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Volume 10, Number 1 $2.95

St. Louis Half Marathon

Bass Pro FALL FITNESS FESTIVAL

Laying a Training Foundation for Teenage Runners Photo by ASI Photo

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Fort Atkinson, WI

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Publisher’s Note By Larry Eder

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Year-End Wrap-Up of Shoes 2010 By Cregg Weinmann

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Race-Specific Training for Teenage Distance Runners By Roy Stevenson

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Laying a Training Foundation for Teenage Runners By Roy Stevenson

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Cheese and Sauerkraut By Whitney Dreier

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Bass Pro Fall Fitness Festival

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Philip Laget Wins St. Louis Half Marathon by 2 Seconds By Douglas Wallace

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1 Second to Glory By Katie Landry, USATF

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ASBA Tracks of the Year By Mary Helen Specher

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Thankful for Pie By Whitney Dreier

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Historic Number of Runners Come Out to Trick or Treat By Brian McQueary

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Maximum Nutrition for the Young Track and Field Athlete By Roy Stevenson

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Copyeditor Marg Sumner Red Ink Editorial Services MargSumner@aol.com

Volume 10 Number 1 January-March 2011 Group Editor Christine Johnson christinej.ssm@gmail.com Founding Editor Gina Sokolich ginasok3@charter.net Managing Editor D. M. Strauss morunner@earthlink.net

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Special Projects Adam Johnson Eder atflistings@gmail.com Pre-Press / Printing W. D. Hoard & Sons Company Fort Atkinson, WI

Group Publisher Larry Eder, Shooting Star Media, Inc. P.O. Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538 larry.eder@gmail.com 608.239.3785 Fax: 920.564.7298

Missouri Runner and Triathlete is produced and published by Shooting Star Media, Inc., P.O. Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Publisher assumes no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher.

Advertising Shooting Star Media, Inc. SSMadvert@gmail.com 608.239.3785

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Design Richele Collins RicheleCollins1@verizon.net

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Contributors Larry Eder, Whitney Dreier, Roy Stevenson, Brian McQueary, Douglas Wallace, Cregg Weinmann, ASI Photo, American Track & Field, Mary Helen Sprecher, Katie Landry, Greg Farris

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

It Takes a Special Athlete to Succeed in the Race Walk Fleet Feet Sports St. Charles | 636.939.0161 Chesterfield | 636.532.0522 Fenton | 636.343.6300

Running Center St. Louis | 314.961.2647

Garry Gribble Running Sports Independence | 816.373.1100 Kansas City | 816.363.4800 Overland Park | 913.469.4090 Lawrence | 785.856.0434

Running Start Shiloh | 618.628.9898

The Starting Block

Larry Young is unique in U.S. Olympic history as the only person to win Olympic medals in the race walks. The race walks, which got their start in the 18th- and 19thcentury pedestrian races, are walked over 20 and 50 kilometers. The race walk requires the endurance of a cross country skier and the agility of a hurdler. One must not bend one’s knee with this modified walking style, and holding one’s style while walking 31-plus miles, to near exhaustion, is exceedingly difficult. The athlete who succeeds at this event is exceptional: Larry Young was such an athlete. Young got his start in track & field running the mile and half mile. While in high school at all-comers meets in upstate New York, Larry tried the race walk, learning the walk and doing pretty well, improving to just under 8 minutes. During this time, he met USATF Hall of Famer and Olympian Ron Laird, who convinced Young to walk indoors in California. In two famous meets, the Los Angeles Invitational and the San Diego Invitational, Young finished dead last in loaded fields. He was about to throw in the towel, when Laird convinced him to run a handicapped race (based on one’s skill, runners or walkers run a certain part of the distance, so the best athlete would walk, say, 10 miles and the next best, 9 miles, 1,200 yards, and perhaps the newest competitor might walk 7 miles). Young met some success at the 10-mile distance, finishing 4th. In 1966, Young walked his first 50K (31.6 miles), the longest distance on the Olympic schedule. In 1967, he won his first major event, the Pan Am Games, walking 50K in 4:26, an American record at the time. Two years later in Mexico City, Young listened to his own counsel and started out slow, not going out with the leaders. In the heat, humidity and altitude, Young started passing walkers at about 20K and by 35K was within striking distance of the leaders. What kept him focused over the last 15K? As he passed fellow walkers, he noticed how exhausted and unfocused they were, and he knew his plan had worked! Young, in extraordinary conditions, walked 4:31:55 to take the Olympic Bronze. The next year, he took a scholarship at Columbia College in Columbia to study art, with a focus on sculpture. Young trained in earnest in 1969, and again took Gold medal at 50K in the Pan Am Games in 1971, defending his Gold from 1967. In 1972, Young walked his fastest 50,000 meters of his career, in 4:00:46. 38 years later it’s still among the 10 best ever in U.S. history. While Young walked through 1977–79, his dream of another Olympics was shattered when the Moscow Olympics were boycotted. After that, Larry Young retired to focus on his large sculptures. Who will be the next Larry Young? If you want to learn more about the race walk, send an e-mail to larry@runningnetwork.com I’ll help you find a race walking club or coach. Or, visit www.racewalking.com

Columbia | 573.874.1803 Springfield | 417.890.7200

Regards,

Larry Eder Publisher, Missouri Runner and Triathlete President, The Running Network, LLC

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REVIEWS

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Year-End Wrap-Up of Shoes 2010 by Cregg Weinmann

Many of the shoes we see each year are actually aimed at the holiday season/year’s end, but others arrive in the fall (earlier than year-end models but later than our traditional fall review) so we think they, too, deserve mention in our year-end wrap-up. Though not always equipped for the weather at the end of the year, here we see three that have been “warmed up” to better handle wet and/or cold conditions. This review looks at eight new or updated shoes split between the Hybrid Trail and Performance categories, with a Motion Stabilizing shoe for good measure—making a little something for everyone.

HYBRID TRAIL

Brooks Adrenaline ASR 7

Mizuno Wave Ascend 5

Combining a bestselling stabilizing shoe with trail protection and traction has been a successful strategy for the Adrenaline ASR. Round 7 continues to provide stability, traction, and protection on trails, as well as roads. The upper features a waterresistant mesh that’s now a little more open, along with increased lateral support and more bunion-friendly support on the medial side. The midsole is multi-density BioMoGo foam with a reconfigured crashpad and a reduced DRB Accel shank, providing a better transition without sacrificing much support. The outersole continues with the same forefoot flex grooves as the 6, but they’ve been opened up slightly to improve flexibility. The tread profile provides the traction the Adrenaline ASR is known for, both on- and off-road.

