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ON THE COVER… Anna Willard is shown winning the Reebok Grand Prix 800 meters with a final lunge! Her time, 1:59.29, was a four second personal best! Photo by PhotoRun.net

One of my favorite athletes in our sport is Anna Willard. Anna has run the 800 meters, 1500 meters, 4x400 meters, cross country— ugggh, wears me out just thinking about it. Last July at the Olympic Trials, Anna broke the American record for the steeplechase. A month later, during the Olympics, Jenny Barringer finished 9th in the Olympic games, breaking Anna's record. Anna finished 10th, also running under her previous record.

4 OLYMPIC DOPING FOLLOW-UP 6 CAMERA ATHLETICA 2009 ADIDAS TRACK CLASSIC 9 BEST SHOES FOR $80 OR LESS 13 INTERVIEW WITH CHRIS SOLINSKY 16 CAMERA ATHLETICA REEBOK GRAND PRIX 2009 18 INTERVIEW WITH LEONEL MANZANO 20 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES: HAILE GEBRSELASSIE

This spring, under the tutelage of Terrance Mahon (he coaches Ryan Hall, Deena Kastor and Jenn Rhines, among others), Anna set personal bests at the 1500 meters and 800 meters and ran a great steeplechase. She’ll run the steeplechase and 1,500 meters at the World Outdoor Athletics Championships in Berlin, August 15-23. Anna wears a streak of various colors in her hair. She looks like some of the metal heads and punks that show up at my son's bands shows. Anna is very straightforward, has a great sense of humor and is working very hard to be the best she can be. But, it has taken a lot of time! So, next time you get frustrated when your running isn’t going well, remember, all good things take time! Larry Eder P.S. Follow us daily on runblogrun.com and remember to sign up to follow us on twitter. We’ll twitter the World Champs from Berlin in August. Publisher, Athletes Only runblogrun@gmail.com twitter: @runblogrun www.atf-athlete.com 608.239.3785

Volume 14, Number 2 Summer 2009 shootingstarmediabiz@gmail.com Group Publisher Larry Eder 608.239.3785 larry.eder@gmail.com Group Editor Christine Johnson Editor Larry Eder 608.239.3785 larry.eder@gmail.com Proofreading Marg Sumner RedInkEditorial.com Design/Layout Two Fish Design Writers Larry Eder Dick Patrick Cregg Weinmann Photographers Victah Sailer (PhotoRun) Lisa Coniglio (PhotoRun) Printer/Prep W. D. Hoard & Sons Fort Atkinson, WI Ad Sales Peter Koch Weser 310.836.2642 pvadmag@yahoo.com National Sales Peter Koch-Weser pkwadvmag@yahoo.com Special Projects Adam Johnson-Eder 608.957.2159 atflistings@gmail.com Proud Member of The Running Network, LLC.

Athletes Only is produced, published and owned by Shooting Star Media, Inc., PO Box 67, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538-0067; 920.568.8142 phone; 920.563.7298 fax; Christine Johnson, President; Larry Eder, Vice President. Publisher assumes no liability for matter printed. Publisher assumes no responsiblity or liability for content of paid advertising and reserves the right to reject paid advertising. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher. Copyright © 2009 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the Publisher. Athletes Only is not related to or endorsed by any other entity or corporation with a similar name and is solely owned by Shooting Star Media, Inc. Publisher recommends, as with all fitness and health issues, you consult with your physician before instituting any changes in your fitness program.

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Olympic doping follow-up

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hen Olympic authorities re-tested urine and blood samples from the Beijing Olympic Games, 1500 champion Rashid Ramzi of Bahrain was the highest profile athlete of the three track athletes caught. That’s assuming his B sample comes back positive for CERA, a derivative of enduranceboosting EPO. The B tests for EPO have been problematic over the years —Bernard Lagat and Marion Jones were among those whose B samples came back negative. If the B confirms the A, Ramzi will lose his medal and serve a 2-year suspension. The B sample test is scheduled for June 8, as is an IAAF hearing on the matter if the result is positive. It will be interesting to see how strongly Ramzi might contest a positive. Will he challenge the validity of the CERA test? Could he claim that the samples weren’t stored properly, leading to a positive? He’s probably facing an uphill battle in the court of public opinion. In a lets-run.com poll, more than 60% of voters said Ramzi was a cheater. The native of Morocco has inspired such suspicion ever since he came on the international scene suddenly in 2005, winning the 800 and 1500 at the world championships without a large body of work on the worldclass level. In 2004, he reduced his 1500 from 3:39 to 3:30, too dramatic an improvement for many observers. Last year he was virtually absent from the European circuit until showing up in great shape in Beijing. All that is circumstantial. It’s up to the tests now. If the positive is upheld, Asbel Kiprop of Kenya will be the champion, followed by Nick Willis of New Zealand and Mehdi Baala of France. “This step shows that athletes who cheat can never be comfortable that they will avoid detection and sends a strong message of deterrence,” the IAAF said in a publicity release. The news did not register strongly in the U.S. Ramzi is not well known here, nor were any U.S. athletes upgraded to medals. Still, the re-test should send a strong message to athletes—assuming the B is positive. If it’s not, then the testers have a credibility problem. Logan names performance chief When Benita Fitzgerald Mosley was working on the Project 30 Task Force last winter, she didn’t realize she was helping write a future job description. The committee, formed by USATF CEO Doug Logan to fulfill his goal of 30 medals at the 2012 London Games com-

