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The Official Publication of USA Track & Field

Volume X • Issue 3 • Fall 2009

Heptathlete Rita Hanscom of San Diego, Calif.

Permit #351 Bolingbrook, IL NON PROFIT ORG U.S.POSTAGE PAID


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MAKE YOUR MARK. Northeast Regional November 28, 2009 Sunken Meadow State Park Kings Park, Long Island, NY CT, DE, MA, ME, MD, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT, WA, DC National Finals December 12. 2009 Balboa Park, Morley Field San Diego, CA South Regional November 28, 2009 McAlpine Greenway Park Charlotte, NC AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, OK, Puerto Rico, SC, TN, TX, US Virgin Islands, VA, WV

West Regional December 5, 2009 Mt. San Antonio College Walnut, CA AK, AZ, CA, HI, ID, MT, NM, NV, OR, UT, WA, WY, US Overseas Military Installations

Midwest Regional November 28, 2009 University of Wisconsin-Parkside Kenosha, WI CO, IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI

BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 1ST, ENTRY FORMS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT SELECT FOOT LOCKER LOCATIONS FOR A LIMITED TIME. TO REGISTER, OR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 212-720-4435 OR VISIT FOOTLOCKERCC.COM

BE A PART OF IT.

Become a friend of the Foot Locker Cross Country Championships on Facebook.


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE O F F I C I A L U S AT F SPONSORS

18 5 USATF Annual Meeting 2009 10 USATF Spotlight: Allyson the Great 12 USATF Alumni Flashback: Inger Miller 16 USA Masters Championships 19 Get to Know Us

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20 Berlin World Championships

O F F I C I A L U S AT F SUPPLIERS

26 USATF Junior Olympics 28 World Junior Championships 30 USATF Events Calendar

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Fast Forward is an official publication of USA Track & Field, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 800, Indianapolis, IN 46204, published quarterly by USA Track & Field. EDITOR Ivan P. Cropper

DESIGN & LAYOUT Basedoor Graphics LLC

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Michele Cooper

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Tom Surber, Vicky Oddi

PRINTED BY Shooting Star Media, Inc. W.D. Hoard & Sons COVER PHOTO Ken Stone

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For more information, visit www.usatf.org or call us at 317-261-0500. Questions or comments about Fast Forward ? Send email to: Membership@usatf.org For advertising inquiries, contact Larry Eder, The Running Network LLC at 608-239-3785.


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USATF ANNUAL MEETING 2009

USATF Annual Meeting Returns to Indianapolis

INDIANA CONVENTION AND VISITORS ASSOCIATION

B Y TOM SU R B E R

THE USA TRACK & FIELD Annual Meeting will be held in Indianapolis for the third time in its history beginning on Wednesday, December 2 and concluding on Sunday, December 6 at the downtown Hyatt Regency and Westin Hotels. The 31st edition of USATF’s Annual Meeting will take place in the home of the USATF National Office. The Annual Meeting also took place in Indy in 1983 and 2006. The Westin and Hyatt Regency will serve as co-headquarter hotels offering special room rates for attendees. Both hotels will host breakout meetings and offer direct access to the Indiana Convention Center. The city of Indianapolis has played an integral role in the history of track and field in the U.S., having played host to storied track and field moments over the years, including the Inaugural IAAF World Indoor

Track & Field Championships (1987), 1987 Pan American Games, 1988 Olympic Trials, 2005 National Junior Olympic Track & Field Championships, and three editions of the USA Outdoor Track & Field Championships - most recently in June 2007. Traditionally held the week following Thanksgiving, the USATF Annual Meeting brings together more than 1,000 of the sport's officials, coaches, administrators, athletes and supporters. The yearly gathering serves as a forum to chart the future of our sport by considering policy changes, selecting national team staffs and Championship meet sites, and electing national officers. It is a forum where the individual's voice can be heard. But it is not all business. The Annual Meeting also gives us the opportunity to recognize the

achievements of our sport's volunteers and athletes. Each year, USATF inducts a new class into the National Track & Field Hall of Fame and makes presentations for year-end award winners, including the Jesse Owens Awards for the top American athletes. Members attending the Annual Meeting have the opportunity to meet the sport's top stars, and USATF offers various social and recreational opportunities for attendees throughout the event. The Annual Meeting will kick-off with the traditional Opening Session presented by Hershey’s Track & Field Games beginning at 9 a.m., on Thursday morning, December 3 in the Grand Ballroom at the Westin Hotel. Highlights will include a report from USATF Chairman & President Stephanie Hightower, and an address by National Track & Field Hall of Famer Bruce Jenner. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Indianapolis, IN

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MALE FINALISTS 

FEMALE FINALISTS 

Christian Cantwell Kerron Clement Tyson Gay Trey Hardee Bernard Lagat LaShawn Merritt Dwight Phillips

Jenny Barringer Allyson Felix Carmelita Jeter Brittney Reese Sanya Richards

One of the highlights throughout the week at the Annual Meeting is the High Performance Expo Show presented by St. Vincent, which offers national sponsors, equipment suppliers, book and magazine publishers, committees, travel bureaus, local sports commissions and other groups the opportunity to showcase their organizations and products in front of the country's largest gathering of track and field conventioneers.