The Wave Ascend proves again that it’s a worthy anchor in the Mizuno trail line, providing traction, protection, and stability. The midsole/ outersole maintain the well-cushioned AP foam, a waveplate combination of lateral rubber and medial TPU for stability, BEST SHOE and a trail profile of effective lugs that grip well on Hybrid Trail both hard and soft surfaces. The upper addresses YE fit and protection. Flat laces replace the bumpy “linkAR-END 2010 sausage” variety and may be a bit easier to adjust the tension of the eyestay. Synthetic rubber has been added to the toe and heel bumpers for more protection from trail hazards. Overall, the fit, cushion, traction, and forefoot flexibility attest to the Ascend’s versatility, garnering it our Best Hybrid Trail Shoe award.

“Fit snugly, but not tight. Good arch support. Fairly firm heel, very stable, but a softer forefoot. Interesting feel; I like the softer forefoot. Excellent off-road traction. I like these shoes a lot.” HYBRID TRAIL $105 Sizes: men 8–13,14,15; women 5–12 Weight: 13.0 oz. (men’s 11); 11.1 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with moderate overpronation

Newton Terra Momentus=Momentum

“Roomy in the forefoot. Seems lighter than most trail shoes, especially for the support and cushioning. Traction is very good, even good on pavement, and surprisingly durable for an aggressive, off-road tread. I don’t see any wear anywhere.” HYBRID TRAIL $95 Sizes: men 7–13,14; women 6–11 Weight: 12.5 oz. (men’s 11); 10.5 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to moderate overpronation

Nike Air Pegasus +27 Trail WR

With Newton’s first foray into trail shoes, the hybridized Terra Momentus=Momentum, we get just what we’ve come to expect: a thoughtfully conceived, well-executed shoe. The upper features a closed mesh with a full rand for protection with extra shoe lace-securing overlays on the tongue. The outersole has been beefed up from its road models with additional carbon rubber on the forefoot actuators and covering the heel membrane to protect it from trail debris. The midsole is Newton’s resilient foam formulation with the same low-profile geometry as in its other models, and it handles trails with a surprisingly nimble touch. Runners already familiar with the Newton ride will find the Terra Momentus=Momentum to be a quality trail alternative. Those looking for a more efficient trail gait can start with Newton.

The Pegasus is Nike’s “King of the Road” and an all-time favorite neutral shoe. The Trail WR is the off-road–equipped version. This season, number 27 (though the trail version has only been around for about a decade) receives both updates informed by the road version and some trail-specific features. The closed mesh upper now sports a full rand in addition to rubbery, high-friction heel and toe bumpers. A water-resistant treatment makes the shoe well suited to wintry, wet trail conditions. The midsole, formerly Phylon foam, has been upgraded to the more durable and lively Cushlon. The outersole is the same toothy waffle tread as before and it remains equally at home on trail or roads. Overall, the Pegasus +27 Trail WR takes the road performance of the Pegasus off-road.

“Great, supportive fit with plenty of room for my toes. Though not very lightweight, it feels very lively on the trail. Good protection, traction, and cushioning. The forefoot-oriented landing improved my trail running.”

“Great cushioning on the roads without mushiness on the trails. Very effective traction on the trails which also manages the roads well. Overall, a great hybrid trail shoe which is just right to run in.”

HYBRID TRAIL $139 Sizes: men 6–13,14,15; women 5–11 Weight: 13.0 oz. (men’s 11); 10.4 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

HYBRID TRAIL $95 Sizes: men 6–13,14,15; women 5–12 Weight: 12.1 oz. (men’s 11); 10.6 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

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Commitment

Whether your dream awaits 50 meters down the track or six feet off the ground, there’s nothing close about it. Because you can’t reach that place until you first make it past the sweat, tears, agony that lie in your way. It may not be the easiest path you’ve chosen but if you stay true, it can take you a lot further and higher than you have ever imagined.

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REVIEWS

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Year-End Wrap-Up of Shoes for 2010 continued

MOTION STABILIZING

PERFORMANCE

adidas Supernova Sequence 3

In round 3, the Supernova Sequence retains its hallmark: reliable, cushioned stability. The upper now features an airier mesh with soft, synthetic suede overlays that are positioned to provide support without hindering the foot. The newly configured midsole has repositioned the forefoot adiPrene inserts beneath the foot and now contains them with a sidewall for better cushioning underfoot. The outersole has seen small adjustments to the flex grooves that improve gait efficiency. Runners looking for a good combination of cushioning and stability will be well served by the Supernova Sequence 3. “Fits well with a comfortable cushy ride. Reliable stability without being too stiff. They kept the best of the previous version and improved the overall feel. A pleasant experience with every run.” Motion Stabilizing $100 Sizes: men 6.5–13,14; women 5–12 Weight: 12.9 oz. (men’s 11); 11.0 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

ASICS Gel-Speedstar 5 The consistent and effective Speedstar has long filled the role of beefy racer/lightweight trainer. Version 5 surpasses its predecessors. The significant change here is the new upper: a breathable mesh with a matrix of black urethane in small hexagonal shapes varying in thickness to provide more support where it’s thicker and more flexibility where it’s thinner. The midsole and outersole remain much the same as previous rounds with a nice combination of responsive cushioning and great flexibility—defining elements of a quality minimalist shoe. The Speedstar’s looks—bright base with striking black—get extra credit, but the real draw here is the performance. “These shoes feel snug and light. Lots of cushion without a bulky feel. The upper was flexible enough to form around the foot with good support to the arches. A very light, comfortable, cushioned shoe for faster running—even an all-around great racing shoe for me. I have used it on many speed workouts and races up to 1/2 marathon.” Performance $90 Sizes: men 6–13,14; women 5–12 Weight: 9.5 oz. (men’s 11); 8.6 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics, for faster-paced running

New Balance 870

The 870 is a performance shoe new to the New Balance NBx line. The upper is a thin, layered open mesh first seen in the 759, here combined with more minimal overlays of synthetic leather and microsuede that don’t compromise support. The lacing uses traditional eyelets along with Ghilley webbing loops attached to the overlays that flank the metatarsals, keeping the foot over the midsole. An abbreviated N-ergy crashpad in the heel encourages the foot through the transition. The dual-density midsole offers a resilient and stable ride with the aid of the polyurethane Strobel board and Abzorb innersole. The outersole is designed for full-sole contact, whether striking on the heel or farther forward, but it’s segmented for good flexibility. The Ndurance carbon rubber in the high-wear areas and better-cushioning blown rubber everywhere else nicely balances traction and durability. “Fits my feet really well. Plenty of cushioning, yet allows you to feel the road. Keeps the foot stable and the pace quick. I’m always looking for a marathoning shoe, and this one is going to Boston!” Performance $100 Sizes: men 8–12,13,14; women 5–12 Weight: 11.5 oz. (men’s 11); 10.4 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics to mild overpronation

