confirmation last year as HUD Secretary, the buzz on Castro continues to grow louder, with his name often mentioned at the top of Hillary Clinton’s list of possible running mates. In 2010 Castro was named one of World Economic Forum’s list of Young Global Leaders. http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/about/ principal_staff/secretary_castro https://www.facebook.com/profile. php?id=221038&fref=ts https://twitter.com/SecretaryCastro

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In her current position, Rodriguez regularly blogs on Latino-focused issues, engaging Latinos and other minorities in service-learning and community development programming. Prior to joining the White House, she served as Director of Youth Employment at the Department of the Interior and as Deputy Press Secretary to the Secretary of the Interior. Granddaughter of labor rights leader César Chávez, Rodríguez grew up in the midst of farm workers organizing for numerous campaigns. She helped launch the Chavez Foundation’s service-learning programs in Latino communities across the country. https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/author/Julie%20 Chavez%20Rodriguez https://www.facebook.com/julie.c.rodriguez.3

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1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

XAVIER BECERRA

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013 OPINION LEADERS

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

HENRY CISNEROS

40 • July / August 2015

014 MEDIA

MARCELO CLAURE

CESAR CONDE E.V.P. NBC UNIVERSAL

FOUNDER AND CHAIRMAN OF CITYVIEW

CEO AND DIRECTOR OF SPRINT CORPORATION

• Married Mary Alice Pérez in 1969. They have three children: Teresa Cisneros, Mercedes Cisneros, John Paul Cisneros.

• He is 44. Married: Jordan Engard Residence: Miami, FL and Kansas City, MO

1975-81 City council member for San Antonio. 198189 Mayor of San Antonio. 1993-97 Served as 10th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Co-chairman of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Housing Commission and Immigration Task Force.

Claure founded Brightstar in the late 1990’s and grew it into a company of over $10 billion in revenue with operations in over 50 countries. He is the owner of the Bolivar Soccer Team in his native Bolivia.

With a long career in community-building, Cisneros has ranged anywhere from mayor to housing developer to TV corporate owner. He is now taken another role as a sort of “evangelizer” of climate change to the business sector, helping to shape public opinion on the subject. He was appointed to Secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1992 and worked to revitalize several of the country’s public housing developments with new policies, which helped grow the home ownership rate in the country

015

Marcelo Claure, the CEO of Sprint Corporation, is one of a handful of Latino CEO’s of multi-billion dollar companies (Sprint ranked number 87 on the Fortune 500 before SoftBank acquired an 80% ownership). Claure also serves on the board of directors of Sprint. He is a wireless industry entrepreneur, having served as Founder and CEO of Brightstar Corp. https://twitter.com/marceloclaure

• Born Dec. 8, 1973, he is married and lives in Miami. At 41, Conde is among the highest-ranked Latinos and youngest executives in English-language broadcast network.

A Harvard graduate and former White House Fellow Conde rose through the executive ranks at Univision to become one of the youngest presidents of an American broadcast network at the age of 36 in 2009. While at the Spanish-language network, he held half a dozen senior positions, from special assistant to the CEO, to VP and operating manager of the Galavisión Network to vice president Univision’s sales and business development. In 2013 Conde joined NBC Universal, where he serves as an executive vice president with general and international business responsibilities, strategic priorities and special business projects http://cesarconde.org

@csrconde

http://www.cityview.com/contact/index.html

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

MARIA CONTRERASSWEET ADMINISTRATOR, THE SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

• Born 1955, she lives in Washington, D.C. 1989 Founding president of Hispanas Organized for Political Equality. 1999-2003 Cabinet Secretary of California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency. 2001-05 Youngest member to be elected to San Antonio City Council. 2014 Appointed 24th Administrator of the SBA

Maria Contreras-Sweet was named the 24th Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration in 2014. Serving as a member of the cabinet of President Barack Obama, her job is to support American small businesses. She has had a long and distinguished career serving as an executive, state cabinet official, and entrepreneur. She previously served with the United States Census Bureau, was Secretary of Business for the State of California, and was the only female executive for the 7-Up/RC Bottling Company. www.sba.gov

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

TED CRUZ

HENRY CUELLAR

U.S. SENATOR (R), TEXAS

U.S. CONGRESSMAN, TEXAS’ 28TH DISTRICT

• Cruz and his wife Heidi have two daughters. • Born, December 22, 1970 2003-2008 Solicitor General of Texas 2012 Elected to the Senate 2015 Announced his candidacy in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

One of only three Latinos in the Senate, Cruz was among the first Republicans to announce his candidacy in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. Previously he served as the first Hispanic (and youngest) Solicitor General of Texas, the State’s chief lawyer before the U.S. Supreme Court. He has been named by American Lawyer Magazine as one of the 50 Best Litigators under 45 in America and by Texas Lawyer as one of the 25 Greatest Texas Lawyers of the Past Quarter Century. www.cruz.senate.gov www.facebook.com/tedcruzpage twitter.com/tedcruz / instagram.com/sentedcruz

• Cuellar and his wife Imelda have two children. • Born, September 19, 1955 2001-2002 Texas Secretary of State 2005 Sworn in as U.S. Congressman 2009 Authored the Southern Border Security Taskforce Act of 2009.

The son of migrant workers who never made it past the fifth grade, Cuellar has positioned himself as a strong advocate for education and has often described himself as “the most degreed member of Congress,” having earned an associate’s degree, a bachelor’s in Foreign Service, a master’s degree in International Trade, a law degree, and a Ph.D. in Government. Two schools in his hometown of Laredo are named in his honor. http://cuellar.house.gov/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-CongressmanHenry-Cuellar-TX-28/152569121550 https://twitter.com/repcuellar

@MCS4Biz

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

PRESIDENT AND CEO OF ALTAMED HEALTH SERVICES CORPORATION

PRESIDENT & CEO OF AT&T MOBILE & BUSINESS SOLUTIONS

DIRECTOR, PRODUCER, WRITER

• He has had numerous mentions and awards, including induction into the National Association of Community Health Centers’ Grassroots Hall of Fame.

• He is 64. Ralph de la Vega and his family live in Atlanta. Married: Maria de la Vega Residence: Atlanta, GA

Began working with AltaMed 1992: Awarded the U.S. Surgeon General’s Gold Medallion for Public Health in 1992 2006-present: AltaMed ranks number 1 one Hispanic Business Magazine’s Top 25 Non-Profit list under his leadership

De la Vega holds a bachelor’s degree of science in mechanical engineering from Florida Atlantic University, and an MBA from Northern Illinois University.

CASTULO DE LA ROCHA

De la Rocha has made a name for himself nationally as a foremost advocate for affordable health care to struggling Latino communities. He holds several degrees from top tier universities, including a Juris Doctorate from Berkeley. Since joining AltaMed in 1977, the company has grown exponentially under his tenure to now serve communities in the L.A and Orange County area. He has had numerous mentions and awards, including induction into the National Association of Community Health Centers’ Grassroots Hall of Fame.

RALPH DE LA VEGA

Ralph de la Vega is President & CEO of AT&T Mobile & Business Solutions, which serve over 116 million mobile customers in the U.S. and over 3.5 million customers in 100 countries worldwide. De la Vega serves on several boards of directors, including the board of New York Life Insurance Company, which ranks #80 on the Fortune 500. De la Vega has had a stellar career in the telecommunications industry and is one of the top executives of one of the dominant industry players. During his career he has previously served as COO of Cingular Wireless and as President of Latin America Operations and President of Broadband and Internet Services for BellSouth’s operations in ten countries. https://www.linkedin.com/in/ralphdelavega

GUILLERMO DEL TORO • Born on October 9, 1964, he is married and lives in Los Angeles. He is married to Lorenza Newton, cousin of Mexican singer Guadalupe Pineda. In 2007 his acclaimed El Laberinto del Fauno got on Oscar nod. Add 50 other wins and 30-plus nominations to other international awards and it is easy to understand that the Guadalajara, Mexico-born Del Toro is considered a master of horror films.

His first directed feature, the Spanish-language Cronos, won the Mercedes-Benz Award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1993; in 2007 his acclaimed El Laberinto del Fauno got on Oscar nod. Add 50 other wins and 30-plus nominations to other international awards and it is easy to understand that Guadalajara, Mexico-born Del Toro is considered a master of horror films in both Spanish and English. His director credits include Mimic, the Hellboy series, El Espinazo del Diablo and Pacific Rim–the latter slated with a sequel and turned into a comic book series. He is also credited as a writer in the film series The Hobbit. Furthermore, FX’s TV series The Strain was picked up for a second season and is airing this year.

41 • July / August 2015

http://deltorofilms.com

LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

SPORTS

PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE FOR HISPANIC HEALTH

PRODUCER, ACTIVIST

JOCKEY

• She resides in Washington, D.C. with her husband.

• He was born on March 12, 1949 and lives in Los Angeles with his wife.

Delgado received a M.A. in psychology from New York University in 1975, a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from SUNY Stony Brook in 1981 and an M.S. in Urban and Policy Sciences from Stony Brook’s W. Averell Harriman School of Management and Policy

1960 Participated in the Chicano Movement 1973 Received his M.F.A. from UCLA 2005 Opened up the first multiplex in the Maya Cinemas chain

• He was born on May 23, 1972. Espinoza is unmarried and has no children.‪ Ten percent of his winnings he donates to the City of Hope to fund pediatric cancer research.‪‬‬‬‬

Her humanitarian deeds started after receiving a PhD in clinical Psychology at SUNY Stony Brook University. Currently the President and CEO of National Alliance for Hispanic Health, she runs an award winning non-profit organization that helps obtain healthcare for Hispanic communities. Prior to that, she was a talent coordinator for Sesame Street before joining the Department of Health and Human Services. Serving on a various boards and author of several books, most recently “Buena Salud Guide to Arthritis and Your Life.” Her achievements have been honored by a wide range of institutions awards and publications.

A prolific producer, this Oscar-nominated filmmaker has been helping tell Chicano/Latino stories on both the big and small screen since the 1970s. His documentary short “Agueda Martinez: Our People, Our Country” won an Academy Award nod in 1978. His most popular full features include “Selena” and “The Milagro Beanfield War” and the HBO film “Walkout.” Not only does he produce movies, Esparza also puts films on the big screen. He is the CEO of the growing movie chain Maya Cinemas that recently opened a new venue in Fresno, California, increasing its presence to four cities in the Golden State. And in a recent tweet, Esparza expressed hopes of opening a movie theatre in Los Angeles.

JANE L. DELGADO

http://janeonhealth.blogspot.com/ @janeonhealth

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MOCTESUMA ESPARZA

www.mayaentertainment.com @MoctesumaE

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VÍCTOR ESPINOZA Winner of the Triple Crown in 2015 riding American Pharoah. Three-time Kentucky Derby winner - riding War Emblem in 2002, California Chrome in 2014, and American Pharoah in 2015. Espinoza also won the Preakness Stakes three times, riding War Emblem in 2002 California Chrome in 2014 and American Pharoah in 2015. Espinoza became the first Latino jockey to win the Triple Crown.

Mexican-born Espinoza is a jockey in American Thoroughbred horse racing. He was born on a dairy farm in the state of Hidalgo. He is the eleventh of twelve children.‪ Victor and his older brother José began riding horses while living on the farm. At the age of 15 Víctor left home and traveled to Cancún to assist his brother as a Quarter Horse trainer.‪ In order to pay for jockey school, Víctor began driving buses in Mexico City at age 17.‪ Later on, Espinoza was racing Thoroughbreds at Hipódromo de las Américas in Mexico City.‬‬‬‬‬‬ https://twitter.com/espinozasvictor

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025 ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

EDUCATION

AMERICA GEORGINE FERRERA

FORMER SECRETARY OF HEATH OF MEXICO AND PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI

• Fenk and his wife, Felicia Knaul, have two children: Hannah and Mariana Havivah.

• He lives in San Antonio, TX.

She has a degree in International Relations from the University of Southern California.

1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

JULIO FRENK

PRESIDENT AND CEO, HISPANIC ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

• April 18, 1984, Married to Ryan Piers Williams June 27, 2011.

In 2002 she debuted in the indie hit Real Women Have Curves. She followed this with several television spots and a many film roles; but it was in 2006 when she starred in Ugly Betty as the plucky and comedic, teen but with a made down appearance. Her performance won her several awards and even a congressional congratulation by the US House of Representatives, for being a role model for young Hispanics. She was also recognized in 2007 by “TIME Magazine” and listed as one of the “Most Influential People in the World.” In her role on the upcoming NBC sitcom, “Superstore,” America will tackle dual roles, performing the role of Amy, and be co-producer.

027 LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

ANTONIO FLORES

ACTRESS AND PRODUCER

42 • July / August 2015

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1996 Became the third president and CEO of the HACU 2009 Flores was featured by Univision Network in an Orgullo Hispano capsule 2011 Celebrated the silver anniversary of the HACU

Dr. Antonio Flores is the current President and CEO of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), taking the post in 1996. Flores is responsible for stewarding the group’s overall leadership, executive management, policy formation, strategic planning and much more. He previously served as the director of programs and services for the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority and the Michigan Higher Education Student Loan Authority. His professional career in higher education found him teaching at private and public institutions.

2000 Health Minister of Mexico 2008 Received the Clinton Global Award 2009 Dean at the Harvard School of Public Health 2015 President-elect at the University of Miami

A Mexican national, Frenk earned his medical degree from the National University of Mexico. After serving in public health service roles within the Mexican government, he was appointed Health Minister by President Vicente Fox from 2000 until 2006. His research is featured in various publications and books, including holding several academic positions. In 2009, Frenk accepted the position as Dean at the Harvard School of Public Health. He will be assuming the role of President at the University of Miami in 2015. @julio_frenk

www.hacu.net

https://twitter.com/americaferrera

MEDIA

LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

NELY GALÁN

ERIC GARCETTI

ENTREPRENEUR, PRODUCER, MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER

• Born in 1963, lives in Venice, CA, with her son, Lucas Rodríguez. Formerly married to actor and comedian Paul Rodríguez. Masters and PhD in Clinical and Cultural Psychology.

