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June/July 2009 $2.95

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Volume 8, Number 3

Christian Cantwell Shows no Sign of Slowing Down www.morunandtri.com

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Fort Atkinson, WI

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 4

Publisher’s Note By Larry Eder

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April Showers Bring Great Results to GO! St. Louis Family Weekend By Brian McQueary

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Aerobic Deficiency By Mike Arenberg

Registration Opens for September’s Lewis & Clark Marathon and Half Marathon By Kristen Murphy

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Volume 8 Number 3 Jun-July 2009 Q&A with Dave Denny By Shawn Love

Group Editor Christine Johnson christinej.ssm@gmail.com

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Calendar

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St. Patrick’s Day Parade Run By Drew Langenberg

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Founding Editor Gina Sokolich ginasok2@sbcglobal.net

Christian Cantwell Shows No Sign of Slowing Down By Elliott Denman Race Results

Managing Editor D. M. Strauss morunner@earthlink.net Group Publisher Larry Eder, Shooting Star Media, Inc. P.O. Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538 larry.eder@gmail.com 608.239.3785 Fax: 920.564.7298 Advertising Shooting Star Media, Inc. SSMadvert@gmail.com 608.239.3785

On the Cover: St. Louis' Zac Freudenburg takes the number one spot in the Go! St. Louis Marathon

Design Richele Collins richelecollins@att.net Copyeditor Marg Sumner MargSumner@aol.com Contributors Larry Eder, Brian McQueary, Mike Arenberg, Kristen Murphy, Shawn Love, Drew Langenberg, Elliott Denman, Tom Madine, Tom Parker Photography, Victah Sailor/PhotoRun, Mark Coffey/Action Sports Images Special Projects Adam Johnson Eder atflistings@gmail.com 608.957.2159 Pre-Press / Printing W. D. Hoard & Sons Company Fort Atkinson, WI Missouri Runner and Triathlete is produced and published by Shooting Star Media, Inc., P.O. Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Publisher assumes no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright ©2009 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the Publisher. www.morunandtri.com

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Two degrees of separation ... I was recently looking through my grandmother Violet’s photo albums. I found her racing number from 1926, when she was 13 years old. I also found pictures of her, all of 13, full of energy and looking remarkably like my niece, her great granddaughter, Sarah. My grandmother competed in a gymnasium in St. Louis where she ran hurdles, and ran relays and did gymnastics among the 10 sporting events on which she was graded. Grandma Vi lived to 90, and was doing her own thing, traveling around the country and such, until about 2 years before she died. What I was, and am, eternally grateful for is that I knew Grandma as a kid, a young adult and a parent with a teenage son. Grandma’s comment was that once you hit 80, you could be anything you wanted. Her race number is one of my prized possessions. When I would visit, we would hit Hodak’s, a little tavern in south St. Louis that served great fish and chicken. It wasn’t too far from St. Agatha’s or Lemp Avenue, where I was raised as a boy. As a junior in high school, my grandmother got to watch me run cross country. At that race, I had my grandmother, who ran in the 1920s, and my mother, who ran in grade school, at the same gymnasium as her mother. My father, I found out later, went to the same gymnasium. What made it even more exciting was that this spring, my nephew Tommy is running track. After his great grandma, his grandma, his two uncles (me and my brother Brian), he is now a fourth generation trackster. He is having a blast, which is all that I ask of any young person who gets involved in our sport. Sincerely,

Larry Eder Publisher, Missouri Runner and Triathlete President, The Running Network, LLC P.S. If you want to follow us daily, sign up for runblogrun.com and also go on Twitter and follow us at track meets!

Boulder, CO. Weekly in June, July & August (4 day camps). Boys only or Girls only. Limit five vaulters/camp. $795. Pat Manson, 819 Sunlight Way, Superior, CO 80027. 303/403-9111. Fax: 303-499-1528. E-mail: patmanson@msn.com. www.patmanson.com

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April Showers Bring Great Results to Go! St. Louis Family Fitness Weekend

Photo by runphotos.com

By Brian McQueary While the sun stayed away from the Go! St. Louis Family Fitness Weekend, the crowds didn’t as more than 12,000 people braved rainy conditions to participate in the weekend’s races. The rain wasn’t the only thing falling on April 19, however, as three course records came down, as well. Despite the races’ wet conditions, spectators were still treated to the top two finishers in the men’s half marathon going under the previous mark of 1:08.20 set in 2008 by Matthew Chesang and both the men’s and women’s marathon winners setting new records for their respective divisions. The Go! St. Louis Family Fitness Weekend kicked off its events with the April 18 5K run, Mature Mile, children’s fun runs and the conclusion of the Read, Right & Run Marathon. The 5K was won on the men’s side by Adam MacDowell, who clocked a time of 15:31. MacDowell’s time is the second fastest ever run, topped only by last year’s champion Justin Kunz’ winning time of 15:10. First place in the women’s 5K was taken by Julie Lossos, who was victorious with a time of 18:21. Both MacDowell and Lossos won handily as both bested the nearest competitor by over a minute. But the highlight of the weekend was the half and full marathons that took Photo by runphotos.com place the following day. The men’s winners, Zac Freudenburg of St. Louis, and Kelly Handel-Williamson, winner of the Kipruto Rotich of Columbia, both set women's Half Marathon

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blistering early paces to separate themselves from challengers and set new course records. Freudenburg clocked a time of 2:23:57 which took 54 seconds off the previous mark of 2:24:51 set last year by rival Karl Gilpin. Rotich took over a minute off the existing record for the half as he covered the 13.1 miles in 1:07:19. Freudenburg acknowledged the hills of the second half of the course as motivation for his early push. “I’ve done workouts down the stretch of the course along Delmar to prepare for the second half of the race. I knew that part would be tough. My goals for the race were to win, obviously, and then get the course record, so I’m happy with my day,” commented Freudenburg, who is preparing to compete in the USA Mountain Running Championship in June. Freudenburg was followed to the line by 2008 marathon champion Karl Gilpin of Russellville, and Brian Baillie of Carbondale, IL. Gilpin, who clocked a time of 2:27:00, found the early surge by Freudenburg too difficult to overcome. He said, “I came through the half in 1:13 which is my pace and he was 3 minutes up on me. If he was going to come back to me then it would happen, but I have to stay committed to my pace. I can’t chase him down, so he was either going to come back to me or win. I just had to run my race.” The men’s half also saw Kipruto Rotich press early in the race as he and

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2nd place finisher Artur Kern of Searcy, AR, rolled to fast times, running 1:07:19 and 1:07:52, respectively. The excitement didn’t end there as the race for 3rd place came down to the line as Craig Donnelly of Hillsborough, NJ, out leaned last year’s champion Matthew Chesang of Olathe, KS. On the women’s side, yet another course record fell in the marathon as Megan Earney of Olathe took 1 minute and 18 seconds off the 2007 time of 2:52:38 set by Christine Ensign and the half saw 2008 champion Kelly Handel-Williamson of Austin, TX, come back and successfully defend her title. Earney is no stranger to the awards stand as she took 3rd in the 2008 marathon. This win was especially sweet for Earney after suffering a tough loss in her last marathon. “This win feels so good right now,” said Earney. “Last race I was beat by one second and that was frustrating. I’m very happy to finally get the win.” Second-place finisher, Jackie PirtleHall felt equally excited about her finish. Apparently a woman who likes a good challenge, Pirtle-Hall entered the marathon not knowing what kind of Photo by runphotos.com shape she was in. “I’m only 3 months back Kipruto Rotich places first in the into training. I have a men's Half Marathon

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Photo by Tom Parker Photography

4- month- old, so the baby keeps me busy, but I also realized during the break how much I missed competing. I’ am just getting back into running and have managed about 42 miles per week,” she said. Those must have been 42 quality miles each week as her 3:08:24 was an impressive time. For the winner of the women’s half, Kelly Handel-Williamson, coming in at 1:23:03, the challenge was more mental that physical. The primary focus of her training has been cycling as she prepares herself for a summer of triathlons. She said, “I was worried about my strength as I only do three or four runs a week in training. At the 4-mile mark I started to feel like I had dead legs, but I managed to loosen up as the race went on.” Also joining Earney on the awards stand was Sarah Jarvis of Elsah, IL, who crossed the line in a time of 1:25:59 for 2nd. Amy Broadhurst from Peculiar, rounded out the top three as she finished in 1:26:43. One of the factors that may have helped her was—surprisingly— the rain. “Perfect weather for a half!” she exclaimed. “Light rain and 60 degrees, I couldn’t have asked for better racing conditions.” ▲

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COFFEE WITH THE COACH

Aerobic Deficiency By Mike Arenberg In a unique a group of renowned distance minds got together for dinner in Alamosa, CO in 1997 and discussed, among many topics, the current state of American distance running. Sitting at the table were Dr. Yilma Berta, Ethiopian national distance coach; Dr. Joe I. Vigil, one of Americas finest distance coaches; and Joe Newton, coach of one of the most successful high school distance running programs in the country. The fourth member at the table was a young, quiet, taking-it-all-in distance coach in the making—yours truly. When I got home from the dinner, I sat down all excited about what I had heard that night. It was the most amazing evening for a young coach to be a part of. Recently, I came across the notes from that evening while searching through folders of information I thought I had lost. During the discussion, many factors were given for the poor state of American distance running on the international level—some social, some psychological and some physiological. It was agreed by all that too many American distance coaches and periodicals were preoccupied with speed work. The term “aerobic deficiency syndrome” had been used to describe the issue. I still see this today at all levels of competition and training. I see 4–5 hour marathoners talking about speed work. I see triathlete’s who run train maybe 4–5 days per week dedicating two of them to speed work. There is a time and place for adding some more intensive training sessions, but what I see as the biggest mistake is not allowing or planning enough time to fully develop the aerobic system. The physiological importance is this: Aerobic energy production is the exclusive responsibility of the mitochondria. Muscle biopsy studies have shown that there are two major changes associated with mitochondrial energy production following a long cycle of endurance training: an increase in the number and the size of the mitochondria. Research has shown a progressive weekly increase of approximately 5% in the number of muscle mitochondria over a 27week (6½ months) period of endurance training. At the same time the average size of the mitochondria increased. These steady but gradual changes in mitochondria are mirrored by other changes in muscle structure and function that together indicate that the structural improvements associated with endurance training may take months and perhaps years to fully develop. Bottom line: It takes time, and you have to dedicate a considerable period to fully develop your aerobic fitness level. Periodization is a term often heard and read about when talking about training. Simply put, it’s way of planning that allows one to focus on specific components. Periodization is an intelligent and organized plan of training over a period of time. It has two purposes: 1) allow athletes to reach their potential and 2) guarantee that peak performance is achieved at the right time. Periodization is not only for competitive athletes. Individuals who are in training for fitness can also benefit by employing the training factors of intensity, frequency and duration in the correct amounts at the correct times.

