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TULSA GUEST GUIDE

THE ESSENTIAL 2017 VISITORS’ GUIDE TO

SHOPPING, SIGHTSEEING,

NIGHTLIFE AND MUCH MORE From the publisher of

Magazine and

HOTEL COPe thisY Please leav copy for future guests


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Tulsa

Guest Guide EDITOR Morgan Phillips CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Anna Bennett, Anne Brockman, John Langdon PHOTOGRAPHERS Greg Bollinger, Valerie Grant, Michelle Pollard, Evan Taylor ART DIRECTOR Georgia Brooks GRAPHIC ARTIST Morgan Welch INTERNS Emerald Dean, Laura Dennis, Chandler Hunt, Tara Rittler, Josalyn Scaife ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Josh Kampf, Rita Kirk PUBLISHER Jim Langdon PRESIDENT Juley Roffers VP COMMUNICATIONS Susie Miller PRODUCTION MANAGER Madeline Crawford TulsaPeople Guest Guide is published annually by

Publishers of TulsaPeople Magazine 1603 South Boulder Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74119-4407 918.585.9924 918.585.9926 Fax www.tulsapeople.com ©2016. All rights reserved. To advertise in the next edition, contact Publisher Jim Langdon: jim@langdonpublishing.com.

TULSA GUEST GUIDE

SUN 11am - 6pm MON-WED 10am - 7pm THUR-SAT 10am - 9pm

THE ESSENTIAL 2017 VISITORS’ GUIDE TO

SHOPPING, SIGHTSEEING,

NIGHTLIFE AND MUCH MORE From the publisher of

3336 SOUTH PEORIA AVENUE 918.949.6950 • IDAREDGENERALSTORE.COM

Magazine and

ON THE COVER: A drone view of downtown Tulsa’s art deco architecture. Photo by Greg Bollinger

2 Tulsa Guest Guide

HOTEL COPY Please leave this copy for future guests


Tulsa Guest Guide 3


From the editor “A City with a Personality.” That line is from the title of a book about Tulsa’s early history by Clarence Brown Douglas, and I can think of no motto more fitting for the place I know and love. Douglas’ book was published in 1921, at the height of Tulsa’s oil boom growth, just as the sophisticated art deco movement emerged. However, I’m happy to report that the Tulsa of today is even more vibrant. Just turn the pages of this book to see some of the wonderful attractions Tulsa has to offer, from the performing arts and museums to festivals and nightlife. Here are some of my favorite spots I hope you’ll visit: Brady Arts District: From a baseball or soccer game to art galleries and a buzzing public green space, this downtown district has plenty to keep you busy any day or night of the week. Bonus if you’re in town on the first Friday of the month; the First Friday Art Crawl ups the energy of this artsy area with plenty of free exhibits and live entertainment from 6-9 p.m. Jenks Main Street: A dozen quaint antique shops and various other boutiques and eateries make Jenks the perfect place for a leisurely treasure hunt. Tulsa Farmers’ Market: Tulsa has two farmers’ markets from which to buy fresh, locally grown produce. From April through October, visit the Cherry Street market on Saturday mornings or the Brookside market on Wednesday mornings. A winter market also runs bi-weekly during the colder months. Now, get out and experience Tulsa’s diverse and engaging personality for yourself. Have fun exploring.

Contents 6 downtown Through The Decades Tulsa’s downtown destinations take visitors from the past to the present.

14 Go, see, do Update your itinerary to include these local festivals and events.

20 Just Ask the Locals The editors of Tulsa’s city magazine share a few of their favorite stops.

26 Stage struck Tulsa is home to performing arts groups and venues small and large. 30 Galleries Where to view and purchase local and regional art

32 Oklahoma on display A peek into the city’s varied museums

36 Fun on the water Activities enjoyed in and around the area’s lakes and river

38 A-plus attractions Discover Tulsa’s historical depth, beautiful scenery and options for family fun. 44 Sports for all seasons The city’s professional and Division I collegiate sports teams

46 Parks and rec Burn off some energy at parks, golf courses and other recreational spots. Morgan Phillips Editor

48 Where to shop Visit the area’s best shopping centers, districts and malls.

52 We got the beat A guide to Tulsa’s diverse venues for live music and nightlife 56 Restaurant and bar index

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Explore downtown Tulsa through the lens of your favorite decade, whether you’re a midcentury modern buff or just haven’t changed your hairstyle since the 1980s. One thing is for certain: 12 decades of development have left downtown with no shortage of things to do. Let’s fire up the time machine and get started.

DOWNTOWN THROUGH THE DECADES

BY ANNA BENNETT

1900s

By the time Oklahoma attained statehood in 1907, the rowdy boomtown of Tulsa had already established many institutions, from religious life to commerce. Vernon AME Church, now at 311 N. Greenwood Ave., has been around since 1905; what’s now the Mimosa Tree Capital building at 301 E. Third St. was the first combination residential/ commercial building in town. Take the Tulsa Historical Society’s tour of the central business district on the last Friday of the month (the third Friday in November and December) at 10 a.m. to walk in the footsteps of the earliest Tulsans.

1910s

Stop by the original Tulsa Municipal Building at 124 E. Fourth St. Built in 1917, the Neo-Classic-style structure served as City Hall until 1969. Then, walk the streets of historic Greenwood. Take notice of the plaques on the sidewalks throughout the district and imagine what it must have been like during its Black Wall Street heyday. The Greenwood of this era was one of the wealthiest black communities in early 20th century America. Visit the Greenwood Cultural Center at 322 N. Greenwood Ave. to learn more. In the days before “talkies,” live entertainment like vaudeville was the thing. One relic from that era, the Brady Theater (105 W. M. B. Brady St.), still hosts many concerts and performances. For modern takes on turn-of-the-20thcentury entertainment — from variety shows to classic ballets — check out the Comedy Parlor (328 E. First St.) and the Tulsa Performing Arts Center (110 E. Second St.).

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Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

1920s

Two words: art deco. Tulsa Foundation for Architecture’s Second Saturday walking tours, which start at 10 a.m. on the second Saturday of the month, offer a fascinating look at the story behind downtown’s opulent buildings. Take in the sounds of the Jazz Age at free Depot Jazz Jams Tuesday nights at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, 5 S. Boston Ave. If you seek a “speakeasy” experience, head down the stairs to the unassuming Cellar Dweller at 417 W. Seventh St. But the 1920s weren’t all glitz, glamour and Gatsby, unfortunately. Pay a visit to John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park, 321 N. Detroit Ave., to honor the lives and livelihoods that were lost in the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot. Continued on p. 8


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Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar 1976 Utica Square, Tulsa, OK | 918-712-7500 Visit FlemingsSteakhouse.com to reserve your table today. Tulsa Guest Guide 7


1960s

Continued from p. 6

1930s

ONEOK Field, 201 N. Elgin Ave., is a new gem, but the games within harken to the days when Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio made baseball America’s Pastime. Experience Oklahoma’s Dust Bowl memories and the legacy of the legend himself at the Woody Guthrie Center, 102 E. M. B. Brady St. Then, visit the Tulsa Art Deco Museum, 511 S. Boston Ave., to catch a glimpse into the lives of the swankier set during the era.

Relive your favorite scenes from the cult classic “The Outsiders,” filmed largely in Tulsa. Some of the downtown locations include Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, 1301 S. Boston Ave., the nowdemolished Bowen Lounge at West 11th Street and South Denver Avenue and Tulsa Regional Medical Center (now OSU Medical Center) at 744 W. Ninth St. Then, taste the British Invasion at Mod’s Coffee and Crepes, 507 S. Boston Ave., or sample the ’60s penchant for tropical kitsch at Saturn Room, 209 N. Boulder Ave. If you think “Mad Men” is groovy, check out the midcentury modern vibes, far-out fare and cool cocktails at The Vault, 620 S. Cincinnati Ave.

1940s

Get into the “swing” of a favorite World War II-era pastime with Tulsa’s Vintage Swing Movement group. Lessons in Lindy Hop are at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Fly Loft, 117 N. Boston Ave. Then, show off your vintage moves at “Lindy in the Park,” VSM’s free dances on the second Friday of the month, April through October, at Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St. If you’re looking for the saucier, sexier side of the decade, unleash your inner pin-up girl with a photo session at Voulez Vous Boudoir in the East Village, 820 E. Third St.

1950s

The post-war era may conjure images of vast suburbia, but there’s plenty of old-fashioned family fun in the heart of the city. At Decopolis, 502 S. Boston Ave., the youngsters can pick out a toy or two from yesteryear. For a grown-up blast from the past, grease your hair, put on that leather jacket and grab a beer at Orpha’s Lounge (112 W. Fourth St.) or Arnie’s Bar (318 E. Second St.), two dives that have been staples since the ’50s. If pool and jukeboxes aren’t your scene, capture the spirit of Beatnik culture at open mic night at the Gypsy Coffee House, 303 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. The beats, jams and verses start flying on Tuesdays at 7 p.m., but arrive before 6:30 if you’ve got something to share. We’ll snap for that.

1970s

Tuck in that mock turtleneck, hike up those athletic shorts and polish your supersized glasses — the ’70s are back in full force at Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge (211 S. Elgin Ave.). The ultra-retro joint is as famous for tater tots and White Russians as it is for bowling. If you’re feeling less square and more punk, catch a show at Cain’s Ballroom (423 N. Main St.) and relive the frenetic energy of the Sex Pistols’ infamous 1978 show there — you can still see the fist-sized hole in the wall left by band member Sid Vicious. Continued on p. 10

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The Vault


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1980s

You can still rock a sweatband, highcut leotard and legwarmers at free fitness classes at Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St. (In the winter, these classes move to Fly Loft at 117 N. Boston Ave.) Or, maybe The Max Retropub, 114 S. Elgin Ave., is a better fit for a nerd like you. Shoot for the high score on classic arcade games like Tron, Pac-Man, Burger Time and more while sipping some righteous cocktails based on your favorite ’80s cartoons. Continued on p. 12

The Max Retropub

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FUNNIEST WEEKEND IN TULSA

SEPTEMBER 7TH-10TH , 2017 BLUEWHALECOMEDYFESTIVAL .COM Guthrie Green, an urban park and entertainment space in the heart of Tulsa’s Brady Arts District.

LAND MADE FOR YOU AND ME.

www.guthriegreen.com | #guthriegreen | Tulsa Guest Guide 11


2000s

Continued from p. 10

1990s

The dream of the ’90s is alive in Tulsa, perhaps most visibly at The Fur Shop, 520 E. Third St. Known for killer local brews and bands, this East Village bar/music venue captures the DIY spirit, featuring hella cool musical acts — local and otherwise — in a variety of genres. Songwriters, shoegazers, roots rockers, ska slayers, triphoppers, loud and proud vintage devotees and other modern throwbacks frequent the scene. The 1990s also saw the expansion of coffee culture, a way of life that’s taken very seriously at Chimera Café (212 N. Main St.), Foolish Things Coffee Co. (1001 S. Main St.), Hodges Bend (823 E. Third St.) and Topeca Coffee (115 E. Fifth St. and 100 E. Second St.).

During a time when Tulsa seemed to be expanding outward, several visionaries put roots downtown. Grab a pint at Elliot Nelson’s original McNellie’s, 409 E. First St., or sip wine at Chris Girouard’s early East Village anchor Girouard Vines, 817 E. Third St. Relive your “American Idol” fantasies at a plethora of karaoke nights: Sundays at Mainline (111 N. Main St.) and Enso (104 S. Detroit Ave.), Mondays at Woody’s Corner Bar (325 E. Second St.), Wednesdays at Club Majestic (124 N. Boston Ave.) and again at Woody’s, Fridays at Elote Café (514 S. Boston Ave.). Live it up “Sex In The City”-style by taking your gal pals to cocktails or brunch. For cocktails, try Valkyrie (13 E. M. B. Brady St.), MixCo. (South Denver Avenue and West Third Street) and Hodges Bend (823 E. Third St.). For brunch try Antoinette Baking Co. (207 N. Main St.), and 624 Kitchen on Sundays (624 S. Boston Ave.). For the best of both, opt for The Tavern (201 N. Main St.), Dilly Diner (402 E. Second St.) or Bramble Breakfast and Bar (311 E. Second St.).

2010s

It’s all about food fads. Get your trendy cupcake fix at Pinkitzel, 201 S. Denver Ave., and hop on the mobile food bandwagon at Food Truck Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St. This public space represents Tulsa’s promising, urban future while already being a fixture in local life. Catch today’s biggest stars at the BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave. And don’t forget to take a selfie at the Center of the Universe, an acoustic anomaly on the pedestrian bridge between East Archer and First streets.

Hair and makeup courtesy Toni Jones of Posh Blow Dry Bar. Models courtesy Linda Layman Agency. Vintage clothing courtesy Cheap Thrills Vintage.

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Hodges Bend


Tulsa Guest Guide 13


Go, see, do

Regardless of when you visit Tulsa, find plenty of festivals and events. Hop Jam Beer and Music Festival

Greg Bollinger

Compiled by John Langdon

JANUARY

MARCH

1-15 Winterfest BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., bokcenter.com

4-5 Big 12 Wrestling Championships BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., bokcenter.com

9-14 Lucas Oil Chili Bowl Nationals Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., chilibowl.com 16 Martin Luther King Jr. Parade Forms at East Pine Street and North Greenwood Avenue, proceeds south on Greenwood through the historic Greenwood District, and ends on East Archer Avenue 27-29 Green Country Home and Garden Show Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., coxradiotulsa.com 30-Feb. 5 Tulsa Boat, Sport and Travel Show Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., tulsaboatshow.com

FEBRUARY 28 Mardi Gras Celebration Blue Dome District, downtown

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9-12 Greater Tulsa Home and Garden Show Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., tulsahba.com 10-12 Women’s Living Expo Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., womenslivingexpo.com 17 St. Patrick’s Day Celebration Blue Dome District, downtown 17-19 2017 NCAA DI Men’s Basketball Championship BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., bokcenter.com Date TBA Herb Day in Brookside East 41st Street and South Peoria Avenue, facebook.com/herbdayinbrookside Date TBA Redfork Native American Film Fest TCC West Campus, 7505 W. 41st St., facebook.com/redforknaff

Date TBA Tulsa Overground Film and Music Festival Multiple locations, tulsaoverground.com

APRIL 1 Kendall Whittier Food Truck Festival East Admiral Place and North Lewis Avenue, historickwms.com 7-8 SpringFest Garden Market and Festival Tulsa Garden Center, 2435 S. Peoria Ave., tulsagardencenter.com 13-15 Easter Island Music Festival Valley Park Sports Complex, 6802 OK-20, Keetonville; easterislandfestival.com 15 Tulsa Roots Music Bash Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St., tulsarootsmusic.org 18-23 Bare Bones International Film Festival Muskogee, barebonesfilmfest00.tripod.com Continued on p. 16


Gastropub focused on Craft Beer, with a full menu serving lunch, dinner, and Sunday brunch on historic Cherry Street. 1551 E 15th St, #101 (918) 591-2888 • rooseveltstulsa.com

A LOCAL, MID-TOWN FAVORITE. YOU WALK IN AS A STRANGER AND LEAVE AS A REGULAR — THUS THE R “OUR” BAR MONIKER. 3421 S PEORIA AVE (918) 392-4811 • RBARTULSA.COM

LOCATED IN THE BUSTLING AND EVER GROWING BRADY DISTRICT OF DOWNTOWN TULSA FEATURING BEERS BREWED ON SITE BY PRAIRIE ARTISAN ALES. 223 N MAIN STREET (918) 936 - 4395 • PRAIRIEPUB.COM

Tulsa Guest Guide 15


Valerie Grant

Summer’s Fifth Night at Utica Square

Continued from p. 14 21-23 Reverb Play Festival echotheatreco.org 21-23 Spring Home and Outdoor Living Expo Expo Square 4145 E. 21st St., springhomeexpo.com 23-29 Woody Guthrie Center Fourth Anniversary Celebration Woody Guthrie Center, 102 E. M. B. Brady St., and Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St., woodyguthriecenter.org

18-21 Tulsa International Mayfest Downtown, tulsamayfest.org

20-21 Juneteenth Jubilee Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St.