Zoot Ultra Kalani The new Ultra Kalani, the neutral companion to Zoot’s Ultra Kane, is designed for economy and protection without added fluff. The upper features the same compression fabric used in the Ultra Speed racer, and employs support straps and laces like the Kane does—more for BEST SHOE minor adjustments—since the compression fabric Performance does such a great job of securing the foot over the midsole. The midsole is EVA foam with a layer of reYE AR-END 2010 silient full-length Z-bound nearer the foot. The EVA Strobel board and polyurethane innersole provide additional benefits—both in step-in comfort, as well as improved fit and feel on the road. The carbon fiber shank responds well to the torsional forces generated through the gait and adds a responsive quality to the midfoot ride. The outersole features blown rubber in the lateral forefoot and ZCR (Zoot carbon rubber) in the rearfoot and medial toe, traditionally the high-wear areas of any shoe. The quality materials, precise execution, and excellent ride garnered the Ultra Kalani our Best Shoe award in the Performance category. “Wow! Great fit, great cushioning, a great shoe to run in.” Performance $140 Sizes: men 8–12,13,14; women 6–11 Weight: 11.4 oz. (men’s 11); 9.8 oz. (women’s 8) Shape: semi-curved For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

CREGG WEINMANN is footwear and running products reviewer for Running Network LLC. He can be reached via e-mail at shuz2run@lightspeed.net. Copyright © 2010 by Running Network LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Running Network LLC. Reprinted here with permission.

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Race-Specific Training for Teenage Distance Runners By Roy Stevenson General conditioning techniques, like long, steady aerobic running, hill running, and strength training, are clearly necessary for developing the runner’s endurance and strength base. However, these training methods won’t stress the athlete’s body enough to withstand the rigors of racing. Ethiopia’s Kenenise Bekele is perhaps the most perfect distance runner we’ve ever seen, with his ability to survive midrace surges, grind out a last mile close to 4 min-

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utes in the 5000 and 10,000 meters, and still unleash a devastating sprint at the finish. How did Bekele develop his body to withstand this sort of punishment and win from the back or front of the pack? He has trained his body to tolerate, clear and buffer the rapid accumulation of lactic acid, and thus defying the fatigue that causes us to slow down when we hit a certain pace. There are three ways we can train our body to tolerate this sort of stress during races. The main technique used is interval training, which consists of a fast burst of running, over a set distance, followed by a recovery run. This extends our ability to run at high intensity by building up lactic acid, then dispersing it during the easy jogging section. Three types of interval training have proven effective with teenage runners. They are (1) aerobic intervals, (2) fartlek and (3) anaerobic intervals. Here’s a primer on how to do each type of interval training:

Aerobic Intervals. Perhaps the most underused subtype of interval training, this involves training at the pace where the runner consumes oxygen at a near-maximal rate. These intervals are longer, ranging from 600 meters to 2,000 meters, and should be done at two-mile to 5000-meter race pace, getting the heart rate up to 85% to 95% of maximum. A heart rate monitor can prove useful here. Aerobic intervals have the added neuromuscular benefit of ingraining race pace and rhythm. How long should the recovery jog be? Most research shows that a recovery jog equal to the length of the fast interval burst gets the best results. For example, if the runner does an 800-meter repeat in 2:30, he should take a 2:30 jog to recover before the next fast burst.

Fartlek. This is a free-form type of interval running, usually done on gently rolling cross country or trail surfaces, or in a forest or park, thus providing a welcome break from the track. Fartlek is a Swedish word that translates into “speed play,” and consists of running fast over a set distance or time, followed by recovery jogging, until the next fast burst. A fartlek workout can last up to one hour, including a 15-minute warm-up jog and a 10–15 minute cooldown jog. Fast repetition distances can be anywhere from 200 meters to one mile, and they can be mixed up; for example, 4x400 meters, 1x1 mile, 4x200 meters. Anaerobic Intervals. These exhausting sessions are best done on the track, at 5% to 15% faster than race pace, at 100% of maximal heart rate. Interval lengths range from 200 meters to 800 meters, with a recovery jog of 1:2 to 1:4. How many repeats should teenage runners do? The cumulative total distance of the fast interval bursts should be between 800 and 3,200 meters. The runners may have to walk briefly during the recovery section, until they’re ready to jog, but keep them moving the whole time. An example of anaerobic interval training would be a 4:40 miler running up to 8x400-meter intervals between 60 and 66 seconds, with a recovery jog of 2:00 to 2:12. These, then, are the three types of racespecific training that will best prepare your runners for the upcoming races. Always remember that the runners will vary in their ability to handle interval training. Give the younger runners fewer repetitions, with a longer recovery between. L

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Laying a Training Foundation for Teenage Runners By Roy Stevenson Racing well depends on your ability to maintain a fast pace for the entire length of the race, then being able to run even faster at the end. Some runners are more physiologically gifted in these areas than others, but I’ve seen many runners of lesser ability beat runners with more talent because the talented runners didn’t work as hard in training. It happens all the time. The point is, every runner can develop his or her cruising speed and fast finish with the right training. How do we go about achieving these goals? First, it’s important to realize that doing only one type of training doesn't develop these skills. Many coaches are “one note coaches” who only have their runners do one thing in training, such as long slow running, for example. Others beat up their runners by having them do interval training 4-5 days a week, which may have the runners racing well for a few short weeks, then crash miserably just when the championship races are held at the end of the season. Here are several types of foundation training that most high school and collegiate coaches use in their schedules, in varying degrees.

1. Long, slow distance. This technique lays the aerobic base for the faster work that's to follow as the racing season approaches. Here, the running is kept slow and steady during the conditioning phase. Young runners can do far more than you or they think possible. A good rule of thumb is for a teenage runner to do 10 miles plus his or her age in their long run, and they can often handle more than this. For example: A healthy 15-year-old can handle a 15-mile run easily. One thing that many coaches fail to do is to program in an easy week every third or fourth week, where the length of each distance run, and the intensity or pace of each run, are reduced. This is called periodization and ensures that the athletes recover from their training. Cutting half an hour off the runs and slowing down their pace, gives teen runners a programmed recovery, and they’ll bounce back the following week when they resume their normal schedules, and they’ll be able to handle more training than previously. It works like magic.