Media mogul is a title that perfectly fits this Cuban immigrant. Galán was the first Latina president of a U.S. television network, Telemundo. She has produced more than 600 episodes for Spanish- and English-language TV, including telenovelas, talk shows, sitcoms and socalled reality series. Her credits include the shows Los Beltrán, Viva Vegas, Sólo en América, La Cenicienta, Father Albert and The Swan. Her company Galan Entertainment helped launched about 10 channels for HBO and Fox in Latin America and also creates content for the web and other media platforms focused on women and Latinos. Galan currently heads the Adelante Movement, a motivational digital platform and tour for Latinas. www.nelygalan.com

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

MAYOR OF LOS ANGELES

• Resides in LA at Mayor’s residency named Getty Housewith his wife, Amy Wakeland, and their daughter. Born on February 4, 1971 in LA

A native Angeleno and Democrat, Garcetti presides over the country’s iconic and second largest metropolitan city as Mayor of Los Angeles. After earned both his B.A and Masters at Columbia University. Garcetti’s political career propelled in 2001 when elected representative of the 13th district to the Los Angeles City Council, where he served four terms as President of City Council. He was elected Mayor of Los Angeles in 2013. He is also a former Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy reserve. Currently running for re-election in 2017. www.ericgarcetti.com

@ericgarcetti

@Nely_Galan

CHARLES PATRICK GARCÍA

CEO OF LATINO PROFESSIONALS FOR AMERICA (ALPFA)

• He is married to Cristina Ávila. He was born is Washington, D. C. He was raised in Panama City, his father being Panamanian. He is bilingual, speaking Spanish and English 1988 Selected by President Ronald Reagan to serve as one of the White House Fellows 1997 Founded Sterling Financial Group 2009 Assumed position as CEO at Garcia Trujillo

Whether traveling for speaking engagements, sitting on corporate boards or becoming a CEO at yet another company, Charles Garcia’s influence dips into many pools. After founding Garcia Trujillo, a merchant banking firm that focuses on the Hispanic market, Garcia recently accepted a new venture to become the CEO of ALPFA International, the “largest Latino association for business professionals and students.” With his new position on the forefront, Garcia will be working to continue increasing opportunities for Latino leadership. @charlespgarcia

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JESUS “CHUY” GARCIA REPRESENTS THE COOK COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS FROM THE 7TH DISTRICT

• He lives with his wife, Evelyn, and their three children in Cook County. • Born April 12, 1956 1992 First Mexican- American member of the Illinois State Senate 2010 Elected Cook County Board of Commissioners 2015 Runner-up for Mayor of Chicago

Years of political service has earned him strong roots in the surrounding Chicago communities. Born in Mexico, Garcia was raised in Chicago where he attended high school and graduated from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He served in local elected roles before becoming a member of the Illinois State Senate in 1992. He ran a tough campaign for the 2015 Mayor of Chicago, losing in the run-off election. Currently serves as the 7th district Cook County Board of Commissioners, presiding as its floor leader. www.chicagoforchuy.com/index.html @garcia4chicago

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

ALEJANDRO GONZÁLEZ IÑÁRRITU

RELIGION

JOSE HORACIO GOMEZ

SINGER, ACTRESS

• A native of Monterrey, Mexico, Archbishop Gomez is one of five children and the only son.

She earned a high school diploma through homeschooling in May 2010.

1978 Ordained to the Priesthood for Opus Dei 2001 Auxiliary Bishop of Denver 2004 Archbishop of San Antonio, TX 2011 Archbishop of Los Angeles

PBS’ Barney and Friends marked the beginning of her career; and the Disney Channel series Wizards of Waverly Place her ticket to stardom–she also performed the theme song. Today Selena Gómez is a pop princess with megahits like “Come & Get It” and “The Heart Wants What It Wants.” She starred in the features Spring Breakers and Getaway and the TV movie The Wizards Return: Alex vs. Alex. The Texan actress is the voice of the Mavis character in the 2012 animated film Hotel Transylvania and its sequel slated for release this September. She has her own clothing line, perfume and production company. This year Gómez has been rocking the music charts with the Top Ten hit “Good for You” from her latest studio album “For You.”

Archbishop Gomez has been a U.S. Citizen since 1995. During his priestly and episcopal career he has founded or co-founded a number of initiatives designed to bring Latino Catholics closer to the Church, and received many awards. Since coming to Los Angeles he has worked very hard to reconcile the various elements of a deeply divided Archdiocese, emphasizing the Faith and local heritage that transcends cultural and ethnic lines. He is particularly concerned about immigration, education, and priestly formation. At the same time he has been keenly aware of the responsibilities of running the nation’s largest Archdiocese.

www.selenaGómez.com

@selenaGómez

http://www.la-archdiocese.org/archbishop/Pages/ @ArchbishopGomez

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

THIRD SECTOR

JUAN GONZÁLEZ MORENO

LINDA GRIEGO DIRECTOR OF AMERICAN FUNDS AND BOARD MEMBER OF SEVERAL COMPANIES

• Born in Tucumcari, New Mexico. Age 66. Lives in Los Angeles.

• Born August 15, 1963, is married and lives in Mexico City

• He is 57. Married: • Residence: Nuevo Leon, Mexico

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SELENA GÓMEZ • She was born on July 22, 1992, lives in Los Angeles, and is single. Gomez has two siblings.

CHAIRMAN AND CEO OF GRUMA AND GIMSA

www.foxsearchlight.com/birdman

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF LOS ANGELES

DIRECTOR, SCREENWRITER, PRODUCER, COMPOSER

With his film “Babel” he became the first Mexican director to be nominated for the Oscar in 2007 and the first Mexican-born director to win the Prix de la mise en scene at the Cannes Film Festival. This year, González Iñárritu walked away with three Academy Awards for Birdman--best film, best director and best screenplay. With more than 100 international awards and nearly as many other nominations, he may be the most acclaimed Mexican filmmaker ever and one of the world’s top directors today. His film “The Revenant,” a drama starring Leonardo DiCaprio, is scheduled for release later this year.

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Masters in Business Administration from the University of San Diego.

Juan González Moreno is Chairman and CEO of GRUMA and GIMSA, the world’s leading producers of corn and flour tortillas as well as wheat-flour related food products. In 2013, González Moreno was named number 20 in “Los 100 empresarios mas importantes de Mexico” (Mexico’s 100 important executives) in “Expansion magazine.” Association of Mexican Entrepreneurs in the U.S. gave special recognition to Gonzales Moreno as Entrepreneur of the Year 2013. (81) 8399-3300

Bachelor of Arts, UCLA

The former Deputy Mayor of Los Angeles is a visionary. She is a member of several high profile boards, including CBS as well as the Chair of the MLK Jr. Hospital Foundation. She is currently planning the construction of a Latino arts community in a small town in New Mexico. Griego is one of the most recognize business woman in California, she also advices numerous boards and received a “ Maestro Award” from Latino Leaders in 2014. www.linkedin.com/pub/linda-griego/14/590/48

http://www.gruma-en.com

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

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037 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

LUIS GUTIERREZ U.S. CONGRESSMAN, ILLINOIS’ 4TH DISTRICT

• He and his wife Soraida have two daughters. • Born, December 10, 1953

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1992 Sworn in as U.S. Congressman 2010 Helped guide the passage of the Development Relief and Education Act for Alien Minors Act (DREAM Act)

Now in his twelfth term, Congressman Luis V. Gutiérrez is the senior member of the Illinois delegation in the U.S. House of Representatives. During his tenure, Gutierrez has not only pushed for quicker legislation to deal with the country’s immigration issues but he has also spearheaded programs to help immigrants become proficient in English, help immigrant children in the education system and inspired other Democrats to join the fight. http://gutierrez.house.gov / repgutierrez.tumblr.com www.facebook.com/RepGutierrez @repgutierrez

038 JUDICIAL SYSTEM

EVA GUZMÁN JUSTICE OF THE TEXAS SUPREME COURT

• She is 54. Married to Anthony Guzmán. Guzman is one of seven children of Mexican immigrant parents. She was reared in Houston. She lives in Austin, TX She graduated in 1979 from the predominantly Hispanic Austin High School. A resident of Cypress in Harris County, she is the first Hispanic woman to serve on the high court.

Texas Supreme Court Justice is the first Latina to serve on the Texas Supreme Court. She was appointed to the Texas Supreme Court in October of 2009 and in the Texas primary elections of early 2010, earned 65% of the vote, defeating Judge Rose Vela. Guzman prevailed in the general election, earning a six year term on the Texas Supreme Court. Guzmán was named Outstanding Texas Leader at the 2015 Texas Leadership Forum. In 2009 she was recognized by the Hispanic National Bar Association as “Latina Judge of Year” and by The Mexican-American Bar Association of Texas Foundation as Judge of the Year”. www.txcourts.gov/supreme/contact-us.aspx @JusticeGuzman

039 LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

DAVID HAYESBAUTISTA PROFESSOR AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

• Dr. Hayes-Bautista is married to Maria Hayes-Bautista, RN, MPH who is a principal staff associate of CESLAC. They are the proud parents of one daughter (Catalina) and one son (Diego). 1971 Founding Executive Director of the La Clinica de la Raza in Oakland, CA 1974 Worked at the School of Public Health at UC Berkeley 1987 Currently Professor at UCLA

Extensive research into Latino healthcare has made Bautista a prominent voice in his field.Graduate from UC Berkeley and then completing his M.A. and PH.D at University of California Medical Center, San Francisco, he founded la Clínica de La Raza. Bautista is a professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, establishing the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the School of Medicine in 1992. Researches the cost-effective, high-quality standard of care in Latino communities. His work has been published in medical journals and he is frequently interviewed in the media. dhayesb@ucla.edu http://ph.ucla.edu/faculty/hayes-bautista

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT.

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

CEO OF LIBERTY POWER

JOURNALIST, RADIO AND TV PRODUCER AND DIRECTOR.

U.S. CONGRESSMAN, TEXAS’ 15TH DISTRICT

• Born July2, 1961, she lives with her husband in New York. Has two children.

• Hinojosa has two children with wife Martha and three children from a previous marriage. • Born, August 20, 1940

DAVID HERNANDEZ • He is in his 40s. Residence: Fort Lauderdale, FL 1997 – 1999 MBA, Finance, Marketing Palm Beach Atlantic University 1988 – 1991 BS, Accounting

David Hernández is the CEO of Liberty Power, the largest independent retail electricity supplier in the United States. Since Hernández co-founded the company in 2001 it has become one of the ten largest Hispanic-owned companies in the country, serving nearly 200,000 business and residential accounts across the electric retailer’s national footprint. Liberty Power was ranked the #1 Fastest-Growing Hispanic 500 Company in 2007 by Hispanic Business Magazine. www.libertypowercorp.com/leadership/ david-hernandez/ Best to reach me through my assistant Suzanne Clark at sclark@libertypowercorp.com

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MARIA HINOJOSA

RUBEN HINOJOSA

Graduated from Barnard College.

For 25 years, this Mexico City-born journalist has been covering all sorts of issues for radio and TV networks like National Public Radio, CBS and CNN. A winner of four Emmys and other national and international awards, Hinojosa is known for also covering underreported issues, Latinos and other communities. She hosts the radio show Latino USA on National Public Radio since 1992. In 2010 she founded the Futuro Group, a nonprofit media organization that produced the recent PBS TV series “America by the Numbers” and has taken over the production of Latino USA. www.futuromediagroup.org @Maria_Hinojosa

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1997 Sworn in as U.S. Congressman 2007 Appointed chairman of the Subcommittee on Higher Education 2012 Elected chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus

Serving his tenth term, Hinojosa is an advocate for equal rights, education and housing development. One of his biggest achievements includes reducing the unemployment rate in 2008, and he is now a key figure in the immigration reform talks, inspiring newly elected Democrats to roll up their sleeves and get to work on solving this controversial issue. http://hinojosa.house.gov/biography https://www.facebook.com/ CongressmanRubenHinojosa https://twitter.com/usreprhinojosa

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PRESIDENT AND CEO OF VOTO LATINO

2004 Founded Voto Latino with Rosario Dawson 2010 Pushed to get American Latinos to fill out the 2010 census via a bilingual iPhone app 2013 Named one of the 10 Most Powerful Women in Washington by Elle Magazine

Very few wield as much influence and praise as Kumar. She is the founder of the acclaimed Voto Latino organization, a nonpartisan group that champions Latino Millennials in their communities and careers. She also serves on the national board of Planned Parenthood and Latino Leaders Network. Named one of the most influential and creative business owners by celebrities and publications alike. She is a frequent guest on TVs biggest programs. Her long list of awards includes an Emmy nomination and the White House Project award. She resides in the Washington, DC area. @MariaTeresa1

EVA LONGORIA ACTRESS, PRODUCER, ACTIVIST

• She has been married twice. Born March 15, 1975, in Corpus Christi, Texas. A former Miss Corpus Christi.

CORPORATE. BUSINESS

GERARDO “GERRY” LÓPEZ CEO AND PRESIDENT OF AMC ENTERTAINMENT INC.

Was cast in 2003 as Gabrielle Solis in ABC’s Desperate Housewives. Starred in The Sentinel in 2006.

Eva Longoria turned 40 this year, but she shows no signs of aging, showing of a bikini body in Spain, producing Devious Maids and heading her own foundation to aid Latinas get into entrepreneurship. A staunch supporter of President Obama, Longoria, the former star of Desperate Housewives is active within the Latino community with her public involvement in several philanthropies. She is the national spokesperson for PADRES Contra El Cancer and politically active and involved in the organization MAL- DEF: Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. http://eva-longoria.us/ https://instagram.com/evalongoria/?hl=en @evalongoria

• He is 56, married, and a father of two. Married: Elaine Lopez • Residence: Kansas City, MO Mr. Lopez holds a B.S. degree in Marketing from George Washington University and a M.B.A. in Finance from Harvard Business School.

Gerardo “Gerry” López is CEO, President, and a Director of AMC Entertainment Inc. He also serves on the boards of directors of Brinker International, Recreational Equipment Inc., DCIP, and Open Road Films. López has held a variety of top executive positions, including President of Global Consumer Products at Starbucks Coffee Company, President at Handleman Company, and President of the International Division of International Home Foods. He has also held a variety of executive management positions with Frito-Lay, PepsiCola, and the Procter & Gamble Company. http://investor.amctheatres.com/ od.aspx?iid=4171292

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

CORPORATE. BUSINESS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

SINGER, ACTRESS, PRODUCER, FASHION DESIGNER

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF IMPREMEDIA

CINEMATOGRAPHER

• She was born on July 24, 1969, and is divorced, living in Los Angeles.

• She is 58. Married: David Ayon • Residence: Los Angeles, CA • Lozano first attended school in Corona del Mar, but graduated from Santa Catalina School in Monterey in 1974.[7She then studied sociology and political science at the University of Oregon

JENNIFER LÓPEZ

MÓNICA LOZANO

She graduated high school from Preston High School in the Bronx, NY

She was the first Latina actress to be paid more than $1 million thanks to her leading role in the biopic “Selena” in 1997 that earned her a Golden Globe nomination. J.Lo has since made many more millions from other films, about 30, including “The Cell,” “Anaconda,” “Out of Sight,” “The Wedding Planner” and “Maid in Manhattan.” Eight music albums, concerts, television deals, clothing line and designer perfumes have positioned her among the world’s highest paid celebrities. She has sold more than 70 million records and has her own film and TV production company. Recently she was the voice of Lucy in the animated film “Home” and her collaboration with Prince Royce and Pitbull entered the Latin charts. And of course, we will see her again as a judge in the iconic TV singing competition American Idol. www.jenniferLópez.com

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EMMANUEL LUBEZKI

Mónica Lozano is the Chairman of the Board of U.S. Hispanic Media, Inc., parent company of ImpreMedia, LLC. She serves on the boards of directors of The Walt Disney Company and of Bank of America. In addition, Lozano acts on a number of additional boards, most notably as a Trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation and as Chairman of the Board of Regents of the University of California. Lozano is a member of the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board and of the California Commission on the 21st Century Economy. http://www.aspeninstitute.org/people/monica-lozano

• He was born in 1964 and lives in Mexico City. His father is actor Muni Lubezki. Studied History and Film at UNAM.