pared to 23 in Beijing, recommended the appointment of a general manager for elite sport. On May 21, Logan named Mosley as USATF’s first chief of sports performance —in charge of USATF’s high performance and sports science programs, relays, national team management, athlete development, coaching education and management of meet officials. Logan said he considered 21 candidates before settling on Mosley, 47, the 1984 Olympic 100 hurdle champion, who spent several years with the U.S. Olympic Committee, including directing its training centers from 1977–2000, and spent the last 8 years as CEO of the nonprofit Women in Cable Telecommunications. “It’s a unique opportunity to take advantage of all the experience I’ve had professionally—on the track and in the boardroom—and apply it to my passion, track & field,” Mosley said. “We all have a lot of pride in being the #1 track team in the world. We want to continue that tradition.” Her first duty, she said, would be to conduct a “listening tour” with athletes, coaches and agents. Early priorities will be strengthening the relays process plus targeting technical events such as jumps and throws, areas that were disappointments in Beijing. “No single individual on the administration side will have a bigger impact on the fortunes of Team USA than Benita,” Logan said. “I have no doubt that our high performance programs will be revolutionized under her leadership.” Mile dream dies hard You can take the marathoner out of the mile, but can you take the mile out of the marathoner? It isn’t always easy. Just ask Ryan Hall, who finished 3rd in April’s Boston Marathon, his fifth attempt at the 26.22-mile distance. Hall is a confirmed marathoner now, with a best of 2:06:17. But it took him a while to give up the sub-4 dream after he ran a 1500 in 3:42.70, equivalent to just over 4:00 for the mile, as a senior in high school in 2001. The time remains his PR, even though he often ran the 1500 or mile during his 4-year Stanford career before moving to longer distances. “I wanted to be a miler so bad,” Hall said. “That was my big dream growing up. Watching Jim Ryun footage, reading about Steve Scott, watching Sebastian Coe in Born to Run. I was convinced I was a miler. You watch the Prefontaine movie and you’re like ‘No one’s going to tell me I’m not fast enough. I’m going to prove you wrong.’

“My PR in the 1500 is still from my senior year in high school. It took me a while to be like ‘All right, I’m done with this. I’m not throwing in the towel. I’m not saying I’m not fast enough. I’m just going to an event I’m more suited for.’ It was really stupid it took me so long. It took years of disappointment at Stanford.” Now that he’s a success at the marathon, Hall still has mile fantasies. His plan was to spend the weeks after Boston recovering and helping with the training of his wife Sara Bei Hall, a 1500/5000 runner. “I’ll be doing some pacing,” he said. “One thing that keeps kicking around in my head is that I’d like to break 4 [in the mile] sometime. I might try to do some quarters and then try to dip under 4 some time this summer.” Hall, who anticipates running a fall marathon, realizes his current event is evolving, especially after two relatively unknown Kenyans went sub-2:05 in the Rotterdam Marathon. “What I think of as possible is always changing, especially when you see some 2:07 guys rolling out 2:04s,” Hall said. “The world of marathoning is changing and it’s exciting to be part of it. “It’s exciting to think of 2:06 as not that fast any more. I’m thinking 2:05, 2:04, 2:03. You’ve just got to go for it. It’s easier to go for it when others have already done it. That inspires me to come to that level.” As far as his dreams of a sub-4 mile are concerned, perhaps Hall can take comfort in the fact that he’s not alone. A year or two after winning the 1972 Olympic marathon, Frank Shorter confided wistfully to a reporter, “I’ve always wanted to break 4 minutes for the mile.” Future Dukie in the dec Curtis Beach obliterated the national high school record in the decathlon in April, scoring 7,909 points, almost 500 points better than the 7,417 scored by Ryan Theriault in 1993.1 Beach’s marks: 10.99 in the 100, 22-81⁄2 in the long jump, 44-8 in the shot put, 6-9 ⁄2 in the high jump, 48.16 in the 400, 14.42 1 in the 110 hurdles, 133-4 in the discus, 14-1 ⁄4 in the pole vault, 155-9 in the javelin and 4:09.48 in the 1500. The Albuquerque Academy senior took a shot at 8,000 early in June at the Great Southwest Invitational Although he fell short with 7,719 he also used the senior shot and discus and ran 42-inch hurdles with the other seven events to score 7,466, breaking Craig Brigham’s 1972 senior mark of 7,359 (which was set in the same manner). Later in the same Continued on page 11

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asics.com


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CAMERA ATHLETICA All Photos by PhotoRun

2009 adidas Track Classic: (left to right) Jenn Stuczynski; Bernard Lagat

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CAMERA ATHLETICA All Photos by PhotoRun

continued on page 8

2009 adidas Track Classic: Allyson Felix

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CAMERA ATHLETICA All Photos by PhotoRun

2009 adidas Track Classic: (top to bottom) Anna Willard; Bernard Lagat

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Best Shoes for $80 or Less by Cregg Weinmann

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he 2009 season offers good news if you find yourself looking for running shoes in the economy price range. Even though prices have been escalating industry-wide, there are numerous shoes with very reasonable prices and good performance. We’ve looked for the best new or updated shoes, and there are more in the performance range—nice and light—than we have seen in many seasons. There’s something here for nearly everyone, whether you’re heading out for training, trails, or racing, and they’ll all give you your money’s worth.

adidas adi Kanadia TR

$65

adidas has a long history of success in the trail shoe category, so its new Kanadia TR has plenty of company. Designed to provide traction and performance, the Kanadia’s attractive price might cause it to be dismissed, but that would be a mistake. Though not as durable as the full- featured (and higherpriced) models, it does a surprisingly creditable job of cushioning, and the traction is as good as most of the better trail shoes, thanks to adidas’ Traxion tread design. The midsole is a low-profile, singledensity CM-EVA with a small adiPrene crashpad for good cushioning both on the trail and the roads. The upper is cool airmesh that’s tailored to provide a nice snug fit. TRAIL Sizes: Men 6.5–13,14; Women 5–12 Weight: 12.0 oz. (men’s 11); 9.6 oz. (women’s 8) For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

END Stumptown 10 oz.

