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Volume 8, Number 2

2009 Spring Shoe Review Bass Pro Sets Stage for MVC Championships

Hitting the Training Pace Sweet Spot www.morunandtri.com

Photo by Victah Sailor/PhotoRun

Fort Atkinson, WI

MEDIA PARTNER www.usatf.org

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©2009 UNDER ARMOUR® Performance.

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UA RUNNING FOOTWEAR INNOVATION

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UA ILLUSION //STABILITY

Some athletes run to train. Some athletes train to run. But make no mistake – ALL ATHLETES RUN. Athletes endure every mile To Be Better. On the road or on the field, it’s about outlasting everyone else. The mission begins on the ground with Under Armour’s latest innovation: UA RUNNING FOOTWEAR.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Off the Wire... Oldest Road Race in KC Welcomes Missouri Sports Hall of Famer

BLAZING TRAILS GO! St. Louis Marathon’s Nancy Lieberman Wins ‘Trailblazer Award’ By Brenda Kimberlin

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Bass Pro Sets Stage for MVC Championships By James Henry

2009 Missouri High School Track Preview By Ben Rosario

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Off the Wire... Record Field Turns Out for Endurance Events

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Sports Medicine Resource Guide

Publisher’s Note By Larry Eder

6 7 For an Under Armour dealer near you, go to:

WWW.UNDERARMOUR.COM

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2009 Spring Shoe Review

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Hitting the Training Pace Sweet Spot By Mike Arenberg

On the Cover: All American track and cross country athlete Emily Sisson.

Copyeditor Marg Sumner MargSumner@aol.com

Volume 8 Number 2 April-May 2009

Group Editor Christine Johnson christinejssm@aol.com Founding Editor Gina Sokolich ginasok2@sbcglobal.net Managing Editor D. M. Strauss morunner@earthlink.net UA REVENANT // STABILITY

UA APPARITION // NEUTRAL

WWW.UNDERARMOUR.COM

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Group Publisher Larry Eder, Shooting Star Media, Inc. P.O. Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538 larry.eder@gmail.com 608.239.3785 Fax: 920.564.7298 Advertising Shooting Star Media, Inc. SSMadvert@gmail.com 608.239.3785 Design Richele Collins richelecollins@att.net

APRIL/MAY 2009

Contributors Larry Eder, Cregg Weinmann, Mike Arenberg, James Henry, Brenda Kimberlin, Ben Rosario Victah Sailor/PhotoRun Mark Coffey/Action Sports Images Special Projects Adam Johnson Eder atflistings@gmail.com, 608.957.2159 Pre-Press / Printing W. D. Hoard & Sons Company Fort Atkinson, WI Missouri Runner and Triathlete is produced and published by Shooting Star Media, Inc., P.O. Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Publisher assumes no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright ©2009 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the Publisher. www.morunandtri.com

LL C

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE Stars Shine in the ‘Show Me’ State The “Show Me” State continues to remind the rest of the U.S. that innovation, hard work and creativity aren’t lacking in Missouri. Consider these exceptional individuals in our wonderful state: Nancy Lieberman—One of the true innovators in our sport, she was presented with the Trailblazer Award at the Running USA Conference. I’ve been lucky enough to watch Nancy and her team grow GO! St. Louis from a dream to one of the top marathon weekends in the country. Beth Salinger—Hospital Hill Run has a reputation in Kansas City for fun, innovation and surprises. Beth, one of the top race directors in the Midwest, continues to challenge the running community, both here and elsewhere, to grow and have fun. Garry Gribble—With three stores in the greater Kansas City area, Garry is a member of the IRRA Running Hall of Fame. A true character if there ever was one, Garry’s laugh can be heard before he runs by, and his love of the sport is evident in how he treats his customers and staff. Christian Cantwell—The Silver medalist pulled the medal out in his last throw in Beijing. Talk about pressure! John Godina, one of the great shot putters of all times, considers our homegrown star to be one of the best, ever. Watch Christian in Berlin. Matt Tegenkamp—Placing 4th in Osaka, be sure to keep on your eyes on Matt this summer as he races toward Berlin 2009 and the IAAF World Championships! And then, some people just like to live here for awhile. Congrats to Rob Myers, who lived in Chesterfield for 2 years and went on to win the U.S. Indoor Championships in the 1500m the first weekend of March. Remember, get out, walk, run, throw a shot, train for a triathlon—do something! It’s good for the heart and the soul—and good for Missouri!

Larry Eder Publisher, Missouri Runner and Triathlete President, The Running Network, LLC

Off the Wire…

Oldest Road Race in KC Welcomes Missouri Sports Hall of Famer Top athlete, Mark Curp, joins Hospital Hill Run’s Board of Directors KANSAS CITY—The oldest road race in Kansas City, Hospital Hill Run, welcomes Mark Curp, member of the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, to its board of directors. Curp set a half marathon world record of 1:00:55 in Philadelphia in 1985, was ranked #1 American Road Runner by Track & Field News, and completed the Indianapolis 25K, 4th in 1:14:45, 40 seconds under the previous world record. “I’m excited to be affiliated with a race that is striving to keep up with the changing running community by altering the run’s distance, adding premium goody bag items, and prize money in the half marathon. In addition, I’m pleased to promote the importance of leading a healthy lifestyle. Running, no matter how fast or slow, can be rewarding both physically and mentally,” Curp said. The Hospital Hill board of directors was established in 2006 to oversee and support the race organization. The board maintains a not-for-profit status, which focuses on efforts that create awareness and generates funds to support local charities. “We are delighted to have Mark Curp join our board of directors,” said Rod Murrow, board president. “Mark lends an invaluable perspective of an athlete who has competed at the highest level.” First held in 1974 with a field of 99 runners, the 2008 Hospital Hill Run hosted its largest field when over 4,200 athletes took to the streets. This year Hospital Hill expects over 5,000 athletes to participate in this historic event. The 36th Annual Hospital Hill Run, 10K and UMKC School of Medicine 5K will be held on Saturday, June 6. For more information or to register for this event go to www.hospitalhillrun.com The 2009 Hospital Hill Run is sponsored by Saint Luke’s Health System, UMKC School of Medicine, Crown Center, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City, Kaufman Foundation, Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP, Sports Radio 810, Hot Talk 1510, Saucony, Garry Gribble’s, Garmin and SoftVu. ▲

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Bass Pro Sets Stage for MVC Championships By James Henry Following the lead of individual champion Jeff Shirmer, the Southern Illinois men claimed the team title at the Missouri Valley Conference Championship on Nov. 1, 2008. Wichita State earned the women’s title over runnerup Missouri State, which boasted the individual champion Pasca Cheruiyot, who scorched the field by 55 seconds. While the runners and their accomplishments usually get the most attention, this year’s MVC Championship hosted by Missouri State University was unique and looks to be just a glimpse into what the future holds for cross country in Springfield. Hoping to draw the NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships to Springfield, Missouri State saw the MVC Championship as an opportunity to show just how capable their running community is. With that in mind, Greg Hipp, Missouri State’s head cross country coach, set out to form a partnership between Missouri State and the now-2-yearold Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Fitness Festival, whose events were set to take place simultaneously. That partnership culminated in one of the most unusual conference cross country championships ever produced. “Bass Pro helped us create a championship experience really only seen at the biggest running events around the country,” said MSU’s Hipp. “We wanted to give the runners and the fans the experience they deserved.” While Hipp stresses that the most important part of a championship is about what happens between the start and finish lines, he also makes the point that when it comes to hosting a great championship, there is more to it than that. “Our goal was to capture the attention of our community and create a championship atmosphere rarely seen in cross country,” said Hipp. “The atmosphere was really done in a firstclass manner,” said MVC senior associate

Courtesy Action Sports Images

commissioner Patty Viverito. “Missouri State, and Greg Hipp in particular, had a vision for what the MVC championship could become, and it reached far beyond what I could have imagined.” Missouri State gave the crowd big-time sound and play-by-play announcing not usually afforded by cross country events. “The sound system was so good we actually were asked to turn down the volume!” said a smiling Hipp. At “half time” nationally known joggler (running while juggling) Chris Essick performed an exhibition between the races and award ceremony to keep the fans entertained. However, Hipp contends that the most

important part of building a championship atmosphere is getting a great crowd. “That is where connecting with the community became crucial.” One such way Missouri State set out to connect with the people of Springfield was with several youth cross country programs. Aside from those programs serving to promote the MVC Championship, Missouri State and its runners hoped they could do their part to improve their sports standing in southwest Missouri, a region where distance running has not always been a mainstay in the area’s youth sports culture. Bass Pro Shops gave Missouri State the platform and funding to develop a youth cross country training program through the area Schools, Parks and Reaching Communities program (SPARC). Elementary and middle schools students at 10 schools in the Springfield area participated in a 6-week cross country training program. Missouri State cross country runners, along with SPARC coaches, led the aspiring runners through running, strength, and flexibility training. “Of all that went on with this championship, the youth programs that started may have been the most rewarding,” said Hipp. Immediately following the MVC Championship races, hundreds of young runners from grades 1 to 8 ran side-by-side with college athletes from Missouri State in different races—1, 2 and 3 kilometers—based on their grade levels. Even a 150-meter kids sprint for kindergarten age and younger runners was held. Bass Pro Shops provided every runner an Under Armour Tech Shirt and a finisher’s dog tag to commemorate their achievement. “After the races, watching the kids ask the college runners for autographs and seeing them take pictures with them showed that all this sport needs to grow is some good role models that are willing to step up and connect Continued on page 8

Courtesy Action Sports Images

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with these kids,” Hipp said. The fun was not limited to the kids, thanks to 600 volunteers who came together to give 3,400 community runners themselves the opportunity to compete in a wide variety of events from Oct. 25 to Nov. 2 as part of the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Fitness Festival. Included were 25K and 50K trail races at nearby Dogwood Canyon and four road races at the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World ranging from 5K up to the marathon. For Missouri Valley Conference athletes and their families, the competition was not the only part of Missouri State’s championship experience. Just outside the Outdoor Fitness Festival’s running expo, Bass Pro Shops treated Missouri Valley Conference runners to a prechampionship banquet that included appearances by running greats Dick Beardsley, Jeff Galloway and Jason Pyrah, a welcome by Frank Shorter and a keynote address by Bill Rodgers. “The entire weekend felt more special than usual,” said Missouri State’s Jamie Vest who earned all-MVC honors at the championship. “When we have been to other places it always seemed like just another meet, but having Bass Pro and the Springfield community take part really took the race to the next level.” After the banquet, the college runners were given time to interact with all the distance running greats Bass Pro Shops had assembled, which brought back memories for Shorter. “I really enjoyed being a part of the banquet, with all those runners there, all at the same place, it was truly a special treat, as well as an acknowledgment of where we all started, and that’s cross country.”