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So triathletes and runners hoping to improve their performance should think about dedicating a specific cycle to the development of their aerobic physiology, or what is commonly called base training. At the high school and collegiate level, runners preparing for the fall cross-country season commit their entire summer to base training. Coach Newton’s York High School is one of the most successful high school cross country programs in the United States with eight state titles. It’ is no surprise that they run more miles in the summer than any other team. They create a strong base to build on for their fall season. At the college level, coach Vigil’s Adams state team won 16 NCAA Division II cross country titles. Their summer program is based on building a strong aerobic base. Both of these successful programs have a period of training 3 months long that focuses solely on building aerobic fitness. It’s the speed work following a good base that builds personal bests and it’s how championships are won. Many experts agree that you only need 6-8 weeks intensive (faster) training on top of a solid endurance base to reach your peak. Author Tim Noakes cites many authorities for this finding, including some well-known marathoners (such as Derek Clayton and Ron Hill) and coaches (e.g., Lydiard, Martin and Coe, Daniels, Vigil and, of course, Noakes himself ). There are also scientific studies that demonstrate dramatic large improvements in performance are achieved dramatically by adding as few as six to eight sessions of high-intensity interval training over as little as 3–4 weeks. The famous New Zealand coach Arthur Lydiard was the first to recognize this and said, “You will gain more by increasing duration rather than intensity.” One of his athletes, Peter Snell, is a great example of this laying down a good base with a long period of aerobic training. Snell completed what Lydiard called a cycle of “standard marathon preparation,” then did 2 ½ weeks of speed work and ran a mile in 4:01. After 5 more weeks of speed work he ran a world record for the mile (3:54.4) and 800 (1:44.3). Lydiard was correct when he claimed that although most or all of the 800m runners Snell whipped to win the 1960 Olympic title were faster than he, he was the only one trained to be capable of a respectable marathon performance. His deep aerobic preparation allowed him to maintain his “inferior” basic speed for much longer than his competitors. He spent many months each year developing his endurance, and only weeks developing his speed! I see it so many times with new athletes. They come to me looking to improve, looking for that elusive personal best, as well as looking for that magic workout, or workouts that will help them reach the top of their personal mountain. The truth is: In the majority of cases it’s not a workout, or group of workouts, but simply running a few more miles for a longer period of time (building that aerobic base). Whether it’s elite athletes training to compete at the international level, or an age grouper competing against themselves trying to achieve a personal bests, spending a little more time building a strong aerobic base may be where your focus should be, and where your next PR will come from. ▲

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By Kristen Murphy St. Charles—On Sunday, Sept. 19, participants in the 8th Annual Lewis & Clark Marathon will explore territory on both sides of the Missouri River. The event, hosted by Fleet Feet Sports, includes a marathon and half marathon. Both race courses start at Riverport’s Verizon Wireless Amphitheater, cross over the Missouri River via the Discovery Bridge, and finish at the historic Lewis & Clark campsite in St. Charles’ Frontier Park. Those running or walking the full marathon will leave the roads at the halfway mark and complete their journey on the Katy Trail, a converted railway that runs along the Missouri River’s bank. In 2009, the race directors are focusing on making the event easier for the predicted 5,000 participants. First, the event start has been moved back by 30 minutes (to 7:15 a.m.) and the start area has been completely redesigned so that the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater team can efficiently manage parking using the same plan used for soldout concerts. Second, packet pickup will be offered throughout St. Louis at the Fleet Feet Sports stores in Chesterfield, Fenton and St. Charles. A “mail my packet” option has been added, as well. In a nod to last year’s untimely arrival of Hurricane Ike, which caused the race to be shortened to 10 miles, the race directors are offering “Hurricane Insurance” for the 2009 event. If a National Weather Service—named storm results in a shortening or cancellation of the race, all participants will receive a full refund. Fleet Feet Sports and the Lewis & Clark Marathon and Half Marathon are proud supporters of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the St. Charles Humane Society. Both organizations will receive a portion of the event’s proceeds. Fleet Feet sports opened in St. Louis in 1993. Retail stores in Chesterfield, St. Charles and Fenton specialize in providing runners, walkers and multisport athletes in the St. Louis area with shoes, apparel and accessories that meet their specific needs. Their event management division is involved in more than 50 running and walking events each year. ▲

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Q&A with Dave Denny By Shawn Love

Dave Denny is an accomplished track & field coach, with more more than 32 years of coaching experience. His former athletes have been American, record holders, and most recently Olympic Finalist. Dave is currently retired, and living in the Kansas City area. MO Runner: In 2007 you retired after coming off a state championship in cross country at Lee’s Summit West. Did you find it difficult to step away, or was this great timing for you? Dave Denny: My intention was to retire from teaching only, but that was not an option. In Lee’s Summit, if you retire from teaching then you cannot be a head coach. I thought that the big upset (winning girls State when we were not expected to) was a good time to step away. Establishing a very successful program at Lee’s Summit West in such a short time [4 years] was very rewarding. I felt like both the track & field program and the cross country programs were in excellent shape and someone else could enjoy some success, also. Nevertheless, I have found it very difficult to “walk away” from distance coaching; the relationships with the young athletes were so rewarding and I miss that. My passion had always been to develop young distance runners since the early 70s and I had so much fun being in control of my own program for 32 years. I was so blessed to go through a great program at Raytown South [3 years in cross country, 1st, 2nd and 3rd place teams] being coached by one of the greatest coaches in MO history, Bob Craddock. Then going through the program at CMSU when Jim Pilkington and Bob Busby really took the program to a high level. Even though I was not a real talented distance runner, I had a good work ethic and got to observe athletes like Ron Tabb, Rick Clear, Charlie Gray, Ed Crumm, Mark Curp, my brother Gary and many others as they became very successful in our sport. For my coaching development I always seemed to be in the right place at the right time, so I feel very fortunate! What have you been doing since that retirement? I substitute teach 2–3 days per week and helped a friend, Bruce DuFresne, coach cross country at Shawnee Mission South last fall. Right now I am keeping my options open and would consider getting back into a full- time distance coaching job if the right one came along. My wife has 3 more years before she can retire, so I will be in the KC area until then. You’ve coached many notable athletes in your 32 years. I’d like to touch on just three of those athletes: Joe Falcon, Matt Tegenkamp, and Amy Wiseman. Joe turned out to be a phenomenal talent. What was the first time you said to yourself, “This guy is going to be something special”? All three of those athletes were a “dream” to work with. Great talent, great work ethic, and super people, and it was fun to motivate them to reach the next level. In the early 80s when I was 27 I began working with Joe and I was very soon aware that he was a special athlete. We had a 9:38 3200 runner, Jonathan Vest, who had worked his whole career at Belton to develop his talent and was a super young man to work with. He broke the school record and even the conference record. Well, Joe came along when Jonathan was a senior and it almost was not even fair that after all that Jonathan had gone through, that Joe was an instant success. Joe initially did not like the

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longer distances (5K and 2 mile), but when Al Klein, the very successful coach at Ray-Pec had a 1-hour run on the Ray-Pec track and Joe had very little problem staying with Jonathan as they ran about 10 miles, it did not take long to figure out that he had some special abilities. In a few months he was 7th at the state cross country meet. Joe did not run cross country as a freshman and then played tennis [varsity letterman] in the spring. His mother, Pat, talked him into running cross country to stay in shape for tennis and as they say, “The rest is history.” I prided myself on helping the young athletes, even the less talented ones, to set goals and to work toward those goals. Motivating the young athletes and not letting them get too satisfied was the key. The “Big Three” often got copies of the T&F news top performances in their events. They worked very hard to get on those lists and in my opinion it kept them “grounded.” I think that I am most proud that Joe, Amy, and Matt all were Footlocker (or Kinney’s) Finalists and all three also competed in the World Cross Country Championships as juniors. To have three athletes experience those great competitions as 17–19 year olds was so much fun for them and for me as a coach. I learned so much from coaching Joe when I was still young; I made some mistakes, but always felt that I learned from those mistakes and by his senior year had advanced as a coach. When Amy and Matt came along, I was much more prepared to help them succeed. Did you have a “working” relationship with Coach McDonnell, once Joe left for Arkansas? John McDonnell was a phenomenal coach and was very helpful to me. When I helped Joe decide where to attend college, I did much research on the successful programs and took notice of Coach McDonnell’s outstanding early success with Niall O’Shaughnessy, Frank O’Mara and many other distance runners at Arkansas. I wanted Joe to realize that the next step at the collegiate level is a very, very difficult challenge and that he needed the best coach that he could get to help him along and John in my view was that person. Coach McDonnell kept me very “in touch” with what was going on with Joe and we talked on the phone numerous times. At one time, I think that many people thought that he just recruited a few older Irish, English or Canadian athletes and that is why he was successful. I saw him take the good American high schoolers and turn them into great distance runners. I learned much from Coach McDonnell and because I kept in close communication with Joe, I was able to get his perspective on Coach Mc (Joe had the greatest respect for John) and then heard Coach Mc’s version of how he saw Joe develop. That was very helpful. It was a little bit uncomfortable for me when Joe asked me to coach him after college. John admitted to me later that he had made a mistake getting “in between” Joe and his soon-to-be wife. I think that he regretted doing that. Joe worked with me and of course what high school coach would not enjoy working with a 3:49 miler, but because Joe was in Springfield and I was in the KC area, it was a less than ideal situation. Joe tended to “over-train,” especially in speed work, and really needed his coach to see him every day; I traveled to Springfield often and he came to the KC area, but not often enough. His Achille’s tendon problems prematurely ended his career and that is such a shame because, in my opinion, he would have run near WR times in the 5K if he would have stayed healthy!!!