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2. Tempo running. Once every week, there's a need for the coach to introduce some faster-paced running over long distances. Tempo running has many benefits, including simulating race pace, developing anaerobic threshold and lactate tolerance, and increasing stride rate and leg speed. These are done over an intermediate length distance, on a track or measured level surface, and are timed. The runners should aim for a steady pace and fast finish over the last 800 meters. 3. Hill running. Hills provide extra resistance that further increases leg power, recruits fast-twitch muscle fibers to develop that fast finish, improves lactate tolerance, increases oxygen consumption and increases leg turnover. Hill training can take many forms, from doing repeats over 100, 200, 400 or 600 meters, with a jog back down the hill, or sustained pace running up the hill during long runs. 4. Strength training. Some form of resistance training is necessary to develop lactate threshold, running economy, neuromuscular coordination, correct muscular imbalances, improve core stability and increase stride length. Jack Daniels, one of the country’s foremost coaches says, “For a beginning runner, gaining strength might be as important as running itself, and for an experienced runner might make the difference in whether or not you reach some lofty goals.” Adequate rest days of slow jogging should be planned between these high-intensity workouts, and as long as they are done slowly, young runners can run comfortably up to one hour without ill effects. The runner should pay attention to a healthy, balanced diet to ensure the muscles are being restocked with glycogen, and that normal growth and development are taking place. Savvy coaches experiment with several of these techniques, and blend them into a program that works for their athletes. It’s OK to experiment, as long as you discard what doesn’t work, and include what does seem to work. A good coach should always be evolving his programs and schedules. L

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American Record High Jump, 2.05m, (2X)

American Record 10,000 Meter 26:59.60

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American Record 5,000 Meter 12:54.12 American Record 3,000 Meter 7:29.00

American Record 110 Meter Hurdle (2X) 12.89

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CHEESE AND SAUERKRAUT 10 Miles of Fun in One of Missouri’s Quirkiest Races

By Whitney Dreier McBaine, MO — This 10-miler is nearly as perfect as they come: The race is free for Columbia Track Club members (a whopping $3 for everyone else), it’s flat as a pancake and there’s always a smorgasbord of homemade baked goods at the finish line. Okay, so there are no race T-shirts or finishers’ medals, but runners can cherish the memory of running by the 350+-yearold “Big Tree,” the largest oak tree in Missouri (tied for largest in the country). How often do you run past something that’s been alive since the 1600s? The event starts on the Katy Trail at McBaine and loops out on Route K by the Big Tree and then back on the trail—twice. Runners write their predicted times on a piece of paper and aren’t allowed to wear watches during the race. The person who predicts his or her time most accurately wins an assortment of gourmet cheeses, and the person who is furthest from his or her predicted time wins an enormous jar of sauerkraut. Interestingly, the person who runs the fastest wins … nothing! “I love this quirky race,” said Nancy Taube, who ran 1:16:46 at the Dec. 11 event. “Its low-tech approach—a decidedly unsophisticated starting line, scratched across the dirt trail—gives it a home-spun, organic feel.” Similarly, runners are handed numbered Popsicle sticks at the finish line and times are recorded on a battered clipboard. This year, 50-year-old Taube was only 13.6 seconds off her predicted time and won a basket full of English Cheddar, Irish

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Dubliner, Gruyere, Parmesan, Swiss and more. “Taking home the coveted cheese prize—or at least managing to avoid the massive jar of sauerkraut—is the goal,” said Taube, who was happy with her time after taking some time off due to injury. “I wasn’t sure what pace to shoot for, or even if I’d be able to finish, so just being able to get out and run felt like a blessing!” Sauerkraut winner Kevin Stone had the opposite experience. Stone was leading for most of the race until he suffered a leg cramp and walked the last few miles, coming in 16 minutes slower than his predicted time. “Stone captured the incredible and probably inedible super-sized jar of genuine sauerkraut, also known as ‘Victory Cabbage’ by the Yanks during WWII,” Hessler reports. With Stone falling behind, Andy Emerson and Andy Starostka took the lead together, although Emerson appears as the overall winner with a time of 1:05:50. “As far as I am concerned, we tied for first,” Emerson says. “It felt good to cross the line with him since he is such a great runner.” Kyla Berendzen was the first female to finish (and the only runner wearing Five-Fingers); her time was 1:11:11. “Runners enjoyed perfect racing conditions: 42°, no wind at all, misty drizzle until 30 minutes or so into the race. And even some lighter-looking skies at times,” reported race director Dick Hessler. The favorable weather lasted until the last award was presented, at which time cold sleet, high winds and rapidly falling temperatures descended on mid Missouri. “We were very lucky,” Hessler said. L

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Bass Pro FALL FITNESS FESTIVAL

Approximately 1,800 runners participated in the Bass Pro Conservation Marathon and the Maynard Cohick Half Marathon held Nov. 7 in Springfield. The events were part of the annual Bass Pro Fall Fitness Festival event, which also featured a marathon relay and the Ozark Greenways 5K, bringing the total number of participants to 2,480. Overall Winners Marathon Men: Julius Rotich, West Des Moines, Iowa, 2:39:26 Women: Sara Major, Springfield, 3:03:47

Half Marathon Men: Mathew Chesang, Olathe, Kansas, 1:08:44 Women: Jackie Stiles, Springfield, 1:25:48

5K Run Men: John Flor, Springfield, 15:27 Women: Courtney Waltbillig, Joplin, 18:19

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Photos by ASI Photo

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Philip Lagat Wins St. Louis Half Marathon by 2 Seconds By Douglas Wallace

Photos courtesy of Greg Farris

Clayton, MO — The St. Louis Track Club’s 31st Annual St. Louis Half Marathon had a nail-biting finish with Philip Lagat winning the race by 2 seconds over Sammy Rotich, with a chiptime of 1:05:46 vs. 1:05:48. Lagat, 27, and Rotich, 23, are not only competitors, they’re also training partners. While both are originally from Kenya, they currently reside in West Des Moines, Iowa. “The course was straightforward,” Lagat said. “There were some hills on the back side of the park, but no problems.” At the end of the race Lagat and Rotich, who has won at least four half marathons himself this year, made the final turn and sprinted about 50 meters toward the finish line. Rotich finished only a couple links behind Lagat. “At the end, I knew I had him at the turn,” Lagat said. Julie Lossos, 29, from St. Louis, was the first female finisher, with a time of 1:20:20. “I love the course. I run in this area, so I knew what to expect—a hilly course,” Lossos said with a laugh. The 31st Annual St. Louis Half Marathon was also the USATF North Region and USATF Ozark Association Open and Master Half Marathon Championship. Brennan Benkert, 22, of Joplin finished in 1:07:34, and Margaret Lyons, 30, of St. Louis finished in 1:21:45. The Clayton Police Department held its annual Special Olympics 5K Run and Walk and ½-Mile Your Fun Run after the half marathon started. Craig Wohlschlaeger was the first male finisher with a time of 19:11. Helen Alexander was the 1st-place female finisher with a posted time of 21:21. The St. Louis Track Club sponsors the half marathon and a marathon relay every November. They will also host their annual Frost Bite series this winter.L Visit www.stlouistrackclub.com for more information.