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Initial Concerns Led to Great Partnership Initially, Hipp worried that having two significant running events scheduled to take place at the same time in Springfield would make the conference championship back-page news. However, he soon realized this was the chance he had been waiting for to pull together the community for the championship he had always envisioned. “It really all started with coach Greg Hipp contacting Bass Pro and expressing his desire to further the sport in Springfield and in the region,” says Carol Hodson, one of the lead coordinators for the Bass Pro Shops Fitness Festival. “Bass Pro has a sincere interest in improving the running culture in this area,” said Hipp. “As we both began planning we found we had a common interest and that this was going to be a great opportunity to really involve the community and to make all the events even stronger.” As the event approached more and more pieces fell into place, giving the event higher standing in the community and even national attention. “Bass Pro has had a long relationship with distance great Frank Shorter, but as we got closer to the event more and more of his friends kep-t calling wanting to be involved,” said Hodson. How the event developed into the unique event that it did may have been a surprise to a few of the coaches and athletes from around the MVC, but it was no surprise to the MVC’s Viverito. “Missouri State has a history of putting on top-notch championships and this one was no different.” As the event approached, Hipp relished the

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opportunity to put Missouri State and Springfield’s best foot forward. “Anytime one of the coaches here at Missouri State has the opportunity to host an event we truly take pride in it,” Hipp said. “We’re not out to show up other schools, we just believe that if you’re going do something, then you should do it right.”

Just the Beginning for Springfield With the Missouri Valley Conference Championship complete, Hipp was quick to point out that “we’re not done yet.” Missouri State is slated to host the NCAA Division I Midwest Cross Country Regional in 2009. The regional will bring as many as 33 Midwest schools to Springfield—all of which will be seeking berths to the NCAA Championships. Missouri State will be seeking something more. Bringing the 2010 NCAA national meet to Springfield is on the minds of many at MSU. “I have spoken to people at Indiana State and they have told me how great it is to host the meet, to bring an event of that magnitude to Springfield would be so, so special,” said Bill Rowe, Missouri State’s long-time athletic director. Mike Scott, USA Track & Field’s executive cross country council chair, said he’s familiar with Springfield and is excited about Missouri State’s potential. “The NCAA has found that championships tend to get lost in major cities. This wouldn’t be case in Springfield. The city is a lot like Terre Haute (the current NCAA national site) in that they would roll out the red carpet for an event like this,” Scott said. The open arms treatment by Springfield to MSU’s conference championship vision is likely proof that the community is ready to jump on board. “Springfield is a great area for major championships, we’re a family-oriented community and really buy into events that our community players host,” said Bass Pro’s Hodson. “Without exception, the MVC schools take exceptional pride in

Courtesy Mark Coffey, Action Sports Images

hosting events,” Viverito said. “That being said, Missouri State and Springfield have something extra to offer.” That something extra may have the most to do with what other recent NCAA championship sites cannot control. With a population of nearly 200,000 and a metro area of over 400,000, Springfield would be the largest city to host an NCAA Division I Cross Country Championship since Tucson in 1991. “Springfield is the perfect size city for an event like the NCAA Championship,” said Hipp. “We’re big enough to support the event at a high level but not so big that no one would fail to notice what was going on.” Hipp goes on to say “With our population and central location, we could see some huge crowds at an NCAA championship in Springfield.” Continued on page 12

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John Citron, Springfield’s sports commissioner, is a former track coach and hurdler at Florida State University and is confident in the city’s ability to handle the travel demands of the NCAA’s teams and fans. “In Springfield we have close to 6,000 hotel rooms. We feel very confident we could accommodate an event as large as nationals. It’s also nice to have an airport 15 minutes away from the course.” Citron also expressed his excitement, saying, “Anytime we can associate with MSU and the NCAA, we are always excited and we’ll be looking forward to the next opportunity.” With the most recent NCAA cross country sites being in smaller cities such as Terre Haute, IN (Indiana State), Cedar Falls, IA (Northern Iowa), Bloomington, IN (Indiana) and Lawrence, KS (Kansas), Springfield would be the first NCAA host city with a capable airport since Greenville, SC (Furman University). In fact, Greenville, which hosted last in 2001, has been the only host city with an airport that participating teams could fly into in the last 10 years of NCAA cross country championships.

The Course What may be holding back other capable cities like Springfield from going after the NCAA cross country championships, is the need for an adequate course. Specific requirements are in place for the courses at host sites bidding for the NCAA championship. At the Missouri State University cross country facility, the starting line can accommodate up to 40 teams, has a 610-meter straight before the first turn, is 100% rolled grass, is at least 15 meters wide throughout and has a final straightaway of 300 meters before the finish. All these characteristics meet, and in some cases exceed, the NCAA standards. “I like a European-style course with loops, and Missouri State gives that to us,” said Rodgers, the 1976 Bronze medalist at the IAAF World Cross Country Championship. “It really makes for a fair race to all styles of runners. You got your flats and you’ve got your hills, it takes strategy.” With the ambition of hosting major meets—and possibly a national championship one day—Hipp kept these requirements in mind as he selected the land to design his course. Four years ago while at a July 4th festival—on land otherwise known as the Springfield Underground because it’s on the surface of a 2-million-square-foot underground industrial development—Hipp first realized the potential. “Walking around at the festival, I immediately thought to myself that this land was made for cross country.” Fortunately the Greismeyer family, owner of the Springfield Underground, was supportive of Hipp’s plans and soon development on Missouri State’s new course was underway. Hipp didn’t go at the task of designing the course on his own. With the help of several coaches and alumni, Hipp sought out the advice of friend Mike Scott, whom Hipp says, between NCAA, USA and world championships has as much experience as anyone picking out a championship course. On his initial review of the course, USATF’s Scott felt confident in the land. “As far as the plot of land is concerned, it is very similar to that of Terre Haute,” said Scott. “Speaking of the course, it lends itself very well to a championship-style event.” In designing the course, Hipp and Scott took into account the NCAA course requirements and how to accomplish different racing distances, as well as spectator site lines and viewing areas. “That’s one of the nice things about the Missouri State course— you can literally stand in one spot and see 80% of the race,” said Scott. Rodgers agreed, saying, “The course is a beautiful piece of land. It’s so spectator friendly. The course really gives the sport back to the fan.” Hipp and Scott also spoke of the logistics of everything from “starting lines to airlines.” Thinking well into the future, the two also discussed the details of where to put a video display and ensured the course’s design could accommodate the demands of a TV crew.

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“Indiana State has changed how cross country meets are held,” said Hipp. “Our goal all along has been to learn from all the things they do well. If we do that, and then throw in a city like Springfield, we think we’re offering a great product.”

Some Critical of MSU For all the positive energy that’s going toward Missouri State’s efforts to host an NCAA championship, there have been some critics who say Springfield should not get to host. Missouri State University doesn’t have a men’s cross country or track & field program. Due to financial and Title IX concerns, MSU’s administration cut their men’s program after the spring of 2006. Bill Rowe, Missouri State’s long-time athletic director, admits, “I understand how the move can be perceived.” However, he went on to say, “It’s my hope that we’re not judged based on that decision,” one he calls the toughest he’s had to make in 47 years at MSU. The program cuts have led to some in the online community to question Missouri State’s commitment to the sport, but Hipp contends hosting the event is a way for MSU to better the sport. “Through the entire process I’ve only gotten positive feedback from the NCAA,” Hipp said. “Having the NCAA Championship in Springfield will give us the platform to improve the sport at our university and in our community.” Bringing the NCAA meet to Springfield, Rowe said, isn’t related to their former men’s program; however, Rowe does see potential benefit for the lost program as a result. “If the meet brings [cross country] heightened attention and brings in some benevolent resources to support the program we will certainly take a look at that situation,” Rowe said. Despite the one noticeable shortfall Missouri State seems to have the support of many. Scott says he has all the confidence in the world in Hipp and is intrigued at the potential in Springfield. “Greg, despite his youth, is very experienced at hosting big-time events. He has been involved in running and planning major meets since the day I met him,” said Scott. The idea of changing venues is shared by Louie Quintana, Arizona State University’s cross country coach and the West region coaches’ representative to the United States Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. “I really enjoy what Indiana State does, but if a school can bring together a similar setting I think all the athletes involved would be open to a change,” Quintana said. “As a former NCAA athlete myself I loved when nationals was at different venues.” If the NCAA is willing to make a change, NCAA athletes and coaches will not have to wait much longer to find out. The NCAA track & field committee, which determines championship sites for cross country, is expected to determine Missouri State’s fate at its 2009 summer meetings. Until then Hipp say’s he and his staff will keep working. “If the NCAA wants to make a change we will be ready and waiting in 2010.” If Missouri State gets the call it looks like they will not be in it alone in their preparation. “Bass Pro was truly honored to be a part of the MVC championship and we hope to work with Missouri State again,” Hodson said. Scott says he is confident in Springfield’s potential. “Terre Haute has done very well and Springfield has the same pieces that make Indiana great. Can Springfield do better? I think it will be interesting to find out.” ▲ For more information on the Bass Pro Fitness festival or the 2009 NCAA Midwest cross country regional hosted by Missouri State, you can go to www.basspro.com/fitness and www.missouristate09.com, respectively.