The annual Expo Show Breakfast will take place Friday, December 4 in the Capitol Ballroom at the Westin Hotel beginning at 7 a.m. The annual Awards Breakfast Buffet will be held on Saturday, December 5 in the Westin’s Capitol Ballroom beginning at 7 a.m. Youth, Masters, Long Distance Running, Track & Field, Race Walking, Officials, Athletics for the Disabled, Athletes Advisory and Mountain

Ultra Trail are just some of the committees and councils that present end of the year awards at the breakfast. The highlight of the Annual Meeting is the annual Jesse Owens Awards and Hall of Fame Inductions Banquet that will take place on Saturday, December 5 beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m. at the Regency Ballroom in the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The banquet will begin at 7:30 p.m. The Jesse Owens Award was established in 1981 as a tribute to the man whose accomplishments are forever enshrined in sports history. It is USA Track & Field's highest accolade, and is presented annually to the man and woman selected through a nominating and voting procedure as the outstanding American performers of the year in Athletics. Also during the evening, five new members will be inducted into the National Track & Field Hall of Fame. Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Track & Field Hall of Fame Board and Committees and members of the media comprise the electorate for the National Track & Field Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame is located at The Armory Foundation at 216 Washington Ave., in the Washington Heights section of New York City. Additional awards presented at the banquet include the Nike Coach of the Year, Visa Humanitarian of the Year, USATF Youth Athlete of the Year and USATF Masters Athlete of the Year. The 2009 USATF Annual Meeting will conclude with the Closing General Session beginning at 8:30 a.m., on Sunday, December 6 in the Cosmopolitan Room at the Hyatt Regency. 

GETTY IMAGES

Jesse Owens Award


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Cross Country Shoes

by Cregg Weinmann

For our annual Cross Country Shoe Review, we’ve examined and tested eight new or updated models. Despite their lowprofile design, cross country shoes provide protective cushioning and traction on varying terrain. The subtle differences in fit from one brand or model to the next allow most runners to find a racing shoe best suited for their particular foot type. Two factors should influence your selection of a cross country racing shoe: how well it fits you and how it feels when you run in it. Cross country racing shoes are more alike than they are different, but we can’t emphasize enough that the differences in fit and cushioning are crucial to individual comfort and performance. Discovering mid-race that model X doesn’t quite work for you is not a positive experience. Spend a little time in your racing shoes before the actual race, since the low profile of the shoe coupled with the intense effort of racing can be tough on your soft tissue if you haven’t prepared well. Fit issues being equal, choose between spikes or spikeless models based on the racing surfaces you’ll encounter over the course of your season. Cross country spikes are slightly better than spikeless shoes at gripping muddy or soggy ground, but they are limited to use on all-natural courses and are not allowed for high school use in California. In the muck, spikeless models work almost as well as spikes and they also manage pavement, sidewalks, and rocky surfaces. In addition, they work well on indoor or outdoor tracks.

adidas adiZero Belligerence

ASICS Dirt Dog/Diva 3

The original Belligerence had a bit of an “old school” appearance, looking a bit like an adidas model from a generation ago. This season’s update takes its design cue from the Japanese character “Kizuna” which is on the sole of the shoe and denotes a blending of family-like unity and teamwork. Like the original, the upper opens only on the lateral side without a traditional tongue, lending more medial support than a standard opening. An elastic strap inside the midfoot enhances the fit and adds to the support provided by the HF-welded overlays. The midsole and six-spike outersole have been retained from last season, and its rubbery lugs are highly effective on natural surfaces.

The successful Dirt Dog and Dirt Diva have been updated with some minor touches that leave their strengths perfectly in place. The secondround version tried to straddle the spike/spikeless question by including flower-shaped, rubbery, screw-in lugs. The Dog/Diva 3 uses a more traditional, metal-spiked platform aimed more to the cross country traditionalist and all-natural courses. The full-length DuraSponge outersole and CM-EVA midsole are the same as before with 6 spike wells to optimize traction. The upper continues to rely on the thin mesh layer for drainage in wet or sloppy conditions, while keeping the shoe light.

“Very snug fit, conformed to my foot perfectly. Never any slippage or problems with traction at all. Just enough cush for cross country, and they were also great on the track.” $90 SPIKE Weight: Men 7.4 oz. (size 11) w/ 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

“Good, secure fit. Great traction with plenty of cushion.” $75 SPIKE Weight: Men 7.6 oz. (size 11) w/ 6 spikes; Women 6.2 oz. (size 8) w/ 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, supported, open toe box

Brooks Mach 11

Mizuno Wave Kaze 5

Though not really capable of traveling faster than 8,000 miles per hour, the Mach 11 is certainly capable of a fleet 8,000 meters. The midsole and outersole continue with the proven, effective design that has worked so well for five rounds of Brooks cross country shoes. As with recent models, the upper is well supported by HF-welded midfoot overlays, but leaves a little room in the forefoot for the toes to spread a bit. The combination of good support from the upper, generous cushioning underfoot, and traction on the bottom make the Mach 11 a good value.

The primary changes in each of the previous four Kaze updates have come in the upper. The outersole and Wave plate have been consistent and unique elements in each model, providing good cushioning, traction, and flexibility. The Kaze 5 features the same level of ventilation with open airmesh. The overlays have been repositioned with a little less in the heel and toe, a little more in the midfoot, slightly improving support, but at a tiny weight increase. The net result is a shoe that offers good traction, a supportive upper, and cushioning suited to the changing surfaces of cross country racing.