January and February Frost Bite Races:

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Sat., Jan. 8

20K / 5K

Sat. Jan. 22

13.1M / 4M

Sat. Feb. 5

15K / 3M

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1 Second to Glory Menghini Claims Junior Olympic National Title in Alabama By Katie Landry, USATF One second defined the last cross country race of Krista Menghini’s senior year. She came to the December USATF National Junior Olympic Cross Country Championships at Veterans Park in Hoover, Alabama on Dec. 11 as the 2009 runner-up in the Intermediate Girls division. Remnants of the former year’s snow-ridden and icy path plagued her mind until she was greeted by the southern sunshine and 2,000 other competitors eager to take flight. Gaining excitement with every step toward the start line, she knew this time would be different. Racing as a St. Joseph’s Academy senior, as a St. Louis Blazer and as a soon-to-be NCAA student-athlete, Menghini had momentum on her side. “Coming into the race, I knew it would be a good one,” said Menghini. “Also knowing it would be my last cross country race ever, I wanted to do the best I could, run fast and have a fun race.” Menghini did more than “have a fun race.” She claimed the national title for the Young Women’s division by edging out her closest competitor by 1 second to break the tape in 19:02. For most young runners on high school cross country teams, their afternoons are spent logging countless miles with their friends and teammates. Yet, Menghini’s high school cross country experience was anything but typical. Menghini was also a standout volleyball player at her school, and the two sports practice at the same time during the fall. Menghini didn’t attend a single cross Photo by ASI Photo country practice; rather, she spent every dark morning running by herself at 5:30 a.m. Exhibiting a true balancing act, Menghini led her cross country team to a school-best 3rd-place finish at the Missouri High School State Cross Country Championship, as well as a volleyball state championship. Even more impressive is that she did it all within 48 hours, which Menghini calls “the best weekend I’ve ever had.” She played in the first rounds of the volleyball tournament in Kansas City on Friday night, drove 140 miles to Jefferson City for the cross country championships Saturday morning, then immediately returned to Kansas City to play in the final game of the volleyball tournament. Individually, Menghini improved her 5K time by 40 seconds over the same 2009 event to run 18:57 and finish 10th. Next year Menghini will take her volleyball talents to Southern Illinois University Carbondale to play for the Salukis. She’s still toying with the idea of continuing her multisport lifestyle by running track in the spring, as well. L www.morunandtri.com

Congratulations,

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TRACKS of the Year By Mary Helen Sprecher There are tight deadlines and then there are the deadlines that are so tight the finished project practically squeaks. And when it came time to do the Ponderosa High School's outdoor running track facility, school officials and sports facility contractors had one of the latter. The challenge? Well, perhaps it’s best to envision it as a memo: TO: Beals Alliance and all participants FR: Ponderosa High School Please help us replace the high school’s existing decomposed granite track and its accompanying natural turf field. Replace it with a new, all-weather track and a synthetic turf field with inlaid striping for football and soccer, as well as field event facilities. Oh, and we start on April 1. Can you have it ready in time to host commencement on May 29? “The project was the first portion of a recently passed bond and was critical to the success of the overall bond campaign," said Chris Sullivan from Folsom, Californiabased Beals. "The project began during track season and had to be completed to a level that would allow commencement ceremonies to be held on the field.” It was, by all accounts, a rush job for the ages and work had to start immediately. And even that part wasn’t without its challenges, added Sullivan. “The existing facility had five feet of grade change south to the north end, with the adjacent bleachers, concession and restroom structures to remain. The track was built to meet the existing grade at midfield with retaining walls at each end for a balanced earthwork site. Tolerance, drainage and accessibility issues dictated that the field would need to balance earthwork on

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2010 Outdoor Track of the Year American Sports Builders Association Running Track Facility at Ponderosa High School

Photo courtesy of Beals Alliance, Folsom, California Looking down at the running track facility at Ponderosa High School in Shingle Springs, California, it's easy to see only a great project -- and impossible to guess that it was completed in record time.

site and remain accessible from all the adjacent amenities to remain.” Construction began in earnest and proceeded on an incredibly expedited schedule. “The project progressed to a point that base work was completed to accommodate graduation in order to maintain the overall schedule.” According to Sullivan, the project stayed on schedule because of constant communication including weekly construction meetings, submittal processing, ASIs,

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RFIs, punch lists and project closeout. “The lease/lease-back delivery method was utilized to ensure integration with the selected contractors and the design team from start to finish. Each element of the design was reviewed from concept to construction to ensure the end product was feasible from a budget, schedule and construction standpoint.” Completion of the project came in August of 2009, making the facility ready for the opening of the 2009-2010 academic

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2010 Outdoor Track of the Year American Sports Builders Association Running Track Facility at Ponderosa High School Shingle Springs, California Architect/Engineer: Beals Alliance Suppliers: ACO Sport (slot drain) Sportsfield Specialties (goal post and soccer goal system, take-off boards, pole vault box, sand catchers and shotput toe board) Mondo, USA (track surface) Robert Cohen Co. LLC (Mondo track surface installer) FieldTurf (artificial turf) year and the Bruins’ athletic seasons. The finished facility is adjacent to the school’s tennis courts and baseball diamond. The facility is aesthetically pleasing and complies with the standards of both the National Federation for State High School Association (NFHS, the governing body for high school sports), and the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF, the governing body for high school sports in the state). The eight-lane track is surfaced with a pre-manufactured vulcanized rubber system. It slopes inward to a slot drain that ties into the existing storm drain system. The synthetic turf field, which has football and soccer markings, uses perforated drain pipes and has a composite base layer. The result has been a facility that not only is a showcase for student athletes, but a showpiece for the school system. And it didn't escape the notice of the American Sports Builders Association (ASBA), the national organization for builders and suppliers of materials for athletic facilities, which recognized the facility in its annual awards of excellence, naming it the Outdoor Track Facility of the Year. Awards are presented each year to facilities built by ASBA members that best exemplify construction excellence. Projects are scored individually and anonymously by a committee of ASBA members, based on considerations such as layout and design, site work, drainage, base construction, surface, amenities, innovation and overall impression. Winning entries are those whose cumulative scores meet or exceed the standard. And while the Bruins of Ponderosa High School can take a lot of pride in the fact that their facility impresses track & field designers, builders and suppliers nationwide, they probably care about something more down-to-earth: impressing their opponents when they run along the grey and green track, or out onto their new field of dreams.L

Photo courtesy of Beals Alliance, Folsom, California The running track facility at Ponderosa High School meets the standards of both the National Federation for State High School Association (NFHS, the governing body for high school sports), and the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF, the governing body for high school sports in the state).

Note: The American Sports Builders Association (ASBA) is a nonprofit association helping designers, builders, owners, operators and users understand quality construction of many sports facilities, including track and field. The ASBA sponsors informative meetings and publishes newsletters, books and technical construction guidelines for athletic facilities including running tracks and sports fields. Available at no charge is a listing of all publications offered by the Association, as well as the ASBA’s Membership Directory. Info: 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org

Photo courtesy of Beals Alliance, Folsom, California The running track facility at Ponderosa High School has an eightlane track surfaced with vulcanized rubber, and a synthetic turf field that uses perforated drain pipes and has a composite base layer.