19-21 13th annual Blue Dome Arts Festival Blue Dome District, downtown, bluedomearts.org

22-25 Mvskoke Nation Festival Claude Cox Complex, 2950 Warrior Road, Okmulgee; creekfestival.com

21 Hop Jam Beer and Music Festival Brady Arts District, downtown, thehopjam.com Date TBA Rocklahoma 1421 W. 450 Road, Pryor; rocklahoma.com

JUNE

29-May 1 Germanfest German-American Society of Tulsa, 2301 E. 15th St., gastulsa.org

1 Brookside Rumble and Roll Parade and Street Festival From University of Tulsa Reynolds Center to Street Party on South Peoria Avenue from East 33rd to 36th streets, rumbleandroll.com

29-June 4 Oklahoma Renaissance Festival The Castle of Muskogee, 3400 W. Fern Mountain Road, Muskogee; okcastle.com

1-25 SummerStage Multiple locations, summerstagetulsa.org

MAY

3-4 Tulsa Pride Festival and Parade 621 E. Fourth St., tulsapride.org

May through August, every Thursday night Summer’s Fifth Night Concerts Utica Square, East 21st Street and South Utica Avenue, uticasquare.com

8-16 OK Mozart International Music Festival Bartlesville, okmozart.com

5 Cinco de Mayo Celebration Downtown, downtowntulsaok.com 7-11 Tulsa International Balloon Festival Tulsa Raceway Park, 3101 N. Garnett Road, facebook.com/tulsaibf

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9-11 Saint Francis Tulsa Tough Blue Dome District, Brady Arts District and Tulsa River Parks, tulsatough.com 15-17 G Fest Muskogee, gfestmuskogee.com

Date TBA Asian-American Festival Martin Regional Library, 2601 S. Garnett Road, tulsalibrary.org/asianfestival Date TBA Dodgebrawl BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., bokcenter.com Date TBA eMerge Dance Festival emergedancefestival.wordpress.com

JULY 4 Folds of Honor Freedom Fest River West Festival Park and Veterans Park, riverparks.org/freedomfest 14-16 Tokyo in Tulsa Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center, tokyointulsa.com 22-23 Tulsa Pow Wow Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center, tulsapowwow.org

AUGUST 11-13 Intertribal Indian Club of Tulsa Pow-Wow of Champions Mabee Center, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., iicot.org


Tulsa State Fair

TULSA’S URBAN VISITORS TO TULSA and locals now have access to an “urban field guide” to the city, thanks to the George Kaiser Family Foundation. Launched in 2016, Root Tulsa is a mobile website and free app for iPhone that invites users to explore their surroundings based on their location and interests. Through a partnership with The Tulsa Voice, Root also features a citywide calendar of events and curates articles from local media such as The Tulsa Voice and TulsaPeople Magazine. Although much of the app’s initial content is focused on downtown, Kate Hofland, Root Tulsa editor, says GKFF wants the app to be a citywide resource. “We don’t want to be Yelp,” Hofland says. “We want to provide more insight and a deeper narrative to what Tulsa is like.” Download the Root Tulsa app at the iTunes app store or visit roottulsa.com on your mobile device.

Cooper Design

FIELD GUIDE

Tulsa Guest Guide 17


17-19 Exchange Choreography Festival bellhouseart.org

Tulsa Tough riders.

26 Utsav India Fest Expo Square Pavilion, 4145 E. 21st St., iagtok.org Date TBA Wild Brew Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center, wildbrew.org

SEPTEMBER 4 Great Raft Race Arkansas River, tulsaraftrace.com

John Howland

4 POSTOAK Wine and Jazz Festival POSTOAK Lodge and Retreat, 5323 W. 31st St. N., postoaklodge.com 7-9 Bluegrass and Chili Festival Claremore, bluegrasschilifest.com 7-10 Blue Whale Comedy Festival Brady Arts District, bluewhalecomedyfestival.com 14-16 Tulsa Greek Festival Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 1222 S. Guthrie Ave., tulsagreekfestival.com 15-17 Oklahoma Scotfest River West Festival Park, 2100 S. Jackson Ave., okscotfest.com 28-Oct. 8 Tulsa State Fair Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., tulsastatefair.com 29-Oct. 28, every Friday and Saturday Haunted Castle Halloween Festival The Castle of Muskogee, 3400 W. Fern Mountain Road, Muskogee; okcastle.com Date TBA Backwoods Music Festival 820343 S. 3480 Road, Agra; backwoodsmusicfestival.com Date TBA BaseCamp Camping and Music Festival Turkey Mountain, 6863 S. Elwood Ave., facebook.com/basecampatturkey Date TBA Higher Plains Music Festival The Vanguard, 222 N. Main St., thevanguardtulsa.com Date TBA I AM Yoga Festival Veterans Park, 1811 S Boulder Park Drive, iamyogafestival.com Date TBA Illinois River Jam Tahlequah Date TBA McNellie’s Harvest Beer Festival East First Street and South Elgin Avenue, facebook.com/mcnelliesHBF

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Date TBA Oysterfest Guthrie Green, 111 E. M. B. Brady St., guthriegreen.com Date TBA ShalomFest Temple Israel, 2004 E. 22nd Place templetulsa.com/shalomfest

Date TBA Tulsa Run Downtown, tulsarun.com

NOVEMBER 1 Dia de los Muertos Festival Living Arts, 307 E. M. B. Brady St., livingarts.org

Date TBA Stone River Music Festival Chandler, stonerivermusicfestival.com

2-5 Will Rogers Days Will Rogers Memorial Museum, 1720 W. Will Rogers Blvd., Claremore; willrogers.com

Date TBA XPO Game Festival Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center, xpotulsa.com

11 99th annual Veterans Day Parade Downtown

OCTOBER 7 National Indian Taco Championship Pawhuska, pawhuskachamber.com 14-15 Cherokee Art Market Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; cherokeeartmarket.com 18-22 Linde Oktoberfest Tulsa River West Festival Park, 2100 S. Jackson Ave., tulsaoktoberfest.org 27-31 HallowMarine Oklahoma Aquarium, 300 Aquarium Drive, Jenks; okaquarium.org 27-31 HallowZOOeen Tulsa Zoo, 6421 E. 36th St. N., tulsazoo.org/boo 28 BooHaHa Parade South Peoria Avenue from East 49th to 33rd streets, brooksidetheplacetobe.com Date TBA Tulsa American Film Festival Multiple locations, tulsaamericanfilmfest.com

19-Dec. 31 Philbrook Festival Philbrook Museum of Art, 2727 S. Rockford Road, philbrook.org 23 Lights On! Utica Square, East 21st Street and South Utica Avenue, uticasquare.com 24-Jan. 14 Arvest Winterfest BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., bokcenter.com Date TBA USA BMX Grands usabmx.com Date TBA Cyntergy Hurtland Owen Park, 560 N. Maybelle Ave., hurtlandusa.com

DECEMBER 9 Tulsa Christmas Parade Downtown, tulsachristmasparade.org


GREEN COUNTRY’S LARGEST HANDMADE, BOUTIQUES AND GOURMET MARKET RETURNS TO TULSA 102 EAST M.B. BRADY ST WOODYGUTHRIECENTER.ORG

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JULY 14-16, 2017 NOV. 17-19, 2017

500 VENDORS. 900 BOOTHS. 3 DAYS. HeartOfTulsa.com

FOOD TRUCKS, TRAILERS, & CARTS 2 CHEFS ON WHEELS // Alpha Grill BBq // ANDOLINI’S // Back Street Burgers & BBQ // BOHEMIA // BROWNIE’S HAMBURGERS // CACTUS JACKS BBQ // COOLRAY COFFEE CAFE // DOG HOUSE // EAT MIKE’S BBQ // EURO PRANZO // FOURAYS EASTERN EATS // EL GRINGO LOCO TRUCK’N FRESH TACOS // GYROS BY ALI // HOOP’S PHILLY TRUCK // Hot Mess BBQ // IN THE RAW ON THE ROLL // JARED’S PROPOPS // JOHN’S DIGGITY DOGS // JOSH’S SNO SHACK // JUBILEE CONCESSIONS // KONA ICE // LEGRUBS CATERING CO. // LICK YOUR LIPS MINI-DONUTS // LONE WOLF BANH MI // THE LOCAL TABLE // LOLA’S CARAVAN // MANGIAMO // MASA // MELTDOWN GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICHES // MOD’S MOBILE // MR. NICE GUYS // PITA PLACE MEDITERRANEAN GRILL // PLUM // POLLO AL CARBON // SAM FRANCES CO. // SMOKIN’ HOWARD’S BBQ // STELLA REAUXS // T-TOWN GOURMET // TACOS FIESTA MEXICANA // EL TAQUERO // TNT DYNO DOGS // TRUE BEAN ICE CREAM RESCUE // THE WURST

Tulsa Guest Guide 19


JUST ASK THE LOCALS

The editors of Tulsa’s city magazine share a few of their favorite stops. TulsaPeople is Tulsa’s award-winning city magazine that celebrates living, working and playing in Tulsa. The staff of TulsaPeople also publishes the Tulsa Guest Guide, which makes us uniquely qualified to share some places and events visitors definitely won’t want to miss. Here are some of our personal recommendations.

READERS OF TulsaPeople Magazine voice their top picks for fun, food, body, shopping and services in the magazine’s annual A-List. Visit TulsaPeople.com/a-list to see what readers consider the best of what Tulsa has to offer.

BEST ARTSY EXPERIENCE: First Friday Art Crawl in the Brady Arts District Whether you seek an out-of-theordinary date night or just want to experience some local culture, the First Friday Art Crawl is a must-do. It’s no surprise these days that the Brady Arts District — and most of downtown — is booming with restaurants, retail and galleries, but the energy experienced during First Friday is astonishing. The art crawl kicks off at 6 p.m. on the first Friday of each month, inviting visitors to wander in and out of the district’s interesting businesses, galleries, restaurants and bars, many of which host free art exhibits and musical performances. The crawl crowd is comprised of all ages and has been known to reach several thousand on nice evenings. Don’t miss live music at Guthrie Green and demonstrations at the Tulsa Glassblowing School, to name just a few First Friday activities.

Evan Taylor

Various venues along East M. B. Brady Street, thebradyartsdistrict.com Continued on p. 22

20 Tulsa Guest Guide


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918-582-1403 www.elotetulsa.com 514 S. Boston Ave. TULSA, OK

Tulsa Guest Guide 21


Continued from p. 20

BEST WAY TO SALUTE THE SUN: Rooftop Yoga Downward dog in a darkened studio is dandy, but to get the most out of your sun salutations, the best way to go is up. Rooftop yoga is hotter than Bikram right now, and there are several places in town to get vinyasa with a view. Get your fix three times a week on Cherry Street over Rustic Cuff. On Thursdays from 7-8 p.m., The Yoga Room offers wine and live music from local musicians. Or, make yoga part of your Cherry Street Farmers’ Market routine with its Saturday morning class from 8:30-9:30 a.m. Some Tuesdays at 7 p.m., The Yoga Room offers rooftop acro yoga (short for “acrobatic” and done in pairs) — no partner or experience required. (Check theyogaroomtulsa.com for a full schedule and weather cancellations.) All classes are donation-based (suggested $10$20), and you’re encouraged to bring your own mat and your friends. For the highest rooftop yoga in town, head downtown to the Mayo Hotel on Thursdays at 6 p.m. Bring your own mat and $10 cash. On the elevator, hit “P” for Penthouse. Namaste indeed. Rustic Cuff, 1325 E. 15th St., 918-794-0243; Mayo Hotel, 115 W. Fifth St., 918-582-6296

BEST WAY TO IMPRESS YOUR FOODIE FRIENDS: Mecca Coffee Co. Walk through the doors of this Tulsa institution and enter a world synonymous with flavor and kitchen know-how. You don’t have to be hip to shop at the 95-year-old store, but it will up your foodie street cred. Some are attracted by the 130-plus kinds of bulk herbs and spices; you can buy as little as 1 ounce or as much as you desire. Others swear by the infused olive oils and balsamic vinegars, with flavors like Thai lemongrass mint, aged red apple, cilantro and roasted onion or Persian lime, in 60-750 ml bottles. The wholebean coffee and loose-leaf tea supplies are impressive, too. A friendly barista can brew up your favorite latte or tea while you shop. Mecca’s selection of barware, distinctive tableware, cutting boards, kitchen gadgetry and one-of-a-kind gifts make it a one-stop destination for finding the perfect gift for that foodie in your life, or an addition to your own discerning kitchen. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Monday-Saturday; 1330 E. 41st St.; 918-749-3509; meccacoffeeco.com