$75

PERFORMANCE STABILITY Sizes: Men 6–13,14,15,16; Women 6–12 Weight: 11.1 oz. (men’s 11); 9.3 oz. (women’s 8) For: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

$75

END (Environmentally Neutral Design) is a new brand with a new target audience. Aimed at the value-minded runner who expects quality for their cash, the Stumptown delivers. The 10 oz. is the most performance-oriented of three versions of the shoe, and it also features the most shoe for the money. The upper is minimal, with wellplaced synthetic overlays, and a pared back design to eliminate unneeded materials and their associated waste. A high-friction toe cap protects on the trail while the lower profile is perfect for nimble trail running. The midsole is singledensity EVA topped by an additional layer of EVA in the Strobel board for good cushioning and a responsive ride. A forefoot protection plate adds a little foot armor without hindering flexibility, and the outersole tread provides excellent traction. PERFORMANCE TRAIL Sizes: Men 7–12,13; Women 5–11 Weight: 10.9 oz. (men’s 11); 8.9 oz. (women’s 8) For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

ASICS Gel-Phoenix

The Gel-Phoenix is a new shoe, but the niche it occupies—Performance Stability—is an ASICS hallmark, here at an economical price. The air mesh upper is roomy in the forefoot with a secure fit in the heel, a family trait thanks to its familiar ASICS last. The SpEVA midsole is durable, cushioned, and offers the good stability for which this configuration is known. The AHAR outersole is an effective blend of traction and durability. The Gel-Phoenix is not the equal of its more expensive sibling, the Gel-DS Trainer, but it does feature a comfortable, stable, resilient ride at a good value.

Mizuno Wave Nexus 3

$80

The Wave Nexus has undergone a number of subtle changes. The upper is a more open airmesh, with overlays reduced in number and many replaced by HFwelds. The Alpha Polymer midsole has seen a minor adjustment in the molding, and the Wave plate has received minor tweaks through the shank, but the ride and performance haven’t been altered to unfamiliarity. The outersole has a significant chunk of lateral blown rubber which may account for a cushier feel, but the X-10 heel maintains the durability necessary for high mileage. These thoughtful improvements are well-executed, and the value in the Nexus 3 is the tangible result. STABILIZING CUSHION Sizes: Men 7–13,14,15; Women 6–11 Weight: 12.4 oz. (men’s 11); 10.0 oz. (women’s 8) For: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

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Best Shoes for $80 or Less New Balance 737

$80

New Balance has often produced effective shoes in the economy range. The 737 is the latest, and perhaps the most versatile, of the neutral shoes New Balance has placed in this price range. The upper makes good use of airmesh and minimal overlays to support the foot and let it breathe. The midsole is a fairly generous slab of ACTEVA Lite, which is quite responsive, though the firm Abzorb crashpad and fabric Strobel board make the shoe a little less cushy for longer runs. The midfoot support is good, and the minimal outersole keeps things light without compromising durability or traction. PERFORMANCE NEUTRAL Sizes: Men 7–12,13,14,15; Women 5–11,12 Weight: 11.2 oz. (men’s 11); 8.4 oz. (women’s 8) For: low- to medium- high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

Saucony ProGrid Jazz

(continued)

Reebok Premier Phoenix $75

Best Motion Stabilizing Economy Shoe

The Premier Phoenix is Reebok’s latest quality economy running shoe. The dual-density, injection-molded midsole offers a durable, stable, and responsive ride, aided by the DMX Strobel board beneath the insole. The upper features a PlayDry lining to keep the foot cool and dry, with well-spaced overlays (there’s a little extra on the medial side) for excellent midfoot support. The combination of supportive upper, multiple layers of cushioning, and good stability make it a solid choice for budget-minded runners; it’s our Best Motion Stabilizing Economy shoe. STABILIZING CUSHION Sizes: Men 7–12,13,14; Women 5–12 Weight: 12.5 oz. (men’s 11); 10.1 oz. (women’s 8) For: medium- to high-arched feet with mild to moderate overpronation

$80

Best Neutral Economy Shoe

Saucony has offered good quality running shoes in the economy range; the best of these is the ProGrid Jazz. The Jazz features the traditional Saucony tailoring— wide toebox and snug heel—for runners with medium-high to lowerarched feet. The single-density midsole offers good cushioning and the ProGrid layer adds considerably to the comfort. The light weight is attributable to minimized overlays coupled with HF-welds for good support without bulk, and the foam formulation combined with the foam layer in the Strobel board is light without losing its highmileage cushioning. The successful XT-900 carbon rubber heel and blown rubber forefoot round out the versatility of our Best Neutral Economy shoe. PERFORMANCE NEUTRAL Sizes: Men 7–13,14; Women 5–11,12 Weight: 11.4 oz. (men’s 11); 9.0 oz. (women’s 8) For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics

Venue Sports Vroom

$60

Venue Sports entered the footwear fray with spikes and throwing shoes, and it now moves onto the roads. The Vroom is a versatile lightweight trainer that can handle a little racing, some speedwork, and the mileage required by efficient young runners looking for a solid shoe. The upper is airmesh supported by synthetic leather and HF-welded overlays in the heel. The midsole is low-profile, single-density EVA with a supportive, ventilated shank. The outersole is grippy, high-traction rubber that’s durable without reducing flexibility. The weight makes them suitable to tempo runs and track work, as well as racing, and the price tag makes them even more attractive. PERFORMANCE NEUTRAL Sizes: Unisex 4–13 Weight: 9.4 oz. (men’s 11) For: medium- to high-arched feet with neutral biomechanics for faster-paced running

CREGG WEINMANN is footwear and running products reviewer for the Running Network LLC. A competitive runner for the past 44 years, he also has coached runners at all levels for almost 30 years. He can be reached via e-mail at shuz2run@lightspeed.net. Copyright © 2009 by Running Network LLC. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of the Running Network LLC. Reprinted here with permission.