“Extremely snug around the heel, but the toe box feels roomier. Handled every type of terrain I came across. Good grip up and down hills, race after race.” $60 SPIKELESS/$65 SPIKE Weight: Men 7.4 oz. (size 11) spikeless, 7.9 oz. (size 11) w/ 6 spikes; Women 6.1 oz. (size 8) spikeless, 6.5 oz. (size 8) w/ 6 spikes Fit: snug heel and midfoot, close-fitting, open toe box

“The fit was great. I liked how they hugged the foot well but didn’t pinch my toes. They have a bouncy feel, good flexibility, and great grip, which I like.” $80 SPIKELESS/SPIKE Weight: Men 9.2 oz. (size 11) spikeless, 9.9 oz. (size 11) w/ 6 spikes; Women 7.5 oz. (size 8) spikeless, 8.0 oz. (size 8) w/ 6 spikes Fit: snug heel and midfoot; close-fitting, open toe box


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Cross Country Shoes

(continued)

New Balance RX506

Nike Zoom Forever XC 2

The new RX506 is designed to provide great traction, responsiveness, and enough cushioning to protect the racing foot. Built on the same last as the RX505, it diverges from previous New Balance cross country models in its top flight elements. The upper is airmesh with minimized overlays that wrap the arch for support and work with the N-lock webbing to secure the foot, and the interior has a nice, barefoot feel. The midsole is a responsive layer of CM-EVA, with a 3/4-length thermoplastic spikeplate and four spike wells. The outersole is rubber with an assortment of ridges and lugs to improve traction. Overall, the RX506 is an excellent value.

The Zoom Forever XC updates the spiked version of Nike’s ultra lightweight cross country racer. The most technical aspects of the shoe in the midsole and outersole— Zoom Air bag, CM-EVA, Pebax spikeplate, fulllength TPU protective plate, and a matrix of rubber lugs—have been retained. The upper now features a minimal mesh with few overlays, offering great drainage. It fits well and has a good barefoot feel inside, thanks to the sueded arch and tongue. The low profile, lug shape and placement, and flexibility of the TPU plate make for a nimble shoe.

“They are very snug and fit like a glove, so good you feel like you are not wearing any shoes at all. Good cushioning, but excellent traction, after all, they are spikes.” $55 SPIKE Weight: Men 8.2 oz. (size 11) w/ 4 spikes; Women 6.6 oz. (size 8) w/ 4 spikes Fit: snug heel and midfoot; close-fitting, open toe box

“Great fit! Hugs my foot like a loving mother. For so light a shoe, it offers good protection and cushioning —and great traction!”

$90 SPIKE Weight: Men 6.3 oz. (size 11) w/ 4 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

Puma Complete Ngong III

Saucony Kilkenny 3

The Ngong, named for hills of the Rift Valley outside Nairobi, Kenya, has represented the best in Puma cross country shoes. This update merges the Ngong spike with the Cortlandt spike/spikeless models. The midsole and outersole from the Cortlandt have been employed here for its combination of traction and cushioning which work well on a variety of surfaces. The spikeless version even does a good job on the roads. The new upper is airmesh with overlays to support the midfoot. Inside, you’ll find the plushest barefoot feel of all the shoes in this review.

Named in a nod to Irish enthusiasm for the sport of cross country, the updated Kilkenny continues to provide quality performance. Its fit and low profile give the shoe a slipper-like quality. The upper is a blend of closed but still breathable mesh and minimal overlays, with a sueded interior for a comfortable feel even if you race without socks. The midsole is the same low-profile, responsive CM-EVA as before, as is the effectively lugged outersole. The flexibility, fit, cushioning, and traction make the Kilkenny 3 an excellent choice for all cross country courses.

“Super fit and very comfortable, even barefoot. Worked great on trail, road, grass, you name it.” $60 SPIKELESS/$65 SPIKE Weight: Men 8.4 oz. (size 11) spikeless, 8.9 oz. (size 11) w/ 6 spikes; Women 6.9 oz. (size 8) spikeless, 7.3 oz. (size 8) w/ 6 spikes Fit: snug heel and midfoot, glove-like toe box

“These shoes were the perfect size and were really snug. It was great on any kind of terrain. I think the weight was the best part about the shoe: it was perfect for a [racing] flat.” $60 SPIKELESS/$65 SPIKE Weight: Men 7.2 oz (size 11) spikeless, 7.6 oz. (size 11) w/ 6 spikes; Women 5.9 oz. (size 8) spikeless, 6.3 oz. (size 8) w/ 6 spikes Fit: snug heel and midfoot, glove-like toe box

CREGG WEINMANN is the Running Network LLC’s footwear reviewer. He has coached cross country for over 25 years at the age group, high school, and university levels and beyond. He can be reached via e-mail at shuz2run@lightspeed.net. Copyright © 2009 by Running Network LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Running Network LLC. Reprinted here with permission.