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2010 Indoor Track of the Year American Sports Builders Association Mount Union College-Peterson Field House By Mary Helen Sprecher Doing more with less. Changing with the times. Putting 10 pounds of material into a 5pound bag. Being proactive. Multi-tasking. They’re all terms that are tossed around frequently—but somehow they all came into play at once during the reconstruction of a college’s fieldhouse. The facility, Mount Union College’s Peterson Field House, had become outdated. Administrators wanted to enlarge it and replace the building’s 20-year-old, 160-meter track with a new 200-meter facility. This called for a number of overhauls, according to Kiefer Specialty Flooring, Inc. of Lindenhurst, Illinois, who sent Brion Rittenberry to look at the project. The building, a steel-frame structure with cinder-block walls, presented some unique challenges, noted Rittenberry. Varying levels on the flooring were just one obstacle. “The enlargement posed significant issues as it related to new and existing surface heights,” noted Rittenberry. “Once we tore back the existing floor, we realized the concrete was at a higher level near the old wall placement, and the joint between the old and new buildings was very uneven.” Once a decision was made to pour the new concrete substrate ½" below the old floor height, thereby providing a level surface across the span of all concrete being used, preparations began in earnest. “Grinding was necessary to even out the two surfaces,” noted Rittenberry. “Moisture test results gave high readings on the new concrete; therefore, a moisture sealer was needed to protect the new floor. The concrete was shot-blasted, and then the sealer was applied, taking special care at the joint to protect it from moisture.” Work on the facility included taking the time to ensure that moisture infiltration wouldn’t become a chronic problem that could cause problems down the road, and that there would be lasting integrity of the joint between the old and new floors. “We used a flexible, self-leveling product to even the joint and provide for possible movement,” notes Rittenberry. “We installed a ½" rubber underlayment with a special shore hardness to bring the height of the new subfloor in line with the old floor. We then abrad-

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Photo courtesy of Keifer Specialty Flooring, Inc., Lindenhurst, Illinois The newly renovated Mount Union College—Peterson Field House in Alliance, Ohio is exceptional in a number of ways, but the one visitors never guess is the fact that it presented multiple challenges to designers, builders and suppliers involved in the project.

ed the old surface to promote an enhanced mechanical bond and overlaid the entire surface with a new pre-fabricated sheet rubber surface.” With flooring in place, it was time to turn to the athletic amenities of the building. The new 200-meter track has six lanes with a ninelane sprint and the entire surface slopes in one true plane with a tolerance of ⅛" in 10 feet. The surface is a pre-manufactured blend of virgin rubber, vulcanized with the base. The colors are dark grey and cognac. In addition to its excellent track facility (and its accompanying field events including long jump and triple jump, located on the southwest and southeast sides of the building) the facility can host a multitude of sports, including practices for many of the athletic programs of the college, according to the college’s website. (A virtual tour of the facility includes mention of the space for four indoor tennis courts, a part of the NCAA program). The project was completed on December 31, 2009. The end result has been a facility that not only is a showcase for student athletes, but a showpiece for the school system. And it

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didn’t escape the notice of the American Sports Builders Association (ASBA), the national organization for builders and suppliers of materials for athletic facilities, which recognized the facility in its annual awards of excellence, naming it the Indoor Track Facility of the Year. Awards are presented each year to facilities built by ASBA members that best exemplify construction excellence. Projects are scored individually and anonymously by a committee of ASBA members, based on considerations such as layout and design, site work, drainage, base construction, surface, amenities, innovation and overall impression. Winning entries are those whose cumulative scores meet or exceed the standard. While administration and students are proud of their enhanced and updated facility, Rittenberry is happy with a project well done. “Despite significant design obstacles and time constraints, we were able to provide Mount Union College with a completely flush world class track surface on time and within budget,” he notes with satisfaction. L

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2010 Indoor Track of the Year American Sports Builders Association Mount Union College—Peterson Field House Alliance, Ohio Specialty Contractor: Keifer Specialty Flooring, Inc. Suppliers: Mondo USA (rubber sports surface) Architect/Engineer: Hastings and Chivetta Construction Manager: Hammond Construction

REPORT: ACSM 2011 Survey on Fitness Trends Includes Trends Favoring Track & Field By Mary Helen Sprecher

Photo courtesy of Keifer Specialty Flooring, Inc., Lindenhurst, Illinois The dark grey indoor track that's the centerpiece of the Mount Union College-Peterson Field House encircles a multi-purpose space that allows athletes to train for any number of sports offered by the college.

The American Sports Builders Association (ASBA) keeps up with the latest trends in exercise, fitness and sports. ASBA often gains important insights on new trends by reading research conducted by leading organizations in the profession. Reading through one newly published survey on fitness by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), we found some potentially good news for the track & field industry. The survey provided a fascinating look into the future, and allowed us to guess how it might affect track & field. The following survey information is presented with the permission of ACSM; comments on interpretation are the theories of ASBA. ACSM’s survey of worldwide fitness trends (specifically those expected to be most popular in 2011) was published in the November/December issue of ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal®. A total of 31 potential fitness trends were given as choices, and the top 20 were ranked and published by ACSM. The full list appears at the end of this article. Here are three items from the top 20—and ASBA’s interpretation of a few ways track and field could dovetail into the projected growth. (Note: The number preceding each item is its numerical place on the list). 2. Fitness programs for older adults: Mature adults are a great market for the fitness industry; in fact, programs aimed at this demographic make up the second most popular trend for 2011. ASBA’s take: If seniors want to take up running, it's likely they'll start with their local school’s track. A softer, springier surface is better than a road or sidewalk, and the enclosed environment a track provides (safe from cars, dogs and the like) is also inviting. 4. Children and obesity: With childhood obesity growing at an alarming rate, health and fitness professionals see the epidemic as an opportunity to create programs tailored to overweight and obese children.

Note: The American Sports Builders Association (ASBA) is a nonprofit association helping designers, builders, owners, operators and users understand quality construction of many sports facilities, including track and field. The ASBA sponsors informative meetings and publishes newsletters, books and technical construction guidelines for athletic facilities including tracks, tennis courts, athletic fields and multi-purpose indoor sports buildings. Available at no charge is a listing of all publications offered by the Association, as well as the ASBA’s Membership Directory. Info: 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org

ASBA’s take: It's no secret that more kids than ever are getting involved with sports at the high school level, and track & field and outdoor cross country have made consistent appearances in the top 10 most popular sports according to the National Federation of State High School Associations in its annual sports participation surveys. Look for parents to encourage kids to stay active through childhood and straight through high school and beyond.