22 Tulsa Guest Guide


BEST TROPICAL VACATION WITHOUT LEAVING TOWN: Saturn Room So, you wished for a beach vacation and ended up in Tulsa instead. Never fear — Saturn Room is your oasis. Escape extreme Oklahoma temps at the Tiki-themed bar that serves beach cocktails like mai tais and the Macadamia Nut Chi-chi in kitschy glasses and fresh coconut shells. This place commits to Polynesian decor, from its thatched bar awning and totem bar stools to its blowfish light fixtures. A stone’s throw from the Brady Theater, Saturn Room is a great spot to grab a pre- or post-show beverage. If you’re with a group — or if you make new friends easily — share a Singapore Sling, which serves two to three people. But be forewarned: The fresh and fruity drinks and friendly bartenders might convince you you’re on island time, not Tulsa time. 4 p.m.-2 a.m., daily; 209 N. Boulder Ave.; 918-794-9422; saturnroom.com

BEST REVITALIZATION OF THE MOMENT: Route 66 For decades, Route 66 was America’s heartbeat. For many it never ceased to be cool, and others are realizing the untapped potential of the thoroughfare that runs through Tulsa. A number of renovations are already underway, and new businesses are flocking to the area. Three years ago, Soul City art studio — today it’s a music venue and gastropub, too — moved into 1621 E. 11th St., the site of a former Texaco service station. Nearby, interior designer Jill Croka set up her showroom on the Mother Road. Jenkins and Co. opened its modern general store in November 2015. These new businesses are interspersed with local favorites like El Rancho Grande, Joseph Gierek Fine Art, the Lola’s Caravan food truck and so much more. East 11th Street from South Peoria to Delaware avenues Jill Croka Designs

Tulsa Guest Guide 23


BEST PLACE TO MAKE A GIFT FROM THE HEART: The Bead Merchant This artsy shop has been a Tulsa fixture for 25 years, specializing in all things beaded and charming. The shop moved from its longtime location to its current digs in the fall of 2014. Cascades of beads and strands fill the windows, catching the sunlight in curtains of color. But the variety on display transcends color and size, moving far beyond colored plastic beads and basic chains and venturing into strands of blue fluorite, Roman glass and quartz in every color, shape and shine imaginable. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Saturday; 1547 S. Harvard Ave.; 918-747-3636; beadmerchanttulsa.com

BEST HISTORIC DISTRICT MAKING A COMEBACK: Kendall Whittier District The more the merrier: That seems to be the motto of the flourishing Kendall Whittier area that is home to a growing collection of artists and ventures. In the past two years, 23 businesses and more than 160 jobs have been added to the neighborhood — thanks in part to $12 million in private investments, says Ed Sharrer, executive director of Kendall Whittier Main Street. The district is anchored by historic Whittier Square, which was at one time the oldest suburban shopping district in Tulsa. Sharrer says the neighborhood declined from the mid-1960s to ’80s and became a haven for adult-oriented businesses that eventually surrounded longtime staples Ziegler Art & Frame and Circle Cinema. In 2010, KWMS was born and has helped change the Kendall Whittier landscape into a careful mix of restaurants, retail, nonprofits, studios and destination attractions. A recent newcomer is the eclectic vintage store Jo and June. The Oklahoma Art Council recently named the district one of seven certified cultural districts in Oklahoma. Valerie Grant

Near East Admiral Boulevard and North Lewis Avenue, 918-633-1934, historickwms.com

24 Tulsa Guest Guide


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Loop w i t h t h e Tu ls a Tra n s i t Bu s Tra cke r A p p . Tulsa Guest Guide 25


Stage struck

Tulsa’s quickly growing performing arts scene offers nonstop entertainment. American Theatre Co.’s “Mothers and Sons” by Terrance McNally

John McCormack Photography

By Anna Bennett

(G)

indicates performing arts group, (V) indicates venue

AMERICAN INDIAN THEATRE CO. OF OKLAHOMA (G)

BRADY THEATER (V)

CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS (G)

AMERICAN THEATRE CO. (G)(V)

BROKEN ARROW COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE (G)(V)

CLARK YOUTH THEATRE (G)

9521 B Riverside Parkway, Box 358; 918-298-2300; facebook.com/aitco

ATC’s productions embrace the unexpected and are more about quality than crowd pleasing. May 12-20, ATC presents “In The Next Room,” a comedy with a prim, Victorian backdrop. Expect to squirm in your seat as a couple is faced with the realities of marriage, medicine and intimacy. The 2016-17 season has big expectations to meet. Two ATC shows from this past season, “Waiting For Godot” and “Mothers and Sons,” won first and second place at the Tulsa Awards for Theatre Excellence. “We continue to strive for productions that are engaging and insightful through a mix of contemporary and classic dramas, comedies and musicals,” says Chief Scenic Designer Richard Ellis, “combined with the use of the top directors, actors and designers in Tulsa, Oklahoma and the country.” 308 S. Lansing Ave., 918-747-9494, americantheatrecompany.org

26 Tulsa Guest Guide

105 W. M. B. Brady St., 918-582-7239, bradytheater.com

1800 S. Main St., Broken Arrow; 918-258-0077; bacptheatre7471.wix.com/bacp

BROKEN ARROW PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (V)

701 S. Main St., Broken Arrow; 918-259-5778; brokenarrowpac.com

CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS (G) 7506 E. 91st St., 918-477-7469, celebrityattractions.com

CERTAIN CURTAIN THEATRE (G) certaincurtaintheatre@gmail.com, whycertainly.wordpress.com

CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA (G) 2210 S. Main St., 918-587-3802, chambermusictulsa.org

5272 S. Lewis Ave., Suite 236; 918-295-5965; choregus.org

4825 S. Quaker Ave., 918-746-5065, clarkyouththeatre.com

COMEDY PARLOR (V)

328 E. First St., 918-921-3535, comedyparlor.com

COX BUSINESS CENTER (V)

100 Civic Center, 918-894-4350, coxcentertulsa.com

ECHO THEATRE CO. (G)

Illuminate. Inspire. Stimulate. That’s the motto of this relative newcomer company, led by some of Tulsa’s most experienced actors. Focusing on new and reenvisioned works, Echo Theatre Co. aims to fill the need for socially conscious, original work in Tulsa. The company will present the Reverb Play Festival from April 21-23. Featuring “dangerous works for a dangerous world,” selected plays will deal with timely social justice themes: racism, sexism, homophobia, immigration, violence and more. All the plays will be new, unproduced works, so audiences are guaranteed a fresh, one-of-a-kind experience.


LORTON PERFORMANCE CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA (V) 550 S. Gary Place, 918-631-5722, lpc.utulsa.edu

THE LOONY BIN (V)

6808 S. Memorial Drive, Suite 234; 918-392-5653; tulsa.loonybincomedy.com

MARY GLASS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (V)

12901 E. 86th St. N., Owasso; 918-274-3420; owassops.org/arts.cfm?subpage=72665

MIDWESTERN THEATRE TROUPE (G) 1416 E. Fourth St., 918-633-8666, nightingaletheater.com

NIGHTINGALE THEATER (V)

1416 E. Fourth St., 918-633-8666, nightingaletheater.com

ODEUM THEATRE CO. (G)

918-607-5625, odeumtheatrecompany@gmail.com, odeumtheatrecompany.com

OWASSO COMMUNITY THEATRE CO. (G) Blinkphototulsa

P.O. Box 1241, Owasso; 918-237-1656; octok.org A Portico Dance Theatre performance based on the natural elements Also coming in spring 2017 are two collaborations with Spotlight Children’s Theatre: “Fairytale Academy” and “Abuela’s Tales.” “Fairytale Academy” tackles tough subjects like bullying but remains lighthearted. “Abuela’s Tales” will feature original music by local legend Rebecca Ungerman and will be performed in both English and Spanish. “An engaged audience listens truthfully, feels deeply and thinks critically in regard to the world around them,” says Artistic Director Machele Miller Dill. “The work we do serves as an impetus to the engaged audience to go out and effect change.” 870-918-4371, echotheatreco@gmail.com, echotheatreco.org

ENCORE! TULSA (G) 1511 S. Delaware Ave., encore-tulsa.com

FLY LOFT (V)

117 N. Boston Ave., 918-574-2421, greenroomok.com/flyloft

GRACE ANN PRODUCTIONS (G) 1125 E. Eighth St., 918-491-3410, graceann.org

G RATED THEATER

(G)

PLAYHOUSE TULSA (G)

P.O. Box 701444, facebook.com/theplayhousetulsa

PORTICO DANCE THEATRE (G)

314 S. Kenosha Ave., 918-585-1234

Portico Dance Theatre has exciting new projects on the horizon. The contemporary dance company’s next full-length piece, “Animalia,” is set to premiere in June 2017. Unlike previous Portico works, the performances will not be held in a traditional theater, but rather in more unusual settings around town. The details are subject to change, so be sure and keep an eye on the website. For choreographer Nina Madsen, “Animalia” is truly a passion project. “The goal is to recreate the dynamics of a specific animal — jungle cat, flamingos, spider, scorpion, jellyfish, elephants and peacocks — without being too literal,” she says. The project will raise money for various animal charities. Portico offers free, adult dance classes on Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at Fly Loft, 117 N. Boston Ave. All levels are welcome. Another unique aspect of the group is its incorporation of aerial dance techniques; ongoing classes are on Mondays and Wednesdays. “Aerial dance incorporates vertical as well as horizontal movement paths,” says Board President Linda Davis. “The fabric has its own motion, which changes the way a dancer must move in response.”

LIVING ARTS OF TULSA (V)

19917 E. 44th Place, Broken Arrow; 405-596-8767; porticodance.org

918-344-9877, facebook.com/gratedtheater

HARDESTY CENTER FOR DANCE EDUCATION(V) 1901 W. New Orleans St., Broken Arrow; 918-712-5327; tulsaballet.org

HELLER THEATRE CO. (G)

1956 Utica Square, #108; 918-609-0482; hellertheatreco.com

HENTHORNE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (V)

4825 S. Quaker Ave., 918-746-5065

IDL BALLROOM (V)

230 E. First St., 918-551-7447, idlballroom.com

LIGGETT STUDIO (V)

307 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-585-1234, livingarts.org

Tulsa Guest Guide 27


Theatre North performs P.J. Gibson’s “Long Time Since Yesterday.”

TULSA CHILDREN’S SUMMER THEATRE (G) 918-595-7732, tcccst.blogspot.com

TULSA LATINO THEATER CO. (G) 918-361-5386, tulsalatinotheater.com

TULSA LITTLE THEATRE (V) Courtesy Theatre North

1511 S. Delaware Ave., 918-749-0020, tulsalittletheatre.com

TULSA MODERN MOVEMENT (G)

1545 S. Harvard Ave., Unit B; 877-460-0422; tummdance.org

TULSA OPERA (G) SAND SPRINGS COMMUNITY THEATRE (G) P.O. Box 1528, Sand Springs; 918-245-1355; sandspringstheatre.com

SAPULPA COMMUNITY THEATRE (G)(V)

cleaning duty, two of them decide to stand up and fight back. “It is an important illustration of how the dominant class can overpower and destroy the dreams and aspirations of the most vulnerable in society,” Wallace says.

124 S. Water St., Sapulpa; 918-227-2169; sapulpatheatre.org

P.O. Box 6255, 918-814-1311, facebook.com/theatrenorthtulsa

SCIANNA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AT CASCIA HALL (V)

THEATRE POPS (G)

2520 S. Yorktown Ave., 918-746-2680, casciahall.org

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY AT TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE (G) 10300 E. 81st St., 918-595-7777, signaturesymphony.org

STUDIO K AT TULSA BALLET (V) 1212 E. 45th Place S., 918-749-6030, tulsaballet.org

THEATRE ARTS INC. (G)(V)

1405 N. Aspen, Broken Arrow; 918-258-2543; theatreartstulsa.com

THEATRE NORTH (G)

In the 1970s, a group of local actors decided to do something about the lack of diversity in Tulsa’s theater scene. The result of their efforts became Theatre North. “Theatre North gives voice to Tulsans of African descent,” says Executive Director Maybelle Wallace. “Only we can tell our stories in an authentic voice.” In 2017, these stories include the plays “CourtMartial at Fort Devens” (Feb. 10-12) and “Spunk” (May 27, June 2-3). Both productions will take place at the Tulsa PAC, 110 E. Second St. Wallace is particularly excited about “CourtMartial at Fort Devens,” written by Jeffrey Sweet and based on true events. Set during World War II, this inspiring drama follows a group of young black women who joins the Women’s Army Corps. When they are demoted from medical technicians to

28 Tulsa Guest Guide

Established in 1989, Theatre Pops focuses on presenting contemporary stories with relevant messages. “My personal mission is to put the community in community theater,” says board member Cecilia Wessinger, who spearheaded such efforts as creating a PSA to deal with the themes of suicide and bullying in “Heathers the Musical” and registering audience members to vote during the political drama “All the Way.” Celebrate a belated Valentine’s Day with a oneof-a-kind performance of Andrew Lippa’s “The Wild Party,” (Feb. 17-19, 24-26) at IDL Ballroom, 230 E. First St. It’s less slow jams and roses, more hot jazz and gunshots. Then, celebrate Easter the unorthodox way with performances of “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot.” This contemporary play by Stephen Adly Guirgis follows the court case that decides the fate of the biblical traitor. “We want to push the boundaries of theatergoers’ experiences,” says Artistic Director Meghan Hurley, “through new works, immersive dinner theater and community outreach.” 918-902-6339, theatrepops.org

THEATRE TULSA (G)

412 N. Boston Ave., 918-587-8402, theatretulsa.org

TULSA BALLET (G)

1212 E. 45th Place S., 918-749-6030, tulsaballet.org

TULSA CAMERATA

(G)

2210 S. Main St., 918-960-0380, tulsacamerata.org

1610 S. Boulder Ave., 918-587-4811, tulsaopera.com

TULSA ORATORIO CHORUS (G) P.O. Box 2915, tulsachorus.com

TULSA PAC TRUST (G)

110 E. Second St., 918-596-7122, tulsapactrust.org

TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (V) 101 E. Third St. and 110 E. Second St., 918-596-7111, tulsapac.com

TULSA PROJECT THEATRE (G)

P.O. Box 626, 918-770-6679, tulsaprojecttheatre.com

TULSA REPERTORY MUSICALS (G)

P.O. Box 4310, 918-744-7340, tulsamusicals.com

TULSA SPOTLIGHT THEATER (G)(V) 1381 Riverside Drive, 918-587-5030, spotlighttheater.org

TULSA SYMPHONY (G)

117 N. Boston Ave., Suite 201; 918-584-3645; tulsasymphony.org

WALTER ARTS CENTER AT HOLLAND HALL SCHOOL (V) 5666 E. 81st St., 918-481-1111, hollandhall.org

