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ClubRunning W E R U N T H E N AT I O N !

Maintaining Motivation Spring Shoe Review

Spring 2010

Crosby Freeman successfully defended his RRCA Western Region Half Marathon title at the Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Half Marathon in February.

Rules of the Trails Running Brothers & Team McGraw

RRCA.org

Permit #351 Bolingbrook, IL

PA I D U.S. Postage NON PROFIT ORG

brightroom.com; (Inset) Courtesy of Jeff McMahon/Tug McGraw Foundation

By night, RRCA-certified coach Jeff McMahon tours with country superstar Tim McGraw. By day, he’s the national program director for Team McGraw, raising funds for the Tug McGraw Foundation. In this issue, Jeff and Kevin Leathers, the RRCA-certified coach of Team McGraw, share their stories.


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newbalance.com

YOU MAY NOT BE FASTER THAN A SPEEDING BULLET,

BUT BULLETS DON’T GO 26.2 MILES.

The New Balance 1064. Because when you’re in the right shoe, you love running more.


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ClubRunning Spring 2010

Matt Mendelsohn

W E R U N T H E N AT I O N !

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Executive Director’s Letter

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Members Speak

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Health & Safety Spotlight

When you’re in the right shoe, you love RUNNING more.

Your Letters and our Web Poll

Running and Heart Health

10

RRCA Members’ Feature

To find a dealer near you, call:

The American Trail Running Association, Running Brothers

800-253-7463 or go to:

15 Program Spotlight Join a Club Campaign Kids Run the Nation Run@Work Day

newbalance .com

19 National Running

Awards Spotlight 24 Training Tips

Maintaining Motivation

27 Spring Shoe Review 30 Potluck Recipes A Is for Appetizers

CONTENTS RRCA.org

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Matt Mendelsohn

Executive Director’s Note 2010 is off to a great start for the RRCA due to the support and dedication of our valued members. Membership renewals are strong and we continue to see new running clubs develop each month in communities that need them. New events continue to be organized around the country, while well-established events continue to see record registration rates. This wouldn’t be possible without the love and dedication of runners around the country just like you. Several members have inquired about more information relating to managing their club or their event. We encourage you to visit RRCA.org, where you’ll find a “resources” tab with subsections for club leaders, race directors, Jean Knaack coaches, and runners. I’d like to take this opportunity to congratulate the 2009 National Award Winners featured on page 19 and to thank everyone who took time to nominate a deserving person. Since 1971, the RRCA has honored individuals and clubs for their outstanding service to the running community. The winners of the RRCA awards exemplify dedication to our sport: They give their free time to ensure the success of their local club or event, dedicate their lives to the pursuit of athletic excellence, and inspire and motivate us to do more and give more to ensure the continued success of the running community. We thank them for their efforts. During the process of working on content for this issue, I was embarking on my own personal journey of training-up for another Ironman race, number 3 to be exact, scheduled for late June. I was struggling to get motivated to do the bare minimum of 30 minutes of exercise a couple of days a week. Dr. Barbara Walker’s article on motivation on page 24 could not have been timelier. I think my own experience underscores an important point: everyone struggles with motivation from time to time. It’s what we choose to do about those motivation challenges that separates the achievers from the couch potatoes. So if you’re struggling to shake off the winter doldrums or come back after an injury or simply trying to jump-start your training plan, I recommend you follow Dr. Walker’s advice, along with the tips from our readers and RRCA certified coaches. Consider working with other members of your running club to keep you on track with your running goals for the year. Don’t be afraid to reach out to a coach or expert to help you work through your challenges. The most important thing to do is keep moving and set small, attainable goals that build toward your larger goals. I encourage everyone to continue to inspire and develop a culture of health and fitness in the United States through your involvement with your local club. In addition, the National Physical Activity Plan, introduced in our last issue of Club Running, will be launched on May 3. We invite our members to learn more about this effort at physicalactivityplan.org/launch/ and help share the information in your community. Stay motivated, continue to inspire, and keep moving. Sincerely, Jean Knaack

Club Running is a complimentary publication made possible by our advertisers and created through a partnership between the Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) and Running Network LLC. You’re a member of your local running club and your local running club is, in turn, a member of the RRCA.

ClubRunning Club Running is produced by Shooting Star Media, Inc. for publisher Running Network LLC, P.O. Box 801, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. All ad materials and insertion orders should be sent to Running Network LLC at the above address. Shooting Star Media, Inc. and Running Network LLC assume no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsibility or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Publisher expects that all claims by advertisers can be substantiated and that all guarantees will be honored. Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright © 2010 by Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) unless otherwise noted. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the Publisher.

We recommend, as with all fitness and health issues, you consult with your physician before instituting any changes in your fitness program.

ClubRunning Spring 2010 www.ClubRunning.net ROAD RUNNERS CLUB OF AMERICA (RRCA) Executive Director Jean Knaack RRCA President Brent Ayer

SHOOTING STAR MEDIA, INC. Group & Coordinating Editor Christine Johnson, christinej.ssm@gmail.com Designer Alex Larsen Photographers Victor Sailer PhotoRun.net Brightroom.com Nancy Hobbs, Matt Mendelsohn, Christine Jegen Jeff McMahon/Tug McGraw Foundation BigStockPhoto.com Proofreader Red Ink Editorial Services, Madison, WI Pre-Press/Printer W. D. Hoard & Sons Co., Fort Atkinson, WI

RUNNING NETWORK LLC Advertising Larry Eder President phone: 608.239.3785; fax: 920.563.7298 larry.eder@gmail.com Advertising Production Manager Alex Larsen Publisher’s Rep Paul Banta OSE Productions, Inc. phone: 503.969.4147; fax: 503.620.4052 paul@oseproductions.com Counsel Philip J. Bradbury Melli Law, S.C. Madison, WI w w w. r r c a . o r g w w w. r u n n i n g n e t w o r k . c o m w w w. s h o o t i n g s t a r m e d i a i n c . c o m Member of

Let Us Hear From You! Club Running welcomes your suggestions, comments, and questions. Direct them to share@rrca.org.

Address Changes/Missing Issues Please email us at shootingstarmediacirc@gmail.com about address changes, duplicate mailings, or missing issues. Please include both old and new addresses.

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RRCA Members Speak

Members Respond to Club Running Play It Safe I am a longtime member of the Florida Striders in Orange Park, FL. I just received my issue of Club Running (Fall/Winter 2009). This is a very good and informative magazine, and I look forward to the coming issues. I am puzzled as to why anyone would run with the traffic at their back. In today’s world of “Me-first mentality,” I don’t trust anyone operating a vehicle. With cell phone, Twitter, Twetter, Putter and any other system they can dream up, and the thirst for instant gratification, you had better have your eyes and ears open and focused at all times if you don’t want to wind up as road kill! Thank goodness I live in a small town south of Jacksonville and run at 5 a.m. There are numerous streetlights and very low traffic volume at that time. I do not wear headphones but I do wear reflectives and run facing the traffic! The very best to you and your magazine and keep the issues coming. —Jack from Florida Stop at Six The Fall/Winter 2009 Club Running had an important article (“Stop at Six” by Sally Young) about the dangers of bisphenol A (BPA) in plastic sports bottles. At an Environmental Risks for Breast Cancer seminar at Vassar College, my wife Lynne (a survivor) and I learned that the FDA has allowed food companies since the 1950s to line cans with BPA to prevent the cans from rusting. BPA leaches from the cans into the food. Now we buy food in glass or in BPA-free cans. After the lecture, we replaced all our plastic containers with glass containers. We also became fanatic about reading food labels.

—Bob Kopac

I Need More Information I was active in the management of running from the late ’70s thru the mid ’90s and attended a number of RRCA conventions. Though I’m still running, admittedly I have not been following the ins-and-outs of RRCA for the last 10 years. I note that page 4 contains almost no information about the RRCA as an organization. The masthead does not list the location of the RRCA HQ, contact info, a website, members of the board, etc.

—Richard from MD Executive Director’s Response: In the ever-evolving world of print media, content space is at a premium. To maximize content space in Club Running, detailed information about the RRCA is posted on our website (RRCA.org) as opposed to in the magazine. We will be sure that in this and future issues, the RRCA website address will be more prominently displayed in the magazine. For detailed information about the RRCA, we recommend you visit RRCA.org/about/. Here you will find the RRCA Mission, Vision, and Values Statements, information about our governing structure, an outline of our 50+ years of history, information about the RRCA Board of Directors, governing documents, minutes of board meetings, opportunities to support the RRCA financially, and much more. On our website, you will learn more about our programs and services that benefit our members and the running community such as our Find a Club, Find an Event, and Find a Coach features. —Jean Knaack, RRCA Executive Director

We invite our readers to participate in the RRCA website polls at RRCA.org.

www.RRCA.org website poll How many running events do you plan to enter in 2010?

Total Votes: 801

I’ll be running my first event in 2010 — 17%

0-5 running events planned — 26% 6-14 running events planned — 34% 15-30 running events planned — 15% 30+ running events planned — 8%

Votes

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Health & Safety Spotlight

Can Running Be Dangerous to My Heart Health? By Timothy B. McAteer, MD In the last year, there have been several reported sudden cardiac deaths in marathon races around the country. The Detroit Marathon drew much attention as there were three deaths during the race. Whenever adverse events occur in sporting situations, questions arise as to the overall safety of performing the activity. In this situation, the question is “Can running be dangerous to my heart health?” The answer in almost all cases is no. Over the last 2 decades, research has more clearly defined the causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes as well as the incidence of SCD while running. The most common cause in athletes over age 35 is coronary artery disease. The most common cause in those under 35 is hereditary or congenital cardiac anomalies. The overall incidence of SCD during marathons is 1 person per 50,000 to 75,000 runners. While there were three deaths in one race in Detroit, this is most likely a statistical anomaly as opposed to a sign of something more serious. It’s well known that cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Risk factors for the disease are diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, tobacco abuse, and to a lesser extent, family history of early heart disease. The more risk factors one has, the higher the chance of having a heart attack or stroke even if you’re an avid runner in good shape.