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16. Sport-specific training: According to the ACSM study, this trend (including programs in sports such as tennis and golf ) is on track to attract a new market to commercial clubs and community-based fitness organizations. ASBA’s take: The ACSM survey points out that sport-specific training appeals particularly to young athletes, such as those in high school, who want to train in the off season, or who want brush up on, or keep their skills sharp, so that they make the team each year. Programs like tune-ups for baseball (which include not only skill drills like throwing, hitting and catching, but aerobic exercise like running), can add up to more track use as well. Workouts are different, even since last year, according to the survey. Fitness trends that dropped off the survey completely included Pilates, use of the stability ball, and balance training. (Note: Something that ACSM professionals thought might be a trend in the 2011 survey was the 24-hour fitness facility, but this failed to register in the top 20.) Taking the place of the three items that dropped out were the following: 17. Worker incentive programs. 18. Clinical integration (defined as the integration and blending of prevention and clinical services). 19. Reaching new markets (defined as a trend that identifies new markets in all aspects of the health/fitness industry). The survey was sent to ACSM-certified health and fitness professionals worldwide, and respondents returned more than 2,200 completed surveys. The full list of fitness trends for 2011 is: 1. Educated and experienced fitness professionals 2. Fitness programs for older adults 3. Strength training 4. Children and obesity 5. Personal training 6. Core training 7. Exercise and weight loss 8. Boot camp 9. Functional fitness 10. Physician referrals 11. Yoga 12. Worksite health promotion 13. Outcome measurements 14. Group personal training 15. Spinning (indoor cycling) 16. Sport-specific training 17. Worker incentive programs 18. Clinical integration 19. Reaching new markets 20. Wellness coaching Source: The American College of Sports Medicine, Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2011, Walter R. Thompson, Ph.D., FACSM, http://www.acsm.org

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Thankful for Pie Thanksgiving Day Pie Run Is Jefferson City’s Largest Race

2010 THANKSGIVING DAY PIE RUN RESULTS North Jefferson City, Katy Trail Pavilion November 25, 2010

By Whitney Drier Jefferson City, MO — Turkey Trots, Cranberry Crawls, Gobble Wobbles: Thanksgiving Day races are a fun way to run into the holiday season—literally. Among the more established end-of-November events is the Jefferson City Road Runners’ annual Thanksgiving Day Pie Run, featuring a 5K and 10K, held at the North Jefferson Pavilion in old Cedar City. Although the race was first run in 1999, pies weren’t awarded to the top finishers until 2002, when John Weghorst became the race director. “I had my wife, Leasa, make 18 homemade pumpkin pies,” Weghorst remembered. “In 2003, I avoided marital problems by getting club members to volunteer to supply the pies.” In 2005, Chez Monet, a Jefferson City bakery, agreed to supply the pies and continues to do so today; a total of 18 pies are awarded to the top three males and female finishers in each event (5K, 10K and 5K walk). In 2002, 126 people finished, and in 2010 more than 650 registered—and not just because the pies are tasty. “Families are getting together for the holidays, and exerting themselves during the race provides a great excuse to maybe take seconds at the holiday meal,” Weghorst said. But perhaps more important, the focus of the JCRR is to provide a good experience for the participants. The course is USATF certified, volunteers are friendly, results are tallied quickly, open pit fires warm runners, coffee and doughnuts are available and Perkin’s pies are offered as door prizes—quite a bargain for only $18. “The Pie Run was a treat, as always,” said Tim Cornell, who won the 5K in 15:15 “Even though the weather was less than desirable, the race was a fantastic start to a true American holiday.” Tim’s toughest opposition—besides the wind and frigid temperatures—came from 2nd-place finisher Magnus Holmstrom (15:41) and Daniel LePage, who took 3rd (15:50). The women had a speedy field, as well, with Ashley Bunch (17:28), Kate Chettle (17:50) and Katie Hauser (18:20) placing in the top three. “I was pleasantly surprised to see a number of very talented mid Missouri runners come out,” Cornell said. His words hold true not only for the 5K but for the 10K, as well: Karl Gilpin covered 6.2 miles in 33:48, followed by Daniel Boyle (35:30) and Andy Starostka (36:00). Whitney Dreier (43:15), Mackenzie Weis (43:42) and Amanda Buhr (43:55) were the top women. As the Pie Run’s field has increased—both in number of participants and quality of runners—its charity proceeds have also grown. “The most satisfying part of this race is that we collect a substantial amount of canned goods to give to the Samaritan Center, and the proceeds from this race are also donated to the Samaritan Center,” Weghorst said. “I anticipate that the donation this year will exceed $2,000 and maybe even $3,000; it is a great thing to do for the community, especially during the holidays.” L

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

Name Tim Cornell Magnus Holmstrom Daniel LePage Ryan Hauser Gaz Davies Chris Cornell Alloch Burton Ashley Bunch Mark Keys Patrick Cooper William Stolz Kate Chettle Jamie Burnham Katie Hauser Carl Broman Tony Rigdon Brad Suthoff Kevin Miller Sam Kiekhaefer Joshua Mantooth Abbrey Hartman Chris Cook Tim Swinfard Cole Bearhorst Sheldon Keence Jason Vanderfeltz Alicia Anderson Scott Jones Kurt Suthoff Kyle Dorge John McNay John Reinkemeyer Andy Emerson Cody Linsenbardt Paul Kiekhaefer Timmy Rackers Jason Groene Joe Gillardi Brad Distler Hampton Waggoner Joe Wallendorf David Admire Marc Tiernan Andrew Connell Robbie Housting David Richter David Berg Clayton Dorge Brad Mesley Nathan Weis

Time 15:15 15:41 15:50 15:52 16:03 16:44 16:57 17:28 17:34 17:36 17:48 17:50 18:02 18:20 18:38 18:46 18:48 19:00 19:07 19:11 19:15 19:23 19:24 19:32 19:33 19:36 19:45 20:11 20:15 20:20 20:21 20:44 20:51 21:03 21:06 21:07 21:08 21:10 21:11 21:57 22:04 22:04 22:09 22:10 22:14 22:17 22:18 22:19 22:20 22:22