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Continued from page 4

photo by PhotoRun.net

meet he ran relay legs of 1:50 and 46.45. Beach comes from a middle-distance background, beginning cross country at 8. In the pentathlon at the National Scholastic Indoor Championships in New York, he ran 2:30.90 in the concluding 1000 to finish with 4,127 points, the No. 2 score in prep history. “He’s got good speed and great endurance, which is rare,” said decathlon historian Frank Zarnowski. “He’s one of those kids unafraid of events. He just goes out and scorches the 1500. What he might do is change the nature of the dec because he’s so good in the final event. This guy could really be something.” Beach will attend Duke, which has never been a power in track and isn’t fully funded, with only about half of the maximum 12.6 scholarships allowed for men’s teams. Beach made his decision because of academics and new Duke assistant coach Shawn Wilbourn, a former 8,200 decathlete who competed at the 1997 world championships. “I felt coach Shawn Wilbourn was the best fit for me,” said the 6-0, 166pound Beach, 18, who also had Oregon, California, Texas A&M and Baylor in his final five. “I know he’s very knowledgeable and I see myself having a lot of success there. In the end, it was a clear choice even if on the surface it looks terrible because historically Duke hasn’t had a great track program. They’re definitely on the rise.” One reason why Beach wants a Duke education: “My dream job would be CEO of USA Track & Field. I want to get into marketing and really help the sport.” A life in track Payton Jordan, a competitor and coach in

the sport for most of his life, died in February of cancer at 91. Jordan was best known as a coach, winning two NCAA small college titles at Occidental before moving to Stanford, where he coached for 22 years and produced seven Olympians. He coached the 1968 Olympic men’s team, considered by many to be the best team in history. Jordan was a star sprinter and football player at USC but lost his best years to World War II. In his latter years, he again became a star, this time as an age-group sprinter, setting a 100 meter world record of 14.65 at age 80. “I had so much respect for that man,” said ex-UCLA coach Jim Bush. “He was not only one of the greatest coaches our sport has ever known, he was a great human being. I loved everything he stood for, which was fairness and hard work.” Jordan used to have a sign in his office with four questions: Is it safe? Is it popular? Is it politic? Is it right? “The only one that matters to me is the last one,” he said. “If it’s right, I’ll do it. If it’s not, I won’t.” Jordan practiced what he preached. Jim Ward, who ran for Jordan during the 1960s when steroids had not yet been banned, told the San Jose Mercury-News that he finished 7th in the 400 at the NCAA meet and that all the runners ahead of him had used steroids. Ward wanted to use them, too. Jordan talked him out of it, he recalls. “He was afraid of all the long-term health aspects of steroids,” Ward said. “I know three or four runners … who are dead now because they used steroids. Coach Jordan helped me stay drug-free. “Payton was very calm and gentle in enforcing rules. He didn’t allow us to lie or fudge. And he didn’t have a racial bone in his body.” Bolt’s rocky start Usain Bolt may have learned how to get out of the blocks on the track, but his 2009 got off to a rocky start. The Olympic 100 and 200 champ from Jamaica was lucky he wasn’t injured seriously after an accident on a rainy road totaled his BMW in May. The windshield was smashed and the chassis severely damaged, but the only injury to Bolt came from stepping on thorns after he and two female passengers exited the vehicle in Spanish Town, Jamaica. Then there was a Bolt comment that attracted negative attention: “In Jamaica, you learn as a child how to roll a joint. Everyone here has tried it. I did, too—but I was real young then,” Bolt was quoted as saying, adding. “My family and my friends don’t smoke and I don’t hang out Continued on page 12

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any longer with people who smoke.” Bolt has said he wants to become the first track athlete to earn $10 million a year in endorsements, appearance fees, prize money and bonuses. His agents might want to approach Guinness and Red Bull for sponsorships. That’s what the German magazine Bild reported Bolt was mixing at a disco in Kingston.

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Bell lap • Lolo Jones, the #1 ranked 100 hurdler in the world, suffered a nightmare for a world-class athlete while competing in her hometown of Des Moines at the 100th Drake Relays in April. On a rainy day with temperatures in the 40s, Jones ignored a balky right hamstring in her lead leg to compete. She pulled up after hitting the eighth hurdle with—yes, a hamstring injury. “It’s a slight tear, not an all-out injury, where I’ll be out for months or my season is over,” she said. “Even up to the last minute, I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh—am I going to run, am I not going to run?’” she said. “I felt tremendous pain warming up. But then when I went out there, the adrenaline took over. The crowd was cheering my name and I was like, ‘I don’t care, I’m going for it.’” • After a career-best year in 2008, New Zealand’s Nick Willis wasn’t as lucky with an early season injury. Willis had hip surgery in April to repair a torn labrum, an operation that could jeopardize his appearance at the World Championships in August in Berlin. Willis was hoping to be able to start jogging in late May. Willis said if he competes in Berlin, it may be in the 800. • Colorado senior Jenny Barringer recorded her fifth collegiate record of the past year with a 15:07.64 in winning the 5000 meters May 2 in Stanford, CA. Barringer, who has run 15:01.70 indoors, was hoping to break 15:00 but fell off the pace early. “I am used to running PRs. Yeah, I’m disappointed,” said Barringer. Five weeks later at Pre, she made up for it with a stunning collegiate 1500 of 3:59:90, just 0.01 behind 2008