Known by the nickname of El Chivo--the goat, Mexico’s Lubezki is one of only two cinematographers to win back-to-back Oscars in the history of the Academy Awards, first with the sci-fi thriller Gravity and this year with the dramatic comedy Birdman. He has also won more than 120 international prizes and received several more nominations. His acclaimed films include Children of Men, The Tree of Life, Ali, Y Tu Mamá También and Como Agua Para Chocolate. Lubeski has a half a dozen movies slated for release this year and 2016 with the world’s top directors and Hollywood’s A-list stars. http://wp-a.com/cinematographers/ emmanuel-lubezki/

@JLo

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MARIA TERESA KUMAR

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

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049 FINANCE

LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

LUIS MAIZEL

SUSANA MARTÍNEZ

1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

FOUNDER AND SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR, LM CAPITAL GROUP, LLC

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050 CORPORATE, BUSINESS

JORGE MAS CHAIRMAN OF MASTEC INC.

• He is in his 50s

GOVERNOR OF NEW MEXICO

• He lives in San Diego

• She is married to Chuck, stepmother to his son, and caretaker to her older sister, Lettie, who has cerebral palsy

1971: Graduated from The National University of Mexico with a degree in industrial engineering 1974: Graduated from Harvard Business School as a Baker Scholar 1984: Ended four-year tenure as president at Industrias Kuick, S.A. and Blount Agroindustras, S.A.

Born on July 14, 1959 1997-2010 District Attorney 2011- Governor of New Mexico 2013- Named Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world

Luis Maizel is the Co-Founder and Senior Managing Director of LM Capital Group, LLC. Prior to founding LM Capital, he served as Vice President of Finance for Grupoventas, S.A. and was a member of the faculty at the Harvard Business School. He was also President of Industrial Kuick, S.A. He currently serves as Chairman of the Board of the Hispanic National Mortgage Association and President of the Investment Committee for the Board of Trustees of the University of San Diego.

Three terms serving as District Attorney helped her win the 2011 Governor’s race in New Mexico, becoming the first Hispanic female governor in the United States. Raised in the Rio Grande Valley, Martínez graduated from the University of Oklahoma College of Law. Well respected for her bi-partisanship in New Mexico and instrumental in passing Katie’s Law, requiring DNA from all felony arrests. Rumors speculated that she was Romney’s pick as a running mate, which she declined to reporters.

www.lmcapital.com

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1994: Publicly traded Burnup & Sims acquired Church & Tower (owned and operated by Mas’ father) and Mas became CEO and changed the name to MasTec 1997: MasTec went public on the New York Stock Exchange 1998: First Hispanic-owned firm to reach the $1 billion revenue mark

Jorge Más is the Chairman of MasTec, a publicly-traded utility infrastructure contracting company that ranks number 562 on the Fortune 1000. MasTec has over $4.6 billion in revenue and over 18,000 employees in North America. Más also serves in additional leadership roles as Founder of Mas Equity Partners, Chairman of the Cuban American National Foundation, director of the Mas Family Foundation, and a member of the board of Overseers of the University of Miami School of Business. www.mastec.com

www.governor.state.nm.us/Meet_Governor_ (@Gov_Martinez Martinez.aspx

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

FINANCE

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

DEPUTY SECRETARY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

MANAGING PARTNER OF MEDINA CAPITAL

U.S. SENATOR (D), NEW JERSEY

• DOB: November 24, 1959. Mayorkas and his wife, Tanya, have two daughters, Giselle and Amelia.

• Medina was born in Matanzas, Cuba and left in 1965, when he was 13.

2009-2013: Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 2013: Appointed Deputy Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security

Manuel Medina heads Medina Capital, a private equity firm focused on high-growth technology companies in sectors such as cybersecurity, big data, mobility and cloud-based technologies, announced late in 2014 the closing of the firm’s Fund with $182 million of aggregate committed capital. In his early career, Medina, worked as certified public accountant, with Price Waterhouse after earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from Florida Atlantic University in 1974. Later, in 1980, he started his own company, Terremark, and served as Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer until 2011, when the company was acquired by Verizon Communications for $1.4billion, out of which he would receive about $83 million from his 4.4 million shares, almost 7 percent of the company. In addition, Mr. Medina is a managing partner of Communication Investors Group, one of their investors.

ALEJANDRO MAYORKAS

Cuban-born Mayorkas is the first foreign-born official to head the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Prior to this position, he served as director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which operates the largest immigration system in the world. In 1998 Mayorkas, who earned his Juris Doctor from Loyola Law School, was confirmed by the Senate as United States Attorney for the Central District of California. He has been recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the “50 Most Influential Minority Lawyers in America.” www.dhs.gov/person/alejandro-mayorkas www.facebook.com/pages/AlejandroMayorkas/494245360604030?fref=ts www. facebook.com/homelandsecurity?fref=photo

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MANUEL MEDINA

ROBERT MENÉNDEZ • Menendez has two children. Born, January 21, 1954 1992: Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives 2006: Sworn in as U.S. Senator 2009: Appointed chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee

Menendez was first elected to the Union City School District’s Board of Education at the age of 20 and went on to become mayor of Union City in 1986. One of only three Latinos in the Senate, he authored comprehensive immigration reform legislation that passed the Senate in 2013 with an overwhelming bipartisan show of support. Menéndez was part of a pretended scandal, but it seems that it was just a punch from his political enemies. www.menendez.senate.gov/ senatormenendez

medinacapital.com/about-us/team/manuel-dmedinacapital medina/

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FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

J. MARIO MOLINA

CECILIA MUÑOZ

TOMAS D. MORALES

CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF MOLINA HEALTHCARE, INC.

• He is 56; he and his wife, Therese Ann, have four children. • Lives in Long Beach, CA Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California MD, Medicine 1980 – 1984 California State UniversityLong Beach B.A., Chemistry 1978 – 1980 Long Beach City College A.S., Physical Sciences 1976 – 1978

J. Mario Molina, MD, is Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Molina Healthcare, Inc., which is ranked number 301 on the Fortune 500, with $9.67 billion in revenues. During his career with Molina Healthcare, Molina also served as Medical Director and as Vice President of provider contracting, member services, market, and quality assurance. He serves on several additional boards including the Association of Health Insurance Plans, the Aquarium of the Pacific, Homeboy Industries, and the Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

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DIRECTOR, WHITE HOUSE DOMESTIC POLICY COUNCIL

• DOB: July 27, 1962. Muñoz is married to Amit Pandya, a human rights lawyer; they have two daughters.

PRESIDENT OF CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN BERNARDINO

• He is in his 60s. Morales is at the top level of leadership in the U.S. higher education sector, serving as Chairman of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.

Tomás Morales is President of California State University, San Bernardino, Chairman of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, and the Chairman of the TIAA-CREF Hispanic Advisory Board. During his stellar career in higher education, Morales served in leadership roles at the College of Staten Island (CUNY); CalPoly Pomona; the City College of New York (CUNY); and the State University of New York (SUNY). Morales is at the top level of leadership in the U.S. higher education sector, serving as Chairman of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. president.csusb.edu

2009-2012: Director of White House Intergovernmental Affairs 2012: Named Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council.

A former senior vice president for the National Council of La Raza, Muñoz also previously served as Director of Intergovernmental Affairs at the White House and has long been one of Obama’s top advisers on immigration issues. In 2000 Muñoz received a MacArthur Foundation fellowship in recognition of her work on immigration and civil rights. She was featured in several episodes of the documentary series How Democracy Works Now: Twelve Stories. www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/dpc/about/ dpc-director www.whitehouse.gov/blog/author/ cecilia44 Cecilia%20Mu%C3%B1oz

molinahealthcare.com

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

EDUCATION

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA

U.S. CONGRESSWOMAN, CALIFORNIA’S 32ND DISTRICT

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, EL PASO

• She is married to Frank Napolitano, a retired restaurateur and community activist. They have five children.

• She lives in El Paso, TX.

JANET MURGUÍA

GRACE NAPOLITANO

• September 6, 1960 in Kansas City, Kansas. B.S. degree in journalism (1982), a B.A. degree in Spanish (1982), and a J.D. degree (1985), Kansas University. 1994-2000: Worked as deputy assistant to President Bill Clinton 2001-04: Executive vice chancellor for university relations at The University of Kansas 2005: Became president of NCLR.

A Kansas City native, Murguia began her political career in Washington, D.C., as legislative counsel to a Kansas councilwoman. Her career took her through the White House as deputy assistant to President Clinton as well as other roles in the 1990s. Murguia joined NCLR in 2005 and has sought to enhance the impact of Latinos in politics since. A few of the areas Murguia has brought to the Latino forefront have been education, health care, immigration, civil rights, economic issues and race and ethnic relations. She is on the board of directors of the American Heart Association and the Partnership for a Healthier America, and is on the executive committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and is a board chair for the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.

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DIANA NATALICIO

Born, December 4, 1936 1986: Elected Mayor of Norwalk, California 1992: Elected to the California Assembly 1998: Elected to U.S. House of Representatives.

Napolitano is a leader in promoting mental health, including her efforts to revitalize the Congressional Mental Health Caucus and to designate May as National Mental Health Awareness Month. She introduced the Mental Health in Schools Act in 2011, a bill to provide more on-site, professional mental health services for students. Napolitano is a member of the House Committee on Natural Resources and the House Committee for Transportation and Infrastructure. napolitano.house.gov/ gracenapolitano

RepGraceNapolitano

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1988: Became President of UTEP 1994: Nominated to the National Science Board by President Clinton, where she served five terms 1999: Inducted into the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame.

Diana Natalicio is the President of the University of Texas, El Paso having assumed the position in 1988. She previously served as the vice president for academic affairs, dean of liberal arts, chair of the modern languages department, and professor of linguistics at the university. She currently serves on a number of boards including the Rockefeller Foundation, U.S.Mexico Foundation for Science, American Council on Education, National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, and the Association of Public and LandGrant Universities. www.utep.edu

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ALEX NOGALES

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1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL HISPANIC MEDIA COALITION

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

EDWARD JAMES OLMOS

JAVIER PALOMAREZ

• He born and raised in the border town of Calexico, California to a family of migrant farm workers. He is single and lives in La Habra.

ACTOR, PRODUCER, DIRECTOR, ACTIVIST

1995: Protested against the “Howard Stern” radio show after Stern’s comments about Selena Quintanilla 2000: A key player in the signing of the Memoranda of Understanding with NBC, ABC, CBS and FOX 2014: The NHMC launched the Latino Experts Program in late June

He graduated from Montebello High School in 1964.

As head of the National Hispanic Media Coalition, Nogales has been at the forefront of the fight for accurate portrayals of Latinos and taken on big names like shock jock Howard Stern, TV personality Lou Dobbs, and Republican presidential candidate and billionaire Donald Trump. When Trump made derogatory comments about Mexicans this summer, Nogales was one of the most prominent and vocal Latino leaders calling for swift action against the billionaire. Trump has now been dumped by NBC, Univision, Macy’s and the Professional Golfers’ Association. Earlier in the year, Nogales and NHMC celebrated the “open internet” rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission that he believes will pave the way for full Latino participation on the internet. www.nhmc.org

@NHMC

FINANCE

CEO UNITED STATES HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

• Born on February 24, 1947, he is married and lives in Los Angeles.

Originally a singer and pianist, this Mexican-American artist morphed into one of the most influential Latino actors and activists of all time and one of the most prolific Latino stars in Hollywood. He is an Oscar and Tony Award nominee and a Golden Globe and Daytime Emmy Award winner. He is credited with opening the doors for other Latino actors in recent decades. He starred in both the seminal theatre play and film Zoot Suit and has acted in nearly 100 feature films, shorts and TV projects. His most iconic characters are Lieutenant Martin Castillo in the TV series Miami Vice, teacher Jaime Escalante in the film Stand and Deliver, and Commander William Adama in the sci-fi TV series Battlestar Galactica. In the aftermath of the L.A. Riots, the Oscar-nominated star took a broom and joined the cleanup efforts. He is a founder of the LA Latino International Film Festival and Latino Literacy Now, and a producer of the multi-city Latino Book and Family Festival. www.edwardjamesolmos.com

GUILLERMO PERALES

SENIOR ADVISOR, VESTAR CAPITAL PARTNERS

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF SUN HOLDINGS, INC.

• Born on March 15, 1947, he and his wife live in Denver, Colorado.

• He is 53

1979: Elected to the Colorado House of Representatives 1983: First elected as Mayor of Denver, CO 1993: Helped bring the Colorado Rockies to Denver

Federico Peña is currently a Senior Advisor with Vestar Capital Partners and joined the firm in 1998. At Vestar, he focuses on the media and communications sector. Prior to this, he served as U.S. Secretary of Energy and as U.S. Secretary of Transportation during the Clinton administration. Before his cabinet positions, he was President and CEO of Peña Investment Advisors and was the Mayor of Denver from 1983-1991. He has been honored as a distinguished Alumnus of the University of Texas. www.vestarcapital.com

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Texas A&M University Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), MBA Earned a Master’s Degree in Business Administration Tecnologico de Monterrey, ITESM CPA Graduated with high honors from the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey as a CPA

Guillermo Perales is President and Chief Executive Officer of Sun Holdings, Inc., a company he founded in 1997. With over 450 locations, Sun Holdings is the largest Latino-owned operator of Quick Service Restaurants in America. Their brands include Burger King, Popeye’s, Arby’s, Golden Corral, Cici’s Pizza, and Krispy Kreme. They also have T-Mobile stores. Sun Holdings is ranked as 8th largest Franchise owner in the United States. guillermoperales.wordpress.com

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•Previously served as Vice President of Multicultural Marketing at ING Financial Services

Javier Palomarez is the President and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC), America’s largest Hispanic business association. The USHCC actively promotes the economic growth, development and interests of more than 3.2 million Hispanic-owned businesses, that combined, contribute over $486 billion to the American economy every year. In 2014, Mr. Palomarez received an honorary Doctorate from Westminster College, Utah’s premier Liberal Arts institution. Most recently, he was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Medallion from National 4-H Council and was recognized by the Government of Mexico with the Ohtli Award, the highest honor bestowed upon foreign citizens. jpalomarez

@edwardjolmos

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

FEDERICO PEÑA

• Wife Rebecca and two sons, Diego and Rigo

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

THOMAS PÉREZ

U.S. SECRETARY OF LABOR

• Perez received his degree from Brown University and law degree from Harvard. He is also a law professor. He lives in Maryland with his wife, Ann Marie Staudenmaier, and their three children. 2007-09: Secretary of the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation 2009-13: Assistant U.S. Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division 2013: Sworn in as 26th U.S. Secretary of Labor

Hailing from a long line of political figures, Pérez was sworn in as the secretary of labor in 2013. A New York native, Pérez is the son of Dominican- born parents. Prior to this position, Pérez was assistant attorney general for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Justice. He was secretary of Maryland’s Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation and a member of the Montgomery County Council, according to the department of labor website www.dol.gov/_sec/

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PATRICIA SALAS PINEDA GROUP VICE PRESIDENT OF HISPANIC STRATEGY AT TOYOTA NORTH AMERICA

• She is 63. Pineda received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Mills College and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California at Berkeley.