VANTREASE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER FOR EDUCATION AT TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE (V) 10300 E. 81st St., 918-595-7777, tulsacc.edu/campus-locations/vantrease-pace

YOUTH ONSTAGE (G)

918-625-2165, youthonstage.net


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Art galleries Courtesy Joseph Gierek

View works from talented local and regional artists at these art galleries. 108 CONTEMPORARY

108 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-895-6302, 108contemporary.org

ACCENT PICTURE FRAMING AND GALLERY

KingsPointe Village, 6008 S. Yale Ave., 918-495-3550, facebook.com/accentpictureframing

THE ANTIQUARY

3024 E. 15th St., 918-582-2897

CHELSEA GALLERY

1639 E. 15th St., 918-582-5601

CHRIS MANTLE

Joseph Gierek Fine Art

LOVETTS GALLERY AND FRAMING

TULSA GLASSBLOWING SCHOOL

M.A. DORAN GALLERY

TULSA INDIAN ART MARKET

NATIVE AMERICAN ART

ZARROW CENTER FOR ART AND EDUCATION

The Farm Shopping Center, 6528 E. 51st St., 918-664-4732, lovettsgallery.com 3509 S. Peoria Ave., 918-748-8700, madorangallery.com

5014 S. Sheridan Road, 918-664-0626, indianarttulsa.com

317 S. Main St., #100, 918-584-5792

1307 E. 15th St.

JOSEPH GIEREK FINE ART

1342 E. 11th St., 918-592-5432, gierek.com

LIVING ARTS OF TULSA

307 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-585-1234, livingarts.org

19 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-582-4527, tulsaglassblowing.org

124 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-631-4400, gilcrease.org/zarrow

PIERSON GALLERY

ZIEGLER ART AND FRAME

1311 E. 15th St., 918-584-2440, piersongallery.com

TULSA ARTISTS’ COALITION GALLERY

6 N. Lewis Ave., 918-584-2217, zieglerart.com

9 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-592-0041, tacgallery.org

Dawn Waters Baker

60” x 48”

“To the Lowest Place”

oil/canvas

Joseph Gierek Fine Art 1342 East 11th Street | Tulsa, Oklahoma 74120 (918) 592-5432 | www.gierek.com

home RICHARD NEEL INTERIORS

3742 SOUTH PEORIA · 918.742.4777 · BROOKSIDE

30 Tulsa Guest Guide


WITHIN EVERY AMAZING CITY LIVES A THRIVING ARTS AND CULTURAL SCENE. During your stay enjoy a complete listing of exhibits, events and performances from our 40 member organizations.

artstulsa.org/events

Tulsa Guest Guide 31


OKLAHOMA ON DISPLAY A range of museums encourages learning at any age.

Alexandre Hogue Gallery of Art The University of Tulsa, 2935 E. Fifth St., 918-631-2739, artsandsciences.utulsa.edu

The Alexandre Hogue Gallery at the University of Tulsa School of Art hosts exhibits and lectures by nationally recognized and emerging artists, TU alumni and current art students and faculty. Exhibitions run during the academic year. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday. Exhibitions and lectures are free and open to the public.

AHHA – Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa Hardesty Arts Center 101 E. Archer St., 918-584-3333, ahhatulsa.org

AHHA, a contemporary art gallery and multipurpose space, features contemporary pieces by local and regional artists. It has two creative studios, a family studio that hosts monthly activities and a third-floor terrace for event rental that overlooks downtown. An exhibition schedule is posted on AHHA’s website. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Wednesday and Friday; noon-5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free.

Cherokee Heritage Center

Located near Tahlequah, the seat of the Cherokee Nation, the Cherokee Heritage Center includes a Trail of Tears exhibition, a reconstructed Indian Territory-period town, the Cherokee National Archives and the Cherokee Family Research Center. Another highlight is Diligwa: 1710 Cherokee Village, which allows visitors to learn about the lifestyles of Cherokees who lived more than 300 years ago. Visitors can witness daily life as they are guided through interpretive stations where tribal experts demonstrate crafts, tell stories and explain Cherokee ways of life. Tahlequah is a little over an hour southeast of Tulsa. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday; closed Mondays from December-February; closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and Christmas. Admission is $8.50, adults; $5, children; $7.50, seniors and students.

32 Tulsa Guest Guide

Valerie Grant

21192 S. Keeler Drive, Park Hill, Oklahoma; 918-456-6007; cherokeeheritage.org Tulsa Children’s Museum

Discovery Lab – Tulsa Children’s Museum

560 N. Maybelle Ave., 918-295-8144, tulsachildrensmuseum.org Discovery Lab, Tulsa’s only children’s museum, offers a hands-on experience for toddlers through preteens. Families can create and experiment with various materials at The Workshop. Children can play in “Tulsa Tape & Tunnels,” an exhibit inspired by the system of tunnels under Tulsa’s downtown streets. Exhibits rotate two to three times a year. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday; 11:30 a.m.5 p.m., Sunday. General admission is $6; free, members and children under 2.

Gilcrease Museum

1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road, 918-596-2700, gilcrease.org Gilcrease Museum is one of the country’s best facilities for the preservation and study of American art and history. The museum draws thousands of visitors from around the world to the hills just northwest of downtown Tulsa to view the world’s largest, most comprehensive collection of artifacts of the American West. The museum also offers an unparalleled collection of Native American art and artifacts, as well as historical manuscripts, documents and maps. Beyond the museum, themed gardens have been developed on 23 of the museum’s 460 acres. Gilcrease also offers tours, workshops, musical events,


lectures and a restaurant open from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art

10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday; public tours daily at 2 p.m.; closed Mondays and Christmas Day. Admission is $8, adults; $6, seniors age 62 and older; $6, active-duty military; $5, students; free, children under age 18 and members.

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

5 S. Boston Ave., 918-928-5299, okjazz.org Oklahoma jazz musicians are recognized and honored here, and works in jazz, blues and gospel art are documented, preserved and displayed. The Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame moved into its downtown Tulsa “Oklahoma Jazz Depot” during summer 2007. The facility houses a library, listening kiosks, classrooms, a Hall of Fame pictorial gallery and a performance hall. Call for tours or information. Enjoy free live jazz music from 5:30-8 p.m., Tuesdays, at “Jazz Jam”; free live blues music follows from 8-10 p.m. Museum is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday and Wednesday-Friday; 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Tuesday; by appointment, Saturday; noon-7 p.m., Sunday; closed major holidays. Sunday concert series is 4-7:30 p.m. Donations are welcome. Museum admission is free; event admission varies.

Oral Roberts University Prayer Tower and Willard Elsing Museum ORU Learning Resource Center, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., 918-495-6262, prayertower.oru.edu, elsing.oru.edu

A central landmark of the Oral Roberts University campus is its 200-foot prayer tower. The Willard Elsing Museum, located inside the ORU Learning Resource Center, has been called “Tulsa’s hidden gem,” with a large exhibition of priceless minerals and natural crystal formations, as well as Native American pieces and Asian artwork. Don’t miss the 31-ton, 90-foot-tall sculpture of praying hands that welcomes visitors to campus. Prayer tower hours: noon-5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. Museum hours: 1:30-4:30 p.m., WednesdaySaturday.

Philbrook Museum of Art

2727 S. Rockford Road, 918-749-7941, philbrook.org One of Tulsa’s most beautiful neighborhoods is the setting for Philbrook Museum of Art, an Italianate villa built on 23 lush acres by oilman Waite Phillips and his wife, Genevieve. Philbrook, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has evolved from a grand family estate to one of America’s finest art museums, showcasing collections from around the

world. Numerous educational programs for all ages, a diverse permanent collection, traveling exhibits, the La Villa restaurant and lush gardens draw more than 150,000 visitors per year. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday; open until 8 p.m., Thursday; closed Monday and major holidays. General admission is $9; $7, seniors, students and groups of 10 or more; free, members, youth under age 18 and active-duty military with ID. Guests who present a Bank of America card are admitted free the first full weekend of each month.

Philbrook Downtown

116 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-749-7941, philbrook.org This satellite campus, an extension of the sprawling midtown museum, allows Philbrook more space to display its evergrowing Native American and contemporary art collections. Located in the Brady Arts District, this modern two-story museum dedicates its main lower gallery to contemporary exhibits. The second floor presents the Eugene B. Adkins Collection of Western and Southwestern art as well as a selection from Philbrook’s Native American collection. Smaller galleries throughout the museum allow for more frequently changing exhibits. An exhibition schedule is posted online.

11 a.m.-6 p.m., Wednesday-Saturday; noon-5 p.m., Sunday. General admission is $7; $5, seniors age 62 and older and groups of 10 or more; free, members, youth under 18 and active-duty military with ID. Guests who present a Bank of America card are admitted free the first full weekend of each month. All guests are admitted free from 6-9 p.m. on the first Friday of each month.

Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art 2021 E. 71st St., 918-492-1818, jewishmuseum.net

The region’s largest Jewish museum, the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art features distinctive architecture and beautiful artwork. The museum also includes educational exhibits and programs on Jewish culture, history, religion and art, from ancient times to present-day Oklahoma, including the Kaiser Holocaust Exhibition. Additional galleries host international exhibitions and those from the museum’s collections. Docent-led tours for large groups are available upon request. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday; 1-5 p.m., Sunday. Closed Saturday and all Jewish holidays. Admission is $6.50, adults; $5.50, seniors; $3.50, students under age 21; $3 each, groups of 10 or more; free, members, teachers with school ID, all uniformed service members and “Blue Star families.”

Tulsa Guest Guide 33


Tulsa Historical Society and Museum

Woody Guthrie Center

through distant galaxies and stars in the planetarium’s 50-foot dome theater, visitors are guaranteed an uplifting experience. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday-Saturday; closed Sunday and most holidays. Planetarium opens at 11 a.m. Admission is $15, adults; $12, seniors and military with ID; $10, ages 5-17; free, 4 and under.

Tulsa Historical Society and Museum 2445 S. Peoria Ave., 918-712-9484, tulsahistory.org

Located in an early Tulsa oilman’s former mansion, the museum boasts two floors of ever-changing exhibits from its extensive collection of more than 5,000 photographs, books, maps, documents, graphics, costumes and architectural remnants from Tulsa’s past. Ongoing virtual exhibits explore the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot, Tulsa’s art deco architecture and public art.

Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium 3624 N. 74th E. Ave., 918-834-9900, tulsaairandspacemuseum.org

Travel through time and space at the Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium, which displays every era of Oklahoma aviation. The scientific exhibits and aircraft collection tell the story of Tulsa’s ongoing improvements in aerospace technology. With handson activities, flight simulators and a trip

34 Tulsa Guest Guide

10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday; closed Sunday, Monday and major holidays. Admission is $5, adults; $3, seniors; free, members, students and children.

Woody Guthrie Center

102 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-574-2710, woodyguthriecenter.org Home to the national Woody Guthrie Archives and the Bob Dylan Archives, the Woody Guthrie Center delivers an interactive learning experience about the life and music of the famous folk musician. The

center features a lyric-writing station, music bar, interactive map, Guthrie’s instruments and more. Oklahoma’s only permanent Dust Bowl exhibit also is housed at the center, and a temporary gallery hosts frequently changing installations. Research access to the Woody Guthrie Archives is by appointment only. An event schedule is available at woodyguthriecenter.org/events. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m., the first Friday of the month. Admission is $8, adults; $7, seniors 55 and older and students with college ID; $6, youth 5-17, military and groups of 10 or more; $5 each, school groups; free, children under 5.

Zarrow Center for Art and Education 124 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-631-4400, gilcrease.utulsa.edu/explore/zarrow

An anchor of the Brady Arts District, the Zarrow Center is affiliated with the University of Tulsa’s School of Art, TU’s Division of Lifelong Learning and Gilcrease Museum. The three-story center spans 18,000 square feet in a former paper warehouse and has been renovated to include classrooms, art studios, gallery space and a reception area for events. Check the Zarrow Center’s online calendar for a schedule of new exhibitions each month. Various art programs also are planned throughout the year for adults, families and homeschool students. Noon-6 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m., Sunday. Admission is free; some programs have fees.


Breakfast

Lunch

Dinner

A Restaurant Like No Other

In Utica Square • For Reservations: 918.742.0712 • wildfork.com

Tulsa Guest Guide 35


FUN ON THE WATER Visit one of these lakes or rivers for activities or a relaxing day.

ARKANSAS RIVER In April 2016, Tulsa citizens approved several improvements to the Arkansas River, including two low-water dams and beautification along the river bank. The dams will create lakes within the river, increasing the river’s potential as a recreation destination. One of the dam areas near Jenks will even incorporate a boat dock and pedestrian bridge. The other dam project is a rebuilding of the current Zink Dam and will complement the neighboring A Gathering Place for Tulsa, an iconic 100-acre public space along the river. Drivers take note: The Riverside roadway, as well as a portion of the River Parks trails, is closed from East 21st to 41st streets as crews work on A Gathering Place. Phase 1 of the project is set to open late this year. South of the construction zone, visitors still have plenty of opportunities to enjoy the many walking and cycling trails, splash pads, parks and playgrounds along the Arkansas River. Flows north to south, west of downtown, through most of Tulsa proper.

GRAND LAKE

918-782-4726, grandlake.com Created in 1940, Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees is ideal for water activities, including boating, skiing, swimming, sailing and fishing. While not on the water, visit the area’s museums, golf courses, shops and communities. Grand Lake is managed by the Grand River Dam Authority. Located about one hour northeast of Tulsa. Take Interstate 44 east toward Joplin, with multiple exits available for Grand Lake.

LAKE EUFAULA

918-689-7751, lakeeufala.com Lake Eufaula is the largest manmade lake in Oklahoma and has more than 600 miles of shoreline. Although the lake is known for its outstanding fishing, Lake Eufaula State Park offers visitors a nature center, golf course, hiking trails and more. Nearby towns Eufaula and Krebs are great places to spend an afternoon or enjoy an evening meal. Located about 1 1/2 hours south of Tulsa. Take Oklahoma 51 and the Muskogee Turnpike east to U.S. Highway 69 South.

36 Tulsa Guest Guide

Sunset on Grand Lake

FORT GIBSON LAKE 918-485-4623

With its lakeshores only 5 miles from the historic Fort Gibson site, this lake is a popular destination for local anglers and fall foliage and wildlife spectators. The Lodge at Sequoyah State Park and the park itself are popular destinations, with a golf course, riding stables, hiking trails, nature center, disc golf course and marina. Located about an hour southeast of Tulsa. Take Oklahoma 51 east through Wagoner.