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No. 1 Gelete Burka of Ethiopia. • Stanford freshman Chris Derrick hooked up with Oklahoma State’s German Fernandez in a race-within-the-race 5000 at the Payton Jordan Cardinal Invitations meet. Derrick, who finished 3rd, set a U.S. junior record of 13:29.98; Fernandez was 4th in 13:31.78. Both broke Galen Rupp’s 2004 mark of 13:37.91. • Oregon redshirt freshman Matthew Centrowitz ran a world-leading time in the 1500 of 3:36.92, equivalent to a 3:52.5 mile. Centrowitz is getting close to the family record in the event, 3:36.7, which his father, Matt, a two-time Olympian, recorded in 1976. • Chris Bucknam, in his first year at Arkansas after the retirement of legendary coach John McDonnell, signed his biggest blue-chip distance recruit for the Razorbacks with Solomon Haile. The native of Ethiopia who lives in Silver Spring, MD, won the FootLocker cross country title in the fall and took two championships at the National Scholastic Indoor Championships in personal bests, the 2-mile (9:02.67) and the 5000 (14:22.88). “He adds great depth in cross country and in the distance events on the track,” Bucknam said. “He has raced against some of the best high school runners in the country and has proven to be successful. Our 2009–10 freshman class is turning into a very well-rounded group of student-athletes and they will bring a lot to our program.” I


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Interview:

Chris Solinsky hris Solinsky is one of the new professional athletes in the U.S. His gutsy run in the U.S. Olympic Trials at 5000 meters, while it garnered him 5th in the Trials, earneded him the respect of U.S. distance fans. He was the runner-up in the 3000m at the 2008 AT&T USA Indoor Championships, and he was the 2006 and 2007 NCAA Outdoor 5000m champion. A five-time NCAA champion, Solinsky enjoyed a banner season in 2007, when he set personal bests in the 1500m, 3000m and 5000m. Solinsky won Wisconsin’s high school cross country state title as a sophomore, junior and senior. He was the 2002 Foot Locker Cross Country champion while attending high school in Stevens Point, WI. Other Stevens Point grads include Olympians Suzy Hamilton and Curt Clausen. Solinsky won the race by 20 seconds, tying the largest margin of victory in the race’s history. The Wisconsin High School State champion in the 3000m as a sophomore, junior, and senior, Solinsky broke the state record as a junior in 8:58.39, and won state title in the 1600 meters as both a junior and senior. He studied history while at the University of Wisconsin.

C

CA: What was your first experience in track or cross country?

Photo by: Victah, PhotoRun.NET

Events: Middle Distance Height: 6’1’’ Weight: 165pounds Personal Records: 1500m 3:37.27 (2007) 5000m 13:12.24 (2007) 3000m 7:36.90 (2007)

Birthday: December 5, 1984

Current Residence: Madison, Wisconsin

High School: Stevens Point (Wisconsin) Area Senior High (SPASH), 2003

CS: In elementary school we had an annual district track meet at the end of the year, and one of the events was “cross country,” which consisted of starting on the track, running around the soccer and baseball fields and then finishing on the track in front of all of the other elementary school kids from all the schools. In 5th grade, I decided to run it just because I had always done well in the [physical education class] mile. I ended up placing 3rd, and I was ticked off, because I have always been really competitive. The next year, I convinced a teacher at my school to start a running club after school, and a few nights a week toward the end of the year, we would run a mile, running a few times around the school block. That year, I was able to beat the defending champ and got my time down to 6:00. I felt like I had won a huge title after that race, and it was awesome finishing first in front of all the other kids. CA: What was training like in high school? CS: I was fortunate to have two great coaches, Donn Benhke and Pat Leahy. In cross country, Donn would have us focus on doing high mileage (60–80), so we would be quite strong for XC. In track, Pat would have us focus on doing more speed work, which really helped me to develop fully as a runner. … I had the best of both worlds. I would often, as well, do tempo runs on my own during the off-season to increase my strength for the coming season. CA: When did you make a commitment to running? CS: I would say that I made the commitment to running after my sophomore year in high school. I went to what is now the Nike Outdoor Nationals when it was held in Raleigh, NC. I ran the mile and 2 mile there, and my highest placing was 16th. That was kind of a wakeup call for me, and I decided that I really wanted to train my hardest and see just how far I could push my body. I made it my mission to not only make Foot Locker, but to win it. Things kind of just took off from there. CA: Tell us about your college coach. How did college differ from high school?

Agent: Tom Ratcliffe

CS: Jerry Schumacher combined both Donn’s coaching strategies and Pat’s coaching strategies into one coach. Our program was strength-based, but when it was time for speed training, we would hit that hard, as well. The difference between high school and college was that my tempo runs went from 4–5 miles to 10–12 miles, and I went from running 5:00 pace for the tempos to 4:50–4:40 pace by the end. Additionally, I went from training alone to training with a group of guys that pushed me every day. There was someone ready to run hard every day, so it took my training to a new level.