Patricia Salas Pineda is the Group Vice President of Hispanic Strategy at Toyota North America, a member of the board of directors of Levi Strauss & Co., and Chairman of the Latino Corporate Directors Association. As the highest ranking Hispanic executive at Toyota, Pineda is responsible for all facets of engaging with the Hispanic community, from Hispanic business organizations, to media, community groups, and associates. During her career at Toyota, Pineda has held leadership roles in diverse areas such as Legal, Human Resources, Government Relations, Corporate Communications, Governance and Philanthropy. She has an extensive track record of service on non-profit boards and currently serves on the corporate advisory board of the National Council of La Raza. She is very likely to lead the newly created Latino Corporate Directors Association.

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CORPORATE, BUSINESS

MEDIA

CEO AND A MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF GAMESTOP

UNIVISION NEWS ANCHOR, AUTHOR

PAUL RAINES • He is 49. Married to Claudia Raines • Residence: Dallas/Fort Worth, TX He graduated from Georgia Tech with a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering in 1985 where he was also a member of the Fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta.

Paul Raines is the CEO and a member of the board of directors of GameStop, which is ranked number 311 on the Fortune 500, with $9.3 billion in revenue. GameStop has over 6,600 locations and 36,000 employees worldwide. Raines is also a board member of Advance Auto Parts, which is ranked number 294 on the Fortune 500, with over $9.8 billion in revenues. Raines has had a terrific career in retail and having previously served in leadership roles with Game Stop, Home Depot, L.L. Bean, and Kurt Salmon Associates. news.gamestop.com/leadership/executivemanagement/j-paul-raines

JORGE RAMOS • Born March 16, 1958, he is divorced and lives in Miami. He majored in Communications from the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City.

This Mexican-born journalist left his natal country looking for more freedom of expression and the press in the 1980s. Ramos found it in the U.S. where he has risen to become the most popular face of Latino journalism and won multiple Emmy Awards. He started out with a Los Angeles affiliate of the Spanish International Network, where he went national before it was relaunched as Univision in 1987. Ramos has coanchored Noticiero Univision for nearly three decades, covered major events from wars to the September 11 terrorists attacks, and interviewed US and Latin American presidents and Nobel Prize winners. He also hosts Univision’s Al Punto and Fusion’s English-language America With Jorge Ramos. He has authored 11 books and writes a column distributed by the New York Times Syndicate. jorgeramos.com

@jorgeramosnews

www.linkedin.com/pub/patricia-pineda/37/b8/831

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

DARREN REBELEZ

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

JIMMIE V. REYNA

PRESIDENT OF IHOP

ROSIE RÍOS TREASURER OF THE UNITED STATES

JUDGE, U.S. COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT

• Age 49. Married to Holly Rebelez. Currently lives in Glendale, CA. United States Military Academy at West Point BS, General Engineering 1984 – 1988 University of Houston, C.T. Bauer College of Business MBA, International Business 1994 – 1996

Darren Rebelez is the President of the IHOP brand of DineEquity, Inc., the restaurant franchise system with 3,600 IHOP’s and Applebees in 18 countries. Rebelez is board member of Torchmark Insurance, which is ranked number 621 on the Fortune 1000, with over $3.9 billion in revenue. Rebelez was previously COO of 7-Eleven and during his career has held leadership roles with retail and restaurant companies including ExxonMobil, Dunkin’ Donuts, Thornton Oil Corporation, Fuddruckers and KFC. www.linkedin.com/pub/darren-rebelez/13/a87/463

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• Reyna married his wife, Dolores Ramirez, during his freshman year at the University of Rochester. Born, November 11, 1952 2006-2007: President, Hispanic National Bar Association 2011: Appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit by President Barack Obama

Reyna is the first Latino to serve on the CAFC, which has nationwide jurisdiction of appeals arising from federal district courts, the Court of International Trade and the U.S. Court of Claims. He is a recipient of the Ohtli Award, the highest honor bestowed by the Mexican government for a non-Mexican citizen. Reyna currently serves on the Nationwide Hispanic Advisory Council of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. www.cafc.uscourts.gov/judges/jimmie-v-reynacircuit-judge.html www.facebook.com/pages/JimmieV-Reyna/123263717731529?fref=ts

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• DOB: July 17, 1965. Rios, a graduate of Harvard University, is married to Joe Gumataotao, Jr., an information technology executive. They have two children. 1997: Hired as director of economic development for Fremont, Calif. 2001: Hired as director of economic development and redevelopment for Oakland, Calif. 2009: Sworn in as 43rd Treasurer of the United States

Rios has direct oversight over the U.S. Mint, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and Fort Knox and is a key liaison with the Federal Reserve. In addition, she serves as senior advisor to the Secretary of the Treasury in the areas of community development and public engagement. She is passionate about supporting Women in Finance and issues of Main Street in the economic recovery. www.treasury.gov/about/organizational-structure/ Rosa-Gumataotao Pages/rios-e.aspx

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

FINANCE

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING (ADT)

ACTRESS AND WRITER

CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, PALLADIUM EQUITY PARTNERS

• Born in Cuba. His parents fled the Castro Regime

Went to Catholic high school at St. Ignatius College Prep. She attended NYU’s Tisch School of the Art. She had four years of training at the Atlantic Theater Company and Experimental Theatre Wing, graduating with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2006.

GINA RODRÍGUEZ

CARLOS RODRÍGUEZ

• Born July 30, 1984, she is single and lives in Los Angeles

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He has been a Director of Automatic Data Processing, Inc., since November 8, 2011 and Hubbell Inc. since June 2009. He serves as a Director of A-T Children’s Project. He is a member of World 50, Inc. Mr. Rodriguez holds a BA in Government from Harvard College and an MBA from the Harvard Business School

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Carlos A. Rodriguez has been the Chief Executive Officer and President of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. since November 2011. Mr. Rodriguez served as the Chief Operating Officer of Automatic Data Processing Inc. from May 2011 to November 8, 2011. Mr. Rodriguez served as the President of Employer Services- National Account Services and Employer Services International at Automatic Data Processing, Inc. from March 2010 to May 2011. www.adp.com/who-we-are/leadership/carlosrodriguez.aspx

Her leading role in the TV comedy “Jane the Virgin” earned her a Golden Globe earlier in 2015. Now Rodríguez, who started out in the soap opera Bold and the Beautiful, is a hot Hollywood star. While working on the second season of “Jane,” which premieres in October, the Puerto Rican-American artist has also been getting busier with half a dozen other film projects. They include the action thriller “Deepwater Horizon,” opposite Mark Wahlberg and Kate Hudson, and the indie romantic comedy “Sharon 1.2.3.” Aware of the power of images in media, she avoids roles that perpetuate negative stereotypes. The actress is also penning a book honoring her father Genaro Rodríguez, “I Can and I Will: Tools My Daddy Gave Me.” hereisgina.com

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

ROBERT RODRÍGUEZ PRODUCER, WRITER

• He was born on June 20, 1968, is single, and lives in Austin St. Anthony High School of San Antonio. Assisted College of Communication, University of Texas

The world and Hollywood first noticed this director when he won the Sundance Audience Award in 1993 with El Mariachi, a film reportedly made on a $7000 budget. That would be the beginning of a popular trilogy along with Desperado and Once Upon a Time in Mexico. His innovative film Sin City won the Technical Grand Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, and was followed by the sequel Sin City: A Dame To Kill For released in 2014. The Texan filmmaker has directed and multitasked in all of the Spy Kids and Machete film series. His El Rey Network, a cable channel reaches 25 million households and is currently seeking unknown talent in the U.S. to produce original content. www.elreynetwork.com

@Rodríguez

MARCOS A. RODRIGUEZ • He lives in New York 1961: Left Cuba as a 6-year-old for the United States 1989: Joined the firm Joseph Littlejohn & Levy (JLL) 1997: Founded Palladium Equity Partners

Marcos Rodriguez founded Palladium Equity Partners in 1997 and serves as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Prior to this, he joined the firm of Joseph Littlejohn & Levy in 1989 and ultimately became a partner. He worked for General Electric in operations. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for several of Palladium’s portfolio companies, including Capital Contractors, Jordan, Taco Bueno and on the Board of Trustees of New York-Presbyterian, the University Hospital of Columbia, and Cornell University. www.palladiumequity.com

@HereIsGina

THIRD SECTOR

LOCAL GOVERNMENT, HEALTH

SAMUEL RODRÍGUEZ

ANTHONY D. ROMERO

PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL HISPANIC CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION

• Rodríguez serves as Senior Pastor of New Season Christian Worship Center in Sacramento, CA where he resides with his wife of 24 years, Eva, and their three children.

• Romero was born in New York City on July 9, 1965, to Puerto Rican parents Demetrio and Coralie Romero. He was raised in the Bronx

Rodríguez earned his Master’s degree in educational leadership from Lehigh University and most recently received an Honorary Doctorate from The Baptist Universities of The Americas. He is an Assemblies of God Ordained Minister since the age of 23.

2001- Became Executive Director of American Civil Liberties Union 2005- named Time Magazine’s 25 Most Influential Hispanics 2007- Co-authors a book called “In Defense of Our America: The Fight for Civil Liberties in the Age of Terror”

Samuel Rodríguez is the head of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership. That means he commands over 40,118 Latino Evangelical Churches. The fiery, completely bilingual preacher of Puerto Rican origin has been active in politics, swaying the Hispanic Evangelical vote in 2012 and some say he will do so again next year. There is a reason Time Magazine chose Rodríguez as one of the 100 most influential Latino leaders in the world. He has a new book out, “The Lamb’s Agenda” and is getting ready to go around the country in preparation for next year’s elections.

It was pivotal time for America when Romero became Executive Director of the ACLU just days before 9/11. Graduating from Stanford University of Law School and Princeton University. His has worked on numerous campaigns to uphold rights of others and lobbying for the civil liberties. He is a co-author, member of several non-profit boards and received quite a few civil service awards. www.linkedin.com/pub/anthony-romero/4/845/7a2

info@nhclc.org

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ANTONIO RAMIRO “TONY” ROMO AMERICAN FOOTBALL QUARTERBACK, DALLAS COWBOYS

• DOB: April 21, 1980. In 2011, Romo married former 2008 Miss Missouri USA, Candice Crawford. 2002- Won the Walter Payton Award during his time at Eastern Illinois University 2003- Signed as a free agent by the Dallas Cowboys 2011- Ed Block Courage Award 2014National Football Conference passer rating leader 2015- #1 ranking player on the Dallas Cowboys Roster

Romo’s love for competition began when he would tag along with father and watch him play basketball at the city gym. His college career at Eastern Illinois University included several awards and honors culminating in a ceremony years later where he was inducted into EIU’s Hall of Fame. Since joining the Dallas Cowboys, Romo has broken a multitude of records and is the first quarterback in franchise history to average 300 passing yards in a season. Romo’s grandfather, Ramiro Romo Sr., who emigrated from Muzquiz, Coahila, Mexico, has often cited Tony’s success as an example of the possibilities afforded to immigrants in the United States. tonyromo9.com

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FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

U.S. CONGRESSWOMAN, FLORIDA’S 27TH DISTRICT

U.S. SENATOR (R), FLORIDA

ILEANA ROSLEHTINEN

MARCO RUBIO

• Ros-Lehtinen has two children, and two stepchildren from her husband, Dexter Lehtinen Born, July 15, 1952 1982: Elected to Florida House of Representatives 1986: Elected to the Florida Senate 1989: Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first Hispanic woman to serve in Congress

With an award record too long to list, Ileana RosLehtinen has made history since being elected as the first woman to serve in U.S. Congress in 1989. With humble beginnings as a Cuban refugee, Ros-Lehtinen began working as a teacher in the Miami-Dade area. With education at the forefront, she continues to support efforts to increase financial aid availability for students and seeks to increase the quality of education in South Florida. ros-lehtinen.house.gov/ roslehtinen

iroslehtinen

• He and wife Jeanette have four children Born, May 28, 1971 2000-2009: Member of the Florida House of Representatives 2010: Elected to the U.S. Senate 2015: Announced his candidacy for the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

After announcing his bid for the White House in April, Rubio, a former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives who once interned for U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, has shifted to a more moderate position to appeal to the larger Republican base. Rubio was chosen to deliver the Republican response to President Obama’s 2013 State of the Union Address. It marked the first time the response was delivered in English and Spanish. www.rubio.senate.gov/public/ marcorubio

tonyromo

SPORTS

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

GOLF PLAYER

PRESIDENT OF SER NATIONAL, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF HACR

ACTRESS, PRODUCER, WRITER.

LIZETTE SALAS

IGNACIO SALAZAR

ZOE SALDANA

• Born July 17, 1989. Graduated from Azusa High in 2007. Played gold at USC. She graduated with a degree in sociology in 2011.

Described as a living version of the American Dream come true, Lizette Salas is one of Golf’s new sensations. Born and raised in Azusa, California from working-class, Mexican parents from Zacatecas, Salas learned to play golf with a makeshift club that her father, a gardener, would construct. Now she is touring the world. Salas won her first championship on the LPGA Tour at the 2014 Kingsmill Championship winning by a four-stroke margin. LizetteSalasOfficial

MarcoRubio

lizettesalas5

Ignacio Salazar began his employment with SER in 1975 as executive director of SER Metro-Detroit. In 1980, he was named vice president of SER National, and in 1984 he returned to the Midwest to serve as president of the Detroit organization. In 2002 he was chosen to be SER National’s president and CEO

As the head of the largest Latino direct services organization, Salazar has a huge responsibility. Still, he has a history of making things work during times of crisis and for bringing order and making things grow, like helping turn SER into one of the most important nonprofit companies in the country. To Salazar, each of the thousands of persons who walk into a SER office for job training or to get ahead is important and has a deep meaning for him, reasons for why many see him as one of the most successful Latino leaders around. www.ser-national.org/ignacio-salazar/

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• She was born on June 19, 1978, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband.

This Dominican-American actress started out in theatre and has starred in the world’s biggest blockbusters. She is voice of Neytiri in the highest-grossing film of all time, the sci-fi thriller Avatar, a role she will be repeating in the series’ three upcoming sequels by director James Cameron. She also stars in another two blockbuster series, “Guardians of the Galaxy” and “Star Trek.” Saldana also acted in “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl,” Colombiana and more recently in the animated film The Book of Life and the horror TV mini-series “Rosemary’s Baby” that she also co-produced. A proud Afro-Latina, she just finished “Nina,” a biopic about the legendary African-American singer, Nina Simone. zoesaldana.com

@zoesaldana

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FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

CO-ANCHOR, NOTICIERO UNIVISION

U.S. CONGRESSWOMAN, CALIFORNIA’S 38TH DISTRICT

U.S. CONGRESSWOMAN, CALIFORNIA’S 46TH DISTRICT

• Los Angeles, California, 1954. Salinas lives in Miami with her 2 daughters, Julia Alexandra and Gabriela Maria

• She and husband Jim Sullivan have a son

Her Alma Mater is the University of California, Los Angeles.