KEYSTONE LAKE

918-865-4991, keystoneok.com For a weekend getaway or just a day of fun in the sun, Keystone Lake, west of Sand Springs, offers fishing, boating, skiing, swimming, camping — for RV and tents — cabins and hiking trails. Bordered by Osage, Creek and Tulsa counties, Keystone is easily accessed from Highway 412. The lake is owned and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Located 10 minutes west of Tulsa.

LAKE TENKILLER

918-487-5252, laketenkiller.com Located near the Cherokee Hills Scenic Byway, Lake Tenkiller is known for some of the clearest water in Oklahoma, attracting those who love to fish, boat, swim and experience nature. While in the area, many visit the Cookson Wildlife Management Area to see Oklahoma wildlife. Numerous hiking and biking trails surround the lake and outlying area. Located about 1 1/2 hours from Tulsa. Take Oklahoma 51 and the Muskogee Turnpike east. Take U.S. Highway 62 east across the Arkansas River to State Highway 10 South.

ILLINOIS RIVER

918-456-3251 (Upper Illinois), 918-487-5252 (Lower Illinois) Divided into the Upper and Lower, the Illinois River provides a wealth of options for fishing and nature junkies. The Upper Illinois is known for its scenic river and has proved to be a popular rafting destination, with numerous outfitters available along the waterway. The Lower Illinois is one of two year-round trout streams in Oklahoma, stocked weekly March through the Fourth of July and biweekly the rest of the year. The Upper Illinois River is located about 1 1/2 hours east of Tulsa. Follow Oklahoma 51 and the Muskogee Turnpike to U.S. Highway 62 east through Tahlequah. The Lower Illinois River is located about 1 1/2 hours southeast of Tulsa. Travel east on Oklahoma 51 and the Muskogee Turnpike to U.S. Highway 64 east toward the Gore area.

SKIATOOK LAKE

918-396-3170, greatertulsa.com/skiatook/ skiatooklake.htm Skiatook Lake and its dam were completed in 1984 to maintain flood control, water quality, water supply and fish and wildlife. With its picturesque bluffs, the lake is the perfect setting for boating, swimming, hunting, fishing and camping. For a more sophisticated lodging and entertainment option, visit the nearby Osage Casino-Skiatook on Highway 20, just west of U.S. Highway 75. The casino features a boutique 33-room, full-service hotel with a pool and fitness room, a restaurant, a sports bar and a convenience store. The property also has more than 2,500 square feet of meeting and convention space. Located half an hour northwest of Tulsa. Take Highway 75 north, followed by Highway 20 west.


BIG THINGS ARE COMING

AND BIG THINGS ARE HERE. You don’t have to go far to have a big trip. Interactive exhibits, daily animal feedings, an immersive tunnel experience where you can view the world’s largest collection of bull sharks—so many big things await you at the Oklahoma Aquarium.

SEA TURTLE EXHIBIT

Plan your visit at okaquarium.org

Spring 2017

501(c)(3) not-for-profit education and research facility

300 Aquarium Drive, Jenks, OK 74037

WHILE YOU’RE IN TULSA… BE SURE TO READ TULSA’S AWARD-WINNING CITY MAGAZINE! TulsaPeople is free on racks around town or in a complete digital edition at .

is a great resource for visitors featuring Things To Do and the A-List Directory of TulsaPeople readers’ favorite restaurants, shops, attractions and more!

Tulsa Guest Guide 37


A-PLUS ATTRACTIONS

A unique Tulsa experience is at your fingertips when you visit one of these local attractions.

Admiral Twin Drive-in 7355 E. Easton St., 918-878-8099, admiraltwindrivein.com Arguably Tulsa’s most recognizable theater, the Admiral Twin Drive-in has risen from the ashes — literally — after a fire destroyed its wooden screen tower in 2010. The original screen, built in 1951, was a Tulsa mainstay for decades and is featured in the 1983 movie “The Outsiders.” The new drive-in, which reopened in June 2012, shows a double feature every night during the summer months or as weather permits. Sound is transmitted through your radio, so sit in your vehicle or bring lawn chairs and blankets. Pets on leashes are welcome. A concession stand sells typical movie treats as well as hamburgers, hot dogs and chicken strips. Showtimes vary. Check schedule and plan to arrive 30 minutes to an hour and a half early, depending on the day. Admission is $7, adults; $3, children ages 3-11.

Safari Joe’s H20 Water Park 4707 E. 21st St., 918-749-7385, safarijoesh2o.com Cool off and have fun in the sun with towering water slides, a wave pool, a float ride and a children’s pool. The park, formerly called Big Splash, reopened in summer 2016 under new ownership, with several new attractions as well as some old favorites. Safari Joe’s is open from Memorial Day through Labor Day: 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Thursday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; and noon-6 p.m., Sunday. Admission is $20, adults; $15, children. On Sunday, tickets are $15 for adults and $13 for kids. Concessions, lockers and tube rentals are available for additional fees.

Cherokee History Tours Visit the Trail of Tears exhibit at the Cherokee Heritage Center; see historical properties such as the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum and the Cherokee National Prison; or tour the Murrell Home, Oklahoma’s last antebellum plantation house. The tour departs from either the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa in Catoosa or the Cherokee Nation Continued on p. 40

38 Tulsa Guest Guide

The Reptile Rush at Safari Joe’s H2O Water Park

Valerie Grant

777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 877-779-6977; visitcherokeenation.com


DISCOVER AMERICA’S TREASURES The Grand Canyon Thomas Moran (1837-1926) American born England detail, oil on canvas, GM 0127.2351

1400 N. GILCREASE MUSEUM RD. TULSA, OK 918-596-2700 The University of Tulsa is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action institution. For EEO/AA information, contact the Office of Human Resources, 918-631-2616; for disability accommodations, contact Dr. Tawny Taylor, 918-631-2315.

GILCREASE.ORG

The most beautiful place in Oklahoma. –House Beautiful, June 2016

philbrook.org Philbrook 2727 South Rockford Road Tulsa, OK 74114 Philbrook Downtown 116 E. M.B. Brady St. Tulsa, OK 74103

Tulsa Guest Guide 39


Greg Bollinger

The Golden Driller welcomes visitors to Expo Square.

Continued from p. 38 Gift Shop at the Tribal Complex at 17725 S. Muskogee Ave., Tahlequah. Lunch is included. Museum is open 10 a.m-5 p.m., TuesdaySaturday, from Sept. 16-June 14, and MondaySaturday from June 15-Sept. 15. All-day and half-day tours are available Tuesday-Friday for groups of 10-26 people. Full-day tours are $42.40 per person; half-day tours are $31.80.

Creek Council Oak Tree East 18th Street and South Cheyenne Avenue, tulsapreservationcommission.org/ nationalregister/buildings For centuries, the Creek Council Oak Tree, Tulsa’s birthplace, has stood strong and tall. Under this tree in 1836, the Lochapoka Creek Indians kindled a ceremonial fire using live coals they had carried from their Alabama homeland over the Trail of Tears. Under the branches of this great oak was Tulsa’s first city hall. Today, it is preserved as a park that includes an ethno-botanical garden and several commemorative sculptures.

Tulsa Historical Society: Tours are on the last Friday of the month (except for November and December, when they are moved up a week to avoid holiday conflicts) and start at the southeast corner of East Fifth Street and South Boston Avenue at 10 a.m.

$5 per person; reservations required. Call 918712-9484. Private group tours and self-guided tours also are available; visit tulsahistory.org.

Expo Square

4145 E. 21st St., 918-744-1113, exposquare.com Each fall, people from all parts of the city, state and country journey to Expo Square for the Tulsa State Fair. This well-loved tradition of more than 100 years attracted an estimated 1.2 million attendees in 2015. Expo Square hosts myriad other events throughout the year, including prominent livestock shows, craft shows, consignment events and a weekly flea market. Welcoming visitors to the venue is the Golden Driller, a 76-foottall, 43,500-pound monument to Tulsa’s oil industry.

Downtown walking tours

Visit the Expo Square website for event calendar.

These nonprofits offer walking tours to explore the city’s art deco architecture and downtown network of underground tunnels. Tulsa Foundation for Architecture: Themed tours are on the second Saturday of each month and usually start at Topeca Coffee in the Mayo Hotel, 115 W. Fifth St., at 10 a.m. $10 per person. For more information, email amanda@tulsaarchitecture.com.

Fair Meadows Expo Square, 4609 E. 21st St., 918-743-7223, exposquare.com/fairmeadows See live horse racing on the Fair Meadows track during summer meets and simulcast racing from tracks around the nation in the state-of-the-art simulcast Racing and Sports Bar. Opens at 5 p.m., Thursday-Sunday, in June and July. Racing and sports bar hours vary daily depending on race schedule.

40 Tulsa Guest Guide

Guthrie Green 111 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-574-2421, guthriegreen.com Though a relative newcomer to the Tulsa landscape, the Brady Arts District’s awardwinning public space has already made its way into the hearts and routines of locals. Food Truck Wednesdays (11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.) are a foodie favorite, and the many fitness classes and frequent concerts are all free — true to the vision of the space’s creator, the George Kaiser Family Foundation — keeping health nuts and music lovers satisfied. Open daily 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Check the website for specific event times.

Mabel B. Little Heritage House and Greenwood Cultural Center 322 N. Greenwood Ave., 918-596-1026, greenwoodculturalcenter.com In its glory days, Tulsa’s Greenwood District stretched for 35 blocks and was the largest and richest of Oklahoma’s more than 50 black communities — so wealthy, in fact, that Greenwood was known as “Black Wall Street.” Shops bustled by day and clubs wailed blues and jazz by night. Today, the Greenwood Cultural Center and the Mabel B. Little Heritage House present a permanent history of the district. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday; Saturdays by appointment; closed major holidays.

Continued on p. 42


The

VOTED TULSA’S

TOP ENTERTAINMENT

BRADY

DISTRICT

The Brady Arts District is an eclectic and historic collection of artists, craftsmen, merchants, residents and businesses. The District offers a unique, walkable neighborhood with a vibrant sense of work and play 365 days of the year. And join us for…

AISRTRTISCT

FIRST FRIDAY

ART CRAWL

D

ARTS 108 Contemporary 108contemporary.org Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa – Hardesty Arts Center AHHATulsa.com Arts Alliance Tulsa Artstulsa.org Brady Artists Studio Living Arts of Tulsa Livingarts.org Philbrook Downtown Philbrook.org Tulsa Artist’s Coalition Tacgallery.org Tulsa Glassblowing School Tulsaglassblowing.org

PARKS • ENTERTAINMENT

CLUBS • BARS

RESTAURANTS

Bar 46 Bar46tulsa.com

Antoinette Baking Co. Antoinettebakingco.com

Brady Theater Bradytheater.com

Caz’s Pub Cazspub.com

Caz’s Chowhouse Cazschowhouse.com

Cain’s Ballroom Cainsballroom.com

Classic Cigars & Lounge Classiccigarsok.com

Chimera Café Chimeracafe.com

FlyLoft Downtown Tulsa Flyloft.org

Club Majestic Clubmajestictulsa.com

Crunch Food Truck

Guthrie Green Guthriegreen.com

Downtown Lounge Downtownloungetulsa.com

Coney Island Hot Weiners coneyislandtulsa.com

John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park Jhfcenter.org/ reconciliation-park

Inner Circle Vodka Bar Icvodkabar.com

Gypsy Coffee House Gypsycoffee.com

KOSU Kosu.org

MAINLINE Art & Cocktails

Hey Mambo Heymambo.com

Facebook.com/mainlineartbar

Tulsa Drillers Tulsadrillers.com

Tulsa Symphony Tulsasymphony.org

Tulsa Roughnecks FC Roughnecksfc.com

Woody Guthrie Center Woodyguthriecenter.org

The Vanguard Thevanguardtulsa.com

Zarrow Center Gilcrease.utulsa.edu/ explore/zarrow

THE FIRST FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6–9 P.M.

Saturn Room saturnroom.com Soundpony Thesoundpony.com The Hunt Club Thehuntclubtulsa.com

Laffa – Medi-Eastern Laffatulsa.com Lucky’s on the Green Guthriegreen.com Mexicali Border Café Mexicalibordercafe.com

RETAIL • SERVICES 36 degrees North 36n.com American Parking Americanparking.com Bradley’s Sanctuary Salon Bradleyssanctuary.com Chrysalis Salon & Spa Chrysalissalon.net Colors of Etnika Colorsofetnika.com Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott.com/hotels/travel/tuldt

Gitwit Creative Gitwitcreative.com Glacier Confection Glacierconfection.com GreenArch Apartments Greenarchtulsa.com Griffin Communications NewsOn6.com

Valkyrie Valkyrietulsa.com

Oklahoma Joe’s Bar-B-Que Okjoes.com

YETI Tulsayeti.com

Prairie Brewpub PrairiePub.com

Metro @ Brady Metroatbrady.com

ZIN

PRHYME Prhymetulsa.com

studioPOP Indoor Cycling & Yoga Studiopoptulsa.com

facebook.com/ZinBradyArtsDistrict

Sisserou’s Caribbean Restaurant

Sisserousrestauranttulsa.com

T-Town Gourmet Food Truck

@BradyArtsDist TheBradyArtsDistrict.com

Facebook.com/ttowngourmet

The Rusty Crane Rustycranetulsa.com The Tavern Taverntulsa.com

Lilly Architects Lillyarch.com

Suite B

styleseat.com/lindseyblackburn

Tribune Lofts Tribunelofts.com Tulsa Violin Shop Tulsaviolin.com Walsh Branding Walshbranding.com

Tulsa Guest Guide 41


Admiral Twin Drive-in

Continued from p. 40

Oklahoma Aquarium 300 Aquarium Drive, Jenks; 918-296-3474; okaquarium.org With eight exhibit galleries and more than 1 million gallons of water, you can see the many mysterious and wonderful creatures of the ocean that now make their home right here in Oklahoma. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., daily; 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Tuesday; closed Christmas. $15.95, adults; $13.95, seniors 62 and older and military; $11.95, children 3-12; free, children under 2.

Oxley Nature Center The Children’s Discovery Garden at the Tulsa Botanic Garden

6700 Mohawk Blvd., 918-669-6644, oxleynaturecenter.org Get up close and personal with nature on the trails that wind through this 800-acre wildlife sanctuary. Volunteers lead recurring tours throughout the month. Guided tours are available by appointment. The visitor center has hands-on exhibits of area plants and wildlife. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., daily; closed most City of Tulsa holidays. Free admission; $2, Mohawk Park entry fee weekends April-October.

