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BEIJING DIARY… ON THE COVER…

Last summer, I was fortunate to be credentialed for my fifth Summer Olympic Games. Our editor, James Dunaway, who celebrated his 80th birthday in Beijing, has been credentialed for 14 Summer Olympics! I spent 20 days in Beijing, China, covering the track & field portion of the Olympics, interviewing great athletes and coaches. Thanks to my friends at Reebok, I had a place about a 40minute taxi ride from the Bird’s Nest Stadium. Most days, I would get up about 10 in the morning local time (it would have been 10 p.m. the night before in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin), take a walk, then grab a taxi and head into Beijing. The 40-minute taxi ride cost me about US$7 or 60 yuan. I always had my intended location written in Chinese, so the taxi drivers were good at getting me around town. The volunteers at the stadium were quite helpful. Most were your age, 15–22, and they would speak English with us as we grabbed our McCafe coffee at the Media Press Centre and walked 20 minutes to the stadium. Most sessions, I was there with two good friends— Pat Butcher, sports correspondent for The Financial Times, and James O’Brien, publisher of Winged Foot, the magazine of the New York Athletic Club. We were mesmerized by 10 nights and days of Olympic track & field. Our routine was to walk to most places, as did most Chinese. There were bikes, old bikes, everywhere. On my walks, I would see grandparents pedaling slowly on their old bikes with the grandchild sitting on a back seat. Unemployment doesn’t exist in China. I met young people—your age—picking the weeds out of Communist officials’ front yards. Most of the Chinese Army regulars, the few who carried guns, were 18–20 years old. I have always wanted to go to China. I will return to China. With 5,000 years of cultural history and amazing natural beauty, the Chinese people have much to be proud of. I was at odds with how their government controlled the media, and disallowed peaceful protests during the Games, but my experiences each night, dining in small Chinese restaurants on fresh fish, vegetables and rice, were memorable. One night, Pat, James and I were sitting in a restaurant having dinner. We had fresh fish (picked out of an aquarium on the wall), donkey with peppers (spicy, tasted like beef), sweet and sour chicken, and lots of fresh vegetables. The cooks finished cooking and sat down next to us, having their large bowls of steaming noodles and fish. But this night was special as the cooks had brought out a fresh watermelon, sliced it with a huge butcher knife and offered us pieces off the end of the knife. The track & field had the largest crowds, but for reasons known only to NBC, you didn’t see much of the track & field in the U.S. The U.S. team had good days and bad days. They won 24 medals, but not in the two short relays, and with Tyson Gay hurt, the chances of a best-ever performance by the U.S. were long gone. My high moments for the U.S. were: Shalane Flanagan in the women’s

Shalane Flanagan is our cover athlete. She is shown running the 10,000 meters in Beijing, where she took the bronze medal in an new American record of 30:22.22!

Photo: Victah Sailor, PhotoRun

3 BEIJING DIARY 4 CROSS COUNTRY SHOE REVIEWS Volume 13, Number 4 Fall/Winter 2008 shootingstarmediabiz@gmail.com Group Publisher Larry Eder 608.239.3785 larry.eder@gmail.com Group Editor Christine Johnson

6 NIKE CROSS NATIONALS 7 THE ESSENTIALS — TIPS 9 THE ESSENTIALS #2 — TIPS 12 CHASING THE LIGHTNING BOLT

Editor James Dunaway 512.261.8354 jodunaway@sbcglobal.net Proofreading Marg Sumner RedInkEditorial.com Design/Layout Two Fish Design Writers Kirby Lee James Dunaway Larry Eder Mark Winitz Photographers Victah Sailer (PhotoRun) Lisa Coniglio (PhotoRun) Kirby Lee Printer/Prep W. D. Hoard & Sons Fort Atkinson, WI Ad Sales Peter Koch Weser 310.836.2642 pvadmag@yahoo.com National Sales Peter Koch-Weser pkwadvmag@yahoo.com Special Projects Adam Johnson-Eder 608.957.2159 atflistings@gmail.com Proud Member of The Running Network, LLC.

Athletes Only is produced, published and owned by Shooting Star Media, Inc., PO Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538-0067; 920.568.8142 phone; 920.563.7298 fax; Christine Johnson, President; Larry Eder, Vice President. Publisher assumes no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsiblity or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright © 2008 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the Publisher. Athletes Only is not related to or endorsed by any other entity or corporation with a similar name and is solely owned by Shooting Star Media, Inc. Publisher recommends, as with all fitness and health issues, you consult with your physician before instit u t i n g a n y changes in your fitness program.