Continued on page 21

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SPONSORED BY:

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WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING CONDITIONS? @ c`b\ [i`m`e^ iX`e%

WHAT GOES THROUGH YOUR MIND WHEN YOU’RE OUT ON THE TRAILS? @ kip efk kf k_`eb XYflk Xepk_`e^% @ kip kf Y\ gi\j\ek Xe[ \eafp \m\ip jk\g%

WHAT’S THE HARDEST WORKOUT YOU’VE EVER DONE IN CROSS COUNTRY SEASON? @ c`b\ _`cc i\g\Xkj ]fi Zifjj Zflekip% N_\i\m\i @Ëd c`m`e^# @ kip kf Ôe[ k_\ cfe^\jk Xe[ jk\\g\jk _`cc Xifle[% @ ljlXccp [f X +'' d\k\i fi -'' d\k\i _`cc Xe[ ile `k Xk c\Xjk ('Ç() k`d\j% @ kiX`e X c`kkc\ [`]]\i\ek n_\e `k Zfd\j kf _`ccj% @Ëcc ile Xcc flk kf k_\ kfg Xe[ af^ [fne \Xjp% @ [feËk _fc[ Xep$ k_`e^ YXZb fe k_\ nXp lg% @ kip kf ^\k ]Xjk\i Xe[ ]Xjk\i Xj k_\ nfibflk gif^i\jj\j i\^Xi[c\jj f] ]Xk`^l\% ?`ccj Xi\ X ^i\Xk \o\iZ`j\ `e d\ekXc Xe[ g_pj`ZXc kfl^_e\jj% Kf ile k_\d n\cc pfl _Xm\ kf XkkXZb k_\d%

@J 9CFE;<I =8JK<I66

WHAT MOMENT STANDS OUT FROM YOUR HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS CAREER? @ i\d\dY\i iXZ`e^ Xk Jleb\e D\X[fn JkXk\ GXib `e E\n Pfib% K_\i\ nXj X m\ip cfe^# jk\\g _`cc _Xc]nXp k_ifl^_ k_\ iXZ\ ZXcc\[ ZXi[`XZ _`cc% @ i\d\dY\i XcnXpj ^\kk`e^ kf k_\ _`cc n`k_ jfd\fe\ iXZ`e^ n`k_ d\ jk\g ]fi jk\g% @ lj\[ kf dXb\ X gf`ek kf _Xdd\i lg k_\ _`cc Xcc flk kf Yi\Xb n_f\m\i nXj n`k_ d\% @ i\d\dY\i ^\kk`e^ kf k_\ kfg f] k_Xk _`cc Zfdgc\k\cp \o_Xljk\[ Xe[ ]\\c`e^ c`b\ @ j_flc[ jkfg% Jfd\_fn @ nflc[ d\ekXccp glj_ k_ifl^_ k_\ ]Xk`^l\ Xe[ _Xdd\i k_\ [fne_`cc Xk k_\ kfg \m\e _Xi[\i Xj `] k_\ Ôe`j_ c`e\ n\i\ i`^_k Xk k_\ Yfkkfd% K_Xk `j _fn @ nfe k_\ Zfe]\i\eZ\ Xe[ i\^`feXc Zifjj Zflekip Z_Xdg`fej_`g k`kc\j k_\i\%

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PRE-RACE MEAL? @ c`b\ kf \Xk X e`Z\ jk\Xb Y\]fi\ dp iXZ\j% @ ljlXccp _`k FlkYXZb Jk\Xb_flj\ k_\ e`^_k Y\]fi\ Xe[ ^\k X e`Z\ jk\Xb n`k_ X j`[\ f] dXj_\[ gfkXkf\j%

WHAT’S THE MOST RANDOM THING YOU’VE EVER DONE? KXb`e^ k_\ c\X[ `e k_\ Fcpdg`Z jk\\gc\Z_Xj\ ÔeXc k_`j jldd\i% K_\i\ n\i\ fecp * fi + cXgj kf ^f Xe[ @ Zflc[ ]\\c dp c\^j [p`e^ Xci\X[p% @ _X[ kf \`k_\i jkXik jcfn`e^ [fne fi dXb\ jfd\k_`e^ _Xgg\e% Jf @ jli^\[ kf k_\ ]ifek# _Xdd\i\[ k_\ gXZ\ Xe[ ki`\[ kf n`cc dpj\c] `ekf X n`e% @ jlggfj\ `k nXj X ZXi[`XZ _`cc dfd\ek% DXpY\ efk jf iXe[fd X]k\i Xcc%

WHAT QUESTION HAVE WE NEGLECTED TO ASK? Jfd\k`d\j pfl _Xm\ kf k\jk pfli c`d`kj% <`k_\i Ôe`j_ `e k_\ gXZb fi ^f ]fi k_\ n`e% @] pfl ^f ]fi k_\ n`e Xe[ ]Xcc j_fik pfl Xk c\Xjk befn n_\i\ pfli c`d`kj Xi\% K_\e pfl ZXe jkXik nfib`e^ fe glj_`e^ k_fj\ c`d`kj% @k _Xj kXb\e d\ (, p\Xij f] glj_`e^ kf ^\k kf n_\i\ @ Xd efn%

>LKK@E> FLK K?< (,B E8K@FE8C :?8DG@FEJ?@G M@:KFIP

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s

ummer training is the key to success, not only in cross country next fall, but also your spring track season. The keys are to build yourself up, both physically and mentally. We at AT&F met with the folks at Saucony to help promote this program. Here’s what we’re going to do: We’ll provide you with 12 weeks of summer and fall training, taking you through the first month of your season in this training program. We’ll also provide you with fine-tuning suggestions each and every week on www.atf-athlete.com, starting the week of June 28, 2009. We’re publishing this piece in American Track & Field, Athletes Only and California Track & Running News. After your track season, you need to take a couple weeks’ break. The break can be a complete departure from running and your regular schedule. If you want to run, then no more than four runs a week of about 40 minutes. Your body and spirit need a break. Pick some books you want to read this summer. Pick the movies you’ve not yet seen. Do some summer vegging. Remember, your summer training program is to build you up and prepare your body and spirit to handle the hard racing and training that come in the fall. This can only happen if you allow your body to rest, and find outlets from the training regimen.

Before you begin your training ... 1. Make sure you have two pair of good training shoes. We suggest that most training shoes can last about 12–16 weeks with your level of training. Take your time when you go to your local running store to purchase training shoes and remember to go at the end of the day (your feet swell during the day). Bring a clean pair of socks and be prepared to check five to seven pair of shoes to find the right shoe for you. Also check socks, shorts and tops (although you probably have enough t-shirts to keep you going for months!). 2. Make sure you’re hydrating yourself. Eight to 10 glasses of water a day plus sports drinks and juice are a good start. Drink coffee, tea and carbonated soda sparingly. 3. You have to fuel the engine. To do that, you have to get the proper amount and proper types of food into your system. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, pasta, modest amounts of fish, chicken and beef make sense. For snacks, try an apple and peanut butter. Nuts are good, pizza, tacos and the trip to fast food places are fine, as long as you’re not doing it every day! 4. Sleep—yes, sleep is important. I know that at 17 or 18 you can text all night or check out the newest game on Xbox, but it’ll affect your training. Get 8–10 hours of sleep and, if you can, try a nap (yes) a few afternoons. 5. Get your training group down. Some people like to train by themselves, but find help with the hard days or long days. Find what works for you and your training style. 6. Inspiration. Find some good books (Once a Runner, The Irishmen Who Ran for Britain, The Lonely Breed, A Cold, Clear Day, Self-made Olympian) that can inspire you. Find music that inspires you (Outkast, Disturbed, Hurt, Counting Crows, Led Zeppelin, ACDC). 7. Goals. Do you want to make the top 7? Do you want to improve your times at your league and section meets? Do you want to race better over the second half of the course? Think about these things now, write them on a postcard and prop them in your room where you can read them each day.

Week 1: Summer training begins ... Goals: In this week, we’ll get you on the road to a good summer of training. We’ll run a long run, a tempo run and some moderately paced runs each week. Don’t worry about pace the first 2 weeks, just get out there, have some fun and get in the habit. Workouts always start with warmup— some gentle stretching of the major muscle groups, light jogging. Do the same for cooldown. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 35–40 minutes’ easy running, warm up, cool down. Tuesday: 1 mile warmup, tempo run, 1 mile cooldown. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5 kilometer. So if you can run 19 minutes for 5K now, that means a 6:10 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:40 per-mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 2 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. Saturday: Off, walk, bike, see a movie. Sunday: Long, easy run, 45 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt. One thought. Make sure that you run on a variety of surfaces—dirt, grassy fields, sand, road, track. It’s good for the feet, and lets you use your feet in a healthy manner.