One Memorable Day By Thomas Kenney, PhD I thought that Sept. 27, 2006 was going to be a memorable day for me. Luckily, I didn’t know in advance just how memorable it would be. I was only thinking about the fact that this was to be my “recovery” run. It would have been my first complete morning workout in over 4 months, the time it took me to recover from a fall off a roof. That accident had resulted in multiple broken ribs, a punctured lung, and a four-day stay in the hospital. This had been a real blow to my exercise program, and I had been having trouble trying to work back up to my normal 10K run. It was a beautiful fall day, and I should have felt good. However, I just couldn’t seem to get into any kind of rhythm. Worse, there was a mild sharp pain behind my lower sternum. I thought about a hiatal hernia, but dismissed the idea since the fall had been so long ago. I wasn’t bothered by the pain, but decided to postpone the recovery run for one more day. So I walked home and sat on a couch. I tried to catch my breath and that’s when the nagging started. In my wife’s defense, I have to admit that I have since learned that, besides being out of breath, I was also very pale and sweating. After about 15 minutes of her hovering over me, I “allowed” her to drive me to the hospital. Once there, they whisked

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Physicians can treat these problems with medications, but the right kind of exercise can also significantly help treat these conditions. It is recommended for most people to exercise most days of the week for at least 45 minutes. Regular exercise has been shown to improve blood pressure, reduce the “bad” cholesterol, improve the “good” cholesterol, and improve blood sugar control for diabetics. The take-home point is that regular exercise in people 35 and older who have cardiac risk factors will considerably reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Those with these cardiovascular risk factors simply need to consult their physician to determine if further heart studies are needed prior to beginning their exercise regimen. So what does this mean for me? All people have a degree of risk for an abnormal cardiac event. For the large majority of healthy people with no risk factors, the chance of SCD is extremely low. The important question is how one knows if they have elevated risk compared to their peers and what should be done about it. If you’re a runner who has any of the above risk factors and are older than age 35, you should speak with your physician to decide whether further screening tests may be beneficial in determining your heart health. If you’re a runner of any age and have had dizziness, shortness of breath, palpitations, chest pain, or passed out while exercising, you most certainly should visit your me into an emergency bed, hooked me up to all sorts of monitors and slapped a patch on my chest. The patch took care of the discomfort I had been having and I started asking how soon I could: (a) get breakfast or (b) leave to get my own food. I was much surprised when the nurses told me that, instead of leaving, I was being admitted to the hospital. I was more surprised when I found out that it was the cardiac unit to which I was being admitted. So I spent the rest of the day in a hospital bed, getting more and more antsy to be released and go about my normal life. Finally around midnight, a new nurse came by with some reading material for me. It was a pamphlet with the less-than-encouraging title: Cardiac Catheterization. She also told me that my Troponin levels were still increasing. Troponin is not normally found in a blood test. Its presence indicates cardiac muscle damage. Sure enough, next morning a cardiac surgeon arrived to confirm that I had had a real heart attack, and he was about to do one of three things. He would look inside my heart to see if: (a) nothing should be done, (b) some plaque could be removed, or (c) one or more blocked arteries needed to be by-passed. I signed the proper papers and off we went to the Cath Lab where I was partially sedated. The doctor threaded a catheter through the artery in my groin up into my heart, and we watched while two blockages were found. They were quashed out of the way and drug-eluting stents were implanted to prevent

doctor. Lastly, if someone in your immediate family has suffered from SCD before age 50, you should speak with your physician. While following these guidelines will help minimize your risk of SCD, it’s important to remember that even with no risk factors, no clinical symptoms, and normal cardiac tests, people can still have SCD. The likelihood is extremely low in these circumstances, and if we choose to exercise, we simply must accept this degree of risk and acknowledge that the benefits of exercise far outweigh the risk of SCD. In conclusion, if you’re a runner with no cardiovascular risk factors and a healthy family history, your chance of having sudden cardiac death during running is very low, but not zero. If you have cardiovascular risk factors, concerning cardiac symptoms with exercise, or a family history of SCD, it would be beneficial to speak with your physician prior to exercising to further evaluate your heart health. Dr. McAteer is a board-certified family medicine physician and is currently a sports medicine fellow in the Maine Medical Center Sports Medicine Division. He has worked as a physician at multiple athletic events including the Lake Placid Ironman, Maine Marathon, and Beach to Beacon 10K. Contact him via email at mcatet@mmc.org. their return. The next day I was discharged from the hospital and sent to the cardiac rehabilitation clinic. I can’t praise those rehabilitation nurses and therapists enough. I walked in as a fresh heart attack patient and told them they had to get me ready for an 8K race in March. They took all this in stride and started working with me. One of the nurses was a marathoner and was especially sympathetic to my wishes. At any rate, I was competing again less than 6 months after the heart attack and catheterization. I learned three important things from this experience: (1) runners should be more attentive when their bodies are trying to tell them something, (2) runners have good circulation, and (3) often do better in hospitals than other patients, so keep running. I shouldn’t brag. I recently found out that the runner who leads my club’s 80+ age group is competing one year after open-heart surgery!

Dr. Thomas Kenney is professor emeritus of chemistry at Montgomery College in Maryland and is a member of the Fredericksburg Area Running Club (FARC) in Virginia. He started running in the 1960s for his health. Competition became part of running for him in the 1990s and he currently leads the 75–79 age group for FARC. Prior to the events described here, his knowledge about heart attacks came from 15 years as an EMT for a local rescue squad.

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RRCA Members’ Feature

The American Trail Running Association (ATRA) By Nancy Hobbs, Executive Director of ATRA The American Trail Running Association (ATRA) was formed in 1996 with a mission to support the trail and mountain running communities. The organization has been an RRCA member since our inception. Our mission is to represent and promote trail and mountain running. We offer individual, club, race, and corporate memberships. Our primary benefits include our quarterly newsletter, Trail Times, and our website at www.trailrunner.com which includes a comprehensive calendar of events. Our newsletter includes a national events calendar, thoughtful articles, and timely information about our sport, and our website provides ’net surfers an opportunity to see current trends in our sport. Additional benefits for members can be found on our website. One of the questions we hear most often at the ATRA office is, “What is a trail run and how

is it different than a mountain run?” We have categorized trail and mountain runs using several elements to include terrain/surface, elevation (gain or loss), and distance. The major component in mountain running is elevation gain or loss. The sport is further defined by surface, distance, and terrain. A mountain run can be on paved surfaces as long as significant elevation change is present. On the international scene, the World Mountain Running Championships are held annually with uphill courses in the evennumbered years and uphill/downhill courses in odd-numbered years. The U.S. has fielded teams in all divisions to include senior men, senior women, junior men, and junior women. The major component in trail running is the surface (non-paved). Trail running is further defined by terrain and distance. There are presently no internationally recognized “trail

running championship events” at the marathon or sub-marathon distance, although the World Mountain Running Association (WMRA) does award a World Long Distance Challenge event annually. The International Association of Ultrarunning (IAU) oversees an ultra-distance trail championship annually. The RRCA and USA Track & Field host annual trail running championships. Trail championships have been awarded that include a variety of distances. USATF also hosts a USA Mountain Running Championship event annually. ATRA recognizes and promotes all runs held on trails and in the mountains. For additional information on ATRA, contact us by mail at P.O. Box 9454, Colorado Springs, CO 80932, by phone at (719) 573-4133 or fax (719) 5734408. Our website is www.trailrunner.com and you can e-mail Nancy Hobbs, executive director at trlrunner@aol.com. Top 6 Tips for Newbies to the Trails (1) Keep your eyes on the trail underfoot, thinking/planning at least two steps ahead for your foot plants to avoid unnecessary falls on the trail. Stop when you want to take in the view. (2) Be prepared for the weather as it is and for what it may become and the resulting change in trail conditions due to moisture, etc. (3) Think in terms of “time,” not “distance” when heading out on a trail run. (4) Consider purchasing a good pair of trail-specific running shoes if you plan regular ventures on the trail. (5) Work on strength training to develop your stability and balance as you will use different muscle groups on the trails than on the roads. (6) Always carry a map in unfamiliar locales and be sure to let someone know your intended route should you plan on a long run (i.e., more than one hour).

Nancy Hobbs

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GOALS OF ATRA • Compile and publish a comprehensive listing of nationwide trail running events • Educate and provide information about our sport to the rest of the outdoor community, to the media and to nonrunning entities that have similar goals and objectives • Organize ATRA-sponsored and -supported events • Be a spokesperson and resource for the sport • Be sensitive to the environment • Provide a forum whereby the business of the sport can be discussed and organized • Create and nurture alliances with other associations • Develop recreational participation and provide opportunities for families to enjoy our sport through events and clinics

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RRCA Members’ Feature Single Track Trail Tips from ATRA “Rules on the Run” are principles of trail running etiquette that foster environmentally sound and socially responsible trail running. These principles emulate the well-established principles of Leave No Trace, and Rules of the Trail by the IMBA. The American Trail Running Association believes that by educating trail runners to observe “Rules on the Run,” trail runners will be able to enjoy continued access to their favorite trails and trail running competitions.