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USATF SPOTLIGHT

Allyson the Great B Y I VA N P. C ROP P E R

At the ripe age of 24, Allyson became the only woman to win three world titles in the 200m. Her victory in Berlin was a year in the making. After her Silver medal performance in Beijing, 10

Allyson rededicated herself with one goal in mind—win the World Championships title. I had the opportunity to catch up with Allyson, which isn’t very easy to do. Q: Growing up the daughter of a minister and a school teacher is pressure packed. How did your upbringing prepare you for the pressure you face as a professional athlete who travels internationally? A: I feel like my upbringing was great in that it definitely prepared me for challenges I face being a professional athlete. Growing up with a dad being a pastor people are always looking at you and expecting you to be a certain way. I felt like I always had to meet high expectations and that is something that I also have to deal with as a professional athlete. I’m grateful that my parents taught me to always stay grounded, taught me the importance of hard work in dedication because without that foundation I don’t think I would be as successful. Q: You are writing history with your performances, are you aware of the history of our sport… more specifically

your event and your place in history? A: I got started with track when I was in high school, so I had to go back and learn the history of track and field. I am so grateful for all the courageous people who have come before me. Individuals like Wilma Rudolph, Jesse Owens, Evelyn Ashford and so many others are so inspirational to me and I'll be forever grateful to them for making it possible to do what I love. Q: Can you describe your mindset going into the final at the World Championships and the show of emotion when you crossed the finish line? A: Going into the finals at the World Championships I felt very determined. Being in the stadium where Jesse Owens was so courageous and phenomenal was definitely special, and I felt like it gave me extra motivation to do well. When I crossed the line I felt so blessed, it’s always my goal to win but when it actually happens it’s a great feeling that all the hard work has paid off. Q: How do you relax in the off-season? I have heard that you like to bowl. I hope

you have a legit bowling shirt & shoes? A: During my time off I’m enjoying just being home with family and friends. I’ve been spending lots of time at the beach rollerblading, bike riding and playing tennis. I do also enjoy bowling, I’m not that great though I think my highest score is 180. Last year I was on a bowling team with David Neville and his wife and Kenneth Ferguson and our team name was the 4x4. Q: As we look to 2010 and eventually 2012, you have shown tremendous promise in the 400 and the 100. Can we expect to see you make either of those races a more permanent part of your future competitions? If you plan to run more 4s and 1s, will we see more of this in 2010 (a year w/o a world outdoor champs)? A: The last couple of years I’ve ran the 100, 200 and 400. I haven't made any final decisions but I am thinking of focusing more on the 200 and 400 in 2010. I love the 100 but the level that the women are running at right now is far beyond where I am at. Since there is no major championship, I am looking forward to seeing how I do focusing on the longer sprints. 

VICTAH SAILER/PHOTO RUN

A

llyson Felix has been part of the professional track & field circuit since she was 17 years old. The fact that Felix became a professional at such a young age shouldn't come as surprise. She has been setting the standard for female track athletes since she stepped into the sport as a high school sophomore. Her talent was undeniable. The only question was how many titles she would win on the way to a Hall of Fame career.


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BOTH PHOTOS: VICTAH SAILER/PHOTO RUN

Inger Miller at the 1999 World Championships in Seville, Spain celebrating her 200m win.

Blood, Sweat, and Tears for a Champion As a 1996 Olympic gold medalist in the 4x100m relay and 1999 World Champion in the 200m, Inger Miller has a story to tell. Most of us wonder how it all begins for such standout athletes. Do they know it the day they are born, or do they discover it by accident? B Y C E C I L E NG U Y E N & S A R A H P R IC E

M

iller is the daughter of two-time Olympian Lennox Miller, who won a silver medal in the 1968 games, and a bronze in 1972 in the 100m for Jamaica. Her godfather is famed Jamaican sprinter Don Quarrie who won four career medals (one gold, two silvers and one bronze) over the span of three Olympic Games. But even with an Olympian for a father and a world class 200m sprinter for a godfather, Inger was a late bloomer on the track scene. She never set foot onto a

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track until her sophomore year at John Muir High School in Pasadena, Calif. “It wasn’t that my father didn’t think that I had the talent,” Inger said. “He grew up in an era where it was exceptional that women competed in sports.” So her father didn’t push her into the sport, but waited for her to discover it. “I had no idea about anything—the distances, the starting blocks, times, nothing,” Miller said with a laugh about joining her high school track team. “But obviously the talent was there—lucky for me!”


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USATF ALUMNI FLASHBACK FUN FACTS ABOUT INGER MILLER Her father was instrumental to Inger’s success in the beginning of her running career, coaching her from 1995 to 1998. “Even when my father wasn’t coaching me, he was around all the time so I was able to share the good and bad times with him,” said Inger. “I’m happy I had him there for not only the achievements on the track, but mentally and emotionally and everything to help me prepare for major competition. He kept me going through the weeks of hard training.” Under Lennox’s watchful eye, Inger won gold at the 1996 Olympic Games in the 4x100m relay. With her medal, the Millers became the first father-daughter combination to win Olympic medals—the only other pair being gymnastics’ Nastia and Valeri Liukin in 2008. “It’s amazing to be able to be the first at something,” Miller said. “It was amazing for me because at that time there was nobody else, no father-daughter combination.” The Millers will forever share this special bond. Another name Inger will forever be linked with is Marion Jones. At times when Jones dominated the field, it was only Miller who had the chance to beat her. “Week in and week out, I was asked the same question: Was she beatable or not?”, said Miller. “I always thought she was. In my mind, it was a huge rivalry. Every day when I went out to practice or walked up to the line to run against her, I never felt that I was running for second. I believe in my ability; I believe in my training. I’m not running for second; I’m going out to win.” Miller had the chance to beat Jones on the international stage at the 1999 World Championships. In the 100m, Miller lowered her personal best to 10.79 but lost out to Jones who ran 10.70. In the 200m, however, Jones had to withdraw due to injury and it was Miller’s turn in the world spotlight. Miller dropped her personal best from 22.10 to 21.77 to earn the World Championship title. Another showdown was set to take place