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CROSSING THE LINE WITH MAGDA DX^[Xc\eX C\np$9flc\k# )''/ L%J% Fcpdg`Z dXiXk_fe\i# `j k_\ )''0 LJ8 ?Xc] DXiXk_fe :_Xdg`fe% DX^[X _Xj X dXjk\iËj [\^i\\ `e \o\iZ`j\ g_pj`fcf^p ]ifd :Xc JkXk\ ?XpnXi[ n_\i\ j_\ nXj Xcjf X kiXZb  Ô\c[ 8cc$8d\i`ZXe% J_\ `j efn X ZfXZ_ ]fi :XcËj Zifjj Zflekip gif^iXd%

HOW DID YOU END UP BECOMING A RUNNER? 8 ]i`\e[ f] d`e\ `e _`^_ jZ_ffc Zfem`eZ\[ d\ kf Zfd\ flk ]fi k_\ Zifjj Zflekip k\Xd% @ nXj X jn`dd\i Xe[ e\\[\[ jfd\k_`e^ kf [f `e k_\ f]] j\Xjfe# Xe[ @ _X[ X ^i\Xk k`d\ [f`e^ `k% @ Xcjf ]fle[ flk k_Xk @ nXj dlZ_ Y\kk\i `e ile$ e`e^ k_Xe @ nXj `e jn`dd`e^# jf @ jklZb n`k_ `k%

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT RUNNING? K_\ gcXZ\j @ ^\k kf j\\% Efk aljk k_\ jgfkj Xcc fm\i k_\ nfic[ k_Xk Zfdg\k`k`fej kXb\ d\ kf# Ylk k_\ kiX`cj @ ^\k kf ile fe \m\ip n\\b% @ Xcjf Ôe[ k_\ k`d\ jg\ek ilee`e^ n`k_ dp ]i`\e[j fi k\XddXk\j gi`Z\c\jj%

DO YOU CROSS-TRAIN AT ALL? P\j# @ jk`cc jn`d jfd\% @ c`]k n\`^_kj Xe[ [f X cfk f] Zfi\ jki\e^k_\e`e^%

WHAT’S THE HARDEST WORKOUT YOU’VE EVER DONE? 9\]fi\ k_\ Fcpdg`Z ki`Xcj `e )''+# @ [`[ X nfibflk k_Xk `emfcm\[ (, d`c\j nfik_ f] k_i\j_fc[ gXZ\ ilee`e^ Xk k_\ k`d\ XYflk ,1). gXZ\ n`k_ ( d`elk\ i\jk ]fi \XZ_ k_i\j_fc[ d`c\# `e Yflkj f] ,# +# *# )# Xe[ ( d`c\ \XZ_%

BEST EXPERIENCE OF YOUR RUNNING CAREER SO FAR? <Xj`cp Ôe`j_`e^ )e[ Xk k_\ )''/ Fcpdg`Z dXiXk_fe ki`Xcj%

WHAT’S THE HARDEST CHALLENGE YOU SEE AS A COACH FOR HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE RUNNERS? Jfd\k`d\j Xk_c\k\j [feËk _Xm\ k_\ jXd\ [\j`i\ kf jlZ$ Z\\[ k_Xk pfl _Xm\ ]fi k_\d kf jlZZ\\[% K_\pËi\ g\i]\Zkcp _Xggp Y\`e^ d\[`fZi\ fi [\Z\ek n_\e pfl befn n`k_ dfi\ [\[`ZXk`fe k_\p Zflc[ Y\ ^i\Xk% @ kip kf Y\ X ^ff[ \oXdgc\ Xe[ kip kf dXb\ k_\d Y\c`\m\ k_\p ZXe XZ_`\m\ X dlZ_ _`^_\i c\m\c# Ylk `e k_\ \e[ k_\ Xk_c\k\ _Xj kf Z_ffj\ `k ]fi _`dj\c] fi _\ij\c]%

WHAT’S THE BEST NUTRITION ADVICE FOR HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES? Jf dXep Xk_c\k\j kiX`e m\ip _Xi[# Ylk ]fi jfd\ i\Xjfe fm\icffb gifg\i elki`k`fe fe X [X`cp YXj`j Xe[ Y\]fi\ `dgfikXek nfibflkj fi iXZ\j# f]k\e glkk`e^ k_\dj\cm\j Xk i`jb ]fi `ealip% Jf# dp X[m`Z\ nflc[ Y\ kf jkXp _p[iXk\[

9<:FD@E> L%J% ?8C=$D8I8K?FE :?8DG

k_ifl^_flk k_\ [Xp# ]l\c lg fe \Xj`cp [`^\jk`Yc\ ZXiYj Y\]fi\ X nfibflk Xe[ i\]l\c n`k_`e *' d`elk\j f] X nfibflk kf i\gcXZ\ k_fj\ ^cpZf^\e jkfi\j%

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PRE-RACE MEAL? G\\kj :f]]\\ Xe[ MXe`ccX >L%

FAVORITE PIG-OUT FOOD? ;Xib Z_fZfcXk\ `Z\ Zi\Xd n`k_ ]i\j_ jkiXnY\ii`\j%

MOST RANDOM THING YOU’VE EVER DONE? FeZ\ X p\Xi dp ^`ic]i`\e[j Xe[ @ [i`m\ kf Pfj\d`k\# _`b\ ?Xc] ;fd\ Xk e`^_k le[\i X ]lcc dffe# nX`k ]fi k_\ jlei`j\# k_\e _`b\ YXZb [fne Xe[ [i`m\ _fd\%

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO WARM UP FOR A RACE? › <Xjp ilee`e^1 8Yflk (, d`elk\j f] af^^`e^ gi\gXi\j pfli dljZc\j ]fi X nfibflk&iXZ\% @] k_\ n\Xk_\i `j nXid# pfl [feËk e\\[ dlZ_ k`d\ kf nXid lg% › ;i`ccj1 _`^_ be\\j# ]Xjk ]\\k › 8Zk`m\ jki\kZ_`e^ › 8 ]\n jki`[\j1 ('' d\k\ij f] c\e^k_ Xk d`c\ gXZ\&\]]fik › D\ekXc gi\gXiXk`fe1 I\d\dY\i k_Xk pfl _Xm\ ef Zfekifc fm\i pfli Zfdg\k`kfij Xe[ n_Xk k_\pËm\ [fe\ kf gi\gXi\# jf ZfeZ\ekiXk\ fe k_\ gfj`k`m\ Xjg\Zkj f] pfli kiX`e`e^# i\cXo Xe[ iXZ\ n_Xk pflËi\ ZXgXYc\ f] XZ_`\m`e^%

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Week 2: Getting the habit started ... Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 40 minutes’ easy running, warm up, cool down. Tuesday: 1 mile warmup, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5 kilometer. So if you can run 19 minutes for 5K now, that means a 6:10 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:40 per-mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 2 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. Saturday: Off, walk, bike, see a movie. Sunday: Long, easy run, 50 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt. Thoughts: You’ll be a little sore this week as your body adjusts. Drink your liquids, sleep, eat well and hang out with your friends.

Week 3: Training gets rolling ... Goals: We’ll begin running 6 days a week and the 7 days a week can begin for juniors, seniors. For college athletes, add a second run 3 times a week of 35–40 minutes of easy running on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 40–45 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cooldown. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for 5K. If you can run 19 minutes for 5K now, that means a 6:10 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:40 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 5 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Easy 30-minute run or a walk. Sunday: Long, easy run, 50–55 minutes on grass or dirt, hang with friends.

Week 4: The training gets tough ... Week 4 you should be running at a better pace than your start and noting that your tempo runs are more fun. You’re getting into a groove. Do the tempo runs and hill runs with teammates, the hard workouts are easier this way. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 40–45 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down. Tuesday: 1 mile warmup, tempo run, 1 mile cooldown. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for 5K. So if you can run 19 minutes for 5K now, that means a 6:10 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:40 per-mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 5 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Find an all-comers meet, and run a 2 mile or 5K. Warm up, run strong and then cool down. Sunday: Long, easy run, 50–55 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 5: Getting on track ... Week 5: We’re getting on track. Make sure you stay focused on the goals. You’re starting to get fit, you run faster, you feel fitter. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150 yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cooldown. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 19 minutes for 5K now, that means a 6:10 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:40 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 5 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Easy 30minute run or a walk. Sunday: Long, easy run, 55–60 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 6: Midway through the summer ... Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150 yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cooldown. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:50 for 5K now, that means a 6:05 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:35 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 5 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jogging back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Easy 30 minutes or find a hilly 4-mile race. Sunday: Long, easy run, 60–65 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

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SAUCONY SHAY XC C`^_kn\`^_k Yi\Xk_XYc\ d\j_ lgg\i _Xj X ^ljj\k\[ kfe^l\ kf b\\g flk ifZbj# dl[ Xe[ [`ik% =\Xkli`e^ X d`[jfc\ ZfejkilZk\[ f] JXlZfepËj dfjk i\jgfej`m\ Zlj_`fe`e^ dXk\i`Xc1 JJC <M8% 8mX`cXYc\ `e jg`b\j fi ÕXkj Xe[ Zfcfij Xj ]Xjk Xj pfl

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SAUCONY SPIKE NIGHTS 2009 >Xk_\i pfli k\XddXk\j Xe[ b`Zb f]] pfli n`ee`e^ j\Xjfe Yp ^f`e^ kf X JXlZfep Jg`b\ E`^_k e\Xi pfl% PflËcc ^\k X gif]\jj`feXc Ôkk`e^# ^`]kj n`k_ Xep JXlZfep gliZ_Xj\ Xe[ X Z_XeZ\ kf n`e Zljkfd`q\[ XggXi\c ]fi pfli \ek`i\ k\Xd =`e[ X JXlZfep Jg`b\ E`^_k e\Xi pfl Yp ^f`e^ kf jXlZfep%Zfd&jg`b\e`^_k

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This is a tough week. Check your shoes and make sure they aren’t too worn down. Now would be a good time to get some racing shoes for the fall and use them for tempo runs.