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AO • FALL/WINTER 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com

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REVIEWS

Cross Country

by Cregg Weinmann

T

he 2008 cross country season is looming, complete with a new batch of shoes designed for traction and lightness. This season’s offerings are familiar, each with a little something for all aficionados of the hill and dale sport. As always, the versatility of cross country racing shoes is their adaptable traction on varying terrain and their protective cushioning, despite their low-profile design. Each has a subtly different fit to allow runners to find a racing shoe for their individual feet. Cross country spiked and spikeless models nearly mirror each other in styling and weight, with spikes providing a marginally better grip on muddy or soggy ground. Cross country spikes are designed to perform best on all-natural courses, while the spikeless versions, which have integral outersole nubs of some sort, generally handle all surfaces, including indoor or outdoor tracks. If you’re looking to make a purchase that will transition from cross country season to track season, consider the one of the spikeless options here.

adidas adiZero Belligerence

adidas RLH Cross

The Belligerence is the first adiZero cross country shoe and, thanks to adidas’ experience, it’s right on target. Available in a spiked version only, it features a flexible, rubbery spikeplate that’s covered with dozens of multi-directional lugs surrounding the 6 spike wells. A thin layer of CM-EVA midsole provides a bit of protection with its very low-profile and responsive ride. The upper uses minimal synthetic overlays with the HF-welded bands from the eyestay to the bottom of the shoe doing the heavy lifting. The tongue is secured in the interior all along the medial side to shore up the foot and provide additional support. On the lateral side, it’s held in place by an elastic band that flexes with the foot while keeping the tongue in place. The mesh used in the upper allows a bit of stretch that improves the fit, but is strategically reinforced to provide a balance between freedom and structure.

After a lengthy run on store shelves, the Neptune has been replaced by the RLH, in both spiked and spikeless versions. RLH (an abbreviation for “Run Like He!!”) takes a cue from the adiZero line and features a more streamlined design than did recent editions of the Neptune. The upper is well tailored with a minimalist approach, but has just enough Lightstrike foam for comfort in the ankle collar and heel. The low-profile midsole offers enough protection without extra weight, and its thin enough that it doesn’t hinder flexibility. Wellplaced Traxion lugs in both the heel and forefoot provide an effective grip, with enough give to provide a little cushioning on hard surfaces. Both spiked and spikeless versions provide the extra traction needed for sloppy conditions.

“Very pleased with the great fit. The traction was the best feature, like an extension of my foot, no, more like part of it, the way it flexed and moved with it.”

“Fit hugs foot without unpleasant pressure anywhere, ideal for racing flat. No feeling of being out of control racing downhill, traction is just right.” Price: $60 Spiked/Spikeless Weight: 7.9 oz. (men’s 11) Spikeless/8.2 oz. (men’s 11) with 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

Price: $90 Spiked Weight: 7.4 oz. (men’s 11) with 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

ASICS Hyper XC2/XCS2 Hyper Rocketgirl XC2/XCS2 The Hyper cross country series, for men and women, has undergone an update which offers improvement at several turns. The value-oriented price holds steady despite increases throughout the industry. The CMSpEVA midsole, lugged outersole, and rubber Trusstic element continue to provide effective support, cushioning, and traction. The unisex sizing remains with the Hyper XC2/XCS2, as does the women’s last for the Hyper Rocketgirl XC2/XCS2. The upper retains the water-shedding, closed mesh though the rand but the overlays have been pared down, helping to shave almost 3 grams of weight. That’s not much of drop, but as long as support and durability aren’t compromised, lighter is always better. The spikeless version is effective for all surfaces and indoor and outdoor competitions, making it a good choice if you’re also looking forward to track season.

“This shoe has a great fit to it, even the heel area has a nice snug feel. The cushioning is low-profile with a minimalistic feel, just enough cushion and grip for racing with nothing more.”