Club: Nike

Continued on page 14

College: University of Wisconsin, 2007

Coach: Jerry Schumacher

AO • SUMMER 2009 • www.atf-athlete.com

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CA: What was college training like? CS: College training was a lot like high school training for me, just more intense and [with] higher mileage. I made quite the jump my freshman year, because I “upped” my mileage and intensity quite a bit from high school and saw immediate results. I was lucky that I had a good base from high school, so that I could step in right away and contribute to the team. It made such a huge difference being able to train with the quality of guys we had at Wisconsin. Having success and good chemistry with a team makes quite a difference [for] enjoying training. CA: What’s the difference between being a college athlete and being a professional athlete? CS: Well, the best part is not having to worry about studying and exams. Now I have more time to dedicate to my training. In college, I did whatever I had time for. Now, I can devote much more time to the little things. Additionally, my diet has improved drastically; in college, I just tried to fill my stomach. I would eat frozen pizza 2–3 times a week and fill the rest of the week with PB&J. Now I actually am able to afford healthier foods and have time to cook real meals. I have found that I love to cook, and I’m actually pretty good at it. Plus, it doesn’t hurt to get paid for something I’ve always loved to do. CA: Tell us about your experience in the Olympic Trials. CS: Well, I wish I had a great storybook story about my experience in the Olympic Trials, but unfortunately, they did not go as I had hoped. I was more on top of my running than I had ever been previously in my career and was full of confidence and hope entering this meet. I was able to navigate the rounds easily and set myself up for a great final. I made the mistake of thinking that what I did in college would work in the Olympic Trials Final. Boy, was I wrong, and what a bad time to learn that lesson. I took the lead with a K to go and began to run 0:58 and 0:59 for the next two quarters. Unfortunately, four guys were able to stick with me, and with 150 meters [to finish], I had nothing left to fight off challengers, and I was passed by them all. I ran my last 200 [meters] in 0:31. I was able to make everyone hurt, because everyone except Bernard Lagat was only able to run 0:29 or slower. I just did not have anything left to do the same. CA: Tell us about your high school experiences in cross country. How was it in college and then open competition? CS: My experiences in cross country varied in high school and college, because I had a fairly successful team in high school, but we were never invited to the big national meets. This meant that I had to travel alone a lot during high school. In college, I was on arguably one of the best teams in the country, as we never finished lower than 2nd at the NCAA meet. I valued being on a successful team far more than traveling and going to meets alone. Accomplishing goals with a team is far more satisfying than achieving my own individual goals.

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CA: How are you with speaking to young athletes on your experiences? What was biggest mistake in high school sports? CS: I really enjoy speaking with younger athletes about what I have learned throughout my career. I love to give back to the running community. I have always said I want to make a longlasting impact on the running world, whether it is through my legs or through someone else’s legs. I would say that the biggest mistake in high school sports, specific to running, would be that coaches are too afraid to allow their kids to train hard because of the fear of having their athletes “burn-out.” Burn out only happens when the athlete loses interest; if the athlete trains hard, they will not burn out physically, just mentally. In fact, that athlete will accomplish a lot and have a great base for the future. Coaches are too focused on “saving” their athletes for college, when they should be worried about preparing them for college and beyond. CA: What keeps you sane during training? Favorite music? Favorite books? CS: I would say that training with my training partners and friends is what keeps me sane during training. Also, I am a very goal-oriented person, and I focus and think about what I want to accomplish the upcoming season. It is always enough to keep me pushing when I am tired or otherwise not wanting to run. I actually like every kind of music, especially rap and R&B. I know [that is] not common for a kid from central Wisconsin, but it gets me fired up to run and race. My favorite book is the 16th Round by Reuben “Hurricane” Carter. It is a great book that is about a heavyweight champion boxer wrongfully accused of a murder because of his skin color. It is a true story. I really enjoy it, because I am a Civil Rights History major. CA: Finally, tell us about your training group. Do you run together every day? Do you run on your own at all anymore?

Photo by: Victah, PhotoRun.NET

CS: The training group we have consists of seven people, all of whom have reached a high level in our sport and are all working together to reach even higher heights. Our group includes: Matt Tegenkamp, Simon Bairu, Jonathon Riley, Tim Nelson, Evan Jager and Dan Lincoln, and of course, myself. We run together whenever it works out, which is quite often. We do training camps where we run together virtually every run, but there are times that you need to get out and run on your own. I have never been one to run alone, as I like the company of others on my runs. There are times that I need to get out and run alone and let off some steam when I get stressed or upset about something. I call these venting runs. CA: One more finally, do you have a favorite quote, a favorite song, that gives you inspiration?

There is always someone out there that wants it just as much if not more than you, and if you are at the top, it can be easy to get complacent, so always remember there is someone out there trying to take you down.

CS: Well, I have a few quotes that I think of when I am training, racing or just need motivation. The one that I am using for this training period and upcoming season is kind of corny, but my dad told me it when I was a junior in high school and trying to defend my state cross country title from the year before … “A hungry dog hunts harder.” There is always someone out there that wants it just as much if not more than you, and if you are at the top, it can be easy to get complacent, so always remember there is someone out there trying to take you down. This year, I am the one who is hungry, and I am looking to make a big splash and create some noise this year. Another quote that I have always liked is “Weakness is not my strength.” In terms of the song, I have always liked Nelly’s “No.1.” It has been on my warm-up mix since I was a sophomore in high school. Most important performances 2008: 5th at Olympic Trials (13:32.17) 4th in 2 mile at Nike Prefontaine Classic (8:15.77) Runnerup at NCAA Indoors 3000m (8:03.80) 2007: NCAA 5000m champion (13:35.12) 7th at USA Outdoor Championships (13:39.83) 1st at Oordegem (3:37.27PR) 3rd at Sheffield (7:36.90PR) 4th at Heusden (13:12.24PR) Bests of 3:37.27PR, 7:36.90PR, 13:12.24PR 2006: NCAA Outdoor 1500m champion (14:11.71) 12th at USA Outdoor Championships (13:47.24) Ranked #10 in U.S. at 5,000m by Track & Field News Bests of 13:27.94, 7:54.73i 2005: 10th at USA Outdoors (13:37.35) 8th at NCAA Outdoors (13:51.36) Bests of 13:37.35, 7:53.14 2004: DNF at NCAA Outdoors Best of 13:42.44