POSTOAK Canopy Tours 5323 W. 31st St. N., 918-697-2700, postoakcanopytours.com Oklahoma’s first and only zipline canopy tour is an adrenaline rush from the get-go. The tour takes thrill seekers and nature lovers soaring above the treetops along a network of more than 3,865 feet of cable line. Seven platforms provide a bird’s eye view of northeastern Oklahoma’s magnificent Osage Hills, the surrounding plains and Tulsa’s cityscape. Advance reservations are required. Various times Saturday and Sunday as well as Friday when school is not in session; closed from Thanksgiving-March and some major holidays. $79 per person, ages 16 and up; $69, ages 1015; $69 per person, groups of 8 or more.

Redbud Valley Nature Preserve 16150 Redbud Drive, Catoosa; oxleynaturecenter.org/redbud.htm The Redbud Valley Nature Preserve is a place of quiet beauty and rugged scenery. On the 1-mile trail, you’ll see plants and animals found nowhere else in northeastern Oklahoma.

Evan Taylor

8 a.m.-5 p.m., Wednesday-Sunday; closed major holidays. Free admission.

42 Tulsa Guest Guide


Route 66 Historical Village 3770 Southwest Blvd.

Tulsa Zoo

Driving through southwest Tulsa, you might be surprised to see the locomotive and oil derrick that comprise the Route 66 Historical Village. The Frisco 4500 provided passenger service daily from St. Louis to Tulsa to Oklahoma City from 1942-47, and for years greeted visitors at the Tulsa Zoo. Today the restored locomotive awaits visitors eager to learn about the history and development of Tulsa’s oil, refining and transportation industries. The oil derrick, which stands as the tallest derrick in North America at 154 feet, commemorates the 1901 oil discovery in nearby Red Fork that started Tulsa on its path to become the one-time “Oil Capital of the World.” Future plans for the village include a visitor center with restrooms, a restaurant with additional seating in dining cars attached to the Frisco 4500 and a replica of a depot from southwest Tulsa’s early railroad days. Open daily. Free admission.

Tulsa Botanic Garden 3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive, 918-289-0330, tulsabotanic.org The Tulsa Botanic Garden sits on 170 acres of prairie and woodlands, with rolling hills offering panoramic views of sunrises, sunsets and skyscrapers. When the garden is complete, guests will be able to explore 60 acres, including a lake, a lotus pool and an all-seasons garden. Until then, visitors can enjoy the Sarah G. Allison Lake Trail, the Children’s Discovery Garden and the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Floral Terraces, displaying a diverse collection of ornamental and flowering plants. Hike the 1-mile nature trail through the Cross Timbers Forest, Prairie and Persimmon Grove; attend one of the garden’s myriad activities for children and adults; and enjoy the natural beauty of the Osage Hills. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Thursday. $8, age 13 and up; $4, children 3-12; free, members and children under 3.

Tulsa Garden Center, Woodward Park and Municipal Rose Garden 2435 S. Peoria Ave., 918-746-5125, tulsagardencenter.com Stroll through the flora of the Tulsa Municipal Rose Garden between Woodward Park and the Tulsa Garden Center. The park, a wooded 45 acres in the heart of Tulsa, boasts azaleas, tulips, dogwoods, redbuds and flower and herb gardens that attract nature

lovers all year long. In 2015, the garden unveiled $500,000 in landscaping updates that also make the venue handicapped accessible. At the Tulsa Garden Center, you’ll find a Victorian conservatory and 3-acre arboretum. The Garden Center’s Linnaeus Teaching Garden is a unique demonstration garden in Woodward Park that gives visitors a chance to improve their gardening skills. The Garden Center is open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

Tulsa Port of Catoosa and Maritime Education Center 5350 Cimarron Road, Catoosa; 918-266-2291; tulsaport.com The Tulsa Port of Catoosa is the head of the 445-mile McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System that links Tulsa with the world and foreign ports by way of the Mississippi River and Port of New Orleans. The Maritime Education Center features hands-on displays and exhibits that teach children and adults about the port’s functions and purpose.

Tulsa Zoo 6421 E. 36th St. N. (Mohawk Park), 918-669-6600, tulsazoo.org Experience the wild side of Tulsa at its zoo, which has been named one of the nation’s best. Located on 84 acres in Mohawk Park, the zoo features more than 3,000 animals in exhibits ranging from an award-winning African penguin habitat to an interactive tropical rainforest to the Helmerich Sea Lion Cove. Visitors can enjoy the children’s petting zoo, education areas, restaurants and concessions, the Mary K. Chapman Rhino Reserve, live animal presentations, a ride on the Safari Train and a gift shop to buy a “zoovenir” when the day is done. The 5-acre Lost Kingdom exhibit, which will feature the Hille Foundation Tiger Bridge — where visitors can safely observe a critically endangered tiger species — is scheduled to open in late spring 2017. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., daily; closed Christmas Day and the third Friday in June. $10, age 12-64; $6, age 3-11; $8, age 65+; free, children 2 and under.

8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday; closed some holidays. Call ahead for group tours. Free admission.

Tulsa Guest Guide 43


SPORTS FOR ALL SEASONS Tulsa offers spectator sports for fans of all kinds, anytime of the year. By Doug Eaton

TULSA DRILLERS

The Tulsa Drillers, the AA affiliate of the Los Angeles Dodgers, provide the opportunity to “watch tomorrow’s major leaguers today.” The team has enjoyed success on the field, making it to the Texas League Playoffs seven of the past 12 years. ONEOK Field, which some have called one of the nicest and most fan-friendly stadiums in AA baseball, is in the heart of downtown Tulsa in the midst of restaurants and trendy clubs. A “splashzone” with water sprays and jets keeps the kids cool on warm game days, and a playground behind centerfield also can entertain antsy children. The ONEOK Field experience offers something special every night of the week for fans of all ages. Visit the Drillers website for a schedule of promotions and giveaways. ONEOK Field, 201 N. Elgin Ave., 918-744-5901, tulsadrillers.com

TULSA ROUGHNECKS FC March through September

The ownership group of the Tulsa Drillers brought the sport of professional soccer to downtown Tulsa and ONEOK Field in 2015 with the Tulsa Roughnecks Football Club. The Roughnecks name is not only a salute to the area’s oil industry, but also the namesake of the previous Roughneck soccer franchise that gave Tulsa its first — and only, to date — major league sports title. The previous version of the Roughnecks claimed the 1983 Soccer Bowl Championship and captured the energy and enthusiasm of many Tulsans, even drawing more than 30,000 fans to a game in old Skelly Stadium. The Roughnecks FC boasts its own unique fan club, the Roustabouts. Pregame rituals include tailgating in front of the stadium before leading a “March to the Match” to ONEOK Field to cheer on the team. ONEOK Field, 201 N. Elgin Ave., 918-744-5901, tulsaroughnecksfc.com

Rich Crimi/Tulsa Roughnecks

April through September

Cristian Mata (in orange) of the Tulsa Roughnecks FC competes against Orange County Blues FC at ONEOK Field.

TULSA OILERS

October through April The Tulsa Oilers are entering their third season as a member of the ECHL AA hockey league. The combination of an exciting and competitive team coupled with a premier arena consistently places the Oilers among the league’s leaders in attendance. Since it opened in 2008, the Oilers have been the main tenant of the BOK Center, one of the most admired arenas in minor league hockey. BOK Center, 200 N. Denver Ave., 918-632-7825, tulsaoilers.com

TULSA ATHLETICS May through July

Soccer is traditionally a low-scoring sport. However, the semi-pro Tulsa Athletics are doing their best to change that mindset and bring even more excitement to soccer fans. Founded in 2002, the Athletics compete in the National Premiere Soccer League in the fourth tier of American soccer. Players for the As typically have ties to the Tulsa soccer community, whether that means playing for local club, high school or college teams. Several of the Athletics have played for the University of Tulsa and Oral Roberts University. 918-633-1990, tulsaathletics.com

44 Tulsa Guest Guide

TULSA’S COLLEGIATE DIVISION I SPORTS UNIVERSITY OF TULSA FOOTBALL September through November

Skelly Field at H.A. Chapman Stadium, 3112 E. Eighth St., 918-631-4688, tulsahurricane.com

TU MEN’S BASKETBALL November through March

Donald W. Reynolds Center, 3208 E. Eighth St., 918-631-4688, tulsahurricane.com

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY BASKETBALL November through March

Mabee Center, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., 918-495-6000, oruathletics.com

ORU BASEBALL

February through May

J.L. Johnson Stadium, 7777 S. Lewis Ave., 918-495-6000, oruathletics.com


Tulsa Guest Guide 45


PARKS AND REC

Find endless opportunities to enjoy athletics in Tulsa.

PARKS AND COMMUNITY CENTERS

PUBLIC GOLF COURSE AND DRIVING RANGES Bailey Ranch Golf Club 10105 Larkin Bailey Blvd., Owasso; 918-274-4653; baileyranchgolf.com Battle Creek Golf Club 3200 N. Battle Creek Drive, Broken Arrow; 918-355-4850; battlecreekgolf.net Cherokee Hills Golf Club 770 S. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 918-384-7600; hardrockcasinotulsa.com/golf

Courtesy Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates

With 140 public parks and six community centers, the City of Tulsa provides visitors and residents with ample recreational opportunities. During the summer months, children can cool off in one of the many free splash pads and water playgrounds scattered throughout the city. Find a city park near you with the City of Tulsa’s Parks Finder at maps.cityoftulsa.org/ parksfinder. Runners and cyclists will find plenty of trails and paved paths throughout Tulsa River Parks’ 800 acres of land stretching along the Arkansas River. Visit riverparks.org for a map of trails and parks along the river, as well as road closures associated with A Gathering Place for Tulsa, a 100-acre public space opening its first phase later this year along Riverside Drive. A rendering of A Gathering Place for Tulsa, a $350 million public park scheduled to open in fall 2017.

South Lakes Golf Course 9253 S. Elwood Ave., Jenks; 918-746-3760; southlakesgolf.com White Hawk Golf Club 14515 S. Yale Ave., Bixby; 918-366-4653; whitehawkgc.com The Woods Golf Course 11872 S. 274th E. Ave., Coweta; 918-486-3117

BOWLING

Lit’l Links Golf Club 11915 S. 129th E. Ave., Broken Arrow; 918-481-3673; litllinks.com

Andy B’s 8711 S. Lewis Ave., 918-299-9494, andybtulsa.com Broken Arrow Lanes 4701 S. Elm Place, Broken Arrow; 918-455-4616; brokenarrowlanes.com Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge 211 S. Elgin Ave., 918-430-3901, dustbowltulsa.com Main Event 7830 S. Santa Fe Ave. W., 918-447-1200, mainevent.com/locations/tulsa-ok

Mohawk Park Golf Course 5223 E. 41st St. N., 918-425-6871, tulsagolf.org

AMF Sheridan Lanes 3121 S. Sheridan Road, 918-627-2728, amf.com/sheridanlanesok

Forest Ridge Golf Course 7501 E. Kenosha Ave., Broken Arrow; 918-357-2282; forestridgegolf.com LaFortune Park Golf Course 5501 S. Yale Ave., 918-496-6200, lafortunegolfclub.com Links Golf and Athletic Club 11500 S. Links Court, Bixby; 918-369-6035; lindseymanagement.com

Page Belcher Golf Course 6666 S. Union Ave., 918-446-1529, tulsagolf.org

SKATE PARKS Nienhuis Skate Park 3201 N. Ninth St., Broken Arrow; 918-259-6550; brokenarrowok.gov River Skate Park 464 W. 23rd St., 918-596-7275, cityoftulsa.org SkateNorth 2910 E. 56th St. N., 918-596-2100, cityoftulsa.org

TRAMPOLINE PARKS Sky Zone Tulsa 8306 E. 61st St., 918-877-7700, skyzone.com Spring Town Trampoline Park 8314 E. 71st St., 918-505-4453, springtowntrampolinepark.com

OTHER Hard Knocks laser tag 6808 S. Memorial Drive, #128, 918-893-5788, indoorwar.com LaserQuest laser tag 2909 S. Sheridan Road, 918-663-5551, laserquest.com Paintball Adventure Games Inc. 10242 S. 49th W. Ave., Sapulpa; 918-224-1055; pbadventuregames.com Helmzar Challenge Course 1006 N. Quaker Ave., 918-595-2875

46 Tulsa Guest Guide


LOOKING FOR SOMETHING

TO DO

WHILE YOU’RE

IN TULSA? LOOK NO FURTHER THAN THE TULSA VOICE AVAILABLE FOR FREE ON RACKS AROUND TULSA EVERY 1ST & 3RD WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH

FEATURING THE BEST IN:

• ENTERTAINMENT • ARTS • NIGHTLIFE • CULTURE For all of the latest happenings around Tulsa: TheTulsaVoice.com/calendar Tulsa Guest Guide 47


WHERE TO SHOP

Find most anything at the city’s boutiques, shopping centers and malls.

Brookside offers nightlife, retail and restaurants.

POPULAR SHOPPING DISTRICTS

Brookside East 32nd to 41st streets on South Peoria Avenue, brooksidetheplacetobe.com Take a stroll down this district full of interesting boutiques, art galleries, the modern shops of Center 1, plus plenty of upscale dining. A luxurious shopping experience during the day transforms into a neon avenue as Tulsans flock to bars for a night on the town.

Cherry Street/15th Street East 15th Street, east of South Peoria Avenue This distinctive area, at one time considered the suburbs east of Tulsa, draws visitors seeking fine dining, home decor and beautiful architecture. Boutiques, salons and a Saturday morning farmers’ market during the growing season make this district an interesting place to wander.

Jenks, America West of the Arkansas River on South 96th Street, jenks.com Travel back in time as you wander through antique shops and tearooms in historic downtown Jenks. This “Antiques and Crafts Capital of Oklahoma” also features RiverWalk Crossing on the bank of the Arkansas River, which offers shopping and dining choices.

Rose District North Main Street in Broken Arrow, rosedistrict.com Drop by this recently revived historic destination for shopping and nightlife. Try some delicious pizza at Andolini’s Pizzeria before heading to Pinot’s Palette for a paint and wine party perfect for a girls’ night out or date night. You also can start your weekend early at the district’s farmers’ market every Saturday morning from April to September.