Week 7: Getting in the groove ... Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150 yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a halfminute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:50 for 5K now, that means a 6:05 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:35 per-mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 7 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Easy 30-minute run or a walk. Sunday: Long easy run, 55–60 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 8: Here comes the cross country season ... High schoolers: You’ll start school within a couple of weeks, college runners have a month to go. Juniors and seniors can handle the 2 or 3 easy morning runs, and college runners, depending on their standards, should be able to handle 3 morning runs a week. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150 yards strideouts, relax, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:30 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 7 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Easy 30-minute run or a walk. Sunday: Long, easy run, 60–65 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 9: Early racing begins ... Your first real race will be a revelation. You should be able to handle the distance, but perhaps your pace will be slower. You’ll recover fast, so you should know that in 3 to 5 races, you’ll be racing fit. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150-yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:30 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 8 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150-yard strideouts, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Saturday: Easy warm up, 5K race for high school, 4 miles for college. Sunday: Long, easy run, 65–70 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 10: Early season ... High school starts quickly with a couple of races a week, so use those early races to get into shape; continue to build speed. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150-yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes. Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18:30 for 5K now, that means a 6:00 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:30 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 8 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10 times 150 yards and cool down. Saturday: Easy 30-minute run, or a race of 5K for high schools, 8K for college. Sunday: Long, easy run, 65–70 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 11: Early season ... Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150 yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warmup, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at halfminute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18 minutes for 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:20 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 8 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. Or, if a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10 times 150 yards and cooldown. Saturday: Easy 30 minute run, or race of 5K for high schools, 8K for college. Sunday: Long, easy run, 65–70 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Week 12: You’ve arrived! By this week, most of you will have raced once or twice, and will be getting into the racing grove. If you’re doing early a.m. runs and need to cut one out, do it. If you’re feeling good but not sure about your leg speed, try this change we’ll suggest for Thursday and do this for the next 3–4 weeks. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 45–50 minutes easy running, warm up, cool down, 8 times 150-yard strideouts, easy on the grass. Tuesday: 1 mile warm up, tempo run, 1 mile cool down. Here’s how the workout goes: Run 20 minutes at a half-minute per mile slower than your present mile pace for a 5K. So if you can run 18 minutes for 5K now, that means a 5:50 pace plus 30 seconds, or a 6:20 per mile pace. Warm up, cool down. Thursday: Warm up, 1 mile, hill repeat, 8 repeats, 200 yards, uphill, 200 yards, jog downhill, 1 mile easy, cool down. At bottom of hill, try 8 times 150 yards, jog back to the start. Keep the strideouts relaxed. If a race happens on Thursday and Saturday, finish up with the 10 times 150 yards and cooldown. Or, if you need some speed work, try the warm up, and 6 times 800 meters in your race pace for mile split at 5K. So if you can run 18 minutes for 5K, your half pace would be 2:45 for 800 meters. Saturday: Easy 30-minute run, or race of 5K for high schools, 8K for college. Sunday: Long, easy run, 65–70 minutes, easy, easy, on grass or dirt with friends.

Anthony Famiglietti is the male runner pictured in our XC Training Piece. Fam, as he’s called, has run the mile in 3:55.71, the steeple in 8:17.34, the 5000 meters in 13:11.93, and the 10,000 in 27:37.74. He is a 2008 Olympian at the steeplechase and a well-respected painter. Fam captures the spirit of the Saucony brand: loyal to the sport, and willing to shake it up, whether he races in cross country, track or on the roads! Magdalena Lewy Boulet finished second last year in the women's Olympic Trials marathon. She races cross country, on the track and on the roads. In 2004, Magdalena took 5th in the women's Olympic trials marathon, missing the team by a small margin. In 2008, Magdalena took the lead from the first mile and led through 22 miles, finishing in 2nd place and making the 2008 team, in 2:30.19, her personal best! In the 10,000 meters, Magdalena took 6th, in her best of 32:45.06. Married to a former miler, and with a son, Magdalena, who was born in Poland, became a U.S. citizen on September 11, 2001. The Shay XC shoe is named in honor of the late Ryan Shay, who ran for Saucony and passed away doing what he loved: racing. It’s the best selling cross country racing shoe in North America. We hope that you like it and use it. Our friends at Saucony sponsored this section to help make you better runners and to show that Saucony is all about loyalty to the sport. Cross country is pure, mud, dirt, hills, and lots of good stories to tell after the races! They ask you to consider its line of running footwear, which can be found at www.saucony.com/Shay XC The ATF presents the Summer 2009 XC Training Program, sponsored by Saucony, which was written, designed and published by Shooting Star Media, Inc., copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Saucony logo, Saucony pages on p. 2, 4, 6, 8 are the sole property of Saucony, Inc. Written by Larry Eder, proofed by Marg Sumner, designed by Alex Larsen. All photos by Photorun.net

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CALENDAR

www.stlouistrackclub.com 314.781.3926 314.781.3726 (24-hour race line) JUNE 13 Boomtown Days Half Marathon/5K 7:00 a.m. Memorial Park, Joplin 417.624.4150

314.544.2930 Splash & Dash: Adult 500m swim/2M run Youth distances vary 9:00 a.m., Cape Girardeau 573.380.3410

St. Elizabeth's Inaugural Royal Run 5K 8:00 a.m., Granite City, IL 618.876.7691

JUNE 15 Racewalker's Club of STL Summer Series 1600m 6:30 p.m., Pattonville HS Maryland Heights 314.838.9486

Freedom Run of the Ozarks 5K/1M 8:00 a.m., Visitors Center of Table Rock Dam, Branson 417.294.4775 June Jamboree 5K Race/Walk 8:00 a.m., New Baden City Park, IL 618.567.8940 Flood Run 2009 7M Run/2.5M Walk 9:00 a.m., Downtown Cedar Rapids, Iowa klammer@cedarrapids.org Run with the Eagles 5K Family Fun Run/Walk 9:00 a.m., Horner Park Lebanon, IL 618.977.2266 JUNE 14 Walking Ramblers Cherokee Antique Row Walk 6M 8:00 a.m., Arsenal & 7th

JUNE 16 Chesterfield JCC Track & Field Summer Series 200 Dash/800 Relay 6:00 p.m., Marquette HS 314.442.3498 SLTC Track Series 200m/100m 6:30 p.m. Clayton HS Track, Clayton 314.781.3926 JUNE 17 SLTC Pace Series 2M 6:00 p.m. Visitor’s Center, Forest Park 314.781.3926 JUNE 20 Green Mountain Relay 200M Team Relay Race 6:30 a.m., Jeffersonville to Bennington, VT

SLTC & PAL “The Hero’s Run” 5K & 1/2M 8:00 a.m. Upper Muny Lot, Forest Park 314.781.3926 Sesser 5K Fun Run & Walk 8:00 a.m., Sesser, IL 618.218.9145 Sandoval Sesquicentennial 5K/1K Kids Fun Run 8:00 a.m., Sandoval, IL 618.532.3639 Crusader 5K 8:30 a.m., Althoff Catholic High School, Belleville, IL 618.235.1124 JUNE 22 Racewalker's Club of STL Summer Series 5K 6:30 p.m., Pattonville HS Maryland Heights 314.838.9486 JUNE 23 SLTC Track Series 400m 6:30 p.m., Clayton HS Track Clayton 314.781.3926 JUNE 24 SLTC Pace Series 5K 6:00 p.m. Visitor’s Center, Forest Park 314.781.3926 JUNE 27 Firecracker Run 5K/1M Run/Walk 8:00 a.m., Central High School, Park Hills 573.431.1051

Dave Denny Continued from page 12 What’s your best Joe Falcon story? First of all, I think that many of the Joe Falcon stories are very exaggerated because Joe came across very confident, some people took him the wrong way! Here are a couple from his early Arkansas years: Two stories: the first one from John McDonnell. When Joe got to college as a freshman, John could see that Joe had come very prepared with a great summer of training. Joe did not plan on going to college and just being an average college runner! When he got on campus he immediately started working out with the talented, older athletes on the University of Arkansas team and tried to “hammer” the workout everyday right up in the front with whoever was leading the workout. What Joe did not realize is that everyday it was a different athlete, like Paul Donovan, David Swain, Randy Reina, etc. He practically ran himself into exhaustion and injury, but John put a stop to it pretty quickly. When John called an athlete into his office www.morunandtri.com

St. Clair Freedom Fest 5K/1M Run & Walk 8:30 a.m., Orchard Park St. Clair, 636.629.1889 Walk to Defeat ALS 5K/1M 10:00 a.m. Visitor's Center, Forest Park 314.432.7257 JUNE 28 Walking Ramblers Forest Park to Clayton 16-17M Round-trip 7:00 a.m. Forest Park Visitors Center 314-727-4441 Ballwin Days 5K/1M/1Mile Youth 8:00 a.m., Vlasis Park Ballwin, 636.207.2388 JUNE 29 Racewalker's Club of STL Summer Series 3200m 6:30 p.m., Pattonville HS Maryland Heights 314.838.9486 JUNE 30 Chesterfield JCC Track & Field Summer Series 400 Dash/1600 Relay 6:00 p.m., Marquette HS 314.442.3498 JULY 1 SLTC Pace Series 2.5M 6:00 p.m. Visitor’s Center, Forest Park 314.781.3926 JULY 2 SLTC Open Board Meeting 7:00 p.m. Clayton Community Center 314.781.3926