1. STAY ON TRAIL Well-marked trails already exist; they are not made on the day you head out for a run. Don’t make your own off-trail path. There is nothing cool about running off trail, bushwhacking over and under trees, or cutting switchbacks up the side of a hill or mountain. Such running creates new trails, encourages others to follow in your footsteps (creating unmarked “social trails”), and increases the runner’s footprint on the environment. When multiple trails exist, run on the one that is the most worn. Stay off closed trails and obey all posted regulations. 2. RUN OVER OBSTACLES Run single file in the middle of a trail, even when laden with a fresh blanket of snow or muddy. Go through puddles and not around them. Running around mud, rocks, or downed tree limbs widens trails, impacts vegetation, and causes further and unnecessary erosion. Use caution when going over obstacles, but challenge yourself by staying in the middle of the trail. If the terrain is exceedingly muddy, refrain from running on the trails so that you don’t create damaging “potholes” in the surface. Moisture is the chief factor that determines how traffic (from any user group) affects a trail. For some soil types, a 100-pound runner can wreak havoc on a trail surface in extremely wet conditions. In dry conditions the same trail might easily withstand a 1,200-pound horse/rider combination. There are many situational factors to consider when making your trail running decision. Trails that have been constructed with rock work, or those with soils that drain quickly, may hold up to wet conditions— even a downpour. But, in general, if the trail is wet enough to become muddy and hold puddles all user groups should avoid it until the moisture has drained. 3. RUN ONLY ON OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED OPEN TRAILS Respect trail and road closures and avoid trespassing on private land. Get permission first to enter and run on private land. Obtain permits or authorization that may be required for some wilderness areas and managed trail systems. Leave gates as you find them. If you open a gate, be sure to close it behind you. Make sure the trails you run on are officially designated routes, not user-created routes.

RRCA.org

When in doubt, ask the land managing agency or individuals responsible for the area you’re using. 4. RESPECT ANIMALS Don’t disturb or harass wildlife or livestock. Animals scared by your sudden approach may be dangerous. Give them plenty of room to adjust to you. Avoid trails that cross known wildlife havens during sensitive times such as nesting or mating. When passing horses use special care and follow directions from the horseback riders. Running cattle is a serious offense. Consider turning around and taking another direction when faced with disturbing large herds of animals, especially in winter when animals are highly stressed already. 5. KEEP YOUR DOG ON A LEASH Unless otherwise posted, keep your dog on a leash and under control at all times. Dogs running off-leash may result in adverse impacts on terrain and wildlife and degrade the outdoor experience of other trail users. If an area is posted “No Dogs” obey signage. This may mean that you leave your dog at home. It’s also imperative that you exercise Leave No Trace practices with respect to removing dog waste, packing out what your dog leaves on the trail. Be prepared with a plastic bag and carry the waste until you come across a proper disposal receptacle. 6. DON’T STARTLE OTHER TRAIL USERS A quick moving trail runner, especially one who seemingly emerges from out of nowhere on an unsuspecting trail user, can be alarming. Give a courteous and audible announcement well in advance of your presence and intention to pass hikers on the trail stating something like, “On your left,” or “Trail” as you approach the trail users. Keep in mind your announcement doesn’t work well for those who are wearing headphones and blasting music. Show respect when passing, by slowing down or stopping if necessary to prevent accidental contact. Be ready to yield to all other trail users (bikers, hikers, horses) even if you have the posted right of way. Uphill runners yield to downhill runners in most situations. 7. BE FRIENDLY The next step after not startling someone is letting them know that they have a friend on

the trail. Friendly communication is the key when trail users are yielding to one another. A “Thank you” is fitting when others on the trail yield to you. A courteous, “Hello, how are you?” shows kindness which is particularly welcome. 8. DON’T LITTER Pack out at least as much as you pack in. Gel wrappers with their little torn-off tops and old water bottles have no place on the trail. Consider wearing apparel with pockets that zip or a hydration pack that has a place to secure litter you find on the trail. Learn and use minimum-impact techniques to dispose of human waste. 9. RUN IN SMALL GROUPS Split larger groups into smaller groups. Larger groups can be intimidating to hikers and have a greater environmental impact on trails. Most trail systems, parks, and wilderness areas have limits on group size. Familiarize yourself with the controlling policy and honor it. 10. SAFETY Know the area you plan to run in and let at least one other person know where you’re planning to run and when you expect to return. Run with a buddy if possible. Take a map with you in unfamiliar areas. Be prepared for the weather and conditions prevailing when you start your run and plan for the worst, given the likely duration of your run. Carry plenty of water, electrolyte replacement drink, or snacks for longer runs. Rescue efforts can be treacherous in remote areas. ATRA does not advise the use of headphones or iPods. The wearer typically hears nothing around them, including approaching wildlife and other humans. The most important safety aspect is to know and respect your limits. Report unusually dangerous, unsafe, or damaging conditions and activities to the proper authorities. 11. LEAVE WHAT YOU FIND Leave natural or historic objects as you find them; this includes wildflowers and native grasses. Removing or collecting trail markers is serious vandalism that puts others at risk. 12. GIVING BACK Volunteer, support, and encourage others to participate in trail maintenance days.

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Nancy Hobbs

RRCA’s Multi-Use Trail Running Tips By Jean Knaack Over the last two decades there has been significant growth of the multi-use trail system in the United States. These safety tips, coupled with the RRCA General Running Safety Tips found on our website at www.rrca.org/education-advocacy/, should help keep you and everyone else on the multi-use trail safe. (1) Follow the rules of the road: Travel on the right and pass on the left. (2) Run to the right side to allow others to pass safely. (3) Leave the headphones at home, but if you just can’t do it, only wear one earpiece. (4) If you’re running an out-and-back route on a trail, don’t make a sudden U-turn at your turn-around point. Stop, step to the right to allow oncoming traffic the opportunity to pass. Ensure the trail is clear of oncoming traffic (runners, cyclists, in-line skaters, etc.) then make your U-turn. Making a sudden Uturn without looking over your shoulder is a good way to get hit by an oncoming cyclist or skater. (5) Avoid running on trails at dusk or in the evening if they are poorly lit and don’t have regular traffic. (6) Never run more than two abreast if you’re running in a group. Don’t be a trail hog. While pedestrians have the right-of-way on most trails, the goal is to share the trails. (7) Alert people when you are passing them– don’t assume they’re aware of their surroundings. A simple “On your left” warning will suffice. (8) Be alert on blind curves to avoid collisions with bicycles, strollers, or skaters cutting the corner. (9) Stop at stop signs if the trail crosses a roadway. Don’t assume cars on the road will stop for the trail crossing. (10) Be mindful of young children on the trail as their movements can be unpredictable. Slowing the pace a bit when passing small children on the trail is a wise idea. Use this as an opportunity to slow the pace then pick up the tempo. (11) Respect private property along the trail. (12) Don’t litter. If you can’t find a trash can, carry your trash home. (13) If you run with a dog on the trail, avoid using a retracting lead as animals on long leads can easily get tangled up with other runners, cyclists, skaters, etc. Keep your pooch close to avoid “clothes-lining” others on the trail. (14) Get approval from local authorities before planning a race or training event on your local multi-use trail. (15) Support and get active with your local trail group to ensure your trails stay safe and well supported by the local community.

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RRCA Members’ Feature

Running Brothers: Making a Difference Jeff McMahon and Kevin Leathers first met in 1983 as college freshmen at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. Both were telecommunications majors, and eventually both would join the same fraternity. McMahon was all about music, while triathloning was Leathers’ passion of choice. Both were runners and they remained friends, but they took different roads. Twenty years would pass before they would finally lace up their shoes and hit the street together. Now, these longtime friends and fraternity brothers are both RRCA coaches and leaders of the Team McGraw Endurance Program in support of the Tug McGraw Foundation. Their efforts help to raise much-needed funds to support research that improves the quality of life for brain tumor and brain trauma patients. They guide athletes, survivors, supporters, and their loved ones from all backgrounds to finish lines, both physical and emotional, across the country. Here they share their stories, from music to the marathon, with the RRCA. Serendipity … Music, Running, and Life

Courtesy of Jeff McMahon/Tug McGraw Foundation

By Kevin Leathers, RRCA Certified Coach In 1979, I was beginning my first season of cross country as a high school freshman in Tennessee. My brother Joe was playing football at the University of Memphis, playing his guitar for fun, and perfecting the art of fraternity life. Jeff McMahon was a high school freshman in Texas practicing piano, playing tennis, and running with his dad. Tim McGraw was probably playing junior high baseball in rural Louisiana. Fast-forward 6 years … Jeff and I are fraternity brothers at Baylor. Jeff ’s musical talents are obvious. I am majoring in fraternity and Slacker 101, but still running. Joe is in the early years of a successful investment banking career and still playing his guitar. Tim is a high school athlete and musician in Louisiana. Jump another 10 years to 1995. Jeff and I reconnect as he tours the country with a ris-

ing country singer, Tim McGraw. Joe is still banking, but he’s playing in a local band in his spare time, and his songwriting begins to flourish from a hobby to a passion. He starts making the trek up I-40 to Nashville to play and pitch songs. Ten years later, it’s 2006. During one of Jeff’s regular tour stops through town, we meet for lunch. He is closely involved with the Tug McGraw Foundation. Tug, Tim’s father and former baseball star, had died of a brain tumor and the Tug McGraw Foundation was established in 2003 to enhance the quality of life of children and adults with brain tumors. Jeff shared his thoughts on the possibility of starting a charity running team, Team McGraw. He knew of my running and endurance background and asked if I would help him get it started. I jumped at the chance. Early on we felt that to give further legitimacy to our program, RRCA coaching certification was vital. The course gave us the fundamentals to help a wide spectrum of runners reach their goals. By this time, my brother’s songwriting was a “career.” January 2010. Tim is still a huge country music superstar and Jeff is still recording and touring with him. Joe has become a prolific, award-winning songwriter. Jeff is the national program director and I’m the national coach for Team McGraw. In 2009, the Tug McGraw Foundation expanded its programs to include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and trauma brain injury (TBI). We collaborate and partner with other organizations so that we can accelerate new treatments and cures to improve quality of life in the areas of the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual impact of those debilitating conditions. Over 300 Team McGraw runners have raised nearly $1 million for brain tumor research. The latest hit on Tim’s new CD Southern Voice (and yes, Jeff played on it) is a song called Still. I’m proud to say that Still was written by—you guessed it—my brother, Joe.