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Shoe Review 2009 SPRING

SHOE REVIEWS: Neutral

iii

Motion Stabilizing

iv

Performance

vi

Two trends are in the forefront this season: gender and money. A few seasons back, some brands attempted to market to men and women separately—even with different names for the same shoes—with lessthan-successful results. This season, the shoes carry the same names and attempt to provide the same kind of running experience for runners of each gender. More than one-third of the shoes in our Review have been modified to account for differences between male and female runners. Men generally weigh more than women and have more muscle mass, which means they can more easily flex running shoes. They also land a little harder than women do. Designers adjusted their shoes to accommodate these very real differences. For men, the landing area is a bit larger and firmer, while the women’s models are, in comparison, softer and more flexible. The second trend has been a noticeable jump in prices. This may have been some time in coming, as the world economy is shifting. Workers everywhere expect higher wages, the costs of resources and transportation have increased, and the bottom line is the bottom line—running shoes are not what they used to be. While they’re not rocket science, running shoes are technical, and technology, research, and delivery have very real costs associated with them. Both trends coincide with the continued push to make running shoes better able to handle the idiosyncrasies of the human foot and, by extension, make your daily run more beneficial.

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Welcome to the Running Network’s 2009 Spring Shoe Review! If you’ve been a longtime reader of our Reviews, you may notice that the review is now part of each Running Network magazine partner’s regular pages. We have done that, quite frankly, in response to the challenging economic times. Our focus is the weartesting and review of running footwear and providing that information to you, the running consumer, in a timely fashion. We publish two large reviews a year (in the spring and fall), and additional shoe features in the May, July, September, and November issues. In addition, we are excited to provide you with an expanded version of this Review—with reviews on an additional 10 shoes— online at www.runningnetwork.com in April 2009. Please remember that our reviews are only the starting point on your personal journey to find the best running shoe for you. We urge you to visit your local running store for more help. If you don’t know where to find one, visit our website and we’ll help you locate your local running store. Happy (and Healthy) Running and Walking!

Running Network LLC Partners

W ELCOME American Track & Field www.american-trackandfield.com Athletes Only www.atf-athlete.com Athletics (Canada) www.otfa.ca Austin Runner www.austinrunner.com California Track & Running News www.caltrack.com Club Running www.rrca.org/clubrunning Coaching Athletics Quarterly www.coachingathleticsq.com Colorado Runner www.coloradorunnermag.com Get Active! www.getactivemagazine.com Greater Long Island Running Club’s Footnotes www.glirc.org Latinos Corriendo www.latinoscorriendo.com Michigan Runner www.michiganrunner.net

Larry Eder President, Running Network LLC

Missouri Runner & Triathlete www.morunandtri.com

Award Winners BEST SHOE Neutral

SP

RIN G 200

9

BEST SHOE Performance SP

RIN G 200

9

BEST SHOE Motion Stabilizing

SP

RIN G 200

9

BEST VALUE SPRING 2009

BEST NEW SHOE SPRING 2009

BEST RENOVATION SPRING 2009

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Saucony Triumph 6 Best Shoe—Neutral Zoot Ultra TT 2.0 Best Shoe—Performance adidas adiStar Salvation Best Shoe—Motion Stabilizing ASICS GEL–1140 Best Value

This 2009 Spring Shoe Review is produced independently by Running Network LLC for its partner publications. All shoes reviewed were tested by experienced, competitive runners who were matched to the biomechanical purpose of each shoe model. Copyright © 2009 by Running Network LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Running Network LLC.

K-Swiss Run One miSOUL Tech Best New Shoe Diadora Mythos 280 GB Best Renovation

MISSOURI RUNNER AND TRIATHLETE

Reviewer: Cregg Weinmann Project Coordinator/Editor: Christine Johnson Designer: Kristen Cerer Proofreader: Marg Sumner, Red Ink Editorial Services Shoe Photography: Daniel Saldaña, Cregg Weinmann Advertising Sales: Running Network LLC, Larry Eder, President, 920.563.5551, ext. 112, larry.eder@gmail.com Publisher: Larry Eder, 608.239.3785 Website: www.runningnetwork.com For a Media Kit, please visit our website.

Running Network LLC and its partner publications suggest that, as with all fitness activities, you meet with a healthcare professional before beginning or changing your fitness regimen.

APRIL/MAY 2009

New York Runner www.nyrrc.org Running Journal & Racing South www.running.net RunMinnesota www.runmdra.org RunOhio www.runohio.com Track & Field News www.trackandfieldnews.com USATF’s Fast Forward www.usatf.org USATF/New England’s Exchange Zone www.usatfne.org The Winged Foot www.nyac.org The Winged M www.themac.com Youth Runner www.youthrunner.com

www.morunandtri.com

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N EUTRAL adidas Supernova Glide—$100 The Supernova Glide is as good as the best neutral shoes in the adidas line. The name is new (it was previously the Supernova Cushion), but the other changes seem cosmetic until closer inspection. The changes, though slight, do improve the shoe. The upper features better breathability and reduced weight, thanks to a change in the mesh that doesn’t sacrifice comfort. The GeoFit memory foam ankle collar still provides a cozy fit around the ankle. The midsole sports slight changes to the molding and retains the ForMotion cassette, so the ride is still the same. Subtle changes in the outersole’s appearance improve its flexibility, and adidas has kept the carbon heel-and-blown rubber combination that has worked well for the Supernova series. If the adidas fit and the neutral Supernova shoes have been your cup of tea, drink up. “Fits great, very comfortable, and wraps around the foot nicely. They felt light weight and felt great while running. The cushioning was very noticeable—almost bouncy, but protective. The shoes are very comfortable, but I think a little overpriced.” Sizes: Men 6.5–13 (whole & half sizes), 14–20 (whole sizes only); Women 5–12 • Weight: Men 12.6 oz. (size 11); Women 10.2 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, adiPRENE+ Strobel board (heel) • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to very mild overpronation

Diadora Mythos 280 GB—$100 The Mythos series displays the best Diadora Running offers, and the 280 GB is a nod to Olympic Marathon champion Gelindo Bordin, longtime brand icon and one of its key developers. The Mythos 280 improves the ride by adjusting its Axeler technology. The threadlike titanium wire is unchanged, but Axeler WI5 adds angled thermoplastic elements to absorb shock by flexing and then springing back to shape, providing an energetic toe-off. The upper is open airmesh with synthetic leather overlays to support the foot, and accommodate a range of foot shapes. Reliable Elaston foam means that the midsole is well cushioned and durable. The shank is vented, providing support and breathability.The outersole is Duratech 5000 and Flexoft (carbon rubber heel, blown rubber forefoot) because it works. New cushioning technology, fine-tuned fit, cushioned ride, and flexibility have earned the the Mythos 280 GB our Best Renovation award. “The fit allows good heel fit and support with a good amount of toe room. I was impressed with the cushioning and forefoot flexibility, though they were heavier than other Diadora shoes I have tried.”

BEST RENOVATION SPRING 2009

Sizes: Men 6–13.5; Women 5.5–10 • Weight: Men 13.8 oz. (size 11); Women 11.1 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

New Balance 1063—$125 The 1063 stays true to the mission of its predecessors: providing great cushioning for low-arched, neutral feet. The upper has been upgraded for a bit more support, with a full rand, redesigned and repositioned overlays in the saddle and the toe, and a little softer mesh to go with the same smooth interior. The midsole sports a new configuration of DTS (Dynamic Transition System): a crash pad that improves the lateral release on touchdown and better smooths the foot’s transition through the footstrike. The forefoot cushioning has been enhanced with a little more Abzorb SBS, but, almost magically, the weight has been reduced (by almost 3% in the men’s shoe), which means less work for runners, and a little faster time on the watch. “The shoes felt supportive and fit quite well. Excellent cushion, especially for long training runs. The support and cushion were better than expected, and this is a good step forward for NB.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15 (B,D,2E,4E); Women 7–11,12 (B,D) • Weight: Men 13.2 oz. (size 11); Women 11.0 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, Abzorb Strobel board • For: low- to medium-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

Reebok Premier Ultra KFS VI—$120 If there were an award for best aesthetic improvement, the Premier Ultra KFS VI would certainly be in the running. Reebok has raised the bar to a new height, gaining ground in both fit and performance. The upper has received improvements to fit, support, and comfort. The KFS inserts have been repositioned nearer the instep, which opens the stretch mesh across the metatarsals, and the overlays have been enhanced from the midfoot to the heel to better secure the shoe to the foot. The midsole is still responsive, but a little better cushioned than version 5, thanks to minor tweaks to the DMX Shear and the shank. The outersole features new flex grooves for better flexibility, and a noticeably more energetic toe-off. Runners looking for high mileage performance will do well to slip their neutral mid-arched feet into the Premier Ultra KFS VI. “Good fit, snug on the heel, and comfy toe box. Bit of a lift (roll up) at the tip of the toe box, which fosters a natural toe push-off. Definitely durable. After 100+ miles, no noticeable wear and tear—shoes still feel like new.” Sizes: Men 6.5–13,14; Women 5–12 • Weight: Men 14.0 oz. (size 11); Women 11.2 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, DMX Foam Strobel board • For: medium to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

Saucony Triumph 6—$125 The Triumph epitomizes the Saucony commitment to producing quality running shoes. The sixth edition, like other updated shoes in this review, requires close inspection to see the changes. The upper is much the same, but the tongue is better padded (though a good deal thinner), and the overlays have been trimmed back or repositioned to provide more open space across the metatarsal area, making the shoe bunion-friendly. The midsole appears largely untouched, though the shank reveals a bit more of the thermoplastic than the Triumph 5 did. The ride is responsive, with cushioning befitting the Triumph legacy. As with many of the shoes in this review, the Triumph 6 will cost a little more, but it’s worth it. The overall feel, craftsmanship, and ride were responsible for the Triumph 6 earning our Best Neutral Shoe award. “The shoe felt light as I ran, probably from the comfortable fit through the arch. I liked the supportive stable feeling, and the good measure of cushioning. There are tiny differences [but] the shoe is very close to the last few versions I have used.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14; Women 5–12 • Weight: Men 12.7 oz. (size 11); Women 10.4 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, HRC Strobel board • For: low- to medium–high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics www.morunandtri.com

APRIL/MAY 2009

BEST SHOE Neutral

SP

RIN G 200

9

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N EUTRAL /M OTION S TABILIZING Under Armour UA Apparition—$110

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Under Armour is new to running footwear, but its development team is not. The UA Apparition, flying a bit under the radar, is actually the best shoe in its new line. The upper utilizes FootSleeve technology, which is similar to the gusseted tongue construction or monosock used in other running shoes. Like all such construction, whether it fits you is largely dependent on the shape and volume of your foot, so it really requires a try-on to tell if it works. The midsole is a combination of EVA and rubbery inserts—ArmourBound, ArmourLastic, and Cartilage—which make for quite a comfortable ride. The flat sole, which keeps the foot in contact with the ground during transition, and good flexibility permit the foot to move naturally. The carbon rubber outersole is unremarkable, except in its durability and good traction. “This shoe fit very well. The more that I wore the shoe, the better it fit, but it had a lengthy break-in period. The cushion felt about right; it felt stiff at first, but broke in with running. Fairly comfortable shoe, I was pleased with its overall feeling.”