JULY 3 Comcast Firecracker 5K for St. Jude 7:00 p.m., Memphis, TN 901.765.4409 JULY 4 Mascoutah Meltdown for the JDRF 5K 8:00 a.m., Scheve Park Mascoutah, IL 618.977.0073 Macklind Avenue Mile 9:00 a.m. Big River Running Company St. Louis 314.832.2400 JULY 6 Racewalker's Club of STL Summer Series 1500m 6:30 p.m., Pattonville HS Maryland Heights 314.838.9486 JULY 8 SLTC Pace Series 2M 6:00 p.m. Visitor’s Center, Forest Park 314.781.3926 JULY 11 Walking Ramblers Babler Walk 10M 7:30 a.m. 800 Guy Park Drive Wildwood, 314.576.4137 Hofbraufest 5K & 1/2M Kids Fun Run 8:00 a.m., Hoyleton Park Hoyleton, IL, 618.493.6088 Jefferson County Moonlight 10K 10:00 p.m., Crystal City Park Crystal City 636.797.5334

for a little individual meeting, he did not “beat around the bush”; he told Joe that even the Olympic champions could not go out and run like that everyday and stay healthy and be worth anything at the end of the season. John was very good at recognizing when an athlete was tired, sick, etc. and would take them out of the workout, if necessary. The second one is soon after the first: Joe wins his first collegiate meet in Oklahoma and was pretty pumped up and when he went to Oklahoma State for his second meet, Joe told me that he would have won it also, but one of his own teammates ran him into a tree. I always assumed that if he actually did get forced into a tree that it was an accident, but nevertheless, it was a great story because there probably was some times where the older European athletes tried to put the young American athlete into his proper place! Joe ended up making All American as a true freshman (24th place) and it was John’s first cross country national title! John told me afterward that he screamed at Joe with about 1,000 meters to go that they needed him to pass 15 people to win the national title and that he did indeed pass at least 15 to ensure that they won (he was 5th man).▲

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ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE RUN A Festival and Competitive Race

heads stretched for miles, as far as the eye could see. The finish line was several blocks down Market from the start line, but by the time the last of the runners going out had crossed it, the first of the competitive runners was just a few minutes away from finishing. The St. Patrick’s Day Parade Run isn’t just a race for weekend warriors and people who want to party. Lyons, who won last year, says it brings out some of the best runners in St. Louis. “As a St. Louis runner it’s one of the must-do races.” This year’s field did not disappoint. Ben Rosario edged out Zac Freudenburg to take first place by just one second, finishing in 24:11 and averaging just under a 5-minute mile. He says the St. Paddy’s day race is always competitive, but the crowd really pumped him up, “It’s just a fun day

By Drew Langenberg

Cold, clear and crisp best describe this near-perfect morning for a race and the weather contributed to keeping the beer at the finish at the perfect temperature. This year’s Saint Patrick’s Day Parade Run turned out to be as unique in spirit as the thousands who ran it. I arrived early, a little before 6, expecting to find a large crowd of dedicated runners warming up. But as I walked onto Market Street, I found cold, empty pavement and workers turning the street lights out of the way for the parade later in the day. Fortunately, that didn’t last long. As the crowd grew, the streets slowly turned green, covered in green paint, people wearing festive green shirts, wigs and costumes. Many of the runners claimed they were in it for speed, but the green skirts, wigs and shopping carts full of beer gave away why many were really there. The streets were lined with spectators waiting for the race and the parade which followed with barbecue pits and, of course, green beer. Many spectators left no doubt to what they were celebrating by decorating the street, parking meters and trees with banners, signs and even an occasional leprechaun statue. Brian Lyons, who has run several St. Paddy’s day races, says it and the festival have become a tradition for many inside and outside the running community. “There are some people who go down early every year to stake out their spot,” he said. When organizers unleashed the crowd of costumed runners, the sea of Ben Rosario edges out Zac Freudenburg to take 1st place by one second

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Everything we do is geared towards helping you love RUNNING more.

Visit your local retailer: BIG RIVER RUNNING CO. Manchester MO 636.527.8850

and I’m a guy who really runs well on emotion,” Rosario said. The first female runner, Francine Nzilampa came in just 4 minutes later with a time of 28:36. Nzilampa, from France and the Congo, is in St. Louis to study at Lindenwood University. The competitive runners make lots of headlines and accomplish unbelievable speeds during the race. They achieve on a regular basis what many of us can only dream of. But what seems to set this race apart is the atmosphere and the mixing of highly trained athletes with everyday Joes and Janes who may only ever run this race and never officially train for it. Rosario says it’s a big part of what makes the run fun: “It’s 9,000 people doing the same thing at different speeds, and they’re all having a blast.” The finish line at this race has something else that sets it apart: a lot of free beer. Table

after table of ice-cold, fresh-from-the-tap brew were set up and waiting for thirsty runners. Some took their own beer out on the course. But for those who didn’t have a shopping cart or big pockets, refreshments were provided at the end. This is where everybody really loosened up and the celebration began. Runners who were already excited at the beginning reached the finish and celebrated the beautiful day, Saint Patrick and the run they had just completed. It was an atmosphere of camaraderie and fun. Most say this is a race they run every year and will continue to run or walk as long as they can make it across the finish line. Rosario calls the St. Paddy’s day run a staple of the St. Louis Running Community and sums up well the sentiments of nearly everyone I encountered that day: “As long as I’m in St. Louis, I’ll be a big part of it.”▲

FLEET FEET SPORTS Fenton MO 636.343.6300 FLEET FEET SPORTS St. Charles MO 636.939.0161 FLEET FEET SPORTS Chesterfield MO 636.532.0522 GARRY GRIBBLE’S RUNNING Kansas City MO 816.363.4800 GARRY GRIBBLE’S RUNNING Independence MO 816.373.1100 GHISALLO RUNNING St. Louis MO 314.727.4786 RIDGE RUNNER SPORTS Springfield MO 417.882.5590 RUNNING CENTER OF SAINT LOUIS Rock Hill MO 314.961.2647 RUNNING START Shiloh IL 618.628.9898 TRYATHLETICS INC Columbia MO 573.447.2453

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Christian Cantwell Shows No Sign of Slowing Down By Elliott Denman Christian Cantwell’s eyes light up and his smile grows a mile wide every time the names of Andy Oaker, Chris Rohr and Pat Fitzgerald work their way into his conversational flow. These three are the bright young throwing lights of the University of Missouri men’s track & field program and Olympian Cantwell, as a volunteer assistant coach of the Tigers’ throwing corps, who helps the young throwers whenever his own hectic schedule allows, delights in their steady progress. “Andy’s a senior now and he’s really coming on strong in the throws,” enthused Cantwell in a recent interview. “He did 17.50 meters [57 feet, 5 inches] indoors and 17.40 [57-1] outdoors, and he has the ability to reach 20 meters [65-7½]. “Chris is a junior and he’s just inches behind Andy. “And Pat, he’s already improved a mile. He should be right up there with the other guys.” They’re talented performers in the discus and hammer, too. This kind of enthusiasm, of course, works both ways. As Cantwell cheers his young students’ progress into regional

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and national level performances, they can cheer their mentor’s distinguished portfolio of major shot put honors that have been steadily amassing since his freshman year at Mizzou in 2000—and peaked in 2008 with his Gold medal in the World Indoor Championships and his Silver at the Beijing Olympic Games. So it’s clear that Columbia, MO is one heck of a location for both young throwers adding meters and feet to their PRs on a steady basis, and a veteran thrower like Cantwell aiming to reach the highest pinnacles of the sport on a regular basis. Solid coaching is at the heart of it all. As Oaker, Rohr, Fitzgerald and others work under the guidance of Cantwell and the full-time coaches on the Missouri staff, it’s those full-timers, head coach Rick McGuire and associate head coach and throws director Brett Halter, who continue to work with Cantwell. Call it a win-win for all concerned. Cantwell didn’t win it all in 2008 but he still was America’s most successful male field events athlete at the Beijing Olympic Games. Team USA drew a total medals blank in the four jumping events and Cantwell’s Silver in the shot represented the lone medal of any

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hue by an American male thrower. But it still wasn’t a complete success because America’s threesome of Adam Nelson, Reese Hoffa and Cantwell swooped into Beijing as top candidates to sweep all the shot put medals. It just didn’t happen—after Nelson wound up injured and failed to qualify for the last three throws of the medal round, and Hoffa slumped to a subpar 7th place. Actually, Cantwell was fortunate to claim his Silver medal, since he was injured, too. It didn’t come out at the time but Cantwell was throwing in Beijing with an aching right elbow. And it’s all six-month-old Jackson Daniel Cantwell’s fault. Or sort of. “I was handling Jackson one day when I felt my arm all bent, and then I felt it [the right elbow] all aching,” said Cantwell. “Don’t get me wrong. When Jackson arrived [to Cantwell and wife Terri, herself a former U.S. Olympic shot putter] in late May 2008, it was a wonderful and life-changing experience. “It [the injury] just happened and I can’t tell you why. It was what it was, and I never complained.” The men’s shot put final was the featured event on the first day of track & field action at the Bird’s Nest Stadium. And that posed a big, big problem because the throwers had to battle it out through a morningsession qualifying round, before grabbing some quick rest and returning to the stadium hours later. Missouri coach Halter—who calls Cantwell “a high performance model of what a great thrower should be”—was already incensed at this kind of scheduling, long before he got to China. “You’ll note that the shot’s the only event in major athletics championships to do that,” he groused. “I have no idea why some of the biggest human beings on the planet get the least rest. “By the time you process out of the stadium [following the morning prelims], and go back to the Village, you barely have enough time to take a nap, change your clothes, and maybe get something to eat, and then you’re back doing it for the PM [12-man finals] session. “Then [for the finals] you don’t know what the officials are going to do, or TV. “To have the ability to just walk into the ring, mentally prepared with zero warm-up, and deliver a huge throw, that’s an advantage.” But few can manage it. As Halter knows it so well, “The shot is an event that requires an incredible balance of body and mind.” It was Tomasz Majewski of Poland who