Four paths over so many years that converge in the most serendipitous way with four guys doing what they love. Life is good.

Road Dog Runner By Jeff McMahon, RRCA Certified Coach If you look up the term “road dog” on UrbanDictionary.com, there are seven different definitions. Most include a travel element, one entry mentions jail, where I’ve never been, and another references beer, which I hate. The last entry of seven hits closest to my world: ROAD DOG: A person who is consistently “on the road,” on the go, or someone who travels to and fro frequently. Yeah, that sounds a lot like me. It’s what I do, who I am, and how I roll. I’ve never been one to sit still for very long, and as I sneak up on 20 years makin’ a livin’ in the music business, I guess I’ve never really had to. This March, I click over my 17th year as keyboardist and vocalist for country superstar Tim McGraw. As a member of his longtime band, the Dancehall Doctors, we’ve crossed the country numerous times. We’ve taken the stage at Madison Square Garden, played a cruise ship in the Bahamas, rocked the house at the Hollywood Bowl, and performed overlooking some of the world’s greatest historical sites in Rome, Italy. I have definitely logged some miles with McGraw and the boys. One might think that in the midst of a concert tour, when the planes land or the buses park, I’d blow into the hotel, prop my feet up, and just “chill.” But that isn’t usually the way it works because I’m a runner. Continued on next page

Coaches Jeff McMahon and Kevin Leathers (front left and right respectively) are pictured with their dedicated team of runners at the ING New York City Marathon in 2009; every single runner crossed the finish line.

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RRCA Members’ Feature

Follow Jeff ’s running adventures at roaddogrunner.com and follow Kevin at cantstopendurance.com. For more on Team McGraw, visit teammcgraw.org.

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Courtesy of Jeff McMahon/Tug McGraw Foundation

Brain tumor survivor Jennifer McDevitt, teammate Chris Keller, and Coach Jeff McMahon are all smiles at the 2008 Country Music Marathon and Half Marathon.

(From left) Beth Brewer, Steve Cibulka, Joel Kreuziger, Coach Kevin Leathers, Gudrun Gisladottir, and Glen McDevitt relish their success at the 2008 Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

Courtesy of Jeff McMahon/Tug McGraw Foundation

It’s not just the travel that makes me feel more at ease, but the movement. And it’s really pretty simple: Grab some shorts and my shoes, get off the bus, and start running. If it looks dangerous, turn around. If I think I might get lost, stay close to the hotel. If we don’t have much time, run short. No show that night? Run long. Bottom line? Just run. If things are good, running makes ’em better. If things are crappy, well, at least they get a little less crappy if I can just get out the door. And I usually do, no matter how many miles we’ve already covered since our last concert, because I’ve still got a few more to do on my own.

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RRCA Program Spotlight

“Join a Club” Campaign Highlights Started in 2009, the Join a Club campaign, funded through the generous McLeod–Tyler gift, is a two-year promotional initiative the RRCA is pursing in an effort to increase awareness about running clubs and to encourage runners and walkers to join and renew their memberships in local RRCA-affiliated running clubs. The campaign includes promotions in print and online, and is designed to spread the word about the benefits of joining a running club. “We believe the RRCA plays an important role in promoting membership in local running

clubs as a service to our members,” explained Jean Knaack. “The McLeod–Tyler investment in the Join a Club campaign is a visionary investment in this role.” As a result of the Join a Club campaign, 67% of our member running clubs reported that their clubs grew in 2009 and another 20% reported that they retained their membership numbers for the year. So 87% of our club members either grew or retained their membership numbers in 2009. Be sure to renew your annual membership in your local running club.

2009 Kids Run the Nation Grant Recipients In 2007, the RRCA developed the Kids Run the Nation Fund to assist running clubs, events, and schools interested in implementing or currently have a youth running program. This small grant program is funded by contributions from RRCA members, individuals, foundations, and corporations. Grants are awarded on an annual basis through an application and selection process overseen by a volunteer selection committee. To learn more about the Kids Run the Nation Program and Grant Fund visit www.rrca.org/programs/kids-run-the-nationprogram/. Through the Kids Run the Nation fund, over $5,000 was granted to the following groups in 2009: Couch to 5K, Children’s Rescue Center Springfield, OH The Children’s Rescue Center is a nonprofit organization that serves at-risk youth. The Couch to 5K is an 8-week program, established in 2009, designed to get students away from unproductive activities and into a healthy lifestyle through training to successfully run a 5K road race. The program serves more than 300 local youth. Clear Creek Running Club Bloomington, IN Clear Creek Running Club is a program offered through Clear Creek Elementary School which serves a rural, low-income population with over 40% of their students receiving free or reduced price lunch. Fitness University Nashua, NH Fitness University is a running and fitness program developed by the Gate City Striders in 1989. It’s a free program for children ages 3 through 14 that’s dedicated to promoting the importance of fitness. Participation in the program has more than tripled over the last 4 years and the program currently serves over 600 children.

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Fay Dolphin Runners Club San Diego, CA Fay Elementary opened its doors in September 2008. To channel the students’ energy and to get them ready to learn for the day, the Fay Dolphin Runners Club was established in 2009. The Club meets two mornings a week before school to run laps. The laps are logged and students earn incentive items as they log their collective school miles across a map of the United States. Sugarloaf Sharks Running Club Cudjoe Key, FL The Sugarloaf Sharks Running Club is a program of the Key West Southernmost Runners Club. The goal of the program is to introduce 10- to 14-yearold middle school boys and girls to running and to offer an activity to youth who don’t qualify for other sports teams. The Club meets twice a week for one hour after school from September through May. Run for Home Youth Training Program Dover, OH The Run for Home Youth Training Program is part of the Run for Home Road Runners Club. The Run for Home Youth Training Program grew out of the interest from the adult training program that benefits Habit for Humanity. The Youth Training Program, launched in 2010, is a series of eight Saturday Continued on page 18

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LIGHT SHOES ARE ONLY GOOD IF THEY STAY LIGHT. WET SHOES ARE HEAVY SHOES. THE K-ONA IS DESIGNED WITH A

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KSWISS.COM


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RRCA Program Spotlight 2009 Kids Run the Nation Grant Recipients Continued from page 15

morning workshops designed to introduce children ages 4 to 12 to the benefits of running, using the Kids Run the Nation program model. Participation in the program is free and participants will be encouraged to run in the Run for Home one-mile fun run/walk. SAVE THE DATE! September 17, 2010 will be the 5th Annual National Run@Work Day®. The goal of National Run@Work Day, the third Friday of every September, is for RRCA members and individuals across the country to host community-based events that encourage people to incorporate at least thirty minutes of walking or running into their daily lives. If adults can lead by example, if companies can encourage healthy living, then together we can combat the national inactivity crisis gripping our nation and our children. Learn how to plan your local Run@Work Day event at www.RRCA.org/programs/run-at-work-day/.

Clearview Panthers Bethlehem, PA The Clearview Panthers formed in 2009 after a successful lesson taught on running and heart health to a kindergarten class at Clearview Elementary School. The Clearview Panthers have modeled their program on the Kids Run the Nation materials and meet weekly for 9 weeks to run. The program will culminate in a trip to the Lehigh Valley Half Marathon kids’ race.

Banner Running Club Peoria, IL The Banner Running Club is a youth running club started by Banner Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization in 2009. The club meets after school for a brief clinic on topics such as goal-setting, nutrition, running, sportsmanship, and more. Students in grades 3 through 5 are encouraged to participate, and the program culminates in running in a local 5K race.

to promote healthy living within the workplace and raise money to help fight childhood obesity. A competition was set-up with CBI, the brand's parent company in Topeka, Kansas, to see which facility could accumulate the most mileage during the seven hours. At the end of the day, Lexington proved victorious, covering 58 miles to Topeka’s 46. A donation of $100.00 per mile was made jointly by CBI and The Stride Rite Corporation against the highest total mileage accrued, in this case, Lexington.