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Sizes: Men 8–13,14,15; Women 6–11,12 • Weight: Men 13.9 oz. (size 11); Women 11.6 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

Sizes: Strobel

K-S adidas adiStar Salvation—$140

BEST SHOE Motion Stabilizing

SP

RIN G 200

9

A new name for the old adiStar Control isn’t all that’s new about this shoe. The last (new about a year ago) has been dialed in to maximize the fit for as many runners as possible—a little to either side of a medium arch. The strength of the Salvation is that it fits well and has outstanding cushioning and stability. The upper switches to EVA in the tongue for better protection, a different open mesh, and repositioned overlays that reduce the weight. The midsole features a minor extension of the ProModerator support and a full-length adiPrene Strobel board for seamless cushioning. Small reductions here and there add up to almost half an ounce shaved off the weight of the shoe. The cushy ride and reliable stability earned the adiStar Salvation our Best Motion Stabilizing Shoe award. “It fits very well. I feel that it gives very good arch support and toes have enough room. Very good cushion—almost like slippers underfoot. Foot felt stable and secure with no rolling. Pleased with the overall capabilities of the shoe.” Sizes: Men 6.5–13,14,15; Women 5–12 • Weight: Men 13.3 oz. (size 11); Women 10.8 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, adiPRENE+ Strobel board (heel) • For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation

ASICS GEL–1140—$85

BEST VALUE SPRING 2009

The GEL-1140 has a lengthy heritage in the ASICS line. Runners looking for effective stability on a budget have always responded to this model. The 1100 series has been the beneficiary of a generous trickle-down of ASICS’ experience and technology. The upper is little changed from the 1130, even using what appears to be the same mesh, with the expected minor tweaks to the overlays. The tailoring has been adjusted for a better heel fit and more room in the toebox. The midsole is time-proven SpEVA (ASICS’ preferred foam prior to its introduction of Solyte), and this configuration gives the 1140 a stable, well-cushioned ride. The outersole is classic ASICS fare: AHAR (carbon rubber) heel with a blown rubber forefoot. The combination of the fit, stability, ride, and—most of all—price earned the GEL-1140 our Best Value award. “From the first time I tried the shoes on they fit my foot perfectly. I felt like my foot was supported and cushioned. It's like running on a gel pack. It seems to help my pushoff. My foot feels well balanced and secure in the shoes while I’m running.” Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15,16,17 (D), 7–13,14,15,16,17 (2E,4E); Women 5–12 (B,D) • Weight: Men 12.8 oz. (size 11); Women 10.5 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: slip-lasted • For: low- to medium–high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 9—$105 Over time, the Adrenaline series has been very consistent; the overall visual impression is one of gradual change. But it also retains the familiar, and that’s a strength of the Adrenaline—it fits and works for its audience. The Adrenaline GTS 9 is “one of the boys,” but with a few tricks up its sleeve. The upper is the same Element mesh, with slightly larger holes to better handle moisture from the foot. The midsole, added this season, is BioMogo, which does a great job of cushioning and, when you’re done with the shoe, it doesn’t last forever in a landfill. The ride is very stable with enough cushioning to keep runners coming back. The HPR carbon heel and blown rubber forefoot are effective and familiar—a known commodity. Runners who swear by the shoe will be pleased, and those looking for stability, fit, and cushioning, have another option to try. “These shoes fit very well. I didn’t have any break-in period, right out of the box [they] fit. I like that. There were several pluses in these shoes: they were comfortable, durable, and stable. A good training shoe, not too heavy, not too light.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15; Women 5–12,13 • Weight: Men 12.5 oz. (size 11); Women 10.5 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: combination Strobel lasted, Texon board (heel), S257 Strobel board (forefoot) • For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation

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Etonic Jepara 3 SC—$110 The strength of the original Jepara was its combination of cushioning and effective stability. The Jepara 3 has outdistanced the earlier versions by tackling their weakness: weight. The upper is a uniform open mesh, with stretch mesh and HF-welds across the metatarsal region to provide a forgiving, yet supportive fit, and a much plusher feel. The midsole features redesigned flex grooves for better forefoot flexibility, an adjusted second density of foam for better stability, TPR inserts only in key impact areas, and a redesigned shank—all of which save weight while providing better stability and support. The effectiveness of the polyurethane innersole and EVA Strobel board combine to enhance the ride, just as they have in other Etonic shoes. The total weight saving is almost 1.4 ounces, testament to the role judicious use of materials plays in a quality running shoe. “On the first few runs, I thought [it] was relatively stiff, but after a little break-in [it] fits well and is comfortable. The foot feels slightly controlled, but it does produce a comfortable footstrike. Compares well with the major brands I have tried.” Sizes: Men 8–14; Women 6–12 • Weight: Men 13.4 oz. (size 11); Women 11.0 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation

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M OTION S TABILIZING Karhu Strong Fulcrum Ride—$140

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Karhu’s shoes over the past few seasons were appreciated for their low profile and responsive feeling. The Strong Fulcrum Ride features Karhu’s Fulcrum technology (think “mini teeter-totter”) to improve responsiveness by pivoting the foot forward after touchdown. Shortening the time on the heel also reduces overpronation. The upper is a well-supported airmesh, but with few overlays and a bunion-friendly open forefoot. The interior is plush and accommodating. The multi-part midsole features an effective heel crash pad and a stable configuration of the Fulcrum element with a flexible forefoot. The polyurethane memory foam innersole adds an extra measure of comfort. The durable, full-length carbon rubber outersole provided excellent traction. “Great, low-profile fit, one of the most comfortable pair of shoes I’ve ever put on. The cushion is very comfortable, but still bouncy. Strong lateral control, great on the ankles. Have really enjoyed these shoes on runs of 10 miles or shorter.” Sizes: Men 8–13,14; Women 6–11 • Weight: Men 12.6 oz. (size 11); Women 10.5 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted • For: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

K-Swiss Run One miSOUL Tech—$125

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K-Swiss demonstrates its commitment to running with its new miSOUL (Modular Interchangeable Sole Technology), a midsole structure designed to accommodate different snap-in innersoles. The Run One comes with two options: a Cushion innersole with resilient rubbery inserts and a Light configuration. By changing them depending on your workout, they don’t get compressed as quickly as the traditional innersole. (You can also purchase replacements.) The combination-lasted design adds stability, along with the dual density midsole and shank supports of the miSOUL components. The upper is open airmesh with cooling perforations through the toecap and the perimeter of the heel, and rubbery thermoplastic overlays give a snug but forgiving midfoot fit. The outersole is traditional carbon rubber in the heel, blown rubber in the forefoot. The combination of the familiar and the innovative earned the K-Swiss Run One our Best New Shoe award. “Quite comfortable, nestles my foot nicely, no signs of blistering or hot spots. I preferred the feel of the Light insole, it enveloped my heel much more snugly. I liked this shoe and the idea of two insoles.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14 (D); Women 6–11,12 (D) • Weight: Men 13.2 oz./14.0 oz. (size 11, with each insole); Women 11.1 oz./11.9 oz. (size 8, with each insole) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel combination lasted, Superfoam (forefoot) and thermoplastic (heel) Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

BEST NEW SHOE SPRING 2009

Nike Zoom Structure Triax+ 12—$100 Gender specificity, championed by the Structure Triax+ in the Nike line, is evident in this version, which is precisely tuned for men and women. This version features the unchanged midsole chassis that worked well for the Structure Triax 11: Phylon, an articulated second density with TPU, and a decoupled crash pad that curbs overpronation while allowing the foot to effectively transition. As a shoe that’s largely on target, the upper features only minor changes. The mesh has a better feel to it (smaller holes feel less coarse) and the overlays have been replaced with HF-welds wherever possible to reduce seams. The outersole is almost the same, with a slightly thicker Duralon layer in the forefoot providing extra protection. Devotees will find the Structure Triax+ 12 to their liking, and runners looking for a stable, supportive shoe with a roomy forefoot would be advised to give it consideration. “The first few miles had a soft footfall and I wondered how many miles the cushion will hold up—it hasn’t quit yet. The shoes performed well, and overall I think they are as solid as the other shoes I’ve tried in the category.” Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15 (D,wide,narrow,4E); Women 5–12 (B,wide,narrow,4E widths) • Weight: Men 13.3 oz. (size 11); Women 11.4 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation

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Pearl Izumi SyncroPace III—$115 The evolution of Pearl Izumi’s SyncroFrame shoes has taken a stable technology and adapted the ride to increase the comfort, finally dialing in the combination of stability and cushion. The ride has been softened with a combination of Skydex and foam. The major change is in the outersole, which has been segmented into pods to improve transition and flexibility. The cushioned feel up front is achieved by a new Skydex bag in the forefoot (effectively used in last season’s award-winning Streak), combined with a better midsole foam. The strength of the SyncroPace continues to be the stability of the SyncroFrame. A dual density innersole feels soft on top, but has a supportive, dense layer underfoot. The seamless upper offers a snug fit with a plush interior, a fan favorite. Several testers have a newfound respect for the shoes, which is testament to sound design. “I love the fit of these shoes! They are comfortable the moment you put them on. The cushioning is the first thing you notice. They ride a little firmer than they feel, but I didn’t develop any problems/injuries elsewhere in my leg, hips, etc. I was impressed with it as an excellent, light shoe with a surprisingly long-term cushioning feel.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14; Women 5–11,12 • Weight: Men 14.2 oz. (size 11); Women 11.9 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation

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Under Armour UA Revenant—$120 After several years of development, Under Armour rolls out its running shoe line. The experienced development team guaranteed that every detail of the technology and function of the shoes was attended to. The upper is open airmesh with a close-fitting, gusseted tongue that Under Armour calls “FootSleeve,” tying its shoes to its compression apparel. The midsole employs ArmourGuide, a cradle that offers stability and support. A rubbery material called Cartilage is designed to improve the cushioning between the cradle and the EVA. The EVA formulations in heel and forefoot—Armourlastic and ArmourBound—contribute to the responsive ride. The articulated heel curbs overpronation by lateral release, stabilizing and smoothing the transition. Relying only on the strength of its own technologies, Under Armour has done a very good job right out of the gate. “Good fit, no blisters, lots of toe room. The tongue could be a bit longer; it just kind of hits into the top of my ankle. I like the bouncy feel, not too squishy. Great stability, my foot was nice and straight, staying right on top of the shoe.” Sizes: Men 8–13,14,15; Women 6–11,12 • Weight: Men 13.8 oz. (size 11); Women 11.2 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation www.morunandtri.com

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P ERFORMANCE STABILITY

ASICS GEL-DS Trainer 14—$110 ASICS has refined the three key areas of the GEL-DS Trainer: upper, midsole, and outersole. The upper is still open mesh with Biomorphic Fit inserts, but by adjusting the asymmetrical lacing to restore the familiar sizing and support, the upper fits better. The overlays sport new tailoring that gives a better fit through the heel and midfoot. The midsole features a shorter medial second density, which may be partly responsible for the slightly softer feel. ASICS reports that the midsole is a millimeter thinner and the outersole is 2 millimeters thicker, making the forefoot a little more responsive. That extra millimeter has been added to the blown rubber in the forefoot, improving the ride and helping to cradle an insert of high-traction rubber called Wet-Grip that has been added to the forefoot. Fans of the shoe will like the adjustments—it’s still stable, responsive, and light. “I really like the snugness of these shoes; they fit around my feet very well. Great feel, lighter than average, good cushioning. The flexy region [Biomorphic Fit inserts] of the uppers is fabulous.” Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15; Women 5–12 • Weight: Men 11.4 oz. (size 11); Women 9.1 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: slip-lasted • For: low- to medium–high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation, for faster-paced runs

NEUTRAL

Mizuno Waverider 12—$100 The Waverider alternates between being a performance shoe and a midweight training shoe. Version 12 has slimmed down to a Performance weight (under 340 grams). A quick glance at the upper reveals a more open mesh, with overlays that are a bit more substantial and supportive. Trying them on reveals a snugger fit and a softer step-in feel, thanks to the addition of the Ortholite innersole. The midsole is noticeably thinner. The ride is more responsive, which is good for lighter runners and shorter runs, but on longer runs, testers noted that it seemed a bit less cushioned than earlier Waveriders. In a development new to Mizuno, the shoes have been designed for gender differences, with the women’s version featuring more flex grooves to accommodate less body mass to flex the shoe, while the men’s version has a broader flare in the sole for a better landing area. “I like the lower cut on the back, many shoes are too high on the Achilles tendon. Need more support and cushioning, though they did fine for mid-length runs. Light compared to what I normally run in—hardly know I’m wearing them.” Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15,16 (D,2E); Women 6–12 (AA,B) • Weight: Men 11.9 oz. (size 11); Women 9.4 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics, for mid-mileage runs

NEUTRAL

Nike Zoom Start+—$88 The Start was conceived as a shoe for those who want to begin running. No matter what level you are, all runners need good shoes and the Start is a good shoe. The aim was to begin with the Vomaro and create a little sibling. The upper is airmesh in front and closed mesh from the midfoot to the heel. Then Nike minimized the overlays and threw on some Flywire for “tech” appeal. The midsole is Cushlon (thinned a bit to reduce price and weight, and improve flexibility), with a Zoom bag in the heel, and gender-specific design reflected in varied flex grooves and crash pads. The outersole is the Waffle design of the Bowerman shoes, Nike’s best multi-surface traction. The ride is well cushioned and responsive, which is the hallmark of the Cushlon foam. The price tag is perhaps the best surprise—the value here is outstanding. “I liked the way these shoes feel from the first time they went on my feet. The cushioning and flexibility in the forefoot make them very comfortable to run in. Overall, I am very impressed with this shoe. Comfortable, light, and stable.” Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15; Women 5–12 • Weight: Men 11.8 oz. (size 11); Women 10.0 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

STABILITY

Puma Complete Concinnity III—$95 With its unique look, the original Concinnity charted a new design direction for Puma. The Concinnity III makes a few wellconsidered changes. The upper is an open airmesh with a well-finished interior. A traditional lacing system replaces the asymmetrical lacing of the I and II, giving this version a secure, but roomy fit. A deeper throat and a reshaped toe also help. The midsole is reconfigured with a smaller second density, a slightly more flexible forefoot, and a lower profile feel. While the cushioning is good for a lightweight runner, some of our testers found that it was not substantial enough for longer runs or heavier runners. The outersole features EverTrack carbon rubber throughout, with blown rubber in the lateral forefoot for durable cushioning. Overall, the improvements succeed in providing a solid stability alternative in the Performance category. “I really liked the snug fit. The comfort and bounce were great for short fast runs, but would not recommend them for anything long.” Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15,16; Women 5.5–11.5 • Weight: Men 11.9 oz. (size 11); Women 9.5 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted, full-length EVA Strobel board • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to very mild overpronation, for faster-paced runs

NEUTRAL

BEST SHOE Performance SP

18

RIN G 200

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MISSOURI RUNNER AND TRIATHLETE

Zoot Ultra TT 2.0—$135 Zoot’s Ultra footwear line is geared to triathletes. The 2.0 offers better cushioning while shaving weight from a very light shoe. The upper has more open mesh, an exposed neoprene insert for a snug-but-forgiving fit, and a DryLex moisture-wicking lining combined with antimicrobial silver nanotechnology. The midsole offers a more generous layer of Z-BOUND, and an extended shank for better stability. Thermoplastic overlays and large holes in the tongue and heel improve the grip and help you get the shoe on fast. The outersole has been upgraded to a tougher carbon rubber in the high-wear areas and combined with blown rubber and TPU to lighten it and improve the ride. All these features meet the needs of triathletes, while providing all runners with low profile, efficient performance. The upgraded materials, design, and performance earned the Ultra TT 2.0 our Best Performance Shoe award. “Fit like a second skin, very minimal. Great light weight. I like it when shoe companies understand that a shoe doesn’t have to be beefy to be good at what it does.” Sizes: Men 8–12,13,14; Women 6–10,11 • Weight: Men 9.9 oz. (size 11); Women 7.7 oz. (size 8) • Shape: semi-curved • Construction: Strobel slip-lasted • For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics, for faster-paced runs

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COFFEE WITH THE COACH

sh with fits betmedial er thinn added Wet-Grip

Hitting the Training Pace Sweet Spot By Mike Arenberg

6:00-minute mile = 360 seconds

Not so long ago VO2 was the physiological measure that was considered the best indicator of running performance. If you read enough training articles, you’ve seen the term VO2 about a thousand times. VO2 is simply a measurement of your body’s ability to deliver and use oxygen. VO2 max then is the maximum amount of oxygen your body can process in the production of energy. Factors that influence this are your cardiovascular and muscle capacity. VO2 max is quantified in milliliters O2/kilogram body weight/minute, or ml/kg/min. For runners without a personal exercise physiologist and humanperformance lab readily available, this number is not very helpful. However, just knowing your running pace when working at VO2 max, can help you to structure a training program to make the best progress in speed and endurance with the least danger of over-training. This pace is known as vVO2, the running velocity that you produce when you are at your VO2 max. It has come to be regarded as not only the best indicator of your racing fitness, but also one of the most accurate ways to determine ideal training intensities for specific workouts. This is because different athletes who can process the same amount of O2 might have different muscular strength or running economy. vVO2 factors in cardiovascular and muscular capacity and running economy, and gives you a practical number you can use every day to guide your training. Recently I attended a clinic where the keynote speaker was Dr. Joe I. Vigil, exercise physiologist and three-time Olympic distance coach. One of his primary topics was the SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand). The idea here is that an athlete’s body will make specific adaptations to the demands placed on it. If, for instance your goal is aerobic development, then your training must focus on that adaptation. The problem has always been accurately calculating training intensities to accomplish specific goals. That is where accurately establishing your vVO2 comes in—it turns out that the best way to ensure optimal results from your training is to base your running pace on your vVO2. You don’t need a laboratory to accurately calculate your vVO2. You can do this by going to your local track and running a mile time trial. The pace at which you run this distance hard is your velocity at vVO2. Because maximum velocity at VO2 max for most athletes corresponds closely with race ability, we use this to determine training paces for aerobic training, lactate threshold development and VO2 max development. This time trial should be done when you’re rested, feeling good and not adversely affected by weather conditions. Do some simple math with this number (your mile time trial) and you can calculate your ideal training intensities for every kind of session from aerobic running to tempo training and VO2 max training. For aerobic development, simply stick to a pace between 65–75% of your vVO2. A more fit or advanced athlete will run toward the upper end of this range. If you’re a beginner, start at the lower end. Calculate this range by taking the time in seconds divided by the desired percent of pace. For example, using a 6:00-minute mile time trial performance.