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got a big one out there early—and held on for the biggest win of his life. Majewski muscled it a career-best 21.51 meters/70-7, to take the Gold. Cantwell rallied for the Silver with his sixth-round 21.09/69-9½, a long way from his PR of 22.54/73-1½, dating back to 2004. Back in 2004 at Athens, Majewski couldn’t even muscle his way out of the morning qualifying round of the Games— and now he was King Olympus. The elbow injury wrecked Cantwell’s timing and balance, and eventually stole away his Gold medal visions. “My technique was just a hair off, and that was enough to ruin me,” said Cantwell. “I had my problems. The shot kind of slipped off my little finger. It left my hand like a knuckleball. So that was the situation and I had to accept it.” He did get some world-class revenge after the Games, touring the World Athletics circuit, and beating Majewski three times out of four. But he didn’t win “the big one,” a fact likely to be never forgiven. “Tomasz and I are good friends,” said Cantwell. “In a sense, I was kind of happy for all the joy he must have been feeling. He’s a good guy. He totally deserved the Gold medal. It was his day, not mine.” Never one to dwell on the might-havebeens, Cantwell went right back into all-out training and is already talking about his

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future book. “I definitely want to be around until 2012 [the London Olympic Games] and maybe even 2016 [site still to be determined],” he said. “I’ll still be young enough [31 for 2012; 35 for 2016.].” “I know Tomasz (Majewski) will be there. There’d be nothing better than he and I going at it again down the road.” The world shot put record, still held by Texas A&M graduate Randy Barnes at 23.12/75-10¼, has been on the books since 1990. But Barnes himself hasn’t been seen on the global track & field circuit since 1998, the year he was tossed out of the sport for use of androstenedione, an anabolic steroid. All the West Virginian can do now is watch the others, complain about those trying to knock him out of the record book, and mutter curse words under his breath. Even before the Olympic Silver, Cantwell’s dossier was brilliant. He’d won Golds at the 2004 and 2008 Indoor Worlds. He’d won the USA Indoor National title three times and was VISA athlete of the year on three separate occasions. Physically, he’s got it all. But consistency has plagued him and he still needs something extra to turn his luck around. So stay tuned for future chapters of the Christian Cantwell story. USA Olympic fans can hardly wait. ▲

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Win An

USATF Announces 2009 Phidippides Award New award offered for participation in road races USA Track & Field (USATF), the governing body of long distance running in the United States, has announced enhancements to the Phidippides Award program, a participatory recognition award for masters athletes (40+ years). The award was initiated last year in partnership with National Masters News in an effort to provide the “every day” runner with the opportunity to be recognized by USATF. Award winners will now receive an attractive plaque (see photo) engraved with their name and award level (gold, silver, bronze). The awards are free to those earning enough points to qualify. The improvements to the award are made possible through a partnership with Hasty Awards (Ontario, Kan.), the official supplier of medals and awards to USATF.

2009 Junior Olympic Track & Field Schedule Association Championships June 12-13 Missouri Valley Association Champs. June 27-28 Ozark Association Champs.

Overland Park, KS Chesterfield, MO

Region 9 Championships July 10-13 Region 9 Championships

Tulsa, OK

National Championships July 27– Aug 2 National Championships

Greensboro, NC

.

The Phidippides Award recognizes individuals for their participation in road races. “USATF is proud to be able to offer this award to the running community as it is something different. Rather than rewarding someone’s performance we are rewarding athletes for the number of times they cross the finish line in races throughout the country,” states Don Lein, USATF Masters Long Distance Running Chair.

To earn points towards one of the Phidippides Awards a runner must: • be a 2009 USATF member; • 40 years old or older; and • compete in road races that use USATF certified courses.

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In 2 tion form tion You view ligh in-c prov ated web on t

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In 2008, 70 athletes were recognized with Phidippides Awards. This number is expected to increase substantially with the improved award and increased awareness.

Athletes earn points based on their age and the number of races they finish during the 2009 calendar year. For more information on the Phidippides Award visit www.usatf.org/groups/RoadRunning.

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Win With Integrity – Clean Kids Program Announced for 2009 USA Track & Field will continue its youth-focused anti-doping efforts in 2009 by continuing educational outreach efforts and, for the first time, conducting incompetition drug testing at youth championship events. The Win With Integrity – Clean Kids Program is a partnership with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) and is tied to USATF's Win With Integrity youth outreach program. In 2008, USATF worked with USADA to distribute educational materials on drug testing and other anti-doping information to youth athletes at the three USATF youth national championship events. Additionally, athletes in the Youth, Intermediate, and Young divisions were required to view USADA's Doping Control Process video, which highlights the processes and procedures that occur during an in-competition drug test. In 2009, USATF will continue to provide educational materials to the athletes and has created a new Win With Integrity – Clean Kids Program web page specific to enhancing the educational outreach on the anti-doping initiative. “’Clean Kids’ is critical to our mission of eradicating performance enhancing drugs from our sport and positively impacting society as a whole,” said USATF CEO Doug Logan. “If we can help these young athletes understand that using drugs is an unethical choice that is wrong for them, wrong for the sport and wrong for their health, then we have taken one step forward in this fight.” In 2009, drug testing will be conducted at the World Youh Trails and USA Youth Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Ypsilanti, Mich.; USATF National Junior Olympic Track & Field Championships in Greensboro, N.C.; and the USATF National Junior Olympic Cross Country Championships in Reno, Nev. Athletes in the Intermediate and Young divisions will be subject to drug testing which will be conducted by USADA. To learn more about the Win with Integrity – Clean Kids Program visit www.usatf.org/youth

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Club

USATF Club T&F Championships New York, NY ΠJuly 10-11

USATF Club XC Championships Lexington, KY ΠDecember 12

YOUTH

World Youth T&F Trials Ypsilanti, MI ΠJune 30 - July 1

National Junior Olympic TF Champs. Greensboro, NC Œ July 27 –August s

USA Youth T&F Championships Ypsilanti, MI ΠJune 30 - July 5

National Junior Olympic XC Champs. Reno, NV ΠDecember 12

www.usatf.org/calendars

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RACE RESULTS GO! St. Louis Marathon April 19, 2009

2009 SKY JUMPERS POLE VAULTING CAMPS June 14-17 ~ Centerville HS, Dayton, OH June 29 - July 2 ~ UWSP, Stevens Point, WI July 10-11 ~ Salt Lake City, UT July 12-15 ~ Kutztown Univ. Kutztown, PA July 20-23 ~ SJVSC, Atascadero, CA December 27-30 ~ SJVSC, Atascadero, CA February 13-14, 2010 ~ Maine S. HS, Park Ridge, IL Check out our highly acclaimed book: Illustrated History of the Pole Vault at www.skyjumpers.com

Place 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Name State Zach Freudenburg MO Karl Gilpin MO Brian Baillie IL Jonathan Kraas MO Jesse McDaniel MO Chris Herren MO Benjamin Nganga KS Zachary Breitenstein MO Juan Arias MO Ken Moran MO Jeremy Hammer KS John Keyes SD Oscar Martinez IL Josh Harper AZ Megan Earney KS Nathan Rahmeier IL Tim Probst MO Rj Sak MO Micah Grafenstein-Kinzel MN Nelson Perez IL Trent Casto MO

Age Chip Time 30 2:23:57 30 2:27:00 26 2:31:08 34 2:31:22 23 2:33:56 25 2:36:19 31 2:38:46 32 2:42:34 40 2:46:33 39 2:47:44 25 2:49:37 29 2:50:53 40 2:51:12 27 2:51:17 29 2:51:20 28 2:53:48 33 2:54:05 25 2:55:04 36 2:58:19 32 2:58:53 26 2:59:01

MIDWEST Sky Jumpers Pole Vaulting Camp. Maine South High School, Park Ridge, IL. Feb. 13-14, 2010. PV. Coed, ages 12 & up. Jan Johnson, 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero, CA 93422. 888-279-7502. E-mail: jan@skyjumpers.com. www.skyjumpers.com. See ad p. xx.

DIRECTED BY JAN JOHNSON

NATIONAL SAFETY CHAIRMAN FORMER WORLD RECORD HOLDER OLYMPIC BRONZE MEDALIST M.S. BIOMECHANICS

National Pole Vault Certifiation Program On line pole vault education and testing for coaches and athletes

s s s s

.ATIONAL(32ULES 0OLE6AULT%NERGY%QUATION 0OLE6AULT3AFETY "ASIC3KILLSAND0ROGRESSIONS

Pole Vault Safety Certification Board

www.pvscb.com

Sky Jumpers Vertical Sports Club 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero CA 93422 PHONE: 1-888-279-7502 www.skyjumpers.com Email: janjohnson18@charter.net

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Sky Jumpers Pole Vaulting Camp. UWSP, Stevens Point, WI. June 29-July 2. PV. Coed, ages 12 & up. Jan Johnson, 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero, CA 93422. 888-279-7502. E-mail: jan@skyjumpers.com. www. skyjumpers.com. See ad p. xx. Sky Jumpers Pole Vaulting Camp. Centerville HS, Dayton, OH. June 14-17. PV. Coed, ages 12 & up. Jan Johnson, 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero, CA 93422. 888-279-7502. E-mail: jan@skyjumpers.com. www. skyjumpers.com. See ad p. xx.