Run@Work Day and the J&R Schugel event was to raise awareness about the importance and benefits of daily physical activity. J&R Schugel’s President Rick Schugel said, “Incorporating regular exercise is something I have encouraged my employees to do for as long as I can remember, and what I love about running is it is the most effective level of cardiovascular exercise.” In addition to awarding top finishers, Schugel recognized and awarded all participants. To help employees prepare, J&R Schugel partnered with fitness coaches to format a Progressing Running Program for those that wanted to teach themselves to run, or want to ease back into running after a long hiatus. The program included a walking program in order to train for the 5K fitness walk, and cross training ideas for days not running/walking, and motivational tips and sources.

How You Can Make a Positive Impact on National Run@Work Day • Plan an event with your employer, your running club, or family and friends. • Hang Run@Work Day posters around the office or around town to promote your event. To get your free copy of the promotional poster, send a self-addressed, postage-paid ($0.65), 9x12 sized envelope to 1501 Lee Hwy, Ste 140, Arlington, VA, 22209. Order multiple free copies of Run@Work Day posters at www.rrca.org/publications/. • Visit our Run@Work Day event page on Facebook. Click on our Facebook link at the bottom of www.RRCA.org and find our 2010 Run@Work Day Event on the RRCA Facebook page. Post information and ideas about your local events. • Download Run@Work ads like the one to the left from www.RRCA.org/services/branding and put them in your local publications.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM 2009 RUN@WORK DAY EVENTS: Saucony On Sept. 18th, 2009 runners representing each of the Lexington-based brands, raised $6,000 for the Saucony Run For Good Foundation during National Run@Work Day, locally hosted by Saucony. For seven consecutive hours, 28 runners ran 15-minute increments on a treadmill positioned center-stage in the Lexington atrium

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This free poster can help publicize your event.

J&R Schugel Trucking, Inc. J&R Schugel Trucking, Inc. employees and contractors based in New Ulm, MN, hosted their first 5K Run@Work Day in 2009. The free 5K Run/Walk@Work Day event was held at all J&R Schugel Terminals, allowing for nationwide participation. The goal of both the National RRCA

Minnesota Department of Transportation Employees interested in substituting break time for exercise participated in the inaugural Minnesota State Capitol Run@Work Day 5K and Half 5K event on Sept. 18. The opening ceremony began at 11:15 a.m. on the State Capitol lawn, with Commissioner Tom Sorel presiding over the start of the race at 11:30 a.m. Various health and running organizations were on hand to speak with employees interested in learning more about running and services offered to foster a healthy lifestyle. Although participation was free, participants and employees were encouraged to bring at least one nonperishable food item to the race which were donated to Second Harvest Food Bank in St. Paul, MN. The event was organized by the Run@Work Day Planning Committee and sponsored by the Hiway Federal Credit Union to coincide with National Run@Work Day, which was created to encourage people to devote some of their break time at work each day to running.

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National Running Awards Highlights

Presented by the Road Runners Club of America Since 1971, the RRCA has honored dedicated individuals for their outstanding service to the RRCA and the sport of distance running through a variety of awards categories. We’re delighted to announce the 2009 National Running Award recipients, and we thank the selection panel volunteers for their time. For more information about the awards presented by the RRCA and to learn more about all of the award winners, visit www.rrca.org/services/national-running-awards/. All award recipients were honored at the 52nd Annual RRCA National Banquet and Running Awards Ceremony held in conjunc-

tion with the RRCA National Convention on April 24, 2010 in Lakeland, Florida. 2010 RRCA DISTANCE RUNNING HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES Established in 1970, the RRCA Distance Running Hall of Fame consists of American citizens who have shown long-term excellence in distance running and/or have made outstanding contributions to the sport. This year, we’re pleased to induct Colleen De Reuck and Libbie Hickman into the RRCA Hall of Fame. You’ll find information about all RRCA Hall of Fame members at www.RRCAHistory.org.

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Colleen De Reuck Colleen De Reuck was born on April 13, 1964 in Vryheid, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa. She now lives in Boulder, Colorado, and became a U.S citizen on Dec. 11, 2000. De Reuck graduated from Stanger High School in KwazuluNatal, South Africa in 1981 and finished college at the University of Port Elizabeth in

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Eastern Cape, South Africa in 1985. Before becoming a U.S. citizen in 2000, she represented South Africa in three Olympics, competing in the marathon in 1992 (9th, 2:39:03), the 10,000m in 1996 (13th, 32:14.69), and the marathon in 2000 (31st, 2:36:58). De Reuck’s first year as a U.S. citizen, 2001, saw her win the USA 8K Championship in 26:16, the Arturo Barrios 10K in 32:35, and the Tufts Health Plan 10K for Women in 32:10. She was also 14th (3rd American) at the New York City Marathon in 2:35:31. She made her first U.S team in 2002 after a 2nd-place finish to Deena Kastor at the USA 8K cross country trials. Kastor and De Reuck then finished 2nd and 3rd, respectively, at the IAAF World Cross Country 8K as they, along with Jen Rhines, won the team Silver medal. In 2003, she was 2nd at the USA Cross Country Champs 8K (29:42), 8th at the World XC Championships 8K (26:49), won the USA Half-Marathon Championship (1:10:00), and was 2nd at the USA Marathon Championships (2:37:41). De Reuck made her fourth Olympic team in 2004, this time as an American, after winning the women’s U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon race in 2:28:25. She finished 39th at the Olympic Games with a time of 2:46:30. Earlier in the year, she won the USA 8K Cross Country race to make her third U.S. cross country team and went on to finish 8th at the World XC Championships. She was also the 2004 USA 15K champion in 49:02. In 2005, at the age of 40, De Reuck again won the USA XC 8K race, this time in 27:24 and was the top U.S. finisher at the World XC Championships (13th, 27:51). She also set a marathon record for masters’ women at the Chicago Marathon, where she finished in 2:28:40. In 2006, De Reuck became a member of the USA’s 8K cross country team for a fifth time, finishing 33rd at the Worlds. Since turning 40, De Reuck has established U.S. master records at eight distances: 5K (15:48), 10K (32:50), 12K (40:48), 15K (49:51), 20K (1:07:21), half marathon (1:11:30), 25K (1:25:15), and marathon (2:28:40). Last year, at 45, she became the oldest woman to win a U.S. championship when she won the New Haven 20K in 1:07:21, the same race where she set a world record (1:05:11) in 1998. 2009 also saw De Reuck lead the Boston Marathon for much of the race; she finished eighth overall in 2:37:57. In the fall, she was second in 2:32:37 at the women’s U.S. Marathon championship race hosted by the Twin Cities Marathon.

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National Running Awards Highlights ning the 1998 half marathon and 10K road championships, and representing the U.S. at three World Championships (1995, ’97, and ’99). A personal favorite win came in 1997, when she won the Bolder Boulder 10K. It was the first time in 14 years that an American woman had won this race in her adopted “native state.” RRCA OUTSTANDING STATE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR 2009 George Rehmet California (Coastal) George Rehmet held the position of RRCA State Representative from 1999 to 2004, winning State Rep of the Year in 2001. After taking a break to devote time to other activities, he returned to the state rep position in 2008 and

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Libby Hickman

2009 RRCA State Rep of the Year George Rehmet (right) with Frank Shorter Christine Jegen

Libbie Hickman Libbie Hickman was born on Feb. 17, 1965, in Billings, Montana. She graduated from high school in 1983 in Cairo, Egypt, where her father was working for an oil company. Hickman began running as a child when she would chase fly balls at her older brothers’ baseball practice and have her dad time her in sprints around the block. She ran track & field in high school and college at Colorado State University. By her own admission, Libbie’s college career was less than stellar. After graduating from CSU in 1987 with a BS in science/physiology and a minor in chemistry, she began a professional running career that lasted 16 years, highlighted by representing the USA in the 10,000m at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. Hickman won major races on the road and track at every distance from 1500m to the half marathon. She had a breakthrough year at road racing in 1991 when she won the ARRA circuit and was ranked as the top woman road racer by Runner’s World magazine. She also won Runner’s World’s top spot in 1998 and 2000, and placed second in 1997 and 1999. (Interestingly, the top-rated runner in 1997 and 1999 was our other 2010 RRCA Hall of Fame inductee, Colleen De Reuck.) Other career highlights include winning the 1999 U.S. 10,000m championship; the 1997 U.S. 5000m championship; finishing fourth at the 1996 Olympic Trials 5000; win-

quickly found himself in the role as the director for the 2009 RRCA National Convention. George has been running since 1981 and his running accomplishments are too numerous to outline in the space available. In addition to running, he has completed more than 100 swims to or from Alcatraz Island, most of them without a wetsuit, in the chilly waters of the San Francisco Bay! George is a teacher and cross country coach at a juvenile detention camp. What RRCA members said about George:

“George has worked tirelessly over the past 12 months or more to bring about the first official physically challenged category in a San Francisco Bay Area road race. It is hard to describe how much it has meant to me, a distance runner who happens to be a leg amputee, to be able to log onto Active.com to register for an event, and check the physically challenged box. I sincerely hope that you bestow this honor upon George, as I believe his inclusive attitude and can-do spirit are exactly what the sport of running needs today and in the future.” – Geoff, Pamakid Runners “George is an attentive and approachable Rep, and has proven this to be so, year-in and year-out. When George returned to the ranks of state reps, he made a concerted effort to get to know my club (new to RRCA) and me personally. He has attended our club’s Saturday morning and Wednesday evening fun runs on multiple occasions, introducing himself to the membership and participating in our run and post-exercise meal. Further, he has attended our annual meeting on multiple occasions and spoken to our group at that forum.” – Jeff, East Bay Front Runners and Walkers “I recommend George Rehmet for Outstanding RRCA State Representative for 2009. I believe that he exemplifies the highest standards of excellence in all that he does for the RRCA. His love for the sport of running is matched by his everyday efforts on behalf of the members he represents. He is the rare person who gives of his time and effort without complaint and always with joy.” – Simone, East Bay Front Runners and Walkers “Through his leadership, the 2009 convention was an extremely successful experience for attendees and host clubs. George traveled to many Bay Area clubs and races to promote the convention, obtain sponsorships, and to support the RRCA. Moreover, he traveled throughout the country to promote the convention. He was tireless in his efforts and spent hundreds of hours on the myriad of details associated with the convention. He helped to develop many of the convention Continued on page 22