Mizuno Wave Kaze 4 For more than 5 years, the Wave Kaze has been consistent thanks to the dialed-in Wave Plate, midsole, and outersole combination. This year, the Kaze continues with what has worked best, and still managed to lighten the shoe by redesigning the upper, thinning out the mesh with a sandwich of Airmesh over closed mesh. Excess material in the overlays has been trimmed, accounting for more than half an ounce coming out of the shoe. The last and sizing continue unchanged with unisex sizes fitting the bulk of the runners, and the women’s shoe taking care of the smaller and narrower feet.

“Fit [is] snug all around, and they work amazingly well on hills. Good traction from the little nubbin-y things on the bottom. Feel light and fast.” Price: $75 Spiked/Spikeless Weight: 8.2 oz. (men’s 11) Spikeless/8.8 oz. (men’s 11) with 6 spikes; 5.7 oz. (women’s 8) Spikeless/6.3 oz. with 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

Price: $55 Spiked/$50 Spikeless Weight: 8.4 oz. (men’s 11) Spikeless/9.1 oz. (men’s 11) with 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, close-fitting toe box

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AOAO • FALL/WINTER • SUMMER 2008 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com • www.atf-athlete.com

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REVIEWS

Cross Country Nike Zoom Waffle Racer VI & Zoom Waffle XC VII

The Nike 2008 cross country season amounts to a back-to-the-drawing board for the Nike Waffle offerings. The upper’s tailoring is familiarly snug, reflecting the spike that it is. The midsole and spikeplate/outersole have recognizable aspects—the aggressive chevron-shaped “Waffle” rubber and the CM-EVA midsole—but the switch to a thin layer of thermoplastic in the midfoot has taken significant weight out of the shoe, a whopping 2 ounces. The upper also contributed to the weight loss, with gauze-y mesh and open mesh sandwiched together, with a soft, synthetic suede arch band for fit and comfort.

“These shoes feel good; they are light, offer good traction, and just enough protection for cross country racing.” Price: $50 Spikeless/$60 Spiked Weight: 6.4 oz. (men’s 11) Spikeless/6.8 oz. (men’s 11) with 4 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

Nike Jana Star Waffle III & Jana Star XC III

The Jana Star series benefits from the changes to its sibling the Waffle Racer, the men’s half of this pair. Significantly, it has dropped over an ounce in weight—directly attributable to changes in the midsole. The midfoot now sports a thin, thermoplastic layer of support in place of the much heavier rubber from before, without sacrificing protection from the cushioning and the thermoplastic layer that protects from rocky surfaces. The upper has been reworked to internalize the structural overlays of the previous version, again at a weight savings. One of the ways that the Jana differs from the men’s versions is the open mesh over the toe with a different sandwich of meshes from the midfoot through the heel. Sueded lining in the heel and just in front of the arch offer comfort where the shoe fits the snuggest.

“I really like the shoes overall. Love the color, and they feel fast! Lacing feels secure and strong, won‘t let me down. Maybe best of all, the fit is comfortably snug, but soft against my foot.” Price: $50 Spikeless/$60 Spiked Weight: 4.9 oz. (women’s 8) Spikeless/5.1 oz. (women’s 8) with 4 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

Reebok Velocity Waffle II & Velocity XC II

The updated Velocity retains the effective parts of the shoe, while introducing some improvements. The proven midsole/outersole, with its dependable traction and cushioning for harder surfaces, does equally well on the soft surfaces. The upper contributes to the lighter weight with a new, closed mesh and a bit of water-resistant, rubbery overlays combined with good support from its Vector stripes. The narrow, sueded overlays on the edging add protection and a little structure. Overall, the supportive, glove-like fit has been maintained to continue to provide Reebok’s version of low-profile design.

“Reebok has steadily provided a shoe that works great for my cross country racing. They fit me, the traction is reliable, and the low profile gives me a feel for the course.” Price: $50 Spikeless/$55 Spiked Weight: 7.9 oz. (men’s 11) Spikeless/8.4 oz. (men’s 11) with 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, glove-like toe box

Saucony Shay XC

The Shay XC becomes Saucony’s new cross country option to the Kilkenny. Named for Ryan Shay, the late elite marathoner and cross country All-America selection, it’s aimed at the fastest performances. The upper features an open mesh with touches of supportive overlays—it’s minimal but enough. Inside, there’s a soft, flexible sleeve stitched to the sides of the tongue and secured along the edges of the Strobel board. This sleeve moves with the foot, offering a close fit and reducing friction. The midsole is nicely cushioned, especially for a racer. The outersole features the old-school Saucony triangular lugs, which really grip on a wide variety of surfaces, and a fun “footprint” in a second color of rubber. The combination of performance and comfort add up to a hardworking cross country racer—just like its namesake.