WEST Sky Jumpers Pole Vaulting Camp. Salt Lake City, UT. July 10-11. PV. Coed, ages 12 & up. Jan Johnson, 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero, CA 93422. 888-279-7502. E-mail: jan@skyjumpers.com. www.skyjumpers.com. See ad p. xx. Sky Jumpers Pole Vaulting Camp. Atascadero, CA. Various sessions: July 20-23, Dec. 27-30. PV. Coed, ages 12 & up. Jan Johnson, 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero, CA 93422. 888-279-7502. E-mail: jan@skyjumpers.com. www.skyjumpers.com. See ad p. xx.

EAST Sky Jumpers Pole Vaulting Camp. Kutztown, PA. June 12-15. PV. Coed, ages 12 & up. Jan Johnson, 6505 Santa Cruz, Atascadero, CA 93422. 888-279-7502. E-mail: jan@ skyjumpers.com. www.skyjumpers.com. See ad p. xx.

JUNE/JULY 2009

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85

Gregory Schrick MO Scott Cichon KS Matt Dirnbeck MO Matthew Ampleman MO Chris Leonard MO Ghee Statham MD Colin Grove WI Brian Todd MO Jeremy Huxol MO Antonio Nebres NY Greg Brown MO Tim Giddens MO Joshua Mullins MO Marco Roveda MO Chris Ryan MO Michael Tognarelli TX Scott Mues MO Erich Gerhardt FL Mark Schiefelbein MO Christopher Anderson MO Ryan Wenos TX David Rhoads MO Timothy Payne IL Bayard Gennert MN Seth Shiver TX Seth Daugherty MO Jackie Pirtle-Hall MO Scott Sexton WI Jared Ehlers MO Steve Pollihan MO Matthew Lehner IL Mairi Burfoot MO Eric Day IL Michael Haft MO Karl King MO George Werner MI Bill Rolfes MO Christopher Williams MO Melinda Hochgesang IL Allen Goans MO John Goble Jr MO Jason Buck MO Mike Santoni MO Zach Boleyn MO Kyle Streeter MO Tom Grehn MO Paul Chicoineau MO Matt Mason TN Stephanie Hill MO Stephen Gitto MO Christian Liddeke KS Michael O'Keefe MO Benjamin Moore MO Silvio Flaim MO Mark Fuchs KS Tiffany Albrecht TX Jonathan Morgan MO Delsin Knowler IA Ben Anderson MO Jacob King MO Matt Nowicki WI Rebecca Jordan AL Nathaniel Stogdill NC Jake Goldsborough MO

34 23 22 21 30 20 38 34 26 37 28 44 20 37 26 37 32 29 30 25 31 21 23 28 33 28 26 45 27 32 22 40 31 22 34 44 33 39 26 38 38 34 40 33 22 43 26 36 25 35 21 35 22 20 44 36 19 38 40 34 32 30 28 26

2:59:07 2:59:38 3:00:03 3:00:45 3:01:30 3:01:38 3:02:13 3:02:49 3:04:26 3:05:02 3:05:20 3:05:21 3:05:40 3:05:51 3:05:59 3:06:04 3:06:18 3:06:58 3:06:59 3:07:13 3:07:56 3:08:04 3:08:04 3:08:12 3:08:13 3:08:16 3:08:24 3:08:44 3:08:52 3:08:57 3:08:59 3:09:04 3:09:16 3:09:29 3:09:32 3:09:33 3:09:54 3:10:44 3:10:50 3:10:51 3:11:21 3:11:46 3:11:54 3:12:10 3:12:12 3:12:25 3:12:26 3:12:47 3:13:01 3:13:30 3:13:49 3:14:13 3:14:26 3:14:41 3:14:46 3:14:53 3:15:13 3:15:37 3:16:08 3:16:10 3:16:46 3:16:54 3:16:56 3:17:28

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On Labor Day Weekend there are lots of things you can celebrate. Just make sure one of them is crossing the finish line. Think about it...a birthday, an anniversary, a family or class reunion, victories and triumphs...the list goes on and on. Really, there couldn’t be a better time for you to bring your celebration to the Disneyland® Resort and combine it with a celebration of running and finishing the Disneyland® Half Marathon! Whatever you’re celebrating, highlight it with an entire weekend of fun and competition! With the summer vacation rush ended, it’s the perfect time to enjoy the Disneyland® Resort! t)BMG.BSBUIPODPVSTFUISPVHIUIFNFQBSLT t"WFSBHFTUBSUUJNFUFNQFSBUVSFTJOUIFT t$PNNFNPSBUJWFDBTUMFëOJTIFSNFEBM t,BOE,JET3BDFTGPSUIFXIPMFGBNJMZ t4QFDJBMIBMGNBSBUIPOWBDBUJPOQBDLBHFT F I N D D E TA I L S A N D R E G I S T E R O N L I N E AT

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© D I S N E Y

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MISSOURI RUNNER AND TRIATHLETE

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RACE RESULTS GO! St. Louis Half Marathon April 19, 2009 Place 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Name Kipruto Rotich Artur Kern Craig Donnelly Mathew Chesang Geoffrey Birgen Tim Bradley Larry Huffman Brian Whitehead Joe Mundt Patrick Fitzgerald Matt Chance Mark Palm Brian Roggeveen Jonathan Huie Austin Schoen Amir Hodzic Sean Mullins Scott Meredith Larry Witte Bobby Williams Kevin Smith Brian Robertson David Przybyla Amin Shazly Chad Silker

State Age Chip Time MO 28 1:07:19 AR 28 1:07:52 NJ 23 1:08:27 KS 27 1:08:29 MO 24 1:10:42 MO 26 1:12:57 IL 26 1:15:04 MO 27 1:15:27 KS 25 1:15:39 CO 34 1:17:40 MO 34 1:17:53 MO 45 1:18:57 MO 34 1:19:46 CO 29 1:20:21 MO 21 1:20:34 MO 28 1:20:59 IN 36 1:21:19 MO 24 1:21:31 CA 44 1:21:36 MO 56 1:21:42 MO 35 1:21:46 IL 23 1:22:05 IN 27 1:22:08 TN 24 1:22:10 MO 29 1:22:12

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55

Kelly Handel Williamson TX Lance Bollinger MO Steve Scott MO Kevin Hammes MO Andrew Kirk MO Larry Spradley CO Keith Robertson MO Chris Givens MO Kevin Walker MO Brandon Schmoele MO Derek Evans MO Jason Lind MO Roger Willis MO David Vonarx MO Jared Driskill CO Austin Gibbons MO Rodney Radcliffe IL Andrew French IL Brian Hammons MO Jeff Harvath MO Delbert Marriott MO Sarah Jarvis IL Todd Loretta MO Louis Stephenson MO Dan Hay MO Chris Willeman MO Derek Burke KS Gerry Cardenas MO Matthew Daugherty MO Amy Broadhurst MO

31 25 24 43 33 32 32 32 22 24 27 40 38 43 35 23 44 28 51 29 40 25 42 48 47 34 23 34 25 24

1:23:03 1:23:04 1:23:15 1:23:35 1:24:02 1:24:21 1:24:42 1:24:43 1:24:51 1:24:59 1:25:00 1:25:08 1:25:11 1:25:19 1:25:23 1:25:30 1:25:31 1:25:34 1:25:39 1:25:43 1:25:49 1:25:59 1:26:03 1:26:11 1:26:15 1:26:24 1:26:26 1:26:32 1:26:40 1:26:43

56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85

Eneko Dorronsoro Duane Malo Casey O'Connor Anthony Kubasta Lauren Shores Jeff Vanderlinden Matt Holmes Kelsey Surbeck Julie Bergfeld Barrett Smith Josh Janisse Scott Linne Matthew Decker Sean Prudence Kevin Levine Cassie Peller Trent Parker Steven Mankofsky Christopher Coon Erica Schoeller Aaron Christiansen Antonio Miranda Katie Sutton David Holland Jason Dement Brandon Janosky George Harrigan Jeff Olsen Randy Bartosh Ryan Huber

MO IL MO MO MO MO IL IL MO MO MO MO DE MO MO IN IL MO IA MO MO IL MO MO MO MO MO MO IL MO

28 37 18 25 23 45 28 19 42 19 19 31 25 26 18 23 20 19 28 25 31 37 29 24 28 28 48 28 51 21

1:26:46 1:26:48 1:26:51 1:27:22 1:27:34 1:27:47 1:27:50 1:27:56 1:27:56 1:28:01 1:28:03 1:28:12 1:28:22 1:28:22 1:28:24 1:28:28 1:28:29 1:29:04 1:29:13 1:29:15 1:29:18 1:29:29 1:29:33 1:29:48 1:29:48 1:29:56 1:30:00 1:30:11 1:30:39 1:31:03

SPORTS MEDICINE RESOURCE GUIDE

Dr. Jennifer McCleary is a nationally board certified Chiropractic Sports Physician and Acupuncturist. Dr. McCleary has worked locally, nationally and internationally with a wide range of sports and enjoys running and extreme hiking herself. Her office offers a conservative approach to treating various sports conditions in individuals of all ages by utilizing chiropractic, acupuncture, nutrition and rehabilitation. She specializes in working with adolescent athletes, pregnant mothers, headaches, and scoliosis cases. Services include:

• Conservative management of overuse syndromes • Chiropractic manipulation for acute or chronic pain • Spinal correction for improved athletic performance • Customized nutritional supplementation • School Sports Physicals • Wellness care plans • Referrals for diagnostic imaging & medical specialist Jennifer L. McCleary, DC, CCSP www.TriadChiropractic.net Creve Couer: (314) 993-2424 Central West End: (314) 534-1566 "Our mission is to promote excellence in the conservative healthcare system through specific and individualized chiropractic care. We continue to strive for this goal through addressing the "Triad of Health" and reaching populations in need."

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www.usatf.org/calendars


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