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2010 RRCA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS RRCA National 5 K Championship Race the Lakes 5K Lakeland, Florida April 24, 2010 www.RRCAConvention.org/

RRCA National 10 K Championship Kalamazoo Klassic 10 K Kalamazoo, Michigan June 19, 2010 www.kalamazooklassic.com RRCA National 10 Mi Championship Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile Race Washington, DC April 11, 2010 www.cherryblossom.org RRCA National Half Marathon Championship Parkersburg News & Sentinel Half Marathon Parkersburg, West Virginia August 21, 2010 www.newsandsentinelhalfmarathon.com RRCA National Marathon Championship Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon Milwaukee, Wisconsin October 3, 2010 www.badgerlandstriders.org/lfm/ RRCA National Ultra Championship Tahoe Rim Trail 100 M Endurance Run Spooner Lake State Park, Carson City, Nevada July 17, 2010 www.sagebrushstompers.org/trt50

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING 2010 RRCA REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS CENTRAL REGION CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS 5K – Rotary Ramble 5K – DeMotte, IN 10K – Dexter-Ann Arbor Run – Ann Arbor, MI Half Marathon – Glass City Marathon & Half – Toledo, OH 30K – Labor Day 30K Festival of Races – Milford, MI Marathon – Indianapolis Marathon – Indianapolis, IN Ultra – Kal-Haven Trail Run – Kalamzoo, MI SOUTHERN REGION CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS 5K – Woodstock 5K – Anniston, AL 10K – The Old Reliable Run – Raleigh, NC 10 Mile – Red Nose Run – Birmingham, AL 15K – Fort Worth Runners Club Labor Day 15K – Fort Worth, TX Cross Country – Chile Pepper Cross Country Festival – Fayetteville, AR Half Marathon – Germantown Half Marathon – Germantown, TN Marathon – Tallahassee Marathon – Tallahassee, FL WESTERN REGION CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS 5K – Heart & Sole Run – Billings, MT 10K – Mainly Masters 10K – San Diego, CA Half Marathon – San Francisco Half – San Francisco, CA Marathon – Kaiser Permanente Napa Valley Marathon – Napa, CA Ultra – Bulldog 50K – Calabasas, CA EASTERN REGION CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS 10 Mile – Capital 10 Mile – Richmond, VA Half Marathon – Mountain MD Half Marathon – Cumberland, MD Marathon – Maine Marathon – Portland, ME Ultra – Mountain Madness 50K – Ringwood, NJ 5 K – Open for bid 10K – Open for bid

There are still a few distances open for bid, and we hope to fill the slate over the remainder of the year. Only RRCA club and event members may bid, and winning races are provided free bib numbers courtesy of Sigvaris, Inc., Gatorade, and awards, including Sports Authority gift cards for overall, masters and grandmasters winners (some exclusions may apply). For more information, or to bid please visit www.rrca.org/programs/championships/.


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RRCA Award Winners activities using his past convention experiences and listening to other runners. George’s ability to recruit the right people in key volunteer positions was also critical to the success of the convention. This demonstrated George’s positive relationships with the running community.” – Len, Lake Merritt Joggers and Striders RRCA ROAD RACE OF THE YEAR The Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Half Marathon The Kaiser Permanente Half Marathon and 5K takes place in February, typically on Super Bowl Sunday. The race starts in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park on John F. Kennedy Drive east of Stow Lake Drive and finishes on Martin Luther King Drive near the Great Highway. The race is presented by the Pamakid Runners, whose purpose is to promote a healthy lifestyle, support the running community and charitable causes by organizing, volunteering, and participating in running-related and social events in the San Francisco Bay Area. Pamakid Runners host training runs leading up to the race, and all levels are invited to join the training runs. In addition, the race website has online training plans that participants can follow. To ensure that all levels of runners may participate in the event, the race has a four-hour finish time. Three hours into the race, participants who are still on the course are moved to the running path to finish, and the finish line is open for four hours after the event’s start. The Pamakid Runners have donated over $100,000 from race revenues to local charities such as Koret Family House, The Harbor Light Center for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, and Support for Families of Children with Disabilities. The race has served as the RRCA Western Region Half Marathon Championship for several years and is a certified 13.1-mile course that’s ranked as one of the most scenic in the country. The race sells out each year with a field 10,000 participants. RRCA Western Region director David Epstein was in attendance to honor the 2009 RRCA Western Region Half Marathon Champions. The race provides a free booth at the finish line expo for local RRCA members to promote local events, as well as the national RRCA organization. Finally, PamaKid Runners and Kaiser Permanente believe that individuals with a disability deserve the inspiration, support, and opportunity to participate in athletic endeavors that promote healthier, active lifestyles. In order to support that belief, the 2010 Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Half Marathon introduced a Physically Challenged Athlete (PC) category for male and female participants. This category requires pre-registration as a PC Athlete and will be excluded from age group categories.

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RRCA ANNOUNCES NATIONAL RUNNING AWARD RECIPIENTS Since 1971, the RRCA has honored dedicated individuals for their outstanding service to the RRCA and the sport of distance running. We are delighted to announce the 2009 National Running Award recipients, and we thank the selection panel volunteers for their time. For more information on each award category and to learn how to nominate a deserving individual from your organization in 2010, visit rrca.org/services/awards. RRCA LONG DISTANCE RUNNING HALL OF FAME Inductees: Colleen De Reuck and Libby Hickman Selection Panel: Jim Oaks, Chair, Amby Burfoot, Jacqueline Hansen, Joe Henderson, Don Kardong, John Parker, Lisa Rainsberger, Steve Shostrom, Ken Young, Kim Jones, and Bill Rodgers RRCA SCOTT HAMILTON OUTSTANDING CLUB PRESIDENT OF THE YEAR David Purinton, Huntsville Track Club, Huntsville, AL Selection Panel: Brent Ayer, Libby Jones, and Mark Grandonico BROWNING ROSS SPIRIT OF THE RRCA AWARD Deborah D. “Debbie” Magilke, Yellowstone Rim Runners, Billings, MT Selection Panel: David Epstein, Gary Corbitt, and Dan Edwards RRCA OUTSTANDING STATE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR George Rehmet, State Representative for California (Coastal Region) Selection Panel: Brent Ayer, Dan Edwards, and Kelly Richards ROAD RUNNERS OF THE YEAR • Open Male: Meb Keflezighi, Mammoth Track Club, Mammoth Lakes, CA • Open Female: Amy Yoder Begley, Nike Oregon Project, Beaverton, OR • Male Master: Jon Williams, Gold Coast Runners, Miami, FL • Female Master: Joan Benoit Samuelson Selection Panel: Mitchell Garner, Jeff Horowitz, Frank Shorter, and Larry Eder RRCA JERRY LITTLE EXCELLENCE IN JOURNALISM AWARDS • Small Club Newsletter: Runners Hi!, Ed Hardee (Editor), Amelia Island Runners, Fernandina Beach, FL • Large Club Newsletter: The Running Account, Esther Dill (Editor), North Carolina Running Club - Raleigh, NC • E-Newsletter: Sooner Soundings, Marlyss Bird (Editor), Pamakid Runners, San Francisco, CA • Club Writer of the Year: Mark Lucas, Cornbelt Running Club, Bettendorf, IA • Journalism Excellence: Roger Robinson, Running Times Magazine Selection Panel: Marlene Atwood, Lisa Herbert, and Susan Zevin OUTSTANDING CLUB WEBSITE AWARDS Each year, one award is given to a small club (250 and fewer members) and one to a large club (over 250 members) from the nominations received. Then, an overall website winner is chosen from the two finalists. Overall Winner: Chattahoochee Road Runners (small club winner) www.crrclub.com, Chattahoochee, GA Honorable Mention: Lake Grapevine Runners and Walkers (large club winner) www.runnersandwalkers.com, Grapevine, TX Selection Panel: Chuck Bartlett, Chris Burch, Michael Bowen, Charles Cline ROD STEELE OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR Diane Perriello, Summit Athletic Running Club, Cuyahoga Falls, OH Selection Panel: George Rehmet, Nancy Hobbs, and Bee McLeod KURT STEINER CHILDREN'S DEVELOPMENTAL AWARD Ron Beasley, Ann Arbor Track Club (AATC), Ann Arbor, MI Selection Panel: Dan Kesterson, Eve Mills, and Lena Hollmann OUTSTANDING BEGINNING RUNNING PROGRAM AWARD Women Run/Walk Memphis led by Terri Clarke and DJ Watson, Memphis Runners Track Club, Memphis, TN Selection Panel: Lena Hollmann, Tony Flesch, and Simone Adair RRCA ROAD RACE OF THE YEAR The Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Half Marathon hosted by the Pamakid Runners, San Francisco, CA Selection Panel: Mark Grandonico, Libby Jones, and John Devitt

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EXPERIENCE NEW ENGLAND’S SPECTACULAR AUTUMN EASY TO GET HERE...