AO • SUMMER 2009 • www.atf-athlete.com

P.S. Congrats to Chris Solinsky for making the U.S. 5,000 meter team for the World Champs in Berlin in August. Chris was second to teammate Matt Tegankamp, and in third was his other former Badger teammate, Evan Jager! 15


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CAMERA ATHLETICA All Photos by PhotoRun

Reebok Grand Prix 2009: (left to right) Leonel Manzano; Anna Willard

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AO • SUMMER 2009 • www.atf-athlete.com


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CAMERA ATHLETICA All Photos by PhotoRun

Reebok Grand Prix 2009: (clockwise from left) Bernard Lagat; Tyson Gay; Stephanie Brown-Trafton


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Interview with Leonel Manzano by Larry Eder

Leonel Manzano is up and running for 2009. After a tough race at the adidas Track Classic, Leonel ran a 3:55 mile in St. Louis, then a very gutty run, winning the Reebok GP 1500 meters in a world-leading 3:34.14.

myself to stay smooth and be conscious of the field. I was able to make a couple good moves and put myself in good position. Bernard had a great finish and I was right behind him. It was a great race. RBR: Beijing was your first Olympics, what was that like? What did you learn from the experience? Leonel: After the trials, it was like roller coaster. My mom and dad got an opportunity to travel to China and watch me compete. This was very exciting since my parents had never been out of the county except for Mexico. This was also the first time they had ever flown. One of my favorite memories is walking into the Birds Nest and hearing the roar of the crowd, looking up and around and feeling excited to be competing in front on the world scene. What I learned from my Olympic experience was that the Olympics was great event where the human race, the world comes together to compete in peace and harmony.

The following interview is from late April. We provided Leonel with questions and he responded. For our Spanish speaking friends, we just had a nice piece in Latinos Corriendo no.19, refering to Leonel as David vs. the Goliaths. Leonel Manzano at the Reebok Grand Prix, 2009. Photo: Victah Sailor, PhotoRun.net

RunBlogRun: Tell us about your first experience in track & field. Leonel: My first experience in track & field was in primary school when we had field day. The first race I ran on a track was the 4x100m when I was 8 or 9. RBR: Did you run in high school? Leonel: I have been running competitively since the summer of my 6th grade years. So I have been running for about 11 years now. RBR: What was your training like? Leonel: In high school we focused more on quality more than quantity. I probably ran anywhere from 30 to 40 miles a week max. But mainly did a lot of 400s in workouts. RBR: Tell us about the hardest lesson in going from high school to college. Leonel: My hardest lesson was coming from high school to college and running with some of the top athletes in the country. RBR: You like to be in the thick of racing. Tell us about your racing philosophy. Leonel: Just go out and have fun and run … RBR: Your NCCA win last year was brilliant. Tell us about that race. Leonel: I knew I needed to take the race out. It was windy so I had to be careful not to fight the wind too much. The change of pace helped me to maintain the lead and when it came time to kick I was able to get a good lead on the field. RBR: Under huge pressure at the U.S. Olympic trials, tell us about the experience and what you remember from the race. Leonel: This race was also very windy. I remembered telling

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RBR: As a professional runner, how does that differ from what you did in college? Leonel: Being a professional runner has been quite a challenge. Many things are given to you in college but as a professional you have to be more aware of the things that you do and don’t do. Either way, being a professional runner has been a lot of fun because of the freedoms that you have yet it is more responsibility. RBR: What would you tell young runners and coaches about your event, and why you love our sport? Leonel: I have fun running my event. Running is a sport everyone can do. No matter if you’re fast or slow, it can be a contest between you or someone else. Either way, it is a clean non-violent sport that most people can enjoy. But for me the challenge of making myself better is what drives my will to run. RBR: How has your family reacted to your success? Leonel: Coming from Mojoneras, a small farming community outside of Dolores Hidalgo, not many people there know much about sports; that is, except for soccer. Yet my success has been a blessing, my family is very supportive of what I do. RBR: There are several Hispanic runners doing well in distance running in the U.S. Do you see yourself as a role model for young Latino runners? Leonel: Running is a great sport. I have seen a rise in Latino runners in the recent years. I wish them all the best and hope they and all young runners continue to improve and do well. RBR: Finally, if you can give three tips to young distance runners, what would you give them about the keys to reaching their goals? Leonel: 1. Have fun and enjoy your running. 2. Don’t stress about running; have fun. 3. Just go out and run and have fun … RUN!!! I

Congrats to Leonel for finishing second in the U.S. Champs in June, and making the U.S. team for Berlin at 1,500 meters! Special thanks to Leonel Manzano and his manager, Ricky Simms.