360 ÷ 65% = 643 seconds or 9:13 pace 360 ÷ 75% = 480 seconds or 8:00 pace

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This athlete’s aerobic training range thus becomes 8:00–9:13 minutes. Continuous runs at this pace range for this person from 20 minutes to several hours will train your aerobic system to use fatty acids as your primary fuel source and allow your body to conserve glycogen. In addition, training in this pace range will develop 0more and larger mitochondria, as well as further capillary development. For lactate threshold development (anaerobic threshold) there is a wide range of literature out there indicating a wide range of running intensities (and terminology) for the development of your lactate threshold. We use tempo runs, or tempo intervals, to bring about this adaptation. The ranges I prescribe and terminology I use may be different than what you read in other articles. One tempo run we use is called an aerobic threshold run and it’s run at 75–80% of vVO2. This is closely related to marathon pace. The second tempo run we use is called a threshold run, and is run at 85–88% of vVO2. Both of these tempo paces will help develop a tolerance to accumulation of lactic acid. Using our 6:00-minute mile time trial result we get the following pace ranges For aerobic threshold pace (75–80% of vVO2) 6:00-minute mile = 360 seconds 360 ÷ 75% = 480 seconds or 8:00 mile pace 360 ÷ 80% = 450 seconds or 7:30 mile pace For threshold pace; (85–88% of vVO2) 6:00-minute mile = 360 seconds 360 ÷ 85% = 423 seconds or 7:03 per mile pace 360 ÷ 88% = 409 seconds or 6:49 per mile pace Threshold runs are of shorter duration than aerobic threshold runs. The duration of tempo runs also depends on the race distance you’re targeting. If you’re training for a 5–10K, then take 20–30 minutes for threshold runs and 30–40 minutes for aerobic threshold runs. For the half marathon to the marathon, use 25–40 minutes for threshold runs, 40–70+ minutes for aerobic threshold runs. The great thing about tempo runs is they can be done year round. They are an effective training tool for races from 800 meters to the marathon. The rate of O2 consumption during aerobic training, and even during lactate development training, is too low to fully develop your VO2 max. For that, a higher training intensity is needed, and it, too, can be calculated accurately based on your vVO2 pace. The best return on investment is to run repeats of 3–6 minutes’ duration at 94–98% of vVO2, with rest periods of 2–3 minutes between repeats Continued on page 24

ruction:

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BLAZING TRAILS GO! St. Louis Marathon’s Nancy Lieberman Wins ‘Trailblazer Award’ By Brenda Kimberlin As president and co-founder of the GO! St. Louis Family Fitness Weekend, Nancy Lieberman is used to handing out medals to deserving runners. But this winter, Lieberman was on the receiving end when she accepted the 2009 Trailblazer Award, presented by Women’s Running Magazine at this year’s Running USA conference in La Jolla, CA. The award, which honors women who are leaders and pioneers in the sport, is a perfect fit for Lieberman, a former teacher who is a passionate advocate for community wellness and health. Missouri Runner’s Brenda Kimberlin caught up with Lieberman in the busy weeks before GO! St. Louis’ 9th annual marathon and Family Fitness Weekend, taking place April 18–19 within view of the city’s famous Arch. Brenda Kimberlin: Congratulations! Were you surprised to be chosen? Nancy Lieberman: I was totally surprised. As a member of the selection committee, we communicated about nominees in late December and January, but had little contact prior to the conference. I was actually sitting next to Dawna Stone, the publisher of Women’s Running Magazine during the luncheon and she didn’t mention anything. When it was her turn to address the conference luncheon, I was only half listening until the background history sounded very familiar. I was shocked and speechless. BK: You’ve received a lot of recognition over the years ... but what does this particular award—being singled out as a “trailblazer”— mean to you? NL: Any award extended by your peers is very special. As individuals, we are an accumulation of our life’s experiences. Surrounding yourself with a variety of professionals allows you to collect information, gain insight from others, gravitate [toward] energy and creativity, and develop the courage to formulate your own path. My peers were instrumental in the growth and development of GO! St. Louis. BK: Many people don’t realize that you entered marathon running later in life. How do women react when they find that out? Are they surprised? Inspired? NL: That’s an interesting question. I [ran] my first marathon at 47 and have been hooked on endurance events ever since. I often hear people say, “I am too old for that,” and I have two responses: “You can never play the age card

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with me,” and “Who says you have to run a marathon?” Running or walking a marathon is not for everyone, but everyone should select a reasonable goal and stick with it. Crossing a finish line is the ultimate experience. The major feeling of accomplishment is overwhelming and while they may not pat themselves on the back, inwardly they are beaming with pride. The medal may represent an athletic achievement that many never thought they could endure. BK: GO! St. Louis is one of the few events of its kind to include children’s and family fitness events. Why is that so important to you? Has it become a model for other fitness events across the country? NL: When we began in 2000 our approach was different from the traditional marathon environment. The GO! St. Louis direction focused on fitness for everybody, not just recruiting elite runners to [run in] our city. Over the years, the organization developed more than 10 events for the weekend to recognize all accomplishments, from the Diaper Dash to the Mature Mile and everything in between—5K, Marathon, etc. In the past several years in the U.S., the number of marathon finishers has leveled off to about 410,000 participants, while the number of half marathon and 5K finishers has increased substantially. The statistics from 2007 illustrate that out of 8.9 million finishers, only 4.6% ran a marathon, 7.3% completed a half marathon, and 38.6% accomplished a 5K event. [So] yes, GO! St. Louis has been ahead of the curve. Our job is to create awareness of the importance of fitness, to help people set appropriate fitness goals and to make them feel good Continued on page 24

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ish line. They may not have understood what the training was all about, but they will comprehend it when they experience the contagious energy. • Relish the accomplishment. No one can ever take it away from you!

Blazing Trails, Continued from page 22 about their accomplishments. By expanding our mission, the organization now offers several unique, year-round programs, including our corporate wellness initiative—GO! St. Louis Mile by Mile Marathon. BK: Any advice to women who want to run a full or half marathon but think they can’t? NL: People can accomplish most goals with a positive attitude. Mental toughness can be as important as physical fitness. Following a training schedule is a must, but surrounding yourself with an upbeat, supportive group is [also] essential.

What Makes a Trailblazer? The Trailblazer Award is presented to the woman who has been a leader and pioneer in the sport and has served the sport with distinction. After spending 20 years working in healthcare, Nancy established GO! St. Louis in 1999 to provide fitness events and programs for all ages and abilities. Past Trailblazer Award winners include Sharon Barbano (Saucony), Carol Lasseter-Rice (Running Times Magazine) and Julia Emmons (Atlanta Track Club). Nancy is president and founder of GO! St. Louis, which was formed in 2000. Over the last 8 years she has guided the organization from an upstart marathon weekend event to an organization that today is a year-round community wellness leader. Her vision to create a weekend event that included fitness activities for all ages and abilities has helped the event grow 700% since its inception. In addition, Nancy has created innovative programs and events that have received national acclaim, while inspiring thousands of people to get fit.

My advice: • Select a realistic distance to walk or run— aim high, but don’t be unreasonable. • Find friends who share similar goals and train with them. Peer pressure is an important component to get outside in lessthan-wonderful weather conditions. • Decide on a training program and stick with it. • Celebrate the minor goals along the way. After a long training run, enjoy breakfast with your partners. • Bring the family and/or friends to the fin-

Programs, such as Read, Right & Run Marathon®, Mature Mile and Mile-by-Mile Marathon, continue to support the organization’s overall mission. Her past volunteer experiences include: race director for Race for the Cure and event director for Senior Olympics. Now Nancy trains young women to run at Girls, Inc., where she serves on the board of directors. In addition, she is a member of St. Louis Forum and is a founding member of a new organization, St. Louis Partnership for Girls & Women in Sports affiliated with Women’s Sports Foundation. When not encouraging others in their pursuit of fitness, watch for Nancy on the roads. She has completed six marathons and dozens of triathlons, including an Ironman. She enjoys traveling to places where she can hike. In Nancy’s own words, “Hiking allows me to enjoy beautiful scenery and breathe fresh air. It’s a great way for me to clear my head.” Most recently she fulfilled a dream by summiting Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania with her daughter Elissa. Prior to starting GO! St. Louis, Nancy spent 20 years working in healthcare management in St. Louis. She was born and raised in Pittsburgh and received a bachelor’s degree from Penn State University. She has been a teacher and social worker. ▲

Coffee with the Coach, Continued from page 19 (less for fitter athletes). This is a standard approach to further develop your vVO2, although the exact lengths of the runs and percentages of vVO2 can be varied in consideration of personal factors (running programs, genetics, general fitness levels, goals, etc.). For some beginners running as low as 90–94% of vVO2 max can bring about substantial gains in vVO2 development. The key here is accuracy. Running too slowly will not elicit enough stimulus, while running too fast may overload the system and miss the desired adaptations— and render you burned out, injured or susceptible to niggling illness. A major physiological benefit of this training is the enlargement and strengthening of the heart (left ventricle), improving its ability to transport blood and oxygen to working muscles. Another benefit is further development of lactic acid buffering capacity of the muscles. Again, using our 6:00-minute mile time trial we can calculate the following workouts of various distances: For VO2 max development (94–98% vVO2) 6:00-minute mile = 360 seconds 360 ÷ 94% = 323 seconds or 6:23 pace 360 ÷ 98% = 367 seconds or 6:07 pace For various repeats distances the following paces would be used: 600m repeats = 2:17–2:23 with 2 minutes rest (8–12 repeats) 800m repeats = 3:03–3:11 with 2–3 minutes rest (6–8 repeats) 1200m repeats = 4:35–4:47 with 3 minutes rest (4–6 repeats) 1600m repeats = 6:07–6:23 with 3 minutes rest (3–6 repeats)

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Nothing is written in stone when it comes to running a good repeat workout. You can start out with an even lower number of reps than are listed. As I’ve stated in many columns, be careful about trying to do too much too soon too fast. Small steps. Calculating training intensities using vVO2 is one of the best methods to determine training intensities. It’s simple, accurate and flexible. It can be altered over time based on your current level of fitness. You can do a mile time trial at various times during the year and make changes to the training intensities. If you want to hit the right training paces-those sweet spots-go to the track and get to know your mile time trial. ▲ — Coach Arenberg Coach Michael Arenberg has an M.B.S. in exercise physiology from the University of Colorado. He has been a competitive distance runner and triathlete for 39 years, completing 25 marathons and 13 Ironman triathlons, including 3 times qualifying for the Ironman World Championships. He has coached U.S. men’s and women’s Olympic Trial qualifiers in the marathon and two top-10 finishers in the U.S. Men’s Marathon Championships, as well as multiple Ironman World Championship qualifiers. Coach Arenberg is available for coaching and can be contacted at makona94@aol.com. If you have a training question for Coach Mike, send him an e-mail at the above address. While he is unable to personally respond to every question, answers will appear from time to time in upcoming issues of Missouri Runner and Triathlete.