“This shoe was a pleasant surprise—traction, cushioning, breathable, comfortable on the foot—it really performs.”

Price: $60 Spikeless/$65 Spiked Weight: 7.2 oz. (men’s 11) Spikeless/7.7 oz. (men’s 11) with 6 spikes Fit: snug heel, close-fitting toe box

Cregg Weinmann is footwear and running products reviewer for the Running Network LLC. A competitive runner for the past 43 years, he also has coached runners at all levels for over 25 years. He can be reached via fax at 661.872.1233 or via e-mail at shuz2run@lightspeed.net. Copyright © 2008 by Running Network LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of the Running Network LLC. Reprinted here with permission.

AOAO • FALL/WINTER • SUMMER 2008 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com • www.atf-athlete.com

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NXN:NXN

11/18/08

9:06 AM

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For the first time in harrier history, a single race—Nike Cross Nationals—will crown both individual and team national champions. Just as in past Nike Team Nationals events, the 22 best teams of each gender will compete. Only difference is, this year they'll be joined by the 45 fastest individuals from non-qualifying teams. It's true cross country, and a true national championship, whether you compete solo or for the team. All high school runners are invited to prove who has the most guts on their stretch of turf and toe the line at the Nike Cross Regionals.

Photo Credit: Nike Communications

Nike Cross Nationals Midwest Regional Open, closes Nov 09 2008 at 11:59 PM CST When: November 15, 2008 Where: Terre Haute, IN Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Geoff Wayton (Gwayton@mymail.indstate.edu) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are in the NXN Midwest Region: Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan & Missouri.

Nike Cross Nationals Heartland Regional Open, closes Nov 09 2008 at 11:59 PM CST When: November 15, 2008 Where: Sioux Falls, SD Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Kristi Rieger (riegalizer@sio.midco.net) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are in the NXN Heartland Region: South Dakota, North Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska & Wisconsin.

Nike Cross Nationals Northwest Regional Open, closes Nov 09 2008 at 11:59 PM PST When: November 15, 2008 Where: Boise, ID Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Ryan Canning (ryancanning@netzero.net) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are in the NXN Northwest Region: Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Alaska &, Hawaii.

Nike Cross Nationals Southwest Regional Open, closes Nov 16 2008 at 11:59 PM PST When: November 22, 2008 Where: Tempe, AZ Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Jeff Guy (JGuy5048@aol.com) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are in the NXN Southwest Region: Arizona, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada & Wyoming.

Nike Cross Nationals South Regional Open, closes Nov 16 2008 at 11:59 PM CST When: November 22, 2008 Where: The Woodlands, TX Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Dan Green (dwilburngreen@yahoo.com) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are part of the NXN South Region: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, & Mississippi.

Nike Cross Nationals Southeast Regional Open, closes Nov 23 2008 at 11:59 PM EST When: November 29, 2008 Where: Cary, NC Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Pat Helland (NXNSoutheast@gmail.com) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are in the NXN Southeast Region: Delaware, Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, West Virginia, & Kentucky.

Nike Cross Nationals Northeast/New York Regional Open, closes Nov 23 2008 at 11:59 PM EST When: November 29, 2008 Where: Wappingers Falls, NY Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Paul Limmer (PALimmer@aol.com) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams Notes: The following states are in the NXN Northeast Region: Connecticut, Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island. The state of New York is its own region.

NXN Open Race Open, closes Nov 30 2008 at 11:59 PM PST When: December 6, 2008 Where: Portland, OR Homepage: http://www.nikecrossnationals.com Point of Contact: Mike Elder (Mike@elderwire.com) Entry Types Allowed: allowed Individual Athletes allowed Coaches/Teams

Notes: It is recommended that, when entering, your team name should reflect that of a club instead of a specific school. And, if a specific club in your area does not exist, that name should have some association with the town or city in which the school is located. All individuals should compete as a club or unaffiliated.


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Dear Readers: You seem to respond best to our suggestions on training and tips on how to be a better runner. So in this issue, you’re getting what you asked for. We’ve prepared two sets of training tips for you. This first one is called “The Essentials.”