AO • SUMMER 2009 • www.atf-athlete.com


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On Sept. 28, 2008, at the real–Berlin Marathon, 35-year-old Haile Gebrselassie broke his own world record for the marathon, and became the first man to break 2 hours, 4 minutes with his time of 2:03:59. He had company until about 36 kilometers, and then ran the final 6 kilometers alone, almost a year to the day after setting his first marathon world record of 2:04:26 on the same fast Berlin course. In that one year, Gebrselassie lowered Paul Tergat’s previous world record of 2:04:55 by nearly a minute. “I am so happy, ” he told Pat Butcher of England’s FinancialTimes after his most recent record.“Everything was perfect—the weather, the pacemakers. Two weeks ago, I had a little problem. I ran 20K 40 seconds faster than in my preparation last year. But I had some cramps and missed a week’s training. I started again a week ago and had some doubts today, but not at the end. [Berlin] is my luck city.” This was Gebrselassie’s eighth marathon and his 26th world record ranging from 2 miles indoors to the hour run on the track, to the half marathon on the roads. Geb has eclipsed his hero, Paavo Nurmi, in the number of ratified world records he has set. But few know that Haile’s ventures into the marathon are not new; in fact, his first marathon dates back 2 decades. Twenty years ago … All of 15 years old, a young Ethiopian made his way to the capital city of Addis Ababa in search of his first race. There was one race that weekend—a marathon. 26.2 miles. Wearing boots, the young Haile Gebrselassie ran 2 hours, 48 minutes. “I finished because there were no cars on the course. I had no choice,” recalled Haile in his interview with Pat Butcher. Like his hero Nurmi, Gebrselassie twice won the Olympic 10,000 meters Gold medal. His wins in 1996 and 2000 stand as two of the classic distance races.The crowds in Atlanta and Sydney were treated to two of the world’s greatest distance runners— Paul Tergat of Kenya and Gebrselassie of Ethiopia—battling it out over 25 laps. In the 1996 Olympic 10,000 meters, Haile reached the halfway mark in 13:55.22, and then ran the final 5,000 meters in 13:11.5. It took his final steps and a brutal 57.5 final 400 meters to win over Tergat, 27:07.34 to 27:08.14. In 2000, in Sydney, it again came down to Tergat and Gebrselassie, with the final 400 meters run in 56.56 and the last 200 in 26.0! Haile ran 27:18.20 to Tergat’s 27:18.29, a finish margin closer than that of Maurice Greene and Ato Boldon in the 100 meters! With his race in Sydney, which former Runner’s World publisher George Hirsch called perhaps the best distance track race of all time, Gebrselassie joined Nurmi, Emil

Victah Sailer@PhotoRun.net


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Zatopek, and LasseViren as winners of two Olympic 10,000-meter titles. It was also the most closely contested distance race in Olympic history, with Gold and Silver determined by just 9/100ths of a second! Three years later, in London in 2003, Gebrselassie tackled his first serious marathon and found himself up against Khalid Khannouchi and Tergat. Some running experts thought that perhaps Haile had waited too long to try the marathon, not knowing about his youthful adventure at age 15. Some thought that his track stride would hurt him over the marathon distance. Khannouchi ran 2:05:38 to break his own world record.Tergat finished 10 seconds back in 2nd, and Gebrselassie was 3rd in an impressive 2:06:35. So much for the experts. Haile ran Flora London in April 2006, and was in the race most of the way, but faded to finish 9th in 2:09:05. In September 2006, he ran Berlin for the first time and won. On world-record pace for 35 kilometers, he finished in 2:05:41. In London in 2007, Haile looked great for 30 kilometers, and then dropped out, his first DNF. It was later determined that he had developed an allergy. Haile returned to Berlin in 2007, the race where he had his first marathon win the year before, and he was a changed man. Running with pacemakers until 36 kilometers, Haile again ran alone over the final kilometers. He was focused and he kept on task. He was determined in this, his seventh marathon, to get the world record many thought him capable of. He did just that, running a stellar 2:04:26 and knocking 29 seconds off Tergat’s 4-year-old record. At Beijing in 2008, in his fourth Olympic 10,000-meter final, Gebrselassie ran the last 5,000 meters like the old days.The problem was that there were still five runners with him. His countrymen Kenenisa Bekele headed for Gold, setting a new Olympic record of 27:01.17, and Sileshi Sihine claimed the Silver in 27:02.77. Haile fought valiantly for third but was outsprinted by Micah Kogo of Kenya, who took the Bronze, and Moses Madai of Kenya and Zersenay Tadesse of Eritrea, who finished 4th and 5th, respectively. Gebrselassie finished a gallant 6th, in 27:06.68—faster than his win in Göteborg at the World Championships and both of his Olympic Gold medals. Afterward, Haile smiled and noted to the media,“If I could have run the first half of the race faster, I could have medaled.” The pace had been 13:48 for the first half and 13:13 for the second half! Another Berlin marathon, another record! Haile obviously recovered from Beijing well, as his second world record in one year over the same Berlin marathon course—his eighth marathon, and his 26th world record—attests.And as he said,“I am so happy.” On Nov. 30, 2008, Haile Gebrselassie ran a 15 kilometer race in 42:20 in Sydney on Jan. 16, 2009, Haile ran 2:05.29 for the Dubai Marathon, running the last 15 kilometers into blinding winds, after having battled torrential rains the entire course. In 2009, he has plans to race the half marathon on March 14 in The Hague, a world record attempt at 20K and the hour run in Hengelo on June 1. He has ruled out the Berlin World Championships. " no longer race for world championship medals; I now race for fast times." How long will Haile compete?When asked that question in January 2009, He said he will never retire! And why not, in 2016, he will only be 42!

Writer: Larry Eder; Design/Layout: Alex Larsen; Editor: James Dunaway; Proofreader: Christine Johnson; © 2008 by Shooting Star Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be stored, copied, or reprinted without prior written permission of Shooting Star Media, Inc. A version of this story first appeared at www.RunBlogRun.com and is reprinted here with permission.

Victah Sailer@PhotoRun.net




 

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WE KNOW

how to blow our nose without breaking stride BECAUSE WE RUN

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AO_ISSUE2-2009:FALL/WINTER 7/15/09 11:10 AM Page 24

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AO_ISSUE2-2009_SUMMER_LORES