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The great relay carnivals of April and May are uniquely American. There’s nothing like them anywhere else in the world. And perhaps the most uniquely American of all is…

Drake.

Lolo Jones

Proud presenting sponsor of the Drake Relays


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The great athletes who compete here every year–world and American record holders, Olympic champions, world champions, and national champions–are only part of what makes these Relays so special. Equally important are the thousands of high school and college runners, jumpers, and throwers who provide four days of exciting, nearly nonstop action.

That first Relays, run in a blizzard, attracted only 82 athletes, mostly from nearby colleges, and a few hundred shivering spectators. High school teams joined the action in 1911, and the same year saw the fledgling meet’s first world record, 1 minute, 31-3/5 seconds for the 880-yard relay, by a University of Illinois quartet.

The setting is perfect: an attractive university campus in a friendly, medium-sized Midwestern city smack in the center of the nation’s grain belt. The jewel-box of a stadium puts fans into seats just a few feet away from the athletes–even closer than many indoor meets.

In the 1920s, Olympic champions and world record holders began to make regular appearances: Californian Charley Paddock, 1920 Olympic 100-meter champion and the first “World’s Fastest Human”; 1924 Olympians DeHart Hubbard, who won the 1924 Relays long jump and went on to win the event in Paris that summer and become the first African-American gold medalist, and Illinoisan Harold Osborn, 1924 gold medalist in the decathlon and the high jump; Clarence “Bud” Houser, Olympic shot put champion in 1924 and 1928.

But perhaps most of all, it’s the Drake fans, the enthusiastic hometown crowds that have produced Saturday sellouts for decades, sometimes with three generations–parents, grandparents, and sons or daughters–sitting together, often in the same seats, year after year. The athletes who compete here love the knowledgeable Drake crowds, their closeness, and their enthusiasm. And the athletes respond with great performances. First-time visitors can’t believe how compact the stadium is, how handy everything is. There’s no need to bring sandwiches. Just outside the stands there’s a huge food court offering hot dogs and hamburgers, cotton candy and popcorn, and lots of other food choices, including two Iowa specialties: pork sandwiches and jumbo turkey legs. And if you like the discus, hammer, and javelin, you can stroll half a block away from your seat in the stadium and get a closer look at the throwers than you can at any other major meet.

Since then, hundreds of great athletes have won Drake Relays watches and gone on to win well over 100 Olympic medals, including Jesse Owens, Al Oerter, Wilma Rudolph, Bob Hayes, Bruce Jenner, Carl Lewis, and Michael Johnson, who among them have won 29 gold medals. ASICS is proud that some of the most outstanding athletes in Drake Relays history have performed in ASICS gear. Among them are sub-3:50 milers Steve Scott and Jim Spivey, high jumpers Amy Acuff and Dwight Stones, and most recently, Des Moines native Lolo Jones, currently ranked No. 1 in the world by Track & Field News in the women’s 100meter hurdles.

For the winners, whether they’re a world-leading distance medley team or a girls’ high school foursome with pigtails and braces, there’s another unique Drake tradition: they get to take a victory lap, carrying blue-and-white Drake flags and exchanging high-fives with the spectators as they circle the track.

Scott and Spivey were two of the best American middle distance runners of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s; both had long and successful careers at distances from 800 meters to 5000 meters.

The Relays have come a long way since 1910, when Major John L. Griffith decided that Philadelphia’s Penn Relays, the only other major relay carnival, was too far away for Midwestern college athletes. (For many, the train trip took more than 24 hours, each way.) With Des Moines almost in the center of the Midwest, what better place than Drake for a meet?

Steve Scott first came to Des Moines in 1979 and, wearing his “Sub-Four” singlet, promptly produced Drake’s first sub-four-minute mile, a 3:55.26 meet record that stood until 2007. Scott also won the Drake 800 in 1980, the mile again in 1981, and the 5000 meters in 1982. Perhaps the hard-running Californian’s most remarkable achievement was his total of 136 sub-four-minute miles, more than any other runner in history.

Jesse Owens

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Jim Spivey, a high school star in Illinois, won his first Drake Relays watch as anchor of Indiana University’s winning distance medley relay teams of 1981 and 1982. Although perhaps most famous as a miler (his best was 3:49.80 in 1986), Spivey’s record at Drake included three victories in the 5000 meters (1984, 1993, and 1996) and a 1985 win at 800 meters. Perhaps Spivey’s greatest Drake moment came in that 1996 5000-meters race, at age 36. He started off slowly and at 3000 meters he was half a lap behind the leader. But feeling strong, he picked up the pace. “There was a real strong wind in the homestretch,” he recalls, “and I figured the only way I could win was to surge down the backstretch where the wind would help me and then stay close behind another runner on the homestretch to break the wind and save energy.”

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ASICS’ newest star is 100-meter hurdler Lolo Jones, the perfect person to represent the future of the Relays, and indeed the future of the sport of track and field. At 26, Lolo has already won four straight Drake hurdles titles (2005–2009) and is ranked No. 1 in the world by Track & Field News. Although she is currently most famous for clipping the ninth hurdle in the 2008 Olympic final in Beijing (she was two meters ahead and on her way to the gold medal and possibly a world record), her behavior after that race brought her worldwide admiration and popularity for her graciousness and sportsmanship in adversity. Born in Des Moines and a graduate of the city’s Roosevelt High School, Jones has never forgotten where she’s from. “I love to compete at the Relays,” she says. “It gives the fans who have supported me throughout my career another opportunity to see me race.”

When he made his first surge, with five laps to go, people in the stands along the backstretch began to nudge their neighbors and say, “Hey, that’s Jim Spivey. Go, Jim!” and lap by lap the cheers grew with each surge. With one lap to go, Spivey had moved into second, perhaps 30 yards behind the leader. As he came into the backstretch and surged again, the packed stands stood up and screamed encouragement. The margin grew smaller and smaller, and Spivey sprinted down the homestretch, passed the leader, and won.

A year ago, she returned to Roosevelt High and gave $3,000 to help the track team and ASICS joined her effort by donating a new pair of track shoes to each team member. And last July, she gave her $4,000 Olympic Trials prize money to a family left homeless by the flood in Cedar Rapids–a gift which ASICS was also happy to match.

Says Spivey of the Drake fans, ”They’re the most knowledgeable and loyal fans of any Relays crowd in America.”

ASICS is proud to salute 100 years of the Drake Relays and athletes like Steve Scott, Jim Spivey, Amy Acuff, Dwight Stones, and Lolo Jones, who have made Drake truly America’s Athletic Classic!

Successful high jumpers have long careers, few longer than ASICS stars Dwight Stones and Amy Acuff. Stones sandwiched his two victories at Drake, in 1973 and 1975, between the two Olympic bronze medals he won in 1972 and 1976. During his career, he raised the world record three times–7-6 ½ in 1973, 7-7 and 7-7 ¼ in 1976–and won an amazing 19 national championships indoors and out from 1984 to 1984. These days, Stones works in television, equally adept as a host, a play-by-play announcer, or an incisive expert commentator/analyst. A slender blonde from Corpus Christi, Texas, Amy Acuff’s equally long and distinguished career includes Drake Invitational high jump victories in 2001, 2004, and 2007, and she holds the meet record at 6 feet, 4 inches, set in 2007. Nationally ranked since 1993, when she was 17, Acuff has been the No. 1 or No. 2 U.S. high jumper for 12 of the last 14 years, and in March of this year, at age 33, she won her eleventh national championship at the USATF indoors with a 6-4 clearance.

Jim Spivey Lolo Jones

Writer/Editor: James Dunaway; Design/Layout: Alex Larsen; Proofreader: Christine Johnson; Photos Courtesy of PhotoRun.net; Special Collections at Cowles Library, Drake University. © 2009 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Shooting Star Media, Inc.

Steve Scott


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2009 Missouri High School Track Preview By Ben Rosario “Out with the Old. In with the New.” If this track preview were a prom in need of a theme, that would certainly be it. Missouri lost some of its best athletes in State history to graduation last spring and 2009 is the year for those who sat patiently in the shadows of Alishea Usery, Maurice Mitchell and others to step up and deliver more of the jaw-dropping, national-level performances we have become accustomed to over the last few years.

Sprints With Usery (Florida) and Mitchell (Florida St.) tearing up the track in the Sunshine State, the door is wide open for new champions in the sprints. The girl most likely to grab the headlines in 2009 is Villa Duchesne senior Lauren Hollingsworth. Hollingsworth was runner-up in both Class 3 short sprints a year ago, clocking 12.12 in the 100 and 24.61 in the half-lapper. Challenges for sprinting supremacy on the girl’s side could come from a slew of sophomores who all made their way to the State finals a year ago. Ekate Lyon from Waynesville, Fox’s Shawntanay Johnson, Crystal Harris from Summit and Normandy’s Eileen Williams are all ready for super sophomore years. Also keep your eye on Parkway Central senior Raequel Jacobs who’ll be looking to score big points for the Lady Colts in their bid for a State team title. For the boys, it may come down to a couple of running backs to see who gets crowned the State’s fastest young man. McCluer North’s Damonte Bell and SLUH’s Ronnie Wingo are both seniors, both highly recruited football players and both lightning fast. Bell clocked 10.98 and 21.99 a year ago at the State meet and garnered 3rd-and 5th-place finishes in the 100 and 200. Wingo was 4th in the short dash for the second time in his career. He finished there as a freshman in 2006, helping SLUH to a team championship. Others to watch in the short sprints include Jennings senior Marcus Bennett and West Plains junior Joey Meyer. We can’t mention the sprints without previewing one of the toughest events on the track, the 400 meter. Seven female returners broke 58 seconds at last year’s State meet led by Berkeley junior Kianna Ruff who was the Class 3 runner-up in a sizzling 55.80. Others to watch include McCluer North’s Kendra White, Lynette Atkinson from Ladue and in Class 2 Stephanie Essner from Scott City. For the boys the field appears wide open with Lafayette senior Ian Moore the only returner who broke 49 seconds at last year’s State meet.