The Essentials

by Larry Eder

Nutrition—Fuel the Engine

Training shoes—Two pair, always

Unless you get real food into your system, each and every day, your engine won’t run well. If you’re starving yourself, not eating right, living on junk food, your body will revolt.

Our sport is pretty basic. You need a couple good pair of training shoes. I suggest a pair of trainers that fit your foot, and get two of the same pair. Alternate them on workouts, and that will cut down injuries during the training cycle. If you race in spikes or racing flats, you should also— gently—start using them early in the season at the end of the workout during stride outs. As you get later into the season, you should use your racing shoes for one hard workout a week, say the tempo run or three times a mile. Train smart, race smart. Using your shoes as the equipment they are is key.

The first facts are that if you’re running 5–6 days a week and eating well, your body will get to its natural weight. Vegetables, green ones, yellow ones, red ones—you should have some every day. Pasta, whole grain breads are great. Milk and cheese are good for you, as are meat and fish. If you’re a vegetarian or vegan, or want to be, remember to fuel the system with beans and rice. Cheese is great, as well. Breakfast, a mid-morning snack, lunch, afternoon snack, dinner and evening snack all make sense. Try carrot sticks, try an apple slice with peanut butter. Drink a low-sodium V-8. You can also eat smart while traveling. Bean burritoes, chicken super burritoes at Taco Bell, pizza with cheese, and veggies.

Training smart—Barefoot or near it, two times a week If you’re serious about racing and truly want to improve your times, strong feet are key. With 26 bones in the foot, proper foot hygiene is paramount. Twice a week in your lightest racing shoes, barefoot, or in shoes like a Nike Free (for those who don’t wear this shoe, your racing flats will do), start by jogging easy for no longer than 30 minutes. Build up to doing your warmup exercises, high knees, butt kicks, in them. Getting your feet to work properly is a key to speed development.

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WE TEST THE SHOES. YOU TEST YOURSELF.

Drink water, fruit juice, green tea, sports drinks. If you want the book on sports nutrition, go to www.nancyclarkrd.com.

Hydration—yes. Water is magic Eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, for a sedentary person, is the rule. We suggest 10 glasses of water a day for a training athlete, plus sports drinks. Cut back on carbonated beverages (they hamper muscle recovery). Water helps your body transfer energy at the cellular level. More leg cramps and worn-out athletes have been “cured” by adding water to their regimen than by any vitamin or medicinal suggestion.

Nike Air Structure Triax+ 11 GTX® GORE-TEX® Footwear with XCR® Product Technology

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© 2008 W. L. Gore & Associaes, Inc. GORE-TEX®, XCR®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY®, GTX®, GORE® and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates.

AO • FALL/WINTER 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com

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08:Layout 1

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Athletics is a sport. Have a life

Everything we do

Everything we do is geared towards is geared towards helping you love helping youmore. love RUNNING RUNNING more.

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www. To find a dealer newbalance near you, go to: .com www. newbalance .com

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The Greeks were right; we have a physical and a spiritual side. When one is out of whack, the other is out of whack. You need friends, family and community to be a whole person. You’ll learn lots from cross country or track. Life lessons. But your running will be better the less pressure you put on yourself and your fellow teammates. Whether you’re planning to win state, your region, your local race or the Olympics, remember, sport is part of your life. Look at Haile Gebrselassie, who had five runners pass him with 200 meters to go! Afterward, he smiled and noted that he’d done his best. Learn from him. Notice how world record holder Paula Radcliffe—who could have quit in Beijing—didn’t, and gallantly finished the race. Why? Because it was the Olympics, something bigger than she. Learn from her. Eight weeks later, Haile Gebrselassie broke the world record in the Berlin marathon.Twelve weeks later, Paula Radcliffe won her third ING New York City Marathon!

Ethics: There is right and there is wrong In this world, you get all kinds of messages. Here’s the truth: most people don’t cheat. In any part of their lives. Sports is a sacred trust. You expect your competitor to train hard, and you train hard. In the end, it comes down to who can kick better down that last 300 yards. Afterward, even if it’s close, you shake the other person’s hand and talk about the race. Those are memories you’ll have for 30 years, I promise you! But you never, ever, rationalize cheating in sport, because at the end of the day, you need to know that that 4:40 mile you ran was yours and nobody else’s. Well, your coach and teammates sure helped, but no chemical help or illegal drug. If you want to see what happens when you get caught, go to the Oprah website and rewatch Marion Jones on the show, and see how the greatest athlete of her generation sold herself short and lost everything. Sport is sport, and using drugs because it may give you more access to money or success just does not make sense. If one uses drugs to further their career in sports, they have dirtied the sport and lowered themselves.