• Celebrates first gold medal by going to Krispy Kreme and eating a donut. • After 1998, she began training under former U.S. Olympian John Smith, who also worked with then100-meter world-record holder Maurice Greene. • Favorite event to run and watch is the 200 meter. • Inger was named after actress Inger Stevens. As a child growing up in Jamaica, her mom saw Inger Stevens on TV, loved the name and decided from then on that she was going to name her first child Inger. Miller spoke with Inger Stevens’ aunt randomly in 1996. When Miller was on a morning talk show in Stockholm, Stevens’ aunt turned on the TV just as Miller was explaining where she got her first name from. Stevens’ aunt tracked her down and the two spoke for hours about Inger Stevens. • Started an event management company called Miller Hawkins Production or MHP Events in 2002 with business partner and long-time friend Jill Hawkins and is based in Los Angeles.

between the two sprinters during the 2000 Sydney Games, this time the tables turned and it was Miller who pulled out due to a hamstring injury. Jones went on to win five Olympic medals all later forfeited after she admitted taking performance-enhancing drugs. “The love of the sport (is what drove me). I think it’s so ingrained in you; it’s what gets you up in the morning. Whether it’s raining or hailing outside, you would still go to practice. What happens is that you’ve tasted success, you know what it’s like, and you know how to obtain it, but sometimes adversity stands in the way.” Inger retired from the running world in 2005, attributing largely to the passing of her father in 2004. “Track and field was such a huge connection bond for us and it was almost like the light had been turned off when he passed,” Inger said. Reflecting back on her career, Inger said she wouldn’t have it any other way because all those experiences helped shape her into the person she is today. “I wouldn’t change anything… it is what it is, and I had great experiences. It was fun and great; a lot of hard work, blood, sweat and tears but it was all worth it.”  13


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WORLD MASTERS CHAMPIONSHIPS

Positively Masterful! W45 Joy UpshawMargerum

B Y V IC K Y ODDI

U

.S. masters athletes won 12 relay medals, six gold, three silver and three bronze, across the various age-groups to help seal a third-place finish in the medal count at the 2009 World Masters Athletics Championships in Lahti, Finland. From July 28–August 8, the World Masters Athletics Championships featured athletes from all over the world ranging in age from 30-95+ in an impressive display of speed, strength, and endurance. Track events range from 100 meters to 10,000 meters, while field events include the full range of jumps and throws. Rita Hanscom had five individual wins, amassing gold medals in the W55 age-division in the 300m hurdles, long jump, 80m hurdles, pole vault as well as establishing a new world record in the heptathlon. Competing in the 300m hurdles for only the second time in her career, the 55-year-old won the gold medal in 53.25 seconds. In the W55 heptathlon, Hanscom blew away the competition with a world record 6,382 points, almost 2,000 more points than the second place finisher.

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M55 relay team: James Broun Rick Easley Ken Stone Thaddeus Wilson

W35 Maurelhena Walles


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TOP PHOTO: KEN STONE ALL OTHER PHOTOS: MARILYN MITCHELL

W35 4x4 relay team: Latrica Dendy, Maurelhena Walles, Charmaine Roberts, Lisa Daley

Ken Stone anchoring the M55 4x400 meter relay

W45 Caren Ware, Steeplechaser

Impressive U.S. athlete finishes included Becky Sisley (three gold, one silver, and bronze medal) in W70 age-group, Jack Bray (three individual gold and two team gold medals) in the M75 age-group, Val Barnwell (two individual gold and two team gold medals) in the M50 age-group, Johnnye Valian (three gold medals) in the W80 and Arnie Gaynor (two gold and two silver medals) in the M80 age-group. Martha Mendenhall also added to the spectacular performances by the U.S. masters athletes as she claimed one gold medal and one bronze in the W50 age-group and one bronze in the W45 4x100m relay. In the 100m prelims in Lahti, Renee Henderson posted an American record in the W45 age group CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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WORLD MASTERS CHAMPIONSHIPS Former French and new U.S. citizen Maryline Roux, W40

with her time of 12.10 seconds. Her performance shattered the previous standard by masters all-time great Phil Raschker of 12.50 from 1995. Henderson went on to win the gold medal, clocking 12.22 in the final. Emil Pawlik finished the M70 decathlon 1500 meters in a downpour, but held on to win the competition with 7,814 points. Pawlik's winning margin over runner-up Willi Klaus of Germany was 110 points. Bill Murray set an American record in the M55 decathlon with his total of 8,087 points, which easily bettered runner-up Klaus Peter Neuendorf of Germany's total of 7,179 points. The U.S. totaled 147 medals (63 gold, 43 silver, 41 bronze) and finished in third place. Finland won the team competition with 319 medals, followed by Germany with 284 medals. 