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MISSOURI RUNNER AND TRIATHLETE

Hurdles If the 400 is one of the toughest events on the track, then the 300 hurdles may be the toughest. Not only are athletes sprinting all out for nearly a full lap but they also have to make their way over eight hurdles in the process. At last year’s State meet, it took Washington senior Kerwin Stricker just 37.71 seconds to complete that task on his way to a State title. Stricker leads the boys returning hurdlers, but will have to exact revenge on McCluer North’s Ralph Watson and Waynesville’s Solomon Williams in the 110 hurdles if he wants two championships in 2009. Watson and Williams were 2nd and 3rd in Class 4 a year ago, respectively, with Stricker in 4th. Also keep your eye on Class 2 where junior Nic Ford took the 110 championship in 15.1. For the ladies it’s all about Class 2 when it comes to the hurdles. Crystal City senior Precious Selmon posted the best time in any class at last year’s State Meet in the 100 hurdles, but was bested in the 300s in Class 2 by Penney sophomore Lindsay Vollmer. Vollmer and Selmon are two of the nation’s top young hopes in the heptathlon as both were ranked in the top 11 in the country. They should battle again this year in all sorts of events but overall hurdle supremacy could go to Pembroke Hill junior Tiffani McReynolds who was the Class 3 champ in both hurdle races in 2008 and ran faster than Vollmer and Selmon in the 300s.

Throws Back to the boys for the throws and back to the theme of out with the old and in with the new. We can’t mention the boys throws without first saying goodbye to two-time defending State champ James Coleman of Marquette. His graduation finally allows for a new top dog in the Class 4 discus, and Blue Springs senior Gus Toca could be the one to grab that title. Toca was 2nd a year ago with an impressive mark of 173 feet, 8 inches. Without question though, the current star in the throws in any class, male or female, is Boonville senior Corey Jones. Jones launched a 66 footer to win last year’s shot put title; setting a new State Meet record and earning himself 5th place on the year-end national list. Others to watch include Lee’s Summit West senior Brooks Mosier who was the Class 4 shot champ and finished 3rd in the discus. The girls throws contingent loses last year’s Class 3 double State champ Brittany Borman of Festus, but returns top contenders Jasmine Boyer of Fort Zumwalt West and Jackson’s Jill Rushin. Boyer, a senior, won last year’s Class 4 shot title and was runner-up in the discus. Rushin, a junior, was 2nd to Boyer in the shot

APRIL/MAY 2009

Courtesy Tracy Rollins

Alyssa Allison and Emily Sisson and 3rd in the discus. Others to watch include Putnam County senior Katie Evans, who launched the disc more than 140 feet at the 2008 State Meet.

Jumps The jumps are events often dominated by great all-around athletes. Think Jackie JoynerKersee, perhaps the best heptathlete of all time, and one of the best long jumpers, as well. It’s no different in Missouri this year as two of its best jumpers are Lindsay Vollmer and Precious Selmon, probably the two best all-around track athletes in the State. Vollmer tops the list of returning high jumpers along with Moberly’s Morgan Whitson and Oak Park’s Ashley Taylor. The Penney sophomore is also tops among returning long jumpers from last year’s State Meet where she leapt 18 feet, 7 inches and bested Selmon by 2 inches. The best combo jumper in the long and triple might be Raytown South junior Jade Nalls, as she is the defending Class 4 State champ in both events. Another defending champ to look out for is Rockwood Summit’s Bethany Buell, who topped all classes in the pole vault last year with a mark of 11 feet, 9 inches. The boys are led by Sikeston senior Cal Lane who took home Class 3 State titles in the long, triple and high jumps a year ago. Raytown South senior Derek Blevins is the defending class 4 champ in both the long and triple jumps and has the best returning mark from the 2008 State meet in the long jump at 24 feet. Besides Lane, other high jumpers to look out for include Grandview’s James White and Poplar Bluff ’s Chris Kilgore who each leapt 6-8 at last year’s State meet. The pole vault is wide open with four boys returning from 14 foot marks at the 2008 State meet.

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North’s Nick Happe, College Heights Christian’s Caleb Hoover, Potosi’s Nick Niggeman, Raytown South’s Stephen Saylor and Lee’s Summit’s Adam Volkert. In the 800 look for Ozark’s Sam Jones, Oak Parks’ Hans Pitia and Hazelwood East’s Banjo Jaiyesime to post top marks.

Distance The out with the old and in with the new theme is back once again, and perhaps most prominently in the distance events. Graduating in 2008 were multiple-time State champions Aimee Bonte, Lauren Borduin, Eric Fernandez and Darwin Price, as well as U.S. Junior 800 meter champ Cydney Ross and Kickapoo standout Rick Elliott. But no one fits the “new” bill as well as the reigning cross country State champ and Nebraska transfer Emily Sisson. Sisson, only a junior, is already a many-time All-American in track and cross country, and her list of accomplishments includes being a three-time Foot Locker finalist and a U.S. Junior champ in the 5000. Look for Sisson to challenge the overall State records in the 1600 and 3200, and perhaps run a leg on what could be a very formidable 4x800 relay for the Lady Colts. Sisson’s teammate Diane Robison, herself a Foot Locker finalist and the 2007 State cross country champ, should challenge in the same events. The Parkway Central duo could be outdone, however, by Festus senior Alyssa Allison. Allison was a double State champ a year ago, running an outstanding 10:48 for 3200 and an even more impressive 4:51 for 1600. Then there’s Berkeley junior Kianna Ruff who’ll likely challenge the State meet record of 2:09.78 set in 1992 by Hazelwood Central’s Ann Heffner.

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Teams Courtesy Tracy Rollins

SLUH Ronnie Wingo Ruff ran 2:09.89 a year ago, losing by just 1/100th of a second to Ross at the State Meet. Others to watch in the distance races include Eureka’s Chelsea Chrisman, Oakville’s Kat Oberle and Liberty’s Megan Yohe. The boys distance races lose the excitement of last year’s successful triple victory by Normandy’s Price, but should make up for it with a wide open field that should produce some very close finishes. The top returning distance ace is without question Potosi’s Jacob Swearingen who won last year’s Class 3 State 3200 title only weeks after suffering a broken jaw. Swearingen won the State cross country title this past fall and should be the favorite to take home at least one more State championship on the track and maybe as many as three. Others to watch in the longer distance races are Lee’s Summit West’s Kevin Colon, Chaminade’s Matt Estlund, Francis Howell

APRIL/MAY 2009

The final out with the old and in with the new reference might be the most intriguing of all, as this could be the year that someone finally ends the Jefferson City Lady Jays’ stranglehold on the Class 4 girls team title. Watch for Parkway Central to go point for point with Jeff City in a 2-day-long battle that could come right down to the end. Jeff City will score in a lot of events, as it always does, but Parkway Central will likely counter with somewhere between 40 and 50 points from the distance events alone. Berkeley will be a force on the girls side in Class 3, but the loss of Usery makes them a little less formidable than in previous years. The boys team battle is wide open as Raytown South loses 40-point man Maurice Mitchell, leaving the door open for a number of teams to try and grab the title away. There will be lots of fireworks in Jefferson City on the last two weekends in May. If you’re a fan of the sport make the trip and check them out! ▲

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Off the Wire…

Record Field Turns Out for Endurance Events LAKE BUENA VISTA, FL—In what is becoming an extraordinary Walt Disney World Marathon tradition, Adriano Bastos of Brazil celebrated another Disney Marathon victory Sunday by coasting to his fifth straight win and sixth overall. Lisa Mizutani won the women’s title. Bastos, 30, led a Disney record field of 22,000 runners virtually from start to finish around the 26.2-mile course which traced through all four of Disney’s theme parks. He crossed the finish line in 2:20:38—roughly 7 minutes ahead of 2nd-place finisher Aaron Church (South Riding, VA), who was followed by Matthew Fecht (Warren, MI) in 3rd. Bastos’ time was 20 seconds faster than last year when he posted a time of 2:20:58. Mizutani of Japan easily outran the women competitors. The 23-year-old, who made the transpacific trip specifically to run in the Disney Marathon, broke away from the pack early, partly because of the enthusiastic cheers from spectators along the route, and ran unchallenged virtually the entire 26.2 miles. She cruised to the finish in 2:46:27, comfortably ahead of Melanie Peters (St. Petersburg, FL), who was last year’s women’s champion, and Christa Benton (St. Petersburg, FL), who finished 3rd a year ago. In the wheelchair division, Krige Schabort of

Congratulations to these top Missouri finishers at the 2009 Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend in Florida. Half Marathon

Photo by Victah Sailor/PhotoRun

Cedartown, GA crossed the line first (1:37:19). Among the women, Shirley Reilly of Tucson won the title (2:09:51). The victories by Bastos and Mizutani capped a weekend of endurance events at Disney, including the Disney Half Marathon, the Circle of Life 5K, Disney’s Kid Races and a Health & Fitness Expo. David Jankowski of Rochester Hills, MI and Elizabeth Chelagat of Las Cruces, NM won the Disney Half Marathon men’s and women’s titles, respectively. In all, more than 45,000 runners competed in events throughout the weekend, making this the largest Disney Marathon Weekend since the event’s debut in 1994. ▲ Registration for the 2010 Disney Marathon Weekend began Jan. 12. To register for the marathon or for any Disney endurance race, visit www.disneyworldmarathon.com.

Men Jason Lind, 40, Dardenne Prairie – 1:22:31 Todd Glass, 37, Clayton – 1:24:29 Matthew Hanford, 37, St. Louis – 1:37:19 Women Christina Bologna, 26, St. Louis – 1:42:10 Tricia Reese, 37, Imperial – 1:50:28 Susan Schremp, 38, Chesterfield – 1:51:57

Marathon Men Andy Emerson, 40, Columbia – 2:58:12 Thomas Wiese, 19, St. Louis – 3:11:30 Dan Sitar, 38, Columbia – 3:15:35 Women Andrea Mcgehee, 40, Lee’s Summit – 3:11:15 Christina Bologna, 26, St. Louis – 3:35:53 Anne Altorfer, 27, Kansas City – 3:55:24

SPORTS MEDICINE RESOURCE GUIDE

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MISSOURI RUNNER AND TRIATHLETE

APRIL/MAY 2009

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Missouri Runner and Triathlete - April-May 2009