AO • FALL/WINTER 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com

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AO_ISSUE4-2008:FALL/WINTER 11/18/08 11:58 AM Page 9

The Essentials

#2 by Larry Eder

Local Dealers

BASICS OF TRAINING

Visit the following retailers for a selection of Sof Sole Performance Insoles.

Academy Sports The Athlete’s Foot City Sports Dick’s Sporting Goods

1. You need a coach! The most important way to make sure your running is a success is to find a coach. The coach at your high school is there because he or she loves the sport (they sure aren’t getting rich from coaching cross country or track). Listen to them, ask them questions, tell them when something hurts or when you’re feeling wiped. They need to learn about you, and you need to learn about them. If you disagree with your coach, do it respectfully, and they should do the same for you. Each coach interprets training differently. Finding an approach that works for you is key. Remember, a good coach will help you be a better runner, challenge your beliefs and, especially, the limits you put on yourself.

Famous Footwear Finish Line Olympia Sports Sport Chalet

2. Warmup and cool down Muscles work better when they’re warmed up. That’s common sense. Our suggestion is to jog an easy mile and take 10 to 15 minutes and stretch the big muscles. Do it gently and increase the focus as you get longer in your buildup. Your cool down should be more of the same. Before a track or speed session, work on the stride-outs, butt kicks, skipping and jumping. Find a system that works for you, and stay with it. If you need a good warmup system, check our website, www.atf-athlete.com.

3. The long run The long run—from 50 to 90 minutes for most high schoolers and 90 minutes to 2 hours for most college runners—is about developing your base and your ability to transport oxygen-rich blood cells through your body more efficiently. Arthur Lydiard called it capillarization. He believed that as you ran 90-minute runs, once a week, your body would continue to develop a stronger circulatory system, which allows you to handle tougher workouts and tougher races. A long run, once a week, run at 65–70% effort, 50 weeks a year is key to your running success. Suggestions are to do it on trails with a few friends. Keep it relaxed and the jokes coming.

The Sports Authority Tradehome Shoes

Visit www.sofsole.com and use the retail locator for more information

AO • FALL/WINTER 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com

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AO_ISSUE4-2008:FALL/WINTER 11/18/08 11:58 AM Page 10

4. A tempo run

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A tempo run is an important tool in your training regimen. Simply done, after a good warmup, a tempo run takes 20 minutes, once a week. At first, you should do your tempo run on the track. This is how you do your run: Take your current 5K racing time—let’s say 18:30. Then, figure out the mile pace, which is 6 minutes per mile. Now, add 30 seconds a mile to that time, so you’re at a 6:30 pace. Your tempo run then is to run for 20 minutes at 6:30 a mile. If there are several of you doing that run, then share the pacing duty. The pace is supposed to be strong, not decimating. As you get faster, increase the pace of your tempo run, but always use this parameter. The tempo run is a huge tool in helping you increase your ability to race at a higher level. Our suggestion is to do this on a Tuesday during your buildup. Cool down well after this workout.

5. Hills, your secret weapon

www. adidas.com/ running

If you have delicate legs, if you can’t handle lots of speed work, hill runs will get you into shape—quickly. The smartest way to start is just running up the hills slowly, and as you get into better shape, the hills will come more easily. I suggest a hilly run 3–4 times a week early on. As you get into shape, cut the hill workout down to the following: nice 2-mile warmup, then start with 4 times a 200-meter charge up the hill, jog down, add one hill charge each week until you hit 12.

6. Train, don’t strain When you start out training for a season, take it all slowly. Add no more than 5% to your mileage every 2 weeks. Running slowly never hurt anyone. As you get into shape, your pace will increase, so relax. The easiest way to foil a season is to train too hard or put too much pressure on yourself!

7. Recovery days When your coach tells you to run an easy hour, do it. He or she has a reason for this. Run as slowly as you’re told, so your body can recover from the hard stuff. If you’re doing easy morning runs, run relaxed and note that over a month, your pace will start to pick up naturally. Keep the rest days at a pace where you can carry on an easy conversation! If you don’t do the recovery days right and easy runs right, you’ll get injured. It’s that simple.