Born, January 28, 1969 2002: Elected to U.S. House of Representatives 2005: Appointed Assistant Minority Whip

• Sanchez is married to retired Army Colonel and lawyer Jack Einwechter. She and her sister Linda Sanchez are the first sisters to serve simultaneously in Congress.

MARÍA ELENA SALINAS

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Possibly the most recognized Hispanic female journalist in the United States, Salinas has provided news coverage to millions of Hispanics in the U.S. and Latin America for over 25 years. Called “the voice of Hispanic America” by the New York Times, Salinas, with co-anchor Jorge Ramos, was honored last year with an Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award. n 2015 she has won a PEABODY Award, Walter Cronkite Award and Gracies Award for her news and documentaries. mariaesalinas

LINDA SÁNCHEZ

LORETTA SÁNCHEZ

Recent media reports indicate Sanchez, the first Latina to serve on the House Ways and Means Committee, will run for vice chair of the Democratic Caucus. Sister of fellow Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez, she is the ranking member on the House Ethics Committee, where she helps maintain the standards of conduct in the House. Known among her peers for her efforts toward children and workers’ safety, Sanchez recently sponsored the Safe Schools Improvement Act of 2015. lindasanchez.house.gov/ CongresswomanLindaSanchez

replindasanchez

Born, January 7, 1960 1996: Elected to U.S. House of Representatives 2015: Announced her bid for the 2016 U.S. Senate race

Now serving her tenth term, Sanchez currently serves as the Ranking Member of the Tactical Air and Land Forces Subcommittee. As founder and co-chair of the Women in the Military Caucus, she advocates for female service members to serve in combat roles and fights to stamp out sexual assault in the armed forces. lorettasanchez.house.gov/ lorettasanchez

LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT

BRIAN SANDOVAL

SANTANA CARLOS

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

GOVERNOR OF NEVADA

MUSICIAN, GUITARIST

CHAIRMAN AND CEO OF EVANS FOOD GROUP

• Born August 5, 1963. He has three children with his wife Kathleen. Resides in Reno, Nevada at the Governor’s Mansion.

• Born in Autlan de Navarro Jalisco in 1947. Was married to Deborah Santana. Married Cindy Blackman on July 9, 2010.

1994- Elected 25th District representative for the Nevada Assembly 1999- Chairman of the Gaming Commission of Nevada 2002- Elected Attorney General of Nevada 2005- Appointed United States District Judge for the District of Nevada by George W. Bush 2011 Governor of Nevada

Graduated in1965 from Mission High School. Became a U.S. citizen in 1965. Carlos was accepted at California State University, Northridge, and Humboldt State University, but chose not to attend college.

Lengthy record of public service in Nevada in a variety of roles, currently as Governor since 2011. Prior to become Governor, Sandoval at 35 became the youngest to be chairman of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Went on to be elected Nevada’s Attorney General and then appointed a US District Judge by George W. Bush. Member of the Republican Governors Association and the Hispanic Leadership Network. His busy schedule, along with governor duties, includes chairing for multiple associations and committees. Boasting high approval ratings reflect dedication to his native state. gov.nv.gov

ALEJANDRO SILVA

A music legend with a career spanning nearly 50 years, Santana has influenced an entire genre of Latininfused rock. “Rolling Stone” listed Santana, who has won 10 Grammys and three Latin Grammys, at number 20 on their list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. He also is the recipient Billboard Latin Music Awards’ 2009 Lifetime Achievement Award. At 67, Santana just keeps going on, recording performing sold-out dates around the world. The Milagro Foundation, established by Santana in 1998, has granted more than $5 mil- lion dollars to supporting underserved children and youth in the areas of arts, education and health.

• He is 68. Silva has an extensive track record of service on corporate, nonprofit, private and governmental boards of directors. A former board member of Walgreens.

Alejandro Silva is Chairman and CEO of Evans Food Group, the largest producer of pork rinds in the world. In parallel to his career in the food industry spanning over 40 years, Silva has an extensive track record of service on corporate, non-profit, private and governmental boards of directors. A former board member of Walgreens, Silva currently serves on several boards including Privatebank & Trust Company, the Chicago Transit Authority, the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and the New America Alliance. www.evansfood.com/leadership.html#

@BrianSandoval fanclub@santana.com santanacarlos

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SONIA SOTOMAYOR

HILDA SOLIS MEMBER, LOS ANGELES COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS; FORMER U.S. SECRETARY OF LABOR

• DOB: October 20, 1957, Los Angeles, CA. Roman Catholic. Married to Sam H. Sayyad. 1994-2001: California State Senator 2001-2009: U.S. House of Representatives 2009-2013: 25th U.S. Secretary of Labor 2014: Sworn in as member of Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors

Solis stepped down from her Cabinet post in 2013 to return to her home state of California where she now serves on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, the most powerful county-level legislative body in the U.S. As Secretary of Labor she helped to improve access to health care for women, minorities and millions of uninsured Americans. She was the first woman to receive the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award in 2000 for her pioneering work on environmental justice issues. http://hildalsolis.org/

hildasolis

HildaSolis

JUSTICE, U.S. SUPREME COURT

• Born, June 25, 1954. Sonia Maria Sotomayor was born in the New York City. Father was from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Her mother was from Santa Rosa, in Lajas. 1998-2009: Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit 2009: Confirmed as 111th Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

The Court’s first Hispanic justice and its third female justice, Sotomayor is also among its most visible through speeches and television appearances. She is also vocal on the Court’s rulings, making headlines for her scathing dissent in last year’s Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, allowing closely held for-profit corporations to be exempt from a law its owners religiously object to if there is a less restrictive means of furthering the law’s interest.

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

VICTORIA SUÁREZPALOMO DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC LIAISON, U.S. TREASURY

• Born February 9, 1986 in Florida A graduate of Emory University, she previously served as a senior advisor in the Office of Business Affairs and Public Liaison and as an assistant to the Counselor to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Named as one of Forbes Magazine’s 30 Under 30 in 2011, Suárez-Palomo has made an early name for herself in Washington. A graduate of Emory University, she previously served as a senior advisor in the Office of Business Affairs and Public Liaison and as an assistant to the Counselor to the Secretary of the Treasury. victoria.palomo

www.supremecourt.gov/about/biographies.aspx Sonia-Sotomayor SotomayorScotus

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

NINA TASSLER

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

THALÍA

ACTRESS, SINGER, PUBLISHED AUTHOR, ENTREPRENEUR

CHAIRMAN OF CBS ENTERTAINMENT

• She was born in 1963, lives in Los Angeles, and is divorced 1997: 1984: Moved with her husband, Jerry Levine, to Los Angeles 2011: Honored by Women in Film with the Lucy Award 2013: Launched CBS’s Limited Series and Live Event Programming unit

As Chairman of CBS Entertainment, Tassler is the highest-ranked woman executive running a broadcast network. Daughter of a Jewish father and a Puerto Rican mother, she studied acting but ultimately went for the TV executive role in real life. Since her arrival at CBS in 1997, Tassler has made her network a more womanfriendly workplace, hiring more women for leading roles in successful shows like Mike & Molly, The Good Wife, Elementary, Mom, Madam Secretary and Extant. Women comprise half of her top executive staff of 12. It is no coincidence that action heroine TV series Supergirl will fly into CBS this fall.

• Married, born August 26, 1971, lives in New York Was part of Timbiriche, one of Mexico’s most successful teen groups of all time.

Twelve albums and 40 million records in worldwide sales have made Thalía a queen of Latin pop music. She ruled the international telenovela world for many years. In 2003, the also business savvy pop icon made history by becoming the first Mexican to launch her own clothing, lingerie, jewelry and home product line in the U.S. in a deal with Kmart; an eyewear line followed later. This year, her clothing empire grew exponentially with a contract with Macy’s while at the same time her 12th studio album, “Amore Mío,” hit the world market. thalia.com

@thalia

www.cbscorporation.com/portfolio.php?division=94

094

095

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

CARLOS TORTOLERO PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF MEXICAN ART

• DOB: Guadalajara, Mexico 1954 He currently resides in Chicago with his wife, María. 2006- present: National Museum of Mexican Art 1987 – Founded the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum 19751987 – History School Teacher

Carlos Tortolero holds a B.A. in Secondary Education and History from the University of Illinois and an M.A. in Bilingual Education Supervision from Chicago State University. After having worked as a teacher, counselor, and administrator in Chicago public schools for many years, he branched out and became the Founder and President of the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago, which is the only Latino museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. He has served on numerous boards including the University of Illinois, the American Alliance of Museums, the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and the Smithsonian Latino Center, to name few. He is the co-author of Mexican Chicago and has written articles for national and international publications. He has taught at the University of Illinois, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University.

096

1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

093

53 • July / August 2015

091


097 CORPORATE, BUSINESS

CORPORATE, BUSINESS

CHAIRMAN OF TRUJILLO GROUP INVESTMENTS

CHAIRMAN AND CEO OF PINNACLE GROUP

• He is 63. Is married to Corine Trujillo • Live in Dana Point, CA

• She is 44. Married: Jim Humrichouse

SOL TRUJILLO

1 O1 MO ST I N F LU E N T I A L L AT I N O S

1999: Received the Ronald H. Brown Corporate Bridge Builder Award from President Clinton 2001: Joined the Board of Orange SA 2009: Left Telstra and returned to the United States

54 • July / August 2015

098

Solomon “Sol” Trujillo is the Chairman of Trujillo Group Investments. He is a member of the board of directors of Western Union, which ranks number 468 on the Fortune 500, with $5.6 billion in revenue and 10,000 employees. Trujillo has served as the CEO of three major telecommunications companies on three continents including US West in North America, Orange S.A. in Europe, and Telstra in Australia. In 2010, Trujillo co-founded the Latino Donor Collaborative (LDC), an organization dedicated to improving the Hispanic brand and ensuring Hispanic participation at every level of leadership in America.

099 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

NINA VACA

STEPHANIE VALENCIA DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE SECRETARY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

1996: Founded Pinnacle Technical Resources 2005: Named Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year 2010: Named Chairman of the Board of Directors of the USHCC 2014: Appointed to the inaugural Presidential Ambassadors for Global Entrepreneurship

Nina Vaca is Chairman and CEO of Pinnacle Group, a group of IT staffing, administrative services, and vendor management companies she founded 19 years ago and has grown to several hundred million in revenues. Vaca serves on the boards of directors of three Fortune 1000 companies: Kohl’s Corporation (Fortune #157 $19 billion in revenues), Cinemark Holdings (Fortune #827 - $2.6 billion in revenues), and Comerica, Inc. (Fortune #828 - $2.6 billion in revenues). She has many years of service in civic leadership and currently serves and the Chairman of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation and as a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship.

www.soltrujillo.com www.pinnacle1.com/our-ceo-founder/ @ninahvaca

• A graduate of Boston College, Stephanie was born and raised in New Mexico. She and her husband Oscar reside in North Bethesda, Maryland with their two dogs, Dug and Lucy. 2011-2013: Deputy Director, Office of Public Engagement, The White House 2013: Special Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy Director, Office of Public Engagemen. 2013: Named Deputy Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Commerce

In her current role, Valencia handles external engagement and collaborates on strategic planning efforts that support the Secretary’s priorities. She previously served in the White House Office of Public Engagement. Valencia served on the Obama-Biden Presidential Transition Team and was Deputy Latino Vote Director on the Obama Campaign. The Boston College graduate started her career as a Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Fellow and has worked for several members of Congress including Rep. Linda Sánchez. www.commerce.gov/directory/stephanievalencia stephanie.valenciaramirez stephanievalenc

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

ARTURO VARGAS

SOFIA VERGARA

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LATINO ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS

• He is from Los Angeles, and was born in El Paso, Texas. Stanford University 1980 – 1985 Vargas holds a masters degree in Education and a bachelor’s degree in History and Spanish from Stanford University.

Vargas is always at the forefront of Latino issues and is routinely sought out by national organizations and VIPs to get the right people at the right places. He is one of the most connected Latinos in the country and those connections make him a sought-after commentator and interviewee for media outlets looking for the Latino reaction to the candidates. Prior to joining NALEO, Arturo was Vice President for Community Education and Public Policy of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund where he supervised and directed MALDEF’s community education and leadership development programs. His prior positions at MALDEF included Director of Outreach and Policy where he coordinated the organization’s 1991 redistricting efforts which led to an historic increase in the number of Latinos serving in the California legislature.

ACTRESS, ENTREPRENEUR, PRODUCER

• She was born July 10, 1972 , and lives in Los Angeles. She is divorced and engaged 1989: Appeared in a Pepsi commercial as a 17 year-old, her first performance appearance 1992: Gave birth to son Manolo. 2008: She ranked No. 62 on Maxim’s Hot 100 list

Her role as the talkative, passionate Gloria Delgado-Prichett in the successful ABC sitcom “Modern Family” has made this Colombia-born actress both a U.S. household name and arguably the biggest star of Latino crossover success in recent years. Discovered as a model in her native country, Vergara is proud of having started her acting career in a Spanish-language TV network to then conquer America’s mainstream market. This year, the Golden Globe and Emmy multiple nominee got a star in the Hollywood Walk of Fame and starred in the comedy film “Hot Pursuit, “opposite Oscar winner Reese Witherspoon. Vergara leads her own artists management company focused on Latino talent, has secured many lucrative endorsement deals, and also has her own line of clothing, perfume, homegoods and shapewear. No wonder Vergara is among the world’s highest paid stars.

ArturoNALEO

100

101


Congratulations to Josuel Plasencia Junior Achievement USA® congratulates Josuel Plasencia for receiving ALPFA’s 2015 Daniel Zamora Student of the Year Award. The Daniel Zamora Student of the Year Award is presented in memory of Daniel Zamora (ALPFA 2009 Student of the Year) to an individual who has shown an excellent balance between academics and community involvement and is actively involved his ALPFA student chapter.

“JA has been the key to success for me. It really opened the doors of opportunity and encouraged me to look beyond the present to the possibilities of the future. I hope my story inspires and gives hope to kids who don’t know how to navigate their way to success.” —Josuel Plasencia

We at Junior Achievement are pleased to see Josuel’s continued leadership and dedication to others as a member of ALPFA and wish him ongoing success for the future.

ALPFA CEO, Charlie Garcia and Junior Achievement CEO, Jack Kosakowski sign historic agreement in Washington, D.C.

ALPFA has joined forces with Junior Achievement USA (JA), the world’s largest organization that inspires and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy. ALPFA and JA have partnered to work together on the shared goal of preparing America’s youth to be work-ready and providing them with a valuable means to explore career opportunities, entrepreneurship, and become financially literate through experiential, hands-on programs.