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Historic Number of Runners Come Out to Trick or Treat By Brian McQueary Every Halloween party has one kid whose bag is straining to contain the haul of candy culled from some secret trick-or-treat route in the nice neighborhood where his parents live. At that party, the kid is the envy of every other child in the room. During the GO! St. Louis Halloween 10K on Sunday, Oct. 17, Mathew Chesang was that kid. With his win on Sunday coming on the heels of winning the Kansas City Half Marathon, his running bag was crammed full of awards that left him the envy of all competitors. For Chesang it was two victories and 19.3 miles raced in a 24-hour stretch. Chesang, who had never raced two days in a row before, required some humorous cajoling from the race director to get him to St. Louis. “I talked with Brian [Lyons],” said Chesang. “And he said I could race with a costume on, but I couldn’t find one so I wanted a second win instead.” A native of Merian, Chesang is best known to the St. Louis running community for his back-to-back wins in the GO! St. Louis Half Marathon in 2007 and 2008. This was his first appearance at GO! St. Louis’ Halloween 10K. It was an impressive debut as Chesang covered the challenging 6.2-mile course in 30 minutes, 29 seconds. This strong pace comes on the heels of running 1:09:20 in Kansas City’s half marathon. His effort outdistanced second-place finisher Adam MacDowell of St. Louis by 16 seconds. Third place went to Glen Carbon, Illinois native Dan Strackeljahn in a time of 31:51. The win wasn’t an easy one for Chesang as MacDowell pushed him through 5 miles before Chesang made an aggressive move to gap his opponent. “I was pushing hard because I didn’t know much he had left in his tank,” Chesang said. Even 2nd-place finisher MacDowell was surprised to see Chesang among the field. “I know he ran a half yesterday. I was like, holy cow, how are you showing up for this!” said MacDowell. Winning was not the goal for MacDowell, who, instead, came into the race focused on improving on his performance from last year. He said, “Last year I ran around 30:58 so I was looking to run around that range and I had a pretty fortunate day.” Like the men’s race, the women’s competition saw a Kansas City native win, followed by two members of the Big River Racing Team. Melissa Todd of Kansas City took the crown in a time of 35:20, followed by St. Louisians Julie Lossos and Margaret Lyons finishing in 35:57 and 36:15, respectively. Todd, like Chesang, had never run the Halloween 10K before and initially didn’t even plan to compete in it. “I had originally planned to run a marathon this fall, but my body wasn’t cooperating with that so I backed off and just focused on shorter races,” said Todd. Her body’s uncooperativeness took the form of a recurring struggle with hypoglycemia that torpedoed her hopes of running the Chicago Marathon. Todd said, “This is the first run I’ve had where I haven’t felt dizzy during it so I’m just grateful for that.” The top three finishers in the race stayed together until the second

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Photos courtesy of GO! St. Louis

mile where Lyons dropped off. Lossos was able to maintain contact with Todd through the midway point. Lossos, who, unlike Todd, was focusing heavily on the marathon, and it had an impact on her performance today. “I haven’t tapered at all for this race. I’ve been putting a lot of miles in for marathon training and I definitely felt it out there,” said Lossos. “My legs were pretty heavy.” This fatigue affected her ability to challenge the move Todd made to win the race. “Melissa pulled away around mile 3,” Lossos said. “I tried to chase her down, but didn’t have it in me today.” Despite the defeat Lossos was still looking forward to her next big challenge competing in the California International Marathon held in Sacramento on Dec. 5. Third-place finisher Margaret Lyons’ husband, Brian Lyons, couldn’t be found cheering for his wife, but not because he’s an unsupportive spouse. As the race director, Brian had numerous other things to attend to during the race, but that didn’t stop him from finding a way to motivate his wife. “I saw him go by on a scooter and tried to hail a ride,” Lyons joked. “But he did honk the horn for me.” This race was not only Lyons’ debut at the GO! St. Louis Halloween 10K, but at the 10K distance, as well. Lyons said, “In college I was more focused on the 3000m on down and when I graduated I just did 5Ks. This was my first opportunity to do a fast 5K and I’m very happy with how it went.” While the top competitors in the race opted for clothing that didn’t hinder athletic performance, nearly half of those racing on Sunday donned costumes. Adding to the Halloween spirit were spectators and racers handing out candy, a finish line decorated with hay bales and pumpkins, and even the race officials who got into the act by pacing the race in a hearse. The race drew more than 4,500 finishers between the 10K and the fun run. The 3,903 finishers in the 10K made it the largest 10K in St. Louis history. That record beats the previous high of 3,330 finishers set in 1989, according to records kept by the St. Louis Track Club. L

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JANUARY—MARCH 2011

MISSOURI RUNNER AND TRIATHLETE

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Maximum Nutrition for the Young Track and Field Athlete By Roy Stevenson

2.Avoid high-calorie, low-nutrient-density foods.

Hundreds of books, filled with conflicting information, have been written about diet and nutrition, so it’s no wonder that many teenagers have questionable diets. And the field of sports nutrition has more than its share of myths and poor dietary practices. Most nutritionists who work with teenagers usually find several things at fault with the diet of every one of their young clients, and teenage athletes are no exception. In fact, many young track & field athletes perform poorly, without even being aware that nutritional errors are causing the slump. Teen athletes are putting their health at risk by not paying attention to their nutrition because they're facing tremendous growth spurts on top of the energy requirements for track & field. Here is some sports nutrition advice you can pass along to your teen athletes that covers the basics, and hopefully results in them making a few changes for the better to their diet. I’m going to sound like your grandmother here, but teens should realize several things about their diet. First, teens tend to be repetitive about their food choices, so the food they eat generally remains constant over the months. Sadly, their diet has far too much high-calorie, low-nutrient-density foods, and is usually missing important foods necessary for sports performance and recovery. Combine these errors with poor nutritional habits such as missing breakfast, not snacking before training and not drinking enough fluids, and you have a recipe for underperformance, no matter what event the teen competes in.

1.Eat a varied and balanced diet. Teens (and by proxy, their parents) should consume a varied and mixed diet, and avoid the fad foods of the latest fad food diet published in a magazine. Foods that should be on your weekly list should include dairy products (milk, cheese, yogurt, butter); meats (beef, poultry, pork, cold cuts); fish (canned tuna and fresh); eggs; grain products (whole wheat bread, pancakes, bagels, pasta, rice, crackers); cereals (nonsugared); fruits (all varieties); vegetables (all varieties); and healthy snacks (healthy, low-sugar sports bars). Eating from this list helps ensure adequate energy for training and nutrients for repair and growth of muscle, tendons, ligaments and bones. It boils down to an emphasis on carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and low-fat foods.

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They are easy to identify, and you don’t need to be a nutritionist to see that Snickers bars and most junk foods fit these categories. The trick is to substitute appetizing foods for junk foods so that teenagers will consume them instead. Eating lower-calorie, high-nutrientdensity foods (such as vegetables and fruit) also provides the important vitamins and minerals that regulate tissue growth and repair.

3.Focus on more calories during high-volume training. Athletes doing strength training may need additional high-protein, low-fat foods. During conditioning phases, the athlete will need a higher intake of calories and fluid.

4.Eat breakfast! This should have a mix of carbohydrates, proteins and fats, and provide between 25% and 33% of the day’s calories. If teens complain that they can’t stomach breakfast, have them try it for two weeks, and they’ll find that their stomach quickly adjusts. They’ll also feel more alert in class and have more energy during the day.

5.Avoid sugary and caffeinated foods and drinks like the plague. I write this story from Seattle, the spiritual coffee capital of the U.S., and have never seen so many anxious, jittery and wired people in my life. The teenage years are way too early to get hooked on caffeine and sugar. Neither of them has any redeeming value to athletes, and may have some negative effects on athletes.

6.Eat healthy snacks throughout the day and drink constantly. Teenagers have a deep addiction to the latest generation of “high energy” drinks such as Red Bull and its imitators. These drinks are expensive and do not benefit the athlete in any way, except to provide a rapid sugar and caffeine release. The other ingredients are questionable at best, and the research on them is scant and wanting. Drink watered-down sports drinks and water, and avoid the sickly, sweet, sugary ones. L

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