W70 relay team: Becky Sisley Sumi OnoderoLeonard Mary Harada Jeannie Daprano

W50 Martha Mendenhall

Fans can read more about it and view photo galleries at http://www.usatf.org/events/ 2009/WorldMastersAthletics Championships/

ALL PHOTOS: MARILYN MITCHELL

M50 relay team: Val Barnwell James Chinn Kenneth Thomas Jeff Lindsay

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PRO

JUNIOR

ULTRA

MASTERS

DATHAN RITZENHEIN

MARCUS ROWLAND

JAMIE DONALDSON

RITA HANSCOM

Portland, Ore. Middle/Long Distance

Auburn, Alabama Sprints

Littleton, Colo. Ultra Running

San Diego, Calif. Track & Field

Donaldson destroyed the 18-year old American record by completing 200,000m on the track in 21 hours 1 minute 28 seconds en route to running 214.487 km in 24 hours. The previous record of 21:08:47 was set by Sue Ellen Trapp in 1991. As the overall winner, Donaldson ended her 24-hour run in dominating fashion, as her next closest competitor, runner-up Andrew McLean of Ontario, ran 202.943 km.

Hanscom won five individual gold medals at the 2009 World Masters Athletics Championships in Lahti, Finland. She amassed gold medals in the W55 age-division in the 300m hurdles, long jump, 80m hurdles, pole vault as well as establishing a new world record in the heptathlon. Competing in the 300m hurdles for only the second time in her career, she took gold in 53.25 seconds. In the heptathlon, Hanscom blew away the competition with a world record 6,382 points, almost 2,000 more points than the second place finisher.

Thirteen years after Bob Kennedy set the American record of 12:58.21 in the 5,000 meters at the Weltklasse Zurich meeting, Ritzenhein smashed that record by almost 2 seconds at the same event, August 28, 2009 finishing third in 12 minutes 56.27 seconds. It was an almost 20 second personal best which makes him the fastest American in history. Also in 2009, Ritzenhein finished sixth in 27:22.28PR in the 10,000m at the 2009 IAAF World Athletics Championships in Berlin, Germany, posting the best time ever by an American at a World Championships.

The 2009 USA Junior champion, Rowland ran the fourth-fastest time ever recorded in the junior men's 100m, crossing the line in 10.03 (+0.7mps) to win the gold medal at the 2009 Pan Am Junior Championships. Rowland then anchored the gold medal winning men’s 4x100m relay to a Championship record 39.06.

RITZENHEIN: VICTAH SAILER; ROWLAND: ERROL ANDERSON; HANSCOM: KEN STONE

GET TO KNOW US

WINNING IMAGES 

BERLIN Opening Ceremonies, Berlin Olympic Stadium (l) Chelsea Johnson (r)

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Clockwise from top left: Jenny Baringer leading the steeplechase; Jeremy Wariner’s leg of the men’s 4x4 relay; Berlin Olympic Stadium. Opposite page: Sanya Richards

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BERLIN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Team USA Reigns Supreme at Berlin World Championships

ALL PHOTOS (EXCEPT SIDEBAR) : VICTAH SAILER/PHOTO RUN

Whether it was posting personal or seasonal bests, bringing home the most medals, winning the most events, leading the placing table, or focusing the world’s attention on its own glorious past, Team USA was the dominant force this summer at the 12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Berlin, Germany. B Y TOM SU R B E R

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ed by international stars Allyson Felix, LaShawn Merritt, Sanya Richards, Dwight Phillips, Brittney Reese, and Trey Hardee, Team USA took on the best athletes in the world and ended the nine-day competition victorious by every measure. Team USA won more gold medals than any other country (10), 2nd place Jamaica (7). Team USA won more medals than any other country

(22), 2nd place Jamaica (13). Team USA dominated the placing table with 231 points, 2nd place Russia (154). Team USA’s numerous accomplishments from the Championships were headlined by Felix, who won her third world 200m title—more consecutive wins than anyone in history. Richards became the first American to win the women’s 400m at a World Outdoor Championships since Jearl Miles captured the event CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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in 1993. In the process of winning her first international title, Richards shed the “best athlete not owning a world title” moniker. Kerron Clement also made history in joining National Track & Field Hall of Famer Edwin Moses (1983, 1987) and Felix Sanchez of the Dominican Republic (2001, 2003) as the only men to win the world 400m hurdles title twice. All three accomplished the feat in consecutive World Championships. A notable performance was delivered by U.S. decathlon champion Trey Hardee, who achieved his victory in the men’s decathlon with a personal best score of 8,790 points, which bettered his previous PR by a whopping 256 points. Hardee is now the #3 all-time American in the decathlon behind only Dan O’Brien and Bryan Clay. American records were turned in by Tyson Gay, who, in winning the men’s 100m silver medal, lowered his own AR to 9.71 seconds (the thirdfastest time ever), and by Jenny Barringer who bettered her own American record in the 3,000m steeplechase final when she crossed the line in 9:12.50. Barringer’s performance improved her previous best time by nearly 10 seconds, and her fifth-place finish in Berlin is the highest ever by an American at a World Championships. 

Top: Berlin Olympic Stadium; Bottom: Men’s 110H finals.