BUILDING

BUSINESS

A BETTER FUTURE, STEP BY STEP

B

ORN IN VILLA Nicolas Bravo in the state of Guerrero, Aparicio lived in a home with no running water or electricity with his five siblings until the family moved to Mexico City when he was 10 years old. “We were the poorest of the poor,” he recalled. Daily existence remained a struggle for the family, which moved to a “vecindad” where they lived in one small room and shared a single public bathroom with 100 people. The prospect of a brighter future seemed unlikely as Aparicio approached manhood and made the painful decision to leave his homeland. Driven by the desire for a better life, Aparicio travelled thousands of miles for weeks to the United States-Mexican border at Tijuana with his uncle, cousin and two others. At the border, they hid in the terrain for more than 24 hours, waiting for a chance to cross. Soaked by heavy rain and weak from hunger, the 20-year-old developed a high fever and began doubting his actions.

58 • July / August 2015

Northwestern Mutual Photos by Jorge Mujica Story by

Ethan Aparicio’s journey from childhood poverty in Mexico to a successful career as a financial representative in California is a testament to the human spirit.

“It’s been 32 years and I still remember all those things as if it were yesterday,” he said. “My biggest fear was that I was going to die at the border. I started wondering if I should go back.” But Aparicio believes the decision he made years ago shaped the man he is today. “I chose not to give up. It’s a lesson that I still apply today–never quit. It’s important to keep going and take that next step toward a better future,” said Aparicio, a financial representative with Northwestern Mutual in Bakersfield, California.


Today Aparicio assists Latino business owners and individuals with financial planning as they strive to create a better life, whether they’re thinking about retirement, business succession, college savings, income protection or other crucial matters.

Stepping stones

Aparicio views the turning points in his life as “stepping stones that ultimately made me a better individual and business person. Going through those trials built endurance.” Homeless for months in the United States, Aparicio learned to survive in the mountains, sleeping under trees and rocks. He picked citrus for three years. “I worked six days a week in 110 degree weather for $150 a week,” he said. Without even a high school diploma in the United States, Aparicio worked his way up, leaving the fields for a fruit-packing business where he taught himself English. In time, he found work as a car salesman. “I’m very proud that I have never been a burden to society or the government. I have been working all my life, paying my taxes and obeying the law.” His first step toward citizenship came in 1985 when President Ronald Reagan provided amnesty for millions of undocumented immigrants. “That’s how I got my green card,” said Aparicio, who became a United States citizen 20 years ago.

Building relationships

Aparico became interested in the insurance industry after purchasing a life insurance policy. “I had a house and a mortgage. I wanted to protect my family in case something happened to me,” said the father-of-two. “I liked the concept behind insurance and planning for the future. Everything in life is about planning. We are where we are today because of the things we have done in the past.” Always eager to explore new opportunities, Aparicio left the car dealership and began selling property and casualty insurance. But after a few years, he grew dissatisfied with the position, which focused more on making commercial transactions than helping people plan for the future. “I wanted to work at a place where I could offer people comprehensive, holistic planning to help them reach their personal and business goals,” he said. “I wanted to add value to their economic lives.” He believed others could benefit from his own resilience. “We all reach crossroads in life where we have to make important decisions,” he said. “It’s good to have a dream. But you also need a game plan. You need to know where you’re going and how you’re going to get there.” Aparicio heard about Northwestern Mutual from a colleague. The more he learned about the company, the more he wanted to join the team.

“I think what sets us apart is that we really listen to individuals to determine what they want and then figure out how we can help them achieve their goals,” he said. “We take care of people by building long-lasting relationships.” Being part of a company that provides financial professionals a vast array of resources was another advantage of joining Northwestern Mutual. “The support I get from the home office is phenomenal,” he said. “The training and education they provide so I can stay up-to-date with the industry is tremendous. I never feel like I’m working alone. I’m part of a team.” Most importantly, Aparicio is doing what he loves most–helping business owners, doctors, nurses, accountants and other hard-working professionals create a secure future. He draws from his own life lessons each day as he helps others pave their way toward a better life. For Aparicio, even the most challenging goals are within reach for those with the courage and foresight to plan and persevere. “It’s all about taking steps, little by little, that gradually put you in the right direction,” he said.

Ethan Nicolas Aparicio is an Insurance Agent of Northwestern Mutual, the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, Milwaukee, WI (NM) (life and disability insurance, annuities, and life insurance with long-term care benefits) and its subsidiaries.


PORTFOLIO

LATINO NONPROFITS Stories by the

Staff of Latino Leaders

Courtesy photos

FRANCISCO RÍOS

MARGARET MORAN

ALEX NOGALES

There’s no question that Latinos are making inroads everywhere. But in business, perhaps where they are reaching the deepest fibers of society may be in nonprofit organizations. The special goals of these types of businesses make them unique. Here, we present three that are noteworthy. One of them, League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) already have legendary status. The other two, National Hispanic Media Coalition and Radio KDNA, are well on their way to being part of the history books. Latino Leaders takes a look at these four special nonprofits.

latinoleaders.com


PORTFOLIO - RADIO KDNA

THE REAL VOICE OF THE FARM WORKERS Photo by Braulio 62 • July / August 2015

Herrera of Braulio’s Photography of Yakima, WA (http://www.braulios.com/)


Radio KDNA shines as the premiere, Latino non-profit station that serves Washington State’s Hispanics

ON MAY 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens of Washington state erupted. The blast, heard across many states, triggered the largest landslide in recorded history sent ash 15 miles up in the air, busting off 1, 300 feet off the volcano, leveling forests, melting ice and snow that provoking deadly landslides that killed 57 people. The Yakima Valley, which is situated about 140 east of Seattle and sits in the breadbasket of the state, is currently home to over 240,000 people, with over 40 per cent of them Latino. Back in 1980, there were no Spanish-language media that informed local migrant workers, almost all from Mexico, except Radio KDNA, a small, non-profit station that had just been installed in the town of Granger, population just over 3,000. Radio broadcasters, some of them formerly migrant farm workers, informed the Spanish-speaking population, telling them how to protect themselves from dangerous ashes, as the day turned dark from the debris. Radio founder, Ricardo García, a legend in the Yakima Valley for a life dedicated to helping Latinos in every conceivable way, retired after 26 years of heading the station. But Radio KDNA 91.9 FM, which is called “La voz del campesino” (The voice of the farm worker) remains a non-profit, giving local Latinos invaluable information that ranges from health care, voting rights and news, with top radio journalists like Francisco Ríos, its news director, on top of the latest. With Ríos at the helm, Radio KDNA persists as the top informative outlet for Hispanics and a true voice for local farmworkers. Despite challenges, Radio KDNA lives on.

FRANCISCO RÍOS NEWS DIRECTOR OR RADIO KDNA, DELIVERS THE LATEST NEWS TO THE RESIDENTS OF THE YAKIMA VALLEY, IN WASHINGTON STATE.


PORTFOLIO - LULAC

VINTAGE NONPROFIT Courtesy photo IT WAS BORN right during the start of the Great Depression, but that didn’t stop the newly created League of United Latin American Citizens to feel upbeat about fighting for the rights of Hispanics. It was 1929, when three regional organizations came together in Corpus Christi, Texas, and became LULAC. From there, the rest is part of the history of Latinos in the U.S. From fighting –and winning- lawsuits against school segregation, greater rights for Latino Armed Forces veterans, health care, voter registration and better schools for Hispanics, Lulac took these battles to the forefront when it was dangerous to be a Latino activist during the 1930s and 1940s, when signs were visible in many establishments that indicated, “We serve Whites ony, no Spanish or Mexicans.” Some critics say that Lulac, which during the 1990s managed to move its headquarters to Washington, D.C., is more conservative than other Latino organizations. Still, the organization remains at the forefront of immigration, health care and social and civil rights issues, says Margaret Moran, its president. “The founders made it their mission to advocate for those rights and we are still doing that,” she says.

64 • July / August 2015

MARGARET MORAN PRESIDENT OF LULAC.


L AT INO LE A DE R S

PORTFOLIO - NHMC

GOOD TIDINGS Courtesy photo

FROM DEFENDING Selena from unwanted comments by a national radio talk show host to forcing some of the major networks to include more Latinos in their ranks and present them more fairly, the National Hispanic Media Coalition has been at the forefront of Latino media. Established in Los Angeles in 1986, the National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) is a media advocacy and civil rights organization for the advancement of Latinos, working towards a media that is fair and inclusive of Latinos, and towards universal, affordable, and open access to communications. Since then it has grown from its headquarters in Pasadena, California. It now has an office in Washington D.C. and has a strong presence in California, New York, Arizona and Michigan. The organization seeks to fight media bias against Latinos. “Although American Latinos comprise over 16% of the U.S. population and are resolutely the largest minority group in the country, this important community is still largely invisible in primetime media,� according to NHMC. For decades, Alex Nogales, its president and CEO has fought to combat negative stereotypes against Latinos. The NHMC has come a long way under his leadership, hosting events like the MediaCon, which features speakers from the top networks who have discussed the changing climate in television.

ALEX NOGALES CEO OF NHMC.

latinoleaders.com


EVENTS

C.D.O. ROUNDTABLE

Story by: Joseph

Treviño

Photos by: Jason

Kindig

Beyond diversity A group of officers came together to discuss the current state of diversity in the workforce

T

hough many advances have been made, minorities in the work force still face the biggest hurdle: cracking the top managerial and CEO spots. That was one of the many conclusions reached during the Chief Diversity Officers Roundtable that was held a the Tower Club, in Downtown Dallas. The business breakfast took place at the Skybox Room, on the 48th floor on Thursday, May 14th. 66 • July / August 2015

Organized by Comerica Bank and Latino Leaders Magazine, the Roundtable brought together Linda Forte, Chief Diversity Officer of Comerica Bank, Mina Kini, of Texas Health Resources, James Fripp of Yum! Brands, Kelley Johnson, of JC Penney and Terri Bryant-Harrell, Vice President, Corporate HR & Diversity of the Dr Pepper Snapple Group (DPSG. Mónica Martínez, National Hispanic Business Affairs director of Comerica Bank also took part in the

A group of top Chief Diversity Officers gathered for the C.D.O. Roundtable, held by Comerica Bank and Latino Leaders Magazine.


LATINO LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

A band apart. From left to right: Kelley Johnson, Terri Bryant-Harrell, Linda Forte, James Fripp and Mina Kini, at the Tower Club of Downtown Dallas.

“WHEN YOU LOOK AT SENIOR MANAGEMENT, THE POOL OF ETHNICALLY DIVERSE INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE WITHIN AN AGE SPAN THAT PROBABLY HAS THE EXPERIENCE, CREDENTIALS TO BE IN A SENIOR EXECUTIVE LEVEL ROLE, WE’RE IN A SCARCITY SITUATION, WHICH IS WHY BUILDING THE PIPELINE IS SO IMPORTANT.”- KELLEY JOHNSON, DVP, DIVERSITY AND EMERGING TALENT.

From left to right: Terri Bryant-Harrell, Vice President, Corporate HR & Diversity of the Dr Pepper Snapple Group (DPSG); Kelley Johnson, DVP, Diversity and Emerging Talent, JCPenney; Mina Kini, Senior Director of Multicultural and Community Health Improvement of Texas Health Resources. They discussed the challenges that diversity faces in the work force.

Roundtable. Jorge Ferráez, publisher of Latino Leaders Magazine, facilitated the discussion. Though efforts to implement diversity in the workplace have been going on for decades, it still faces many challenges, the participants said. Hiring practices, especially regarding entry-level positions and some in middle management, have improved. But the problems lie in how to prepare minority middle managers for the next step up the corporate ladder, they said. Johnson, from J.C. Penney, says that one of the major problems is being able to find minority candidates who have the skills and experience that is required of a senior executive’s position. “We know in this country that if you are over forty there’s five Caucasians to one person of color. That’s census data,” she says. “By virtue of that, when you look at senior management, the pool of ethnically diverse individuals who are within an age span that probably has the experience, credentials to be in a senior executive level role, we’re in a scarcity situation, which is why building the pipeline is so important.” But the challenge to rise to the requirements to reach executive level positions should not only be on minority candidates, but on senior leaders who must insists on not only mentoring middle managers, but taking a step further and sponsoring them, says James Fripp, of YUM! Brands. latinoleaders.com


EVENTS

LATINO LEADERS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

C.D.O. ROUNDTABLE

“IT’S MORE ABOUT HOW DO WE ENGAGE, HOW DO WE CREATE THE SAFE ENVIRONMENT WHERE WE CAN HAVE OPEN DIALOGUE.”- JAMES FRIPP, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL DIVERSITY & INCLUSION FOR YUM! BRANDS. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by age, race, Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, and sex, first quarter 2015 averages, not seasonally adjusted Total Age, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

Number of workers (in thousands)

Median weekly earnings

Men

Women

Number of Median workers weekly (in thousands) earnings

Number of workers (in thousands)

Median weekly earnings

TOTAL 16 years and over 16 to 24 years 16 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 years and over 25 to 54 years 25 to 34 years 35 to 44 years 45 to 54 years 55 years and over 55 to 64 years 65 years and over

107,194 9,106 995 8,111 98,088 76,291 26,227 24,684 25,380 21,797 17,838 3,959

$808 480 378 493 856 847 736 893 930 893 903 838

59,361 5,067 619 4,448 54,294 42,510 14,780 13,879 13,850 11,784 9,632 2,152

$895 491 394 504 944 922 772 981 1,039 1,029 1,038 989

47,833 4,039 376 3,663 43,794 33,781 11,446 10,805 11,530 10,013 8,205 1,807

$730 461 356 478 759 757 693 796 811 768 777 741

White 16 years and over 16 to 24 years 25 years and over 25 to 54 years 55 years and over

84,008 7,128 76,879 59,009 17,870

835 492 883 872 924

47,591 4,031 43,560 33,720 9,840

918 503 969 945 1,060

36,416 3,097 33,319 25,289 8,030

746 476 776 773 788

Black or African American 16 years and over 16 to 24 years 25 years and over 25 to 54 years 55 years and over

13,241 1,220 12,020 9,720 2,300

650 389 692 680 738

6,268 616 5,652 4,595 1,057

694 398 731 721 764

6,972 604 6,368 5,126 1,242

614 375 654 633 720

Asian 16 years and over 16 to 24 years 25 years and over 25 to 54 years 55 years and over

6,570 328 6,242 5,085 1,157

966 574 999 1,045 860

3,684 181 3,503 2,875 627

1,090 493 1,129 1,146 1,034

2,886 147 2,739 2,210 530

869 650 881 918 749

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity 16 years and over 16 to 24 years 25 years and over 25 to 54 years 55 years and over

18,124 2,135 15,989 13,645 2,344

590 433 616 615 620

10,973 1,322 9,651 8,271 1,380

612 448 656 653 679

7,151 814 6,337 5,374 963

547 415 580 582 560

68 • July / August 2015

“It’s more about how do we engage, how do we create the safe environment where we can have open dialogue,” Fripp says. Still, many industries are still struggling with hiring diverse people, says Kini, of Texas Health Resources. For instance, she adds that in the U.S. only four per cent of nurses are Hispanic. “It’s not easy,” Kini says. It’s important that companies hire and retain minority senior executives who can lead a company to resonate with all customers, including minorities, says Johnson. In the end, this practice should be good for the company and clients. Fripp agreed. He added that by creating that relationship with minorities, brands can do better business. “If we are good at what we do, we are going to figure out today how to get in the minds and hearts of current day as well as the up and coming customers by virtue of understanding their cultures, of what’s important to them, authentically engaging them on those ways that are important,” he says.