8. Double runs

www.adidas.com/running

If you’re trying to build summer mileage, an easy run in the morning or an easy run after a race or hard workout helps get the cobwebs out, and also the lactic acid. Try this 2–3 times a week, but never on long days or speed days. I

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AO • FALL/WINTER 2008 • www.atf-athlete.com


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10,000 meters; Stefanie Brown Trafton winning the women’s discus, giving the U.S. its first women’s Gold medal in the discus since 1932(!); the men’s 400 meters and 400 meter hurdles; Sanya Richards’ move in the last 50 meters of the 4x400 meters; and the U.S. guys in the 4x400 meters. Dathan Riztenhein and Ryan Hall went 9 and 10, respectively, in the Olympic marathon, after a 21-yearold Kenyan dusted the entire field, running a 2:06:21 in the humid Beijing conditions.

racing. Commentators on government-run TV asked that the Chinese people consider Liu Xiang’s feelings. Two days after his loss, on Chinese TV Liu Xiang apologized to the Chinese people about his injuries, and promised to get healthy and race again. The Great Wall

Usain Bolt was everywhere. He was the rock star of the Games. The crowd loved him, and he loved the crowd and the adulation. The team from Jamaica put it all together on the right 10 days at the right times. I was also impressed by Kenenisa Bekele, who won the 5000 meters and 10,000 meters, the first since his countrymen Miruts Yifter won both races in Moscow in 1980! In the 5000 meters, Bekele won by running a 4-minute mile with 5 laps to go, and then sprinting a 53-second last lap! On the women’s side, Tirunesh Dibaba, also of Ethiopia, won the first women’s double, with a sub-30-minute 10K. Her 5000 meter victory was a snorer—really slow for 11 laps, then kick over the last lap and a half. Liu Xiang was to be the Gold medal that did not happen Liu Xiang is the 2007 world champion in the 110 meter hurdles. He’d hurt himself last spring and when he showed up at the Reebok Grand Prix he withdrew. At the Pre Classic, he false-started the race. The week before the Olympic track sessions began, Liu injured his Achilles so badly that, in front of 80,000 fans, on his first round Xiang made it five steps over the first hurdle and then went back to the start as the entire stadium made a collective gasp. The Games were changed for China. Liu Xiang was to have been China’s first win for a Chinese male in a major track event. It was not to be. 1.4 billion Chinese were disappointed. A press conference followed where Liu Xiang’s coach, in tears, spoke of the pain Liu had taken on trying to compete. The Chinese team coach tried to soften the blow, but the Chinese media was all over the coaching staff. On Chinese websites, there were accusations of a double cross, of Liu faking it, and much worse. But the Chinese authorities took most notes down the same day. The President of China sent a note to Liu Xiang wishing him a speedy recovery and noting that he would “win many more great victories for the motherland.” That afternoon, all nine Chinese TV stations did an hour-long show on Liu Xiang, his coach, his

My most memorable moment came after the Games closed. I joined James and Pat on a journey to the Great Wall. We found an untouched section of the Wall, which stretches 1,000 kilometers across China, 2 hours from Beijing. Seeing the Great Wall for the first time was amazing. The wall, built over several hundred years, nearly 2,000 years ago, was to keep the Chinese people in and other people out. It was effective. The wall is 50 feet thick, and 100 feet high, and built along mountain ridges. “How did they get one brick up here?” I thought, as I sweated profusely, trying to get up 100 feet at a time. The steps were steep, the sun was out and I was sweating—and sweating some more. Every 1,000 feet or so, there would be a small shop selling sodas, water, etc. The Chinese have sure embraced capitalism. Climbing the wall took me nearly 2 hours. It was hot, even in the morning. 3,000 steps later, and several breaks, I made it to the top of the wall. I went to Towers 5 through 8. Chinese came up and took my picture. They said I was one of the biggest guys to climb the wall. All I know was that I was tired, and my size 13 feet on size 6 steps meant that I walked sideways down the steps for 2 hours! The climb was worth it. By this time, instead of gasping, I was laughing and enjoying the irony of being in China and being asked by a Chinese American family if I had interviewed Kobe Bryant (no, but I have interviewed Yao Ming and Liu Xiang). Our last evening in Beijing was spent at the Gu Luo, the Drum Tower area, where we could find lots of small restaurants. My return flight was 14 hours from Beijing to Chicago, and then a 3-hour bus ride home to Fort Atkinson. My flight was full of NBC TV crew and Olympic athletes. It was a nice flight, but I slept most of the time. I’ve been back for 6 weeks. I’m sleeping a pretty regular schedule now as I head to the ING New York City Marathon this weekend, and then to the Nike Border Clash and Nike Team Nationals later this fall. Write me (larry.eder@gmail.com) about your ideas on how we can make Athletes Only better for you!