SHOPPING CENTERS

The Farm Shopping Center East 51st Street and South Sheridan Road, farmshoppingcenter.com The centerpiece of this charming shopping area is a restored rustic barn, adding to the village square-like feel. Park your car and spend some time exploring the blend of more than 40 national, regional and local retailers, including Pier 1 Imports, Massoud’s Jewelry, Espigares Watches and Clocks and Ted’s Pipe Shoppes Ltd. Hungry? Choose from a variety of eateries, such as Margaret’s German Restaurant and Deli, Villa Ravenna and Gelateria STG, where you can find a sweet selection of cold treats.

Kings Landing 9900 Riverside Parkway, kingslandingtulsa.com This shopping center offers diverse shops and gourmet dining along the Arkansas River. Along with an enjoyable atmosphere, Kings Landing shops include Luxe Home Interiors, Push Pedal Pull, J. Cole Shoes and Red Rock Canyon Grill. Continued on p. 50

48 Tulsa Guest Guide


1 8 3 4

U t i c a

S q u a r e

9 1 8 . 7 4 9 . 3 4 8 1

AWA R D W I N N I N G A U T H E N T I C I TA L I A N F O O D L O C AT E D I N D O W N T O W N T U L S A .

1742 S. BoSton Ave | 918-582-1551 DA L E S A N D R O S . C O M

European Style Bistro Nestled in the lower level of the Historic Hotel Ambassador Open 365 days a year for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 1324 S. MAIN ST. • 918-582-1964 THECHALKBOARDTULSA.COM

Tulsa Guest Guide 49


Continued from p. 48

Cherry Street

Tulsa Hills

KingsPointe Village East 61st Street and South Yale Avenue, kpvtulsa.com This outdoor shopping center includes casual and gourmet dining, sporting goods and interior design stores, and a salon. Shop during the day and wrap up with dinner at McGill’s or Pei Wei.

The Plaza East 81st Street and South Lewis Avenue For dining, The Plaza has it all, with restaurants featuring Italian, deli and Asian fare. For early risers or those who need a relaxed place to hang out in the evening, The Plaza also is home to Nordaggios, one of Tulsa’s signature coffee roasters. Shopping opportunities include The Vintage Pearl, which specializes in handstamped jewelry, and Nielsen’s Gifts, where shoppers can find a wide variety of high-end items.

Promenade Mall East 41st Street and South Yale Avenue, tulsapromenade.com JCPenney, Macy’s and Dillard’s anchor this spacious shopping mall, complete with a food court, a variety of specialty shops and a 12-screen movie theater.

Shops of Seville East 101st Street and South Yale Avenue, shopsofsevilletulsa.com Valerie Grant; Top: Greg Bollinger

Stop by when you are in the mood for Spanish colonial-style architecture and quaint boutiques. Upscale shops such as Donna’s Fashions and Canterbury Lane Gifts are full of the latest fashions and gift ideas. Two charming bistros offer distinct dining experiences.

SouthRoads East 41st Street and South Yale Avenue Catch the newest flick at the AMC 20 movie theater, buy your pet a treat at Wagology or browse to your heart’s content at Barnes and Noble in this popular shopping center. Other stores include Old Navy, Ulta and a TGI Friday’s restaurant.

Tulsa Hills West 71st Street and Highway 75, shoptulsahills.com Located in west Tulsa across the Arkansas River, the sprawling Tulsa Hills is one of the metro area’s newest shopping havens. The district includes anchors Target, Belk, Famous Footwear and Marshalls,

50 Tulsa Guest Guide

along with restaurants such as Chili’s and Hideaway Pizza.

Utica Square East 21st Street and South Utica Avenue, uticasquare.com This Tulsa original offers a delightful combination of local and national shops and upscale restaurants to make for a great day of shopping. The meticulously landscaped outdoor shopping center features English telephone booths, wrought-iron benches and Old World clocks. During the summer, the square features live outdoor entertainment on Thursday evenings.

Woodland Hills Mall East 71st Street and South Memorial Drive, simon.com/mall/woodland-hills-mall The largest mall in the region, Woodland Hills offers more than 165 shops, including stores not offered anywhere else in Tulsa, such as Lolli and Pops gourmet confectionary. JCPenney, Sears, Macy’s and Dillard’s make this mall a shopper’s paradise, with a retail establishment to please every taste.


If you’re visiting Tulsa and want to take home something special for your dog or cat…

Is my present in your suitcase?

I watched the house for you.

I was good at camp.

Gimme, gimme!

I’ll shake for it.

It smells good!

Is it edible?

Don’t forget about me!

I’m being patient.

Thank you! I feel handsome.

Shranks for the new reash, mom.

…come see us at

at Utica Square. Thank you.

Gracias.

Danke Schoen!

1778 Utica Square • 918-624-2600 • Open Monday-Saturday, 10-6 Tulsa Guest Guide 51


We got the beat

Where to see the best local and national musical acts

Twenty One Pilots at Brady Theater

Welcome to Tulsa, Oklahoma: capital of Western swing and home of the renowned “Tulsa Sound.” Whether or not you realize it, you have most likely heard the influence of Tulsa musicians on countless records. If you’re on the hunt to experience Tulsa’s wealth of talent in person, here are some secrets and not-so-secrets from locals who know where to find the musical gold.

WHERE TO SEE LOCAL ACTS Centennial Lounge

The Colony

Guthrie Green

Once owned by legendary musician Leon Russell, The Colony is a dimly lit Britishthemed midtown dive with live music nearly every night. In the past, this has been an infamously smoky spot, but since 2011 it has been smoke-free. The bartenders might be a fun source to find out about local happenings. The fireplace is one of the best in town during the winter. Check it out if you’re venturing away from the downtown area.

Some might say the heart of the Brady Arts District is Guthrie Green. It’s an urban park and entertainment space with action happening nearly all year long, including live music, yoga and other events hemmed in by the district’s art galleries. From April to October, the Sunday Market features fresh food and live music all morning. The First Friday evening of each month, the district swells with people and music for a free monthly art crawl.

2809 S. Harvard Ave., 918-794-4208, thecolonytulsa.com

Located on the upstairs level of the local VFW in the Pearl District near East Sixth Street and South Peoria Avenue, this hidden gem is just blocks from other district entertainment and restaurants. Recently renovated, this sleepy spot sits above a dance hall and can awe you with local music acts of all varieties.

Dusty Dog Pub

1109 E. Sixth St., 918-671-1629, facebook.com/centenniallounge577

5107 S. Harvard Ave., 918-933-5473

52 Tulsa Guest Guide

Off the beaten path and a bit south, the Dusty Dog is regarded by many musicians as a local jam spot and, luckily, patrons are welcome to enjoy the show. You might not be out of place pulling up on a motorcycle, though all walks enjoy the music and drinks here.

111 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-574-2421, guthriegreen.com

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame A music hall in a renovated train depot in the heart of downtown Tulsa, the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame offers not only jazz, but also classical, blues, rock and soul on many evenings of the week. It is adjacent to the locally famous “Center of the Universe”: an outdoor courtyard with a “barrel echo” voice

Morgan Welch

By Lindsey Neal Kuykendall


111 E. First St., 918-281-8600, okjazz.org

The Shrine Less hipster, more soul. The Shrine sits on the corner of East 18th Street and South Boston Avenue, a historical music hotspot. The venue always has a fine list of acts on the books, making the meager cover charge well worth it. The rock and jam band shows here won’t disappoint. Conveniently located across the street from both Dalesandro’s Italian Cuisine (1742 S. Boston Ave.) and 1740 Wine Bar (1740 S. Boston Ave.), the Shrine and its surroundings could make a whole evening. 112 E. 18th St., 918-949-1345, tulsashrine.com

Soundpony Tulsa’s only bicycle-themed, experimental music bar, Soundpony, never fails to entertain. Whether it’s the live music or the patrons themselves, there’s always something fresh to discover here. Located steps from Cain’s Ballroom downtown, Soundpony can make an entire evening or a great drink pit stop before or after a big concert at historic Cain’s. Soundpony also hosts trivia night each Tuesday and live music nearly every other night. If you are in the area at Halloween, Soundpony is a can’t miss; make sure you’re in costume. 409 N. Main St., 918-582-7669, thesoundpony.com

Vanguard Music Hall At the end of a long hallway lies The Vanguard. The venue has had many names, but one thing has always remained: live music. The Vanguard might host the widest range of alternative acts and events around — from punk and metal to folk, rock and Americana. It also hosts the RAW Artist Showcase, featuring up-and-coming artists of all backgrounds (RAWartists.org/tulsa). Just a block away are Soundpony and Cain’s Ballroom, if hopping around is desired. 222 N. Main St., 918-561-6885, thevanguardtulsa.com

Woody Guthrie Center This sparkling GRAMMY™ museum affiliate is dedicated to the history, memorabilia and works of Oklahoma music star Woody Guthrie. It includes not only an interactive gallery, but also a 59-seat theater.

WHAT IS THE ‘TULSA SOUND’? The evolution of a legendary musical style EXCERPTED FROM “THE ROOTS OF TULSA SOUND” BY ANDY WHEELER

B

Leon Russell

esides the ever-present Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa exploded with venues for live music in the ’50s and ’60s and brought a deluge of artists together, playing with and learning from one another. Since there were arcane liquor laws, these clubs were illegal to begin with and their bands adopted the same outlaw attitude. They threw out the rules of conventional rock ‘n’ roll and borrowed from everyone and everything: country, blues, jazz, rockabilly, Western swing and even gospel. Those same musicians were not just born at the right time; they also practiced like madmen. Musicians such as Carl Radle and Leon Russell became obsessed with their craft, constantly finding ways to get more time on the bass or keys, respectively. Drummers, including Jimmy Karstein and Chuck Blackwell, kept the beat. J.J. Cale shuffled along with his guitar. A flood of skilled musicians was being dammed up in Tulsa’s illegal clubs. The dam first started leaking when Russell joined with the most recorded session group of all time: the Wrecking Crew. Russell made inroads with almost everyone: the Beach Boys, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, George Harrison, B.B. King, Jerry Lee Lewis, Willie Nelson and the Rolling Stones. But the dam burst when Russell directed the chaos that was Joe Cocker’s “Mad Dogs and Englishmen” tour. Russell capitalized on his fame, talent and resources and brought Shelter Records to Tulsa. With Shelter Records also came a lot of attention to T-Town. The band Teegarden and Van Winkle, including Tulsa drummer David Teegarden, went to Detroit and started making music with Bob Seger. Radle and some other young musicians went to Florida to save a legend in Clapton. And Cale kept shuffling along. The Tulsa Sound was let loose upon the ears of an intrigued public. Artists named Elvin Bishop, Roger Tillison, Gene Crose, David Gates, Dwight Twilley, the Gap Band, Jim Byfield, Don White, Rocky Frisco and dozens of others achieved varying levels of recognition. More recognized names such as the Allman Brothers, Dire Straights, Johnny Cash, Santana and The Band took notice and started emulating and picking up tricks from the Tulsa Sound. The Tulsa Sound still plays on throughout alt-country (e.g., Uncle Tupelo, Old 97’s and Wilco) and red dirt music (Cross Canadian Ragweed and Red Dirt Rangers), but the most authentic Tulsa Sound can still be found all over Tulsa clubs.

Courtesy The Joint at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino

and sound phenomenon that can only be experienced by standing in the circle yourself. Weekly jams, concert series and one-off shows can make for an inspiring evening.

Tulsa Guest Guide 53


Here lies plenty of opportunity to catch highcaliber concerts, workshops and inspiration in general. Make a day of it; it’s perfectly easy to visit art galleries, restaurants and music venues up and down the surrounding streets. 102 E. M. B. Brady St., 918-574-2710, woodyguthriecenter.org

WHERE TO SEE NATIONAL ACTS BOK Center

200 S. Denver Ave., 918-894-4200, BOKcenter.com

Brady Theater Nicknamed “The Old Lady on Brady,” the Brady Theater is a venue worth experiencing. Since being built in 1914 when it was dubbed “Tulsa Convention Hall,” the art deco theater has hosted musical greats including Will Rogers, Ed Sullivan, Roy Clark, Buddy Holly and B.B. King. The theater keeps not only music memories, but also dark secrets, such as allegedly holding people after the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot. This historic venue sits on East M.B. Brady Street, officially dubbed “Reconciliation Way” by the citizens of Tulsa in an attempt to heal its tumultuous past. 105 W. M. B. Brady St., 918-582-7239, bradytheater.com

Cain’s Ballroom Ah, the legendary Cain’s Ballroom. After its first life as a garage, Cain’s became the home of Western swing: jitterbug, sock hop — just a good old-fashioned dance hall turned legend by Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys. Renovated in 2013 by the current owners, today Cain’s hosts top acts many nights of the week, and new shows are added all the time. Earplugs are $1 if needed in the intimate venue with a reputation for rocking, and be sure to wear your walking shoes: Most Cain’s concerts are standing room only. Soundpony

Greg Bollinger

Say B-O-K (not “Bawk”). Named for the Bank of Oklahoma headquartered in Tulsa, this is downtown’s mega concert and sports arena with a 19,199-seat capacity. Lovingly described as architecturally resembling a giant roll of silvery-gray duct tape, this is where greats like Paul McCartney, Madonna, Elton John and Cirque de Soleil have graced the stage. Words to the wise: Purchase tickets online and find parking early. Nearby Italian restaurant Ti Amo, 219 S. Cheyenne Ave., makes a lovely pre-show dinner and is walking distance from your seats inside. Enjoy the show! Guthrie Green

and The Yeti are neighboring bars for preand post-show antics. Plus, Oklahoma Joe’s serves up tasty barbecue just next door. 423 N. Main St., 918-584-2306, cainsballroom.com

Tulsa Performing Arts Center Experience the finer things in life with a dose of culture at the Tulsa PAC. Within the center are four theaters of varying sizes that host symphonic, operatic, theater, dance and concert events for all ages. Opened in 1977, the Tulsa PAC replaced the Brady Theater as the City of Tulsa’s municipal auditorium with a premiere concert by Ella Fitzgerald. See what’s on the schedule for an evening of sophistication. 110 E. Second St., 918-596-7111, tulsapac.com

CASINOS Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa Try your hand at poker, blackjack or one of the more than 2,600 electronic games, including video poker, at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa. The resort features a hotel, a championship golf course, an assortment of shows and several restaurants. 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 918-384-7800; 800760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

54 Tulsa Guest Guide

River Spirit Casino Resort Featuring the River Spirit Casino and Margaritaville Casino, the casino resort has over 3,000 state-of-the-art electronic games, numerous table games and an actionpacked poker room. It also includes a luxury 27-story hotel tower, Paradise Cove Theater, Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Restaurant and 5 o’Clock Somewhere Bar, and Ruth’s Chris Steak House. 8330 S. Riverside Parkway, 918-995-8080, riverspirittulsa.com

Osage Casino-Sand Springs Enjoy a café, bar and lounge and approximately 460 electronic gaming devices in this 25,000-square-foot oilfield-themed casino. 301 Blackjack Drive, Sand Springs; 918-699-7723; osagecasinos.com

Osage Casino-Tulsa This 50,000-square-foot casino has more than 1,000 electronic gaming devices, blackjack and poker, a full-service restaurant, a bar and an entertainment venue. 951 W. 36th St. N., 918-699-7614, osagecasinos.com


From our stages to our suites, we’re the ultimate crowd-pleaser. When you add our new luxurious spa, fine-dining restaurant McGill’s on 19, Replay Sports Bar, Cherokee Hills Golf Course, 75,000 square feet of meeting space, our electric nightlife and more than 2,400 of the newest and most popular electronic games, you’ll find Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa will rock your world. Don’t miss our resort-style pool opening Spring 2017! I-44 Exit 240 800.760.6700 | HARDROCKCASINOTULSA.COM

Know your limits. Gambling problem? Call 800.522.4700.