LATINO LEADERS MAGAZINE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SOUTHWEST AIRLINES AND FROST BANK

STORY BY JOSEPH TREVIÑO PHOTOS BY EMILIA GASTON

CLF DALLAS

EVENTS

A new,

talented breed The Club Leaders of the Future of Dallas led to some lively, profound discussions

P

assion, speaking perfect Spanish and being completely bicultural and bilingual are some of the traits that separate young Latino professionals from other groups, agreed a group of young Hispanics. This happened during the Club Leaders of the Future event, held at the Nobu Dallas Restaurant, located at the Rosewood Crescent Hotel in downtown Dallas. Southwest Airlines and Frost Bank, together with Latino Leaders Magazine, produced the dinner. Moderated by Yol-itzma Aguirre, National Events Director of Latino Leaders, the dinner discussion centered on what Latino identity means. Club members like Mateo Pérez, of Alix Partners, an economic advisor and investigator, says that Hispanic culture, and this includes classical Latino culture culled from novelists and philosophers and not necessarily from populist customs, helps fuel genuine culture and success for young Latinos. “It’s more like the abilities we have. Our Latino heritage helps us because we are prone to speak Spanish fluently. Mexico is always going to be there,” Pérez says.

CLUB MEMBERS OF DALLAS CLF DISCUSS IDEAS AROUND A TABLE FULL OFF TALENT.

EMERGING LEADERS: ALEX GARCÍA, MATEO PÉREZ, RAÚL ARRIAGA AND ISAURO REYNA.

NETWORKING WITH EMERGING LEADERS IN DALLAS.

ROBLEDO FAMILY VINEYARDS WINES WERE PROUDLY POURED. latinoleaders.com


EVENTS

CLF DALLAS

STORY BY JOSEPH TREVIÑO PHOTOS BY EMILIA GASTON

Adrián Pérez Alanís

Financial Analyst. Maxitransfers Corporation. Adrián was raised in Tampico, Tamaulipas and moved to Monterrey, Nuevo Leon. In 2010 Adrían accepted a full time internship in DFW at Maxitransfers Corporation, a job position he would later take on as of August 2011. Later he went Mexico to finish a B.A. in Financial Management at Tecnológico de Monterrey (graduated with honors). During that time Adrían got licensed as an Investment Strategy Advisor by the Asociación Mexicana de Intermediarios Bursátiles (AMIB). Currently, Adrían is involved in Treasury Management, Reconciliation and Internal Auditing to FOREX Trading, Risk Management, Forecasting and Business Development. In 2015 he finished the GraduateFinance Certificate Program at SMU Cox School of Business. Adrian is the treasurer for the Asociación de Empresarios Mexicanos Jóvenes in DFW.

Alex Garcia Topete

Nowadays Orange Productions, Dallas Film Society. Alex has had extensive experience writing and directing for film and television, both in the U.S. and his native Mexico for the past six years. His passions for storytelling and filmmaking have been the main driving force of his career and life. Aside from the projects with his partners at the production company, he’s involved with the Dallas Film Society and the Dallas International Film Festival, as well as several other non-profit organizations that focus on education, bilingual literacy, and arts and culture.

Angela San Juan Cisneros Lead Financial Analyst. Capital Planning group at AT&T.

As a Lead Financial Analyst, Angela carries out extensive business case studies and project budget analysis. Angela’s position at AT&T requires her to interact with a wide variety of business units within the company. Prior to joining AT&T Angela swam professionally for more than 12 years. Angela had the honor of representing her native Spain in multiple international competitions, including swimming finals at World and European Championships, World University Games and Mediterranean Games. Angela’s career culminated with her participation in the Olympic Games in Beijing 2008. Angela broke 56 Spanish Records some of which remain unbroken until today.

Anna Kurian

Senior Manager of Communications North Texas Food Bank Anna Kurian is a communications professional and company spokesperson from Dallas, Texas. Anna serves as a company spokesperson and oversees internal communications, media relations as well as social media for NTFB. Stories of hope from clients and Partner Agencies are what fuels Anna and her team to spread the word and increase awareness about hunger in North Texas. Prior to her work at the food bank, Anna served as a company spokesperson, social media contributor and company writer for Oncor- a Dallas based electric transmission and distribution company. Anna’s first job after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Corporate Communications and Public Affairs from Southern Methodist University was at the Axis Agency, a multicultural PR firm.

70 • July / August 2015


LATINO LEADERS MAGAZINE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SOUTHWEST AIRLINES AND FROST BANK

Carmen Ayala

Office manager and special projects manager. Dallas County Democratic Party. Carmen Ayala was born and raised in East Dallas. She is a graduate of Skyline High School, El Centro College, and Texas Women’s University. She has a Bachelor of Science in Biology and Political Science. She is responsible of the day to day operation at the party headquarters and helps coordinates major fundraising and social events for the county party. Events she has helped plan and coordinate include the annual Johnson Jordan Fundraiser Dinner, which brings in over a hundred thousand dollars to the local county party, as well as an annual Fish Fry which brings in local and grassroots support and donors to the party. Recently she co-founded a private political consulting group and think tank, Political Kit, with a very close friend. Carmen currently resides in Fair Park, teaches Sunday School at her church for over nine years now, and can be found supporting local businesses, artists, and non-profits.

Diana Diaz

Co-Owner of Paletas Pop Diana considers herself to be a native Texan while having multiple ties to the Midwest and Cd. Juarez, Mexico. She is fully bilingual and bicultural. While attending college at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas, she quickly realized that her interest in marketing was much greater than administration and switched majors. In 2007 she moved to Dallas, TX and began working for RadioShack Corp. For 6 years she worked under the general market media team. Due to her vast knowledge of the Hispanic Market, she progressed into the General Market and Hispanic role for media and branding. Her accomplishments include, launching the 1st digital initiatives for the Puerto Rico Market along with managing strategic product placements in key Hispanic Market. In 2014, she finally got her chance and joined the Richards/Lerma team. RL is a Hispanic Advertising Agency based in Dallas, TX. As of May, Diana decided to take a leap of faith and become an entrepreneur. She has ventured into opening a family business with her siblings. Her family business is set to open fall of 2015.

Dora Ramirez

Community Development Manager. Wells Fargo. Dallas, Fort Worth and Texas Border Markets. Dora provides oversight and direction to Wells Fargo leadership on CRA related initiatives in addition to building external relationships with nonprofits entities and local officials.Dora has been in the financial services industry for 12 years. Prior to joining the Wells Fargo team, Dora worked for Citi’s Community Mortgage Lending group where she managed the achievement of CRA, Fair Lending and Mortgage Lending goals for Texas. She has also worked for Lehman Brothers/Neuberger Berman as a Wholesale Sales Assistant and with JPMorgan Chase as a Marketing Officer. She is a certified NeighborWorks counselor, licensed banker (Series 7 & 66 - expired), and a graduate of the University of Texas - Arlington with a BBA in International Business. She currently chairs the Hispanic Scholarship Fund Texas Advisory Board, and serves on the ACCION North Texas Advisory Board as well as the Real Estate Council’s Community Fund Board. She is a 2014 alum of the Leadership Dallas program and a current member of the Mayor’s Star Council.

Guillermo Zamarripa

Broadridge Financial Solution Founder & CEO of CMASathletes Guillermo has been involved in sports all his life. He received an athletic scholarship from the New York Institute of Technology in 2009. Convinced there is a huge opportunity to positively impact younger generations Guillermo founded Career Management Advisory Solutions(CMAS Athletes), a consulting company dedicated to guiding Latin-American talent towards American universities. Today the company offers a vast array of products and services targeted to studentathletes who are looking for life changing opportunities. Impacting youth sports and bridging the gap between the lack of support and the thousands of opportunities in the sporting industry is my passion. Guillermo strongly believes these actions will have a long-lasting effect on education and economic-social

latinoleaders.com


EVENTS

CLF DALLAS

STORY BY JOSEPH TREVIÑO PHOTOS BY EMILIA GASTON

LATINO LEADERS MAGAZINE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SOUTHWEST AIRLINES AND FROST BANK

Isauro Reyna

Senior Associate. Investar Financial. Isauro is a native of Monterrey, Mexico. His responsibilities include identifying and evaluating private equity investment opportunities, performing transaction due diligence, and monitoring portfolio investments. During his 4-year tenure at Investar, Isauro has been involved in transactions that aggregate over $100 million in invested capital across a number of industries. Prior to joining Investar, Isauro was an Equity Research Analyst at Arbitrak Investments. Isauro is also a board member of the Asociacion de Empresarios Mexicanos Jovenes Dallas, a nonprofit that helps bring young entrepreneurs together to enable them to become successful in the U.S. Isauro graduated with honors from Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey where he earned a B.S. in Finance.

Marisela Olivares

Senior associate KPMG Internal Audit, Risk & Consulting Services practice. Marisela worked as a member of the Internal Audit team at AT&T, Radio Shack, and JC Penney specializing in operational and SOX audits. She also has five years’ experience as a senior portfolio analyst at Bank of America’s Global Corporate Investment Banking group, specializing in Insurance, Money Managers/Broker Dealers, and Financial Institutions. Marisela obtained her MBA and Bachelors degrees at Southern Methodist Univerisity. organizations that focus on education, bilingual literacy, and arts and culture.

Mateo Pérez

Associate. AlixPartners. Mateo specializes in providing econometric, investigative, and due diligence services on behalf of a wide range of companies, including private equity investors, and their stakeholders. A native of Mexico, Mateo came to the United States in 2009. His career has taken him all over the world; he has lived in Monterrey, Mexico City, Chicago, Paris, Geneva, Nashville, and now, Dallas. Before joining AlixPartners in 2014, he worked at Ernst & Young and MSCI (f.k.a. Morgan Stanley Capital International). After graduating from the prestigious CIDE, the leading Economics Center in Mexico, Mateo earned a master’s degree in economics from Vanderbilt University, where he was awarded the only full scholarship in the program. He is fluent in Spanish and French and is well-versed in working in Mexico, and Latin America, in general, in areas such as new market entry analysis, corporate governance and valuation.

Raúl Benetto Arriaga. URE – Arriaga Group

Recognized by the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals as a Top 250 Latino Real Estate agent in all U.S. for 2013-2014. Author of the “Ultimate Guide to Dallas Real Estate” released in 2014. Raul have been interviewed by TIME magazine and many other media outlets as an expert for local and international real estate. Founded Arriaga Group 2012. Raul shows his leadership qualities by the numerous designations he has earned. His latest accomplishment is the Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS) where he also continues to assist clients worldwide. Raul is among the top 1% producing agents in the Dallas Area, helped hundreds of families achieved the American Dream of home ownership. Raul passion and mission continues to strive and grow so that he can help others to succeed with their real estate needs. Recently Raul helped Cinemagic now CineAmerica, a movie theater chain form Mexico expand operations in Texas. Raul unique philosophy in real estate and business have come a long way. Raul is an active board member for NAHREP North Texas, Association of Mexican Entrepreneurs. Proud parent of 8 year old son Maximo.

72 • July / August 2015


Story by Staff of Latino Leaders Courtesy photos

AEM Jóvenes gather in Dallas AEM Jovenes members from all over Texas including Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Laredo as well as Mexico City and Monterrey gathered for this first AEM Leadership Summit.”

O

The group got together for the first time in the Metroplex area

n June 6, the Asociacion de Empresarios Mexicanos (AEM) Jovenes Dallas group hosted for the first time the AEM Jovenes Leadership Summit. The Summit was the first time that leaders from different chapters of AEM Jovenes worked together addressing the future of AEM Jovenes. AEM Jovenes members from all over Texas including Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Laredo as well as Mexico City and Monterrey gathered for this first AEM Leadership Summit. The AEM Jovenes Summit featured speakers such as Dr. José Octavio Tripp (Cónsul General of Dallas), Enrique Marroquín (CEO-Hunt Mexico), Eduardo Bravo (Chairman-AEM), Jorge Ferráez (CEO-Latino Leaders), Tonatiuh Salines (DirectorCrédito Joven NAFIN) as well as Uriel Sánchez (U-Links) and Jesús Gerardo López (1P One Pay). During the afternoon session, Alexia Dabdoub, Michelle Kafie and Juan Pablo Alcantar discussed and lead several important issues of the present and future of AEM Jovenes. The event was held in SMU with the collaboration with the Latino Leadership Institute and its executive director Anthony Herrera. Opening remarks of the event were addressed by Jorge Gámez (AEM Jóvenes-Chairman) and Eduardo Márquez (AEM JóvenesPresident). The AEM Dallas team that led and organized this event includes general coordinators Ivanna Vlasich, María José Martínez and AEM Dallas members Michelle Kafie, Karina Corral, Gloria Gutiérrez, Adrián Pérez and Luis Octavio Barraza. The event was sponsored by Mission Foods, Interceramic, Alarcon Construction Group and Latino Leaders. latinoleaders.com


EVENTS

LATINO LEADERS OF ATLANTA

STORY BY STAFF OF LATINO LEADERS

Southern

Hospitality

Latino Leaders of Atlanta discuss ways place more Hispanics in key posts

HUMBERTO GARCÍA-SJÖGRIM, VICE PRESIDENT OF LATIN AFFAIRS AT COCA-COLA, WITH GEORGIA STATE SENATOR, SAM ZAMARRIPA, AT THE LEADERS OF ATLANTA.

I

t was a beautiful warm southern night as Latino Leaders magazine, with the support of Coca-Cola and Delta Airlines, headed to Pampas Steakhouse in Atlanta, GA to meet with the influential leaders that have been paving the way for the Latino community. We were very fortunate to have former Senator Sam Zamarripa with us to share the great backstory on what Latinos have built. The evening began, and the room was quickly filled with plenty of friendly handshakes and warm embraces all the traces of southern hospitality were present as they took their seats and the conversation began. The leaders seem to have the same vision for building of leadership in Atlanta, “we need to unify and really support our community.” Comparisons were made between the solidarity that exists in other groups and the success those groups have had in promoting their agendas and moving people into positions of power, as one leader said “we don’t have a ‘codigo Latino’ and we need one in order to organize.” As the night progressed, and their stories were told, we saw a beautiful blended mix of Latino backgrounds, Central America, Mexico, Puerto Rico and others. From politics to school boards, to the private sector, no topic was left unturned, but the one tying thread throughout the night was the importance of mentoring and giving back to the community in order to create effective change, “we need to get involved, become part of a board, and get more Latinos in those seats.” The Latino Leaders of Atlanta have been hard at work laying the foundation for the next generation of young leaders, we look forward to revisiting this great thriving group. Hosted by Delta Air lines and Coca-Cola, many luminaries showed up at the event, including Humberto García-Sjogrim, Vice-President of Hispanic Strategies for Coca-Cola, Letty Ashworth, Director, of Global Diversity for Delta Air Lines and Georgia State Senator, Sam Zamarripa.