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For 10 days in August 2008, young Jamaican runner Usain Bolt captured the interest of the world. Bolt, who turned 22 during the Olympic Games, broke world records at 100 and 200 meters, and then ran the third leg of Jamaica’s world record 4x100m relay effort! Thanks to three Gold medals in 10 days, Usain Bolt is now a household name across the globe.

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At the beginning of the Games, there were three sprinters who looked to dominate the sprint competition: Bolt, fellow Jamaican Asafa Powell, and American Tyson Gay. All three were relatively healthy and all three were set to compete in Beijing. But instead of witnessing head-to-head competition, it turned out to be Usain Bolt alone who took the global stage and enthralled track fans everywhere. Tall for a sprinter—6 foot, 5 inches—Bolt has excellent form and had dedicated the year leading up to the Games to training with his coach, Glenn Mills. No question, Bolt was ready to race when he came to Beijing. In the opening round of the 100 meters, Bolt ran 10.20 and looked like he was jogging. In round two, he ran 9.92, the fastest time of the day to that point, and he was still jogging! The following day, August 16, Bolt began to look as if he was racing, clocking 9.85 in the semi-finals at half past seven in the evening. Unfortunately, the injury Tyson Gay had suffered at the U.S. Olympic Trials took longer than expected to heal and he was eliminated in the semi-finals. Three hours after the semis, the athletes were back in the starting blocks for the final. As the gun went off, Bolt charged out of the blocks. By the 50-meter mark he was in control of the race. At 75 meters, he put his arms out and then flew through the finish, recording a legal world record 9.69 seconds! Such domination in the 100 meters—second place was 2/10 of a second back—hadn’t been seen since 1964, and the crowd of 91,000 fans in the Bird’s Nest couldn’t stop applauding! Later Bolt told the assembled media, “I will run my heart out in the 200 meters.” And the Jamaican Gold medalist kept his promise. On August 20 in the 200 meters final, Bolt came off the turn 6/10 of a second ahead of 2004 Olympic Gold medalist Shawn Crawford. Running strong the whole way, Bolt grimaced and leaned at the finish, stopping the clock at 19.30. He destroyed the world record set in 1996 by Michael Johnson, a record that many thought would never be broken. Even more remarkable, Bolt’s second world record of the Games was set running into a headwind!

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On Friday night, August 22, the crowd was anticipating the 4x100m relay final. Without the American team on the starting line—their relay hopes had ended in the first round when they failed to complete the handoff between legs 3 and 4—Jamaica was the clear favorite. A crowd of 90,000-plus cheered as the baton was passed from Nesta Carter to Michael Frater to Usain Bolt. Bolt made the final hand-off to Asafa Powell, who brought it home for Jamaica in a new world record of 37.10!

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Over the course of the 2008 Olympic Games, the men and women on Jamaica’s track & field team captured 7 of a possible 12 individual medals in the 100 and 200 meters, plus the men’s 4x100m relay gold. In the final analysis, Bolt’s success in Beijing started a year ago. At the 2007 World Championships in Osaka, Bolt was beaten by Tyson Gay, who came from behind in the men’s 200 meters to snatch away the Gold medal. Determined never to be passed like that again, the young man who liked to have fun went to his coach, Glenn Mills, and requested a year-long training program. And then came August 2008. Usain Bolt ran 10 races in 10 days. He set two solo world records, at 100 meters and 200 meters, and another one with his teammates in the 4x100m relay. His performances also earned Jamaica its first Olympic Gold medals in the sprints. What’s next for Usain Bolt?

Writer: Larry Eder; Design/Layout: Alex Larsen; Editor: Christine Johnson; Proofreader: Red Ink Editorial Service. © 2008 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Shooting Star Media, Inc. A version of this story first appeared at www.RunBlogRun.com and is reprinted here with permission.

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