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BERLIN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Phillips follows in Jesse Owens’ Footsteps 2004 Olympic gold medalist Dwight Phillips captured his third world outdoor men’s long jump title, tying Ivan Pedroso of Cuba for the most wins ever at this event. At the awards ceremony, Phillips received his gold medal from Jesse Owens' granddaughter Marlene Dortch (right). German 1936 Olympic long jump silver medalist Luz Long's granddaughter Julia-Vanessa Long awarded the silver medal to runner-up Godfrey Khotso Mokoena of South Africa. The special men’s long jump medal presentation was the climax of USA Track & Field’s summer-long recognition of Jesse Owens’ four gold medal-winning performance at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, where silver medalist Luz Long of Germany came to Owens’ aid during long jump qualifying. Owens had fouled during his first two attempts. Facing elimination from the competition if he did not post a qualifying mark on his third attempt, Owens received advice from Long, who set the Olympic record during qualifying. Owens qualified for the final and won the gold medal and the two competitors became close friends. The two walked from the stadium, arm-in-arm, and in the more than 70 years since that moment, the two families have remained in contact. Luz's son Kai met Jesse Owens on several occasions after his father’s death in World War II, and the athletes’ children and grandchildren have remained in contact. At the World Championships, Team USA athletes honored the memory of Jesse Owens by wearing a special uniform which displayed his initials.

Trey Hardee, Decathlon

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TEAM USA MEDAL TABLE 2009 World Championships in Athletics GOLD (10) Christian Cantwell (Columbia, Mo.), men's shot put, 22.03m/72-3.50 Sanya Richards (Austin, Tex.), women's 400 meters, 49.00 Kerron Clement (Gainesville, Fla.) men's 400m hurdles, 47.91 Trey Hardee (Austin, Tex.) men's decathlon, 8,790 points Allyson Felix (Santa Clarita, Calif.) women's 200 meters, 22.02 LaShawn Merritt (Suffolk, Va.) men's 400 meters, 44.06 Dwight Phillips (Snellville, Ga.) men's long jump, 8.54 meters/28 feet .75 inch Brittney Reese (Gulfport, Miss.) women's long jump, 7.10 meters/23-3.50 TEAM USA WOMEN'S 4X400M RELAY, 3:17.83 Debbie Dunn (Norfolk, Va.) Allyson Felix (Santa Clarita, Calif.) Lashinda Demus (Palmdale, Calif.), Sanya Richards (Austin, Tex.), Natasha Hastings (Los Angeles, Calif.), Jessica Beard (College Station, Tex.) TEAM USA MEN'S 4X400M RELAY, 2:57.86 Angelo Taylor (Atlanta, Ga.), Jeremy Wariner (Waco, Tex.), Kerron Clement (Los Angeles, Calif.) LaShawn Merritt (Suffolk, Va.), Lionel Larry (Compton, Calif.), Bershawn Jackson (Savoy, Ill.)

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SILVER (6) Tyson Gay (Clermont, Fla.) men's 100 meters, 9.71 Chelsea Johnson (Los Angeles, Calif.) women's pole vault, 4.65m/15-3 Lashinda Demus (Palmdale, Calif.) women's 400m hurdles, 52.96 Terrence Trammell (Atlanta, Ga.) men's 110m hurdles, 13.15 Jeremy Wariner (Waco, Tex.) men's 400 meters, 44.60 Bernard Lagat (Tucson, Ariz.) men's 5,000m, 13:17.33

BRONZE (6) Carmelita Jeter (Inglewood, Calif.) women's 100 meters, 10.90 Bershawn Jackson (Savoy, Ill.) men's 400m hurdles, 48.23 Bernard Lagat (Tucson, Ariz.) men's 1,500 meters, 3:36.20 Wallace Spearmon (College Station, Tex.) men's 200 meters, 19.85 David Payne (Covington, Ky.) men's 110m hurdles, 13.1 Shannon Rowbury (San Francisco, Calif.) women's 1,500 meters, 4:04.18


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Christian Cantwell

Sanya Richards

Kerron Clement

Trey Hardee

Allyson Felix

LaShawn Merritt

Dwight Phillips

Sanya Richards, Debbie Dunn, Allyson Felix, Lashinda Demus

LaShawn Merritt, Kerron Clement, Jeremy Wariner, Angelo Taylor

Brittany Reese

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ALL PHOTOS: USATF

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Nine-time gold medalist Carl Lewis (bottom) was joined by Dan O'Brien (top right), the 1996 decathlon champion and American record holder, and Joanna Hayes (opposite page, right), the 2004 100m hurdles champ, at the ceremonies, which celebrate the 43rd edition of the national meet.

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USATF JUNIOR OLYMPICS

America’s next generation of track and field stars take center stage in North Carolina B Y S A R A H P R IC E

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either rain, nor wind, nor any other force of nature could stop Carolina Elite’s Bryce Love as he won his third individual gold in record-setting fashion, stunning the crowd with a 50.75 in the midget boys’ 400 meters on the final day of the USATF National Junior Olympic Outdoor Track & Field Championships at North Carolina A&T State’s Irwin Belk Track. Love, who set a pair of national youth records in the 200m, started his day with a win in the 100m at 11.79 into a stiff wind, and then made the best of terrible weather conditions to rip his own 400m record to shreds, slicing more than a second off the time he turned in Friday in the prelims. Miami Northwest ExpressTrack Club’s Robin Reynolds also notched her third individual gold of the meet, taking the intermediate girls’ 400m in a near-national-record 52.15, missing the mark by only .04. Kristyn Williams of Dallas Gold also turned in a lifetime best in second with a 52.59. Reynolds earlier raced to bronze in the 100m, after previously winning the long jump and 200m. Another South Florida athlete, Aaron Hanna of Miami Dade TC, shattered the national record in the midget boys’ shot put, throwing the six-pound ball 15.77 meters/ 51 feet9 inches. Runner-up Malik McMorris also topped the previous