JUAN BUENO FROM MCKINSEY, ATLANTA.

74 • July / August 2015

WE NEED TO UNIFY AND REALLY SUPPORT OUR COMMUNITY: SAM ZAMARRIPA.


LATINO LEADERS MAGAZINE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH COCA COLA AND DELTA

Humberto García-Sjögrim

Vice-President of Hispanic Strategies for Coca-Cola. A polyglot who speaks English, Spanish, French and Swedish, Humberto García Sjogrim is the Vice President of Hispanic Strategies for Coca-Cola. García has worked in many countries, showing his passion for diving headfirst into strategic, new opportunities, leading cultural and philosophical change and fostering transformational leadership. His leadership skills has helped create a winning environment in four countries, laboring for global corporations. Along the way, García-Sjogrim has adapted and embraced local cultures. As the Vice President of Latin Affairs, García-Sjogrim is responsible for strengthening relationships with the Hispanic community. Responsibilities include establishing and managing relationships with key local, state and national Hispanic political, business, civic and community leaders.

Letty Ashworth

Letty Ashworth is Director, of Global Diversity for Delta Air Lines. In this role she is a key leader in Delta’s global strategy to develop an efficient, effective, and diverse workforce that reflects the rapidly changing demographics of an increasingly interconnected world. She works closely with various Delta business units on recruiting efforts to ensure Delta is an employer of choice for diverse talent, including the company’s efforts in recruiting and supporting veterans. Those recruiting efforts include the company’s major commitment to support veterans and advocate on behalf of issues that are important to Delta employees and their families living with disabilities. Ashworth has been recognized by numerous organizations like the American Legion Award and the 2012 Catalyst Award from Uptown Magazine and was honored by the White House for Promising Practices work in diversity.

Maggie Castillo Foster

Complex Commodity Manager, Procurement, UPS Maggie Castillo Foster is the Complex Commodity Manager for UPS’ Procurement Group. Foster joined UPS in 2011 and currently leads processes related to UPS’Access Point™ and the Transportation Sourcing group. She is the Chair of the UPS Latino Business Resource Group. Born in Miami, Florida and raised in Bucaramanga, Colombia, Maggie displayed great talent as a leader and entrepreneur from a very early age. After completing her Bachelors of Science degree from the Universidad Autónoma de Bucaramanga, she moved back to the U.S. to start an 11 year career in the Financial Services Industry. Foster currently lives in Atlanta, Georgia, with her husband Joel and their son Nicholas. For six years she worked for Smith Barney, then transitioned to the area of lending services. Maggie contributed to financial growth for her company without compromising advocacy for her clients. Maggie holds two Masters degrees from the Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University, one in Business Administration and one in Finance. She is fluent in Spanish and English.

Adilka White

Solutions Section Manager for UPS Adilka Indhira White is a Solutions Section Manager for UPS, having responsibility for Healthcare Solutions across US, Canada and Puerto Rico. In this role, White has a team of Project Managers that supports the sales force in the development of unique distribution solutions for potential and existing clients. In addition to her job responsibilities at UPS, Adilka is an active member of Crecer, the UPS Latino Business Resources Group (BRG) and has been key in the development of its overall strategy of supporting UPS business growth through gaining market share in the Hispanic community. Originally from Dominican Republic, Adilka currently resides in Woodstock, GA, with her husband Jason and their two children: Elias Andrew, 5 and Lucia Grace, 3.

latinoleaders.com


EVENTS

LATINO LEADERS OF ATLANTA

STORY BY STAFF OF LATINO LEADERS

LATINO LEADERS MAGAZINE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH COCA COLA AND DELTA

Sam Zamarripa

Financial advisor and former Georgia State Senator Sam Zamarripa is the first Hispanic to serve in the Georgia State Senate, representing the 36th District located in eastern Fulton County, Georgia. Mr. Zamarripa served two terms in the State Senate of Georgia representing the City of Atlanta where he served as the Secretary of the State Economic Development Committee and member of the committees on Insurance, Science & Technology and Transportation. He retired from the State Senate, undefeated in 2006. He is a past member of the board of directors of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF).

Álvaro Silva

Senior Manager of System Evolution, Coca-Cola Alvaro Silva is a Senior Manager of System Evolution (North America’s Refranchising) at The Coca-Cola Company. He was born in Colombia where he studied Industrial Engineering at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. He also holds a Bachelors of Business Administration in Finance from Kennesaw State University, and a MBA from the Goizueta Business School at Emory University. Prior to joining The Coca-Cola Company, Mr. Silva held various positions throughout his banking career. His positions have ranged from being a Personal Banker, a Banking Center Manager, to being a Financial Analyst in the Commercial Banking Middle Market group at Bank of America. Alvaro currently lives in Atlanta, GA with his wife and two daughters.

Louis Martin

Senior Vice President, System Evolution, Coca-Cola As the Senior Vice President of System Evolution, Martin leads effort to re-franchise CocaCola’s North American bottling business. He directs strategic initiatives and capabilities for the brand’s refreshements. He has been Senior Vice President since 2014. Before that he was the Executive Administrator and Chief of Staff for CCR’s president, from 2013 to 2014. Previously, Mr. Martin was the brand’s spokesperson, also managing the relationship and investments in the community. Mr. Martin also led strategic initiatives for Coca-Cola’s North America operating group.

Margoth Pasquel

Treasurer for the Latin American Hispanic Employee Network Margoth serves as (LAHEN) and she actively engages employees in career mentoring and professional development. She is a firm believer in the importance of education and the difference that we can make by levering our power in our community. In the past, she has conducted free seminars to educate the Hispanic community in how to make better financial decisions and she has also worked with Project Open Hand and City of Refuge preparing, packing and delivering food to men, women and children affected by critical illnesses or disabilities. In her professional life, Margoth is an Analyst for DELTA’s Revenue Management department as part of DELTA’s first Analyst Rotational Program. In the ten years prior to joining DELTA, Margoth worked in the Banking industry and held different retail management positions for JP Morgan Chase. Margoth has a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Business Administration from Kennesaw State University. She grew up in Quito, Ecuador, and immigrated to the US as a teenager in 1999.

76 • July / August 2015


Travel Section

The writer, one of the top actresses from 1980’s Mexican Cinema, takes us on an escapade to the Riviera Maya, Mexico’s Idyllic and uncongested dreamy destination Story by Anaïs de Melo

R

iviera Maya is a beautiful sunny destination located in southeastern Mexico and is part of the Yucatan peninsula. It best known for its idyllic beaches, with clear turquoise warm water and white fine sands. It is the home of one of the most beautiful resorts in the world; it combines the laid back village of Puerto Morelos and the blissful and quaint town of Playa del Carmen. I decided a few weeks ago to take a vacation far away from the chaotic city where I live, and had my heart set on Playa del Carmen. Being the easygoing type, I was looking for a place

PARADISE FOUND where I could read, write and paint and just take it easy for a few days. Playa del Carmen seemed like the perfect place, although I was looking for a much quieter venue. I was actually searching for a place to take it easy during the day and be able to party at night. Playa del Carmen seemed to be the perfect place for the nightlife I was looking for, but I wanted a tranquil place for my daytime needs. Puerto Morelos was definitely the locale I needed. Long stretches of empty beaches where I could take extended walks, look deep into the horizon, paint, write, meditate, work on my tan or just take a siesta and rest. I could explore the natural wonders such as the coral reef (500 meters from shore), have a serene and delicious lunch with the locals, snorkel or swim. So there was my plan: Puerto Morelos for the daytime and Playa del Carmen for the nightlife. It was perfect. I was really proud of myself for having chosen those two paradisiacal destinations.


Puerto Morelos is located on the edge of the Riviera Maya, only about 20 minutes away from the Cancun airport. I would arrive at the airport, take a shuttle to my hotel in Puerto Morelos, leave my suitcase and go about my business. That´s exactly what I did. I checked in, put on a bathing suit and rushed to meet the blue beautiful waves of this Caribbean slice of heaven. After a long day on the beach, I went back to my hotel, took a siesta for a couple of hours, had a shower, got dressed for the evening, and took a cab to Playa del Carmen, only a few kilometers away. Playa del Carmen was originally a small fishing town which has recently undergone a quick development, catering to the needs of the rich, the famous and the luxury lovers. Playa del Carmen, although just a few kilometers away from Puerto Morelos, is a completely different concept from the laidback and quiet village of Puerto Morelos. Playa del Carmen is literally a destination for people who like the glitz and the glamour whereas Puerto Morelos is a place that attracts artists, writers and the more intellectual crowds. Looking for a night move As an artist and a world traveler, I like both sides of life. I enjoy the high-end facilities, luxury boutiques and hotels and I love the artistic and cultural style, which is why I decided to make my vacation with a bit of both. I wanted to spend some time on a quiet beach and I wanted to be around the nightlife with the striking people. After spending a great evening visiting a few restaurants and bars, wondering about the clubs and making new friends in Playa del Carmen, I walked along Fifth Avenue, looking for a disco. Oh Lord. Which one should I choose? Decisions, decisions. There are so many fun places stretched along this popular avenue. I decided to walk into a nice, relaxing bar, have a good glass of wine and call it a night. I had a big adventure waiting for me the next day. I found a nice quiet bar that went with my mood, had myself two glasses of red wine and after a couple hours I took a taxi back to Puerto Morelos and headed right back to my room for a good night sleep; and a very good night sleep it was. I slept like a baby, listening to the soft waves knocking gently on my window terrace. The next day the bright sun that was peeping curiously and warmly awakened me into my room; it was like the most perfect wake up call. It was nature´s way of telling me that the day was about to start.

78 • July / August 2015

COURTESY PHOTOS

I was about to open the door and exit my room in order to go to the restaurant to have breakfast, but a knock on my door beat me to it and to my surprise there was a waiter standing at my doorstep with the most delicious breakfast ever. He took the tray to my terrace and with a big smile said to me in Spanish, “muy buen provecho señora.” I took my time enjoying the luscious breakfast and while I was gazing at the breathtaking view, I realized that I never wanted to leave the premises, but unfortunately a long day was waiting for me and I had to get myself together and leave the hotel to take a tour to the beautiful archeological sites of Chichén Itzá. ¨Wow, or “ohhhh my Lord” would be the best way to describe this great Mayan ruin which is one of the Seven Wonders of the World. Chichén Itza which means in Mayan, “at the mouth of the Itza well” was established before the period of Christopher Colombus and had served as the religious center of Yucatan. Chichén Itza was one of the greatest Mayan centers of the Peninsula of Yucatan and goes back a 1000 years. It took me a few hours to tour the beautiful ancient site and although the heat was ferocious it was well worth it. The sight seeing was over and my guide took me back to the hotel. After a well-deserved nap, I decided to have a light supper with the locals in the center of town of Puerto Morelos and go right back to sleep. I put the “do not disturb” sign on and decided to sleep late until the next morning. I was exhausted from the Chichén Itza adventure. En el mar, la vida es más sabrosa The next day I woke up quite late, called in “room service”, had breakfast on my terrace and went for my snorkeling class. A local teacher who has been doing this most of his life gave me the lesson. He was patient and very gracious and took me on his boat to the most amazing little spots. I got to swim 3 feet above fish colonies and the sight was as pretty as a post card. After that we went to have lunch with the locals and the rest of the day I spent on my terrace painting the beautiful sunny horizon. In the evening, I decided to stay in, gaze at the bright big stars, have a chilled glass of white wine and go to sleep, listening to the tender waves knocking as always on my terrace window. It was a gorgeous escapade full of emotions, beautiful experiences and splendorous exploits. It was breaking my heart to have to say goodbye to the nice employees of the hotel who always greeted me with joyous faces, but all good things must come to and end. This perfect holiday which was one of the best vacations I have ever had, came to a finale; as I was saying goodbye to the staff and handing back my key, my eyes filled with tears and I promised to be back real soon.


LATINO LEADERS @JFerraez_Latino

IN DEFENSE OF

ROSE WINE

S

IPPING A GOOD, dry, fruity and complex Rosé in the summer time has no comparison. For those who don’t like the lightness of white wines, but find a little hard to cope with the complexity and heaviness of red wine during the day -let’s say at home before dinner-Rosé wine is the answer. Rosé usually has sweet aromas; strawberries, rose petals, peach, passion fruit, raspberries. But at the taste is goes completely dry. However, the impression of sweetness kind of influence our perception and we could perceive tangerine, pomegranate and grapefruit. Rosé is made of almost every red varietal, but gets only a small fraction of skin contact time with the most at fermentation— that’s where it gets its color. For light Rosés, I go for some Spanish or Napa Valley made from Tempranillo, Pinot Noir or even Sangiovese. For heavier ones, to drink at lunch or dinner, I recommend some Bordeaux, South African or Australian made from Cabernet Sauvignon or Shiraz.

CELLAR

Mulderbosch Rose 2014 (Got it at Whole Foods Market, one of my favorite wines) Region: Coastal Region, South Africa Varietal: Cabernet Sauvignon Price: $ 12. Aromas: Flowers, pomegranate, fresh berries Flavors: Peach, cherry, grapefruit Impression: Sweet but dry Structure: Medium Body, will go well with food Drink with: Grilled Salmon, Cesar Salad with Chicken Why I loved this wine? Incredible fruitiness and nice color. My Rating: 90 pts.

Hundred Acre 2005 (Dining with Luis Maizel in La Jolla, CA) Region: Napa Valley Varietal: Cabernet Sauvignon Price: $ 350. Aromas: Ripe fruit, leather, mocha Flavors: Blueberries, plum, mint Impression: Incredibly silky Structure: Powerful, and yet subtle Drink with: Anything! Why I loved this wine? Beautiful wine! My Rating: 99 pts.

Arcanum “il fauno” 2010 (At a restaurant in Charleston S.C.)

For those who don’t like the lightness of white wines, but find a little hard to cope with the complexity and heaviness of red wine during the day -let’s say at home before dinner-Rosé wine is the answer.

80 • July / August 2015

Region: Toscana, Italy Varietal: Bordeaux style blend Price: $ 86 Aromas: Dark fruit, earthy, forest berries Flavors: black cherries, mocha Impression: Armonic and big Structure: Balance and elegant Drink with: Beef or red meat pasta sauces Why I loved this wine? Round and Balanced My Rating: 91 pts.


Profile for Latino Leaders

Latino Leaders Magazine | July/Aug 2015  

Latino Leaders Magazine | July/Aug 2015  

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