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OCTOBER 9, 2010

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Hotels that fit your budget, all within two blocks of the race start and finish.

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Walk to everything, from the expo to the Pasta Supper, from race start to great spectator spots.

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Named the GREENEST MARATHON IN AMERICA by The Council for Responsible Sport, 2009

www.inghartfordmarathon.com

ING Hartford Marathon and Half Marathon magnificent finish under the Memorial Arch.


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Training Tips

Maintaining Motivation By Barbara J. Walker, Ph.D.

Beep, beep, beep … Beep, beep, beep. 5 a.m. You rub the sleep from your eyes. Make a cup of coffee, and assess the conditions outside. The soft glow of a sunrise-to-be is growing on the horizon. The air is cool and comfortable. Your legs are beginning to show signs of an eagerness to get moving. There’s a restless anticipation building inside. Check list time: Shorts, shirt, shoes? Check. GPS? Check. Water? Check. It’s GO time! For most committed runners, the preceding scenario is a pretty normal occurrence during the on-season. It’s a situation where the motivation to train comes compliments of the morning sunlight. But what do you do when the conditions are not so favorable, when the air is cold, and it is raining or snowing, and windy? When the sun is on vacation and you’re feeling that you should be, as well, just as you might find during the off-season? Motivation during a training season is not very difficult for most serious runners. In fact, in my practice as a sport psychologist, I often have discussions with my clients about the risks of being overly zealous and “too motivated,” and about helping them carve in easy/rest days and more sleep. Training, just like the seasons, has to change from time to time to be the most fruitful. The winter offseason is the time to build your strength for your upcoming season, allow other muscle groups to become stronger, and especially allow some recovery. It’s a great time to do some cross-training, including swimming, indoor cycling, strength work, pilates, and/or yoga, or just take more time to rest. It’s when we build on the hard work and successes of our recent past, and prepare for even greater success in the future. So, we now have the perfect justification to train in the off-season, but how do we find the motivation to do it? What tools do we have to keep the fire burning inside and the heart pumping? Two of the most powerful and most utilized tools in the sports psychologist’s toolbox are goal setting and visualization. We’ve all heard about the importance of setting goals, but few people know how to set them effectively. The goal-setting process is simple in theory, but takes critical thinking and planning to do it well. Teaching yourself to set realistic, yet challenging personal performance-oriented goals will allow you to do the work necessary to achieve those goals, allow you to see improved performance, lead to increased confidence, and ultimately lead to your success as an athlete.

The goal-setting process consists of seven steps. Take your time with each step and write your answers for each point down on paper.

1 DEFINE WHAT YOU WANT TO ACCOMPLISH THIS YEAR. What did you do last year? What excites you and gets you looking forward to getting up in the morning to actually look forward to your workouts? Do you want to try something completely different or do you want to set a new PR? Think big (but realistically) and imagine where you want to go with running this year. See it and feel it. For goal-setting purposes, we’ll call this your Outcome Goal. Now, with outcome goals, it’s OK to think in terms of placement, but we have no control over placement in a race. We all really want to be in first place. You never hear someone say that they hope they come in fifth, right? Assume that all your competitors want first, as well; that will be a given. I suggest you set time goals or some performance-oriented goal for yourself, something you have more control over. You could have the best race of your life and still not be in first place. If you set a placement goal, you may tend to be disappointed in your race, rather than celebrate the fact that you just had a personal best.

2 KNOW WHERE YOU ARE RIGHT NOW. How are you doing right now? Get feedback from your training partners, life partners, and/or coaches. What’s your typical training and/or racing pace? How strong are you?

3 BE HONEST ABOUT WHAT YOU NEED TO DEVELOP. This is a tough, yet critical step. You will need to be objective with yourself to know where the gaps are! Again, get feedback from others. Dig deep and put your ego aside; it will help you in the long run. Would it be beneficial for you to work on your core? On hills or speedwork? Improve your confidence?

4 SET SUB-GOALS. Break down your outcome/season-long goal into specific concentrated areas, like physical, nutrition, and mental skills. Continued on page 26

We recommend, as with all fitness and health issues, you consult with your physician before instituting any changes in your fitness program. 24 • ClubRunning S p r i n g 2 0 1 0

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Training Tips

5 CREATE PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES FOR EACH SUB-GOAL CATEGORY. This is the most challenging and where most persons fall short. This is the area that will help you the most in making daily gains, and help you maintain motivation as the season progresses. Planning for daily improvement helps maintain motivation and each practice becomes high quality. With performance objectives, you want to be as specific and personally performance oriented as possible. As an example, if you are currently eating one serving of vegetables per day, but know that you would like and need to get in five to seven servings per day, instead of writing “Eat more vegetables,” you would say, “Eat 5–7 servings each day.”

6 COMMIT YOURSELF COMPLETELY. Make sure the goals you have set are really what you want to accomplish, and that you are capable of accomplishing over a period of time. Committing yourself means writing down your goals and objectives. Share them with a partner or friend. Post them where you will see them to keep them at the forefront of your mind. Creating a daily or weekly check-off list will help you stay motivated, as well as allow you to see what areas you’re doing well in and not so well in.

7 CONTINUALLY MONITOR YOUR PROGRESS. Be flexible and change the plan when necessary. Sometimes your goals will change based on illnesses, injuries, or quicker/slower improvements than expected. My experience is that really committed runners (sometimes bordering on being obsessive and anxious about their training) forget to listen to their bodies and monitor themselves. Monitoring and being flexible will help you gain the best shape by avoiding illnesses and injuries. In addition to goal setting, another exceptional skill you can develop to support motivation is visualization, or imagery. Visualization can be defined as using all the senses to create or recreate in the mind a clear and vivid picture of the desired performance and outcome. You may have experienced visualization as you read the introduction to this article. As you begin to develop your visualization skills, your goal will be to see and feel your vision as crisply and clearly, and in real time (rather than slow motion). To develop the skill, start with just a few minutes at a time. Being in a relaxed, comfortable, and quiet setting is key so that you can avoid distraction. Practice initially with your eyes closed. Doing a relaxation or breathing exercise prior to visualizing also helps you create the right mindset prior to visualizing. Once your goal is defined, each night before you go to bed and/or prior to your training runs, take about 10 minutes to visualize yourself performing the race or run excellently, at your desired pace. Think of this skill as needing development over a period of time, just like your endurance in running; it’s more effective to practice visualization daily for weeks, rather than one time just before a big race. Feel and see what you want your body to be doing. Create as much detail as possible. For example, if you’re visualizing a marathon, put yourself at the starting line, feeling relaxed, yet ready, or you can put yourself visually at mile 18, allowing your hands and shoulders to be relaxed, head up, feeling great mentally and physically. Having a purpose is important. If you don’t know where you’re going, then any path will do. Developing your goals will help you define your path. Motivation and drive come from constant focus on the destination and then seeing yourself moving through a known process for getting there. Setting goals and seeing yourself performing that goal is part of a process of identifying why you do what you do, and ultimately, defines what kind of athlete you not only want to be, but are going to be.

Dr. Barbara Walker is a performance psychologist who provides consultation to high-level athletes and business professionals in the area of peak performance. She earned her doctorate in clinical psychology with an emphasis in exercise and sport psychology, and is a licensed clinical psychologist and certified consultant. Dr. Walker is a regular presenter at national and local professional conferences and workshops, as well as a regular contributor to magazines. She has appeared as a guest expert on multiple radio and television programs. She serves on the board of directors of the Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), as the Professional Services Division head, and the Cincinnati Flying Pig marathon. She is a member of both the American Psychological Association and AASP, as well as a member of the sport psychology registry with the United States Olympic Committee. She demonstrates a passion for peak performance principles applying them in her personal life as a competitive athlete in the sports of marathon, triathlon, and duathlon, where she is currently nationally ranked. She is currently the Ohio State time trialing champion in her age group. Visit her website at www.centerforhumanperformance.com

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RRCA FACEBOOK FRIENDS SHARE THEIR TIPS ON STAYING MOTIVATED Stephanie from California: The #1 motivator for me is to sign up for races. Having a date set on the calendar only pushes you to keep training and reaching that goal ’til race time. Aside from a race, I think it's good to keep running just to be heart healthy and stay in shape. Running truly helps keep the pounds off and gives you the energy you never thought you had before. Carl Sniffen (former RRCA President) from Oregon: Pick a target: a race, a reunion, a mountain running trip and gear your training towards that target. When you get out of the shower, look in the mirror. See something you don’t like, start running (get dressed first). See something you like, same advice to keep it that way. Use variety: trails, cross country, roads. Take a break periodically—a complete break of at least 1 to 2 weeks. Linda from Illinois: For me, it’s pretty simple— when I don’t run, I’m not myself. Running is my meditation and I miss it when I don’t get out there. Cross-training is great, but it isn’t the same for me. So running is a habit with me. I love running first thing in the morning when it’s dark. It’s the way I start my day. If I can’t run for some reason in the morning, I pack my gear, change and run right after work, from work, or change and drive home. Then there’s no chance I don’t run; I’m ready to go! RRCA Certified Coach Jeff McMahon: What motivates me? I wish I could say I’ve always stood as a shining star of self-discipline when it came to my running. Uncompromising, stalwart, never relying on others to get me out the door on those days that motivation tends to be a bit lacking. The best athletes possess that quality, and I do okay, but I could do better. In truth, my training sword became much sharper with the establishment of the Team McGraw Endurance Program. Through this program, athletes are guided and trained for events of their choosing while they offer their support for the Tug McGraw Foundation and quality of life brain tumor research. I carry the keys as director of the program. Kevin [Leathers, also an RRCA-certified coach] is an accomplished ultramarathoner, triathlete, and Ironman finisher; I’m one of those “get to the finish line” guys. But early on, Kevin and I sought out RRCA for their coaching course as a way to better help all our folks meet every goal they seek. I am inspired by the survivor of a brain tumor that didn’t complete her first marathon until after her original diagnosis; a father that trained for his first marathon in honor of the fight currently underway with his own son; a wife who ran a half-marathon to inspire her survivor husband, who later completes the same distance at her side. Remembering that I’m saddled up with folks like these, on those “I don’t feel like runnin’ today” days, that gets me out the door quicker than anything. I’m proud to stand with ’em, I wanna train for ’em … And when the gun fires … I’m gonna be one of ’em.