record with his 15.27m/50-1.25 effort. Jasmyne Graham of Cal Rising Stars chopped more than three-tenths of a second off the midget girls’ 80 hurdles record, winning in 11.94. The meet record fell in the youth boys' discus, where Grant Hill of Huntsville won with a toss of 57.63m/189-1, and in the bantam girls’ 1500m, with Daesha Rogers knocking almost 10 seconds off the previous best with her 4:51.62. She returned just over an hour later to win the 400m in 61.78. In the young women’s javelin, World Youth team member Ashley Aldredge of Peak Performance set a meet record with a throw of 45.27m/148-6. Raevyn Rogers of Wings TC made quick work of the youth girls’ 400m, stopping the clock at 54.01 to add that

gold to the one she won the day before in the 800m. World Youth team member Claudia Francis of Team Evolution was another double-winner, adding the intermediate girls’ 1500m gold to the 800m she won yesterday. Marielle Hall of Juventus TC, who also was on Team USA at the World Youth Championships, was dominant in the young women’s 1500m, winning by more than 10 seconds in 4:33.62. Howard Shepard of the Texas Stars TC completed the middle distance double with gold in the young men’s 1500m, winning in 4:01.97 with a superb homestretch sprint. Youth girls’ throws double gold went to Kennedy Blahnik of Wisconsin, who won the shot put at 14.69m/ 48-2.5, after taking top honors in the discus. 

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Heavy medal at Pan Am Juniors B Y V IC K Y ODDI

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Clockwise from top: Mason Finley, discus; Jordan Hasay, 1500m; Chalonda Goodman, 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay. Opposite page: Wayne Davis, 110m hurdles

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ALL PHOTOS: VICTAH SAILER/PHOTO RUN

eam USA won a record 56 out of a possible 84 total medals and saw a World Junior record set in the men’s 110m hurdles at 2009 Pan Am Junior Championships, July 31–August 2, at Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain, Trinidad. 2008 USATF Youth Athlete of the Year Jordan Hasay (Arroyo Grande, Calif.) dominated the women’s 1500m, charging to a lead of 10 meters in the first 100m of


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WORLD JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS

the race. She continued extending her lead over the next 1400m and brought home Team USA's first gold medal of these Championships with her winning time of 4:26.26. On the men’s side, 2009 USA Junior champion Mac Fleet (San Diego, Calif.) started out towards the back of the pack, but continually worked his way up and surged over the final lap to take the lead and claim the gold medal in 3:48.04. Already laying claim to the title of the fastest youth ever over the 110m hurdles by running a world junior leading 13.19 in the first round of competition, Wayne Davis (Raleigh, N.C.) put his stamp on the event. In the finals, Davis shot out of the blocks and into the lead accelerating all the way down the track to win in a pending world junior record time of 13.08 seconds. The previous record of 13.12 was set in 2002 by 2004 Olympic gold medalist Liu Xiang. 2009 USA Junior 100m and 200m champion Chalonda Goodman (Newnan, Ga.) brought home three gold medals from Trinidad. Goodman and Oregon’s Amber Purvis (Benicia, Calif.) went 1-2 in the women’s 100m, with Goodman claiming gold in a Championship record 11.22. Purvis was the runnerup in 11.38. Goodman won her

second individual gold medal in the women’s 200m in 23.08. She then anchored the women’s 4x100m to victory in 44.09. Team USA’s young men followed in the ladies footsteps going 1–2 in the shot put. The gold medalist in the discus, Mason Finley (Buena Vista, Colo.) set a Championship record with his heave of 20.36m/ 66-9.75. Jordan Clarke (Anchorage, Alaska) was the runner-up with 19.97m/65-6.25. 2009 USA Junior champion Marcus Rowland (Spartanburg, S.C.) ran the fourth-fastest time ever recorded in the junior men’s 100m, crossing the line in 10.03 (+0.7mps)

and D’Angelo Cherry (Jonesboro, Ga.) claimed the silver medal in 10.17. Team USA went 1-2 in the men’s and women’s pole vault. Two-time USA Junior champion Jack Whitt (Norman, Okla.) was the victor, clearing 5.20m/17-0.75 and Mike Arnold (Salt Lake City, Utah) the runner-up at 5.10m/16-8.75. American junior record-holder Natalie Willer (Lincoln, Neb.) won the women’s pole vault in meet record fashion, clearing 4.30m/14-1.25 on her third attempt. Shade Weygandt’s (Mansfield, Texas) runner-up finish at 4.25m/13-11.25 also surpassed the previous Championship record and earned her the silver medal. 

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USATF EVENTS CALENDAR DECEMBER 2–6 USATF Annual Meeting Indianapolis, IN DECEMBER 12 USATF National Junior Olympic Cross Country Championships Reno, NV DECEMBER 12 USATF National Club Cross Country Championships Lexington, KY JANUARY 17 USA Half Marathon Championships Houston, TX FEBRUARY 7 USA Masters Half Marathon Championships Melbourne, FL FEBRUARY 13 USA Cross Country Championships Spokane, WA FEBRUARY 27–28 USA Indoor Track & Field Championships Albuquerque, NM MARCH 6–7 USA Indoor Combined Events Championships Bloomington, IN MARCH 7 USA 50 km Championships Lloyd Harbor, NY MARCH 13 USA 15 km Championships Jacksonville, FL MARCH 26–28 USA Masters Indoor Track & Field Championships Boston, MA

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