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2010 SPRING SHOE REVIEW ach new season brings with it the anticipation of improved design and new materials. The shoes that endured our weartesting Edesign process represent the best shoes for a variety of feet and runners. The influence of “Natural Motion” and a reexamination of and available materials can be seen in the changes that have been made in a number of the shoes. Many shoes in all categories have been lightened up and have lower profiles, though there are still a number of heavyweight shoes with heavy-duty motion stabilizing technologies, or multiple layers of plush cushioning. Such changes have further established some best practices that improve overall comfort. All brands have their own lasts and formulations of basic materials that allow them to address the majority of runners’ requirements for fit and feel. The number of offerings in the Neutral and Performance shoe categories continues to grow, while those in the Motion Stabilizing category, though smaller in number, are becoming more precisely tuned to give better support and a more efficient transition from heel to toe-off. While there are some new patents in both design and use of materials, a number of innovations have spread throughout the industry so rapidly that they have already become best practices, and the consumer is the ultimate beneficiary. Shoe companies use slightly different lasts (the foot-shaped forms on which shoes are made) and proprietary midsole formulas, and those result in a wide range of offerings on the market and improved chances that runners can find a shoe to match their fitness and biomechanics. It may take a bit of time to check out all the options, but you’ll know the right shoe for you when you try it. We offer this Review as a starting point.

Welcome to the Running Network’s 2010 Spring Shoe Review! arefoot running has been a hot topic of late: Should you run in shoes or do they hinder your natural movement? This discussion surfaces every decade or so, and in my 30+ years in the sport, I’ve developed my own take on this, which was corroborated by Cregg Weinmann at last year’s Running Network meetings. All things being equal, a runner should run in the least amount of shoe they can, depending on their biomechanical needs. It’s true that some people can run barefoot or in minimalist shoes on long runs, etc., but others risk injury that way. I suggest what my college coach, Dan Durante, had me do: Take a varied approach. I ran on grass, dirt trails, roads and tracks. I ran on beaches barefoot or grass tracks once in a while. I ran in light shoes during fast sessions and had my favorite (heavier) training shoes for long runs and easy days. I also noted that the better shape I got in, the lighter the shoes I could successfully train in. Just remember that this is a personal decision about what

AWARD WINNERS

BEST SHOE Neutral

SP

RIN G 2010

BEST SHOE Performance SP

Scott Makani II Best Shoe—Performance

RIN G 2010

BEST SHOE Motion Stabilizing

SP

K-Swiss Keahou II Saucony ProGrid Triumph 7 Best Shoe—Neutral

Nike Zoom Structure Triax+ 13 Best Shoe—Motion Stabilizing

RIN G 2010

BEST NEW SHOE SPRING 2010

BEST RENOVATION SPRING 2010

RRCA.org

adidas adiStar Solution Best New Shoe

Brooks Glycerin 8 Best Renovation

works for you in your own set of circumstances. Find the right shoe or shoes for you, and add some variety to your training surfaces—you’ll have healthier feet for it! As always, thanks to Cregg Weinmann, our RN footwear reviewer, Kristen Cerer, our designer, Marg Sumner, our proofreader, and Christine Johnson, our RN project manager. We ask you to use the Running Network’s Shoe Review as the starting point in your journey to find your perfect running shoe. Go to your local running store (we track 683 of them at runningnetwork.com’s Store Locator) to finish the journey!

Larry Eder President, Running Network LLC

Reviewer: Cregg Weinmann Project Coordinator/Editor: Christine Johnson Designer: Kristen Cerer Proofreader: Marg Sumner, Red Ink Editorial Services Shoe Photography: Daniel Saldaña, Cregg Weinmann Advertising Sales: Running Network LLC, Larry Eder, President, 920.563.5551, ext. 112, larry.eder@gmail.com Publisher: Larry Eder, 608.239.3785 Website: www.runningnetwork.com For a Media Kit, please visit our website. This 2010 Spring Shoe Review is produced independently by Running Network LLC for its partner publications. All shoes reviewed were tested by experienced, competitive runners who were matched to the biomechanical purpose of each shoe model. Copyright © 2010 by Running Network LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Running Network LLC. Running Network LLC and its partner publications suggest that, as with all fitness activities, you meet with a healthcare professional before beginning or changing your fitness regimen.

Running Network LLC Partners

B

American Track & Field www.american-trackandfield.com Athletes Only www.atf-athlete.com Athletics (Canada) www.otfa.ca Austin Fit www.austinfitmagazine.com California Track & Running News www.caltrack.com Club Running www.rrca.org/clubrunning Coaching Athletics Quarterly www.coachingathleticsq.com Colorado Runner www.coloradorunnermag.com Get Active! www.getactivemagazine.com Greater Long Island Running Club’s Footnotes www.glirc.org Latinos Corriendo www.latinoscorriendo.com Michigan Runner www.michiganrunner.net Missouri Runner & Triathlete www.morunandtri.com Running Journal & Racing South www.running.net RunMinnesota www.runmdra.org RunOhio www.runohio.com Track & Field News www.trackandfieldnews.com USATF’s Fast Forward www.usatf.org USATF–New England’s Exchange Zone www.usatfne.org The Winged Foot www.nyac.org The Winged M www.themac.com Youth Runner www.youthrunner.com

Running Network 2010 Spring Shoe Review

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SEE FULL REVIEW AT WWW.THEWINGEDM.COM CLUBRUNNING.NET

Read our complete reviews at

BEST SHOE Motion Stabilizing

SP

ASICS GT-2150—$100

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 10—$105

RIN G 2010

Nike Zoom Structure Triax+ 13— $100

BEST NEW SHOE

BEST RENOVATION

SPRING 2010

SPRING 2010

Pearl Izumi Fuel—$100

BEST SHOE Neutral

SP

adidas adiStar Solution—$120

adidas Supernova Glide 2— $100

RIN G 2010

Brooks Glycerin 8—$130

K-Swiss Keahou II—$100

BEST SHOE Neutral

SP

RIN G 2010

Puma Complete Ventis—$100

Saucony ProGrid Triumph 7—$130

Under Armour Apparition II—$95

Karhu Forward Fulcrum—$130

Mizuno Waverider 13—$100

Zoot Ultra TT 3.0—$130

ASICS Gel DS Trainer 15—$110

Mizuno Wave Elixer 5—$105

BEST SHOE Performance SP

New Balance 740—$85

Nike LunarElite+ 5—$100

Reebok Premier SF Attack—$90

RIN G 2010

Scott Makani II—$110

Running Network 2010 Spring Shoe Review

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Potluck Recipe If your name falls in the alphabetical group that’s asked to bring appetizers to a potluck event, consider these great, easy ideas for your next get-together.

A Is for Appetizers

Hummus and Pita Bread You can find pre-made hummus in most grocery stores, but consider impressing your running friends by bringing your own homemade hummus to your next event. You will need: 1 16 oz. can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans ¼ cup liquid from can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans 3–5 tablespoons lemon juice 1½ tablespoons tahini 2 tablespoons fresh minced garlic ½ teaspoon (or less) salt 2 tablespoons olive oil Drain the chickpeas and set aside the ¼ cup of liquid from the can. Combine all ingredients in blender or food processor. Add the ¼ cup of liquid from the chickpeas and blend/process until thoroughly mixed and smooth (approximately 2 min. in a blender, 1–1½ min. in a food processor). Spoon hummus into a serving dish and serve with cut strips of pita bread or pita chips.

7-Layer Dip and Chips

BigStockPhoto.com

1 16 oz. can vegetarian refried beans 1 package (1 oz.) taco or guacamole seasoning mix 1 16 oz. container low-fat sour cream 1 16 oz. jar of salsa (we recommend medium spice) 1 large tomato, chopped ½ cup chopped onion 1 6 oz. can black olives (drained, then chopped) 2 cups shredded taco-style cheese Optional: 1 small head of iceberg lettuce, shredded Baked tortilla chips Mix the refried beans and seasoning mix together until smooth. Spoon the beans into a 9x9 glass baking dish, covering the bottom of the dish. Next, smooth on a layer of sour cream, followed by a layer of salsa. Top with the cheese, tomatoes, onions, black olives, and lettuce (if using). Serve with baked tortilla chips.

CLUB RUNNING RACE ADS To advertise in this publication, please contact Paul Banta at OSE Productions, Inc. phone: 503.969.4147 • fax: 503.620.4052 • email: paul@oseproductions.com

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Club Running  

April-June 2010

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