Tulsa Guest Guide 55


RESTAURANTS & BARS ADVERTISER INDEX First-time visitors to Tulsa might be surprised at the variety and quality to be found in the city’s culinary scene, but locals are growing increasingly proud of the bevy of eateries from which to choose. From its location in the heartland, one might expect Tulsa to do well at signature American cuisine such as steaks and burgers — and it does. However, local chefs are hitting it out of the park with establishments ranging from Asian fusion to pub fare to pizza and more. Some have even taken their concepts on wheels, joining the food truck craze seen around the country. Home to numerous barbecue competitions, Tulsa serves up some of the best “Q” around. The Oklahoma style is a modern blend that some might say borrows from regional styles found in Kansas City and Memphis.

Buffet at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa p. 55 At Buffet, you can enjoy a salad bar and five food stations: Mexican, Asian, Italian, American and barbecue. Plus, a dessert bar for your sweet tooth. 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Burn Co. BBQ p. 61

Burn Co. is famous for its wait-worthy lunch specials that often attract lines out the door. With utilitarian decor and amenities, Burn Co. focuses on the food, resulting in a distinctive backyard barbecue flavor.

1738 S. Boston Ave., 918-574-2777, burnbbq.com

Celebrity Restaurant p. 3

Celebrity Restaurant’s atmosphere, outstanding food and excellent service have made it a Tulsa tradition for more than 50 years. Try the house’s special Caesar salad, prepared tableside upon request.

3109 S. Yale Ave., 918-743-1800, celebritytulsa.com

The Chalkboard p. 49

Located inside the historic Ambassador Hotel, The Chalkboard serves gourmet American fare and fine wines in a white tablecloth setting. Open for breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch. 1324 S. Main St., 918-582-1964, chalkboardtulsa.com

Champions Grill at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa p. 55

Located in the clubhouse overlooking the beautiful course at Cherokee Hills Golf Club, Champions Grill offers a delicious breakfast and lunch menu.

777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

56 Tulsa Guest Guide

Tulsa also is known for its portfolio of solid Tex-Mex restaurants with a sprinkling of more authentic Mexican and South American cuisine. If you like your burritos and tacos spicy and your margaritas cold, your stomach will thank you for coming to Tulsa. More and more, restaurants in Tulsa are offering fresh, innovative dishes made with sustainably raised meat and produce. At Tulsa’s seasonal farmers’ markets, you can shop alongside many local restaurateurs

who purchase produce and other items directly from northeastern Oklahoma farmers. Tulsans like their happy hours, and there are plenty all over town — not to mention many spots that marry great food, spirits and live entertainment. The city’s “caffeinated culture” is one to experience, too, as the coffee market in Tulsa is hot. The following pages will introduce you to some of the best locally owned eateries at which to try Tulsa’s creative cuisine.

The Colony p. 63-64

edge of downtown’s dynamic Brady Arts District.

This midtown dive bar is an integral part of Tulsa’s modern-day music scene, but The Colony has roots in the past, too. Formerly owned by Leon Russell, the hotspot offers cold drinks and live music seven nights a week.

2809 S. Harvard Ave., 918-749-4208, thecolonytulsa.com

Dalesandro’s p. 49

This cozy Italian bistro just south of downtown serves up traditional Italian cuisine. Expect homemade pastas and sauces, a lengthy wine list and delicious, authentic desserts.

1742 S. Boston Ave., 918-582-1551, dalesandros.com

Dilly Diner p. 63-64

Like its former incarnation, Dilly Deli, the updated restaurant offers high-quality ingredients in dishes both classic and creative with a new, upscale diner feel. This Blue Dome District fixture now serves breakfast all day, as well as belly-warming lunch and dinner. 402 E. Second St., 918-938-6382, dillydiner.com

Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge p. 63-64

Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge is a retro tribute to the classic bowling alleys of the 1970s. Bring back some salivary memories with a plethora of tater tots and corn dogs. It’s like the sleepover you always wanted to throw, but with White Russians.

211 S. Elgin Ave., 918-430-3901, dustbowltulsa.com

Elgin Park p. 63-64

Elgin Park is a family-friendly sports bar and brewery serving pizza, wings and burgers on the

325 E M. B. Brady St., 918-986-9910, elginparkbrewery.com

El Guapo’s p. 63-64 El Guapo’s Cantina in the Blue Dome District boasts a popular rooftop with stellar views of downtown. The south Tulsa location features a huge selection of tequila. Both restaurants have great Mexican food and excellent service. 332 E. First St., 918-382- 7482; 8161 S. Harvard Ave., 918-728-7482; elguaposcatina.com

Elote Café and Catering p. 21

Elote uses fresh, local ingredients to create innovative and healthy Mexican food all while following sustainable practices. Check out the Luchador Bar, or catch an entertaining Luchador match.

514 S. Boston Ave., 918-582-1403, elotetulsa.com

Fassler Hall p. 63-64

Fassler Hall is downtown’s one stop for beer and brats. Transport yourself to Blue Dome’s “Little Germany” for delicious house-made sausage and great live music.

304 E. Elgin Ave., 918-576-7898, fasslerhall.com

Fireside Grill at River Spirit Casino Resort Back cover

Fireside Grill offers casual dining for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Featuring expertly prepared entrées, plus craft cocktails, a well-curated wine list and a great selection of beers. 8330 S. Riverside Parkway, 918-995-8080, riverspirittulsa.com

Continued on p. 58


An Unrivaled Dining Experience The Award-Winning food, warm atmosphere and attentive service have made McGill’s a Tulsa favorite for over 20 years. hours open mon - thur:

11 am - 10 pm sat: 5 pm - 10 pm sun: 5 pm - 9 pm

1560 e. 21st st - 918.742.8080 6058 s. Yale - 918.388.8080 McGill’s on 19 Hard Rock Hotel 918.384.7500 (call for hours)

Proudly Serving Tulsa Proudly Serving Tulsa

918~492~2596 Located at 71st and Yale (In the Light House Shopping Center) 7143 S. Yale Avenue Tulsa, OK 74136

Open: Monday-Friday 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. Saturday 4:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.

Tulsa Guest Guide 57


RESTAURANTS & BARS Fleming’s p. 7

Continued from p. 56

The French Hen p. 57

A longtime staple in the high-end Utica Square shopping center, Fleming’s delivers an indulgent steakhouse experience. On the dinner menu, find hand-selected USDA Prime and Certified Angus beef, a fine selection of seafood, robust wine and cocktail choices, and decadent desserts.

A longtime fine dining establishment, this bistro and wine bar fuses French and American cuisine in a relaxed yet elegant setting. Here, everything from lunch to dinner to dessert is made from scratch daily.

1976 Utica Square, 918-712-7500, flemingssteakhouse.com/locations/ok/tulsa

Hwy 66 Diner at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa p. 55

Flying Tee Sports Bar p. 47

This world-class sports bar has something for everyone, whether you’re craving pizza, burgers, sandwiches or steak. Combined with the riverfront bar, great games and entertainment at Flying Tee, this casual eatery keeps customers coming back for more. 600 RiverWalk Terrace, Jenks; 918-528-4634

Food Court at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa p. 55

Try these Food Court staples: Salsa: Made-to-order burritos, quesadillas and tacos. Slice: Pizza by the slice and whole pies. That’s amore. FlipSide: All-American favorites for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Open 24/7.

777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

7143 S. Yale Ave., 918-492-2596, frenchhentulsa.net

All-American classics get a rock ‘n’ roll twist at 66 Diner. This fan-favorite dishes up breakfast, lunch and dinner 24/7/365. 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

In the Raw p. 49

With a menu combining traditional and nouveau sushi, plus a variety of non-sushi entrees and a vibrant ambiance, In the Raw is synonymous with great food and good times.

3321 S. Peoria Ave., 918-744-1300; 6151 S. Sheridan Road, 918-524-0063; 216 S. Main St., Broken Arrow, 918-893-6111; intherawsushi.com

Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Restaurant at River Spirit Casino Resort Back cover

Visit Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Restaurant to get a taste of true tropical life. Features include a seaplane and a volcano erupting lava into a giant

THE PLACE TO GO BEFORE THE SHOW! Across from the BOK Center and convenient to the PAC, Brady Theater & Cain’s Ballroom.

Join us daily in our beautiful bar for Happy Hour from 4pm-7pm. (not valid on BOK special events.) We’re serving up gourmet flatbreads, pizzas, wings, burgers, pasta and more! Patio and private dining available, too.

201 s. denver ave. • 918-879-1990 • naplesflatbread.com

58 Tulsa Guest Guide

blender, plus two outdoor decks with river views and live music. 8330 S. Riverside Parkway, 918-995-8080, riverspirittulsa.com

Johnny Rockets at River Spirit Casino Resort Back cover

Visit Johnny Rockets for All-American favorites, made fresh. Classic handmade burgers, grilled sandwiches, hand-dipped shakes and malts and more, served up in a classic diner atmosphere. 8330 S. Riverside Parkway, 918-995-8080, riverspirittulsa.com

Juniper p. 5 At Juniper, expect creative, modern cuisine that changes with the seasons and utilizes locally sourced ingredients. Its intimate downtown setting is the perfect backdrop for a craft cocktail and a scrumptious selection from the weekly rotating menu of chef’s specials. 324 E. Third St., 918-794-1090, junipertulsa.com

La Villa Restaurant at Philbrook p. 39

Enjoy a casual museum dining experience with a spectacular view of the sprawling Philbrook Gardens. Continued on p. 60

RicaRdos, WheRe The LocaLs Go!

An award winning Mexican restaurant since 1975, serving the best Tex Mex in town. Just ask the locals...it’s where they go! 5629 E. 41st Street, Tulsa 918.622.2668 • RicardosTulsa.com


1542 E. 15th St. (918) 949-4440 INSPIRED AMERICAN, LOCALLY SOURCED SMOKETULSA.COM

• Voted Best Steak in Tulsa • Voted Best New Concept • Voted Best Tulsa Chef • Hermetically Sealed Cigar Lounge Tulsa Guest Guide 59


RESTAURANTS & BARS Continued from p. 58 Daily lunch and Sunday Brunch offer a gourmet touch, but all entrees are under $15, with many kid-friendly options. Adults, don’t miss the house specialty: the spicy bloody mary with bacon and shrimp garnish. Inside Philbrook Museum of Art, 2727 S. Rockford Road, 918-748-5367, lavillaphilbrook.com

McGill’s p. 57

With two locations serving prime steak, seafood and a range of entrees for lunch and dinner, experience fine dining with a relaxed elegance at McGill’s. An extensive wine list and dessert menu are not to be missed.

1560 E. 21st St., #106, 918-742-8080; 6058 S. Yale Ave., 918-388-8080; dinemcgills.com

McGill’s on 19 p. 55

With an upscale menu, expanded wine offerings and a breathtaking panoramic view unequaled in the state of Oklahoma, McGill’s on 19 truly is the ultimate fine-dining experience. Reservations recommended.

Inside Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa at 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

McNellie’s p. 63-64

Famed for its incredible selection of bottled and on-tap beers, McNellie’s aims to bring a taste of Irish pub culture to the 918. The pub features a full menu of tasty favorites and offers brunch on the weekends.

409 E. First St., 918-382-7468; 7031 S. Zurich Ave., 918-933-5250; mcnellies.com

The Melting Pot p. 61 Dinner is better when it’s dipped ... in creamy cheese or chocolate, for example. Enjoy a four-course dining experience: cheese fondue, a salad, an entree and dessert. Or, keep it simple by pairing a glass of wine with cheese fondue — a one-pot wonder. 300 Riverwalk Terrace, Suite 190, Jenks; 918-299-8000; meltingpot.com/tulsa/welcome

Molly’s Landing p. 61

Tucked away along historic Route 66 near the infamous Blue Whale, Molly’s Landing has treated guests to delectable steaks and seafood for more than 30 years.

3700 N. Highway 66, Catoosa; 918-266-7853; mollyslanding.com

Naples Flatbread and Wine Bar p. 58 Experience casual, chic dining in a convenient location near the BOK Center event venue. Naples’ expansive menu includes Italian favorites such as pizza, flatbreads and paninis and “comfort food” ranging from pasta to pot roast. 201 S. Denver Ave., Suite 107, 918-879-1990, naplesflatbread.com

Oklahoma Joe’s BBQ p. Inside front cover

This homegrown hotspot serves its award-winning barbecue in two locations. To sample a little bit of everything, opt for the Grand Champion Platter. We won’t judge you for not sharing.

333 W. Albany St., Broken Arrow, 918-355-0000; 423 N. Main St. inside Cain’s Ballroom, 918-960-2017; okjoes.com

Osage Casino – Sand Springs p. 65

Enjoy a meal at The Café or watch your favorite sporting event on one of 16 flat-screen TVs in the sports bar. Play on any of 500 games. Guests must be 18 and over.

Open 24/7 at 301 Blackjack Drive, Sand Springs; 918-699-7723; osagecasinos.com

Osage Casino – Tulsa p. 65

Visit the nearest gaming and entertainment venue to downtown Tulsa with over 1,000 games, poker, blackjack, live music and NINE18 Bar. Dine at The Deli or Che Buono — a pizza, pastry and coffee shop open 11 a.m.-3 a.m. daily. Guests must be 18 to enter.

951 W. 36 St. N., 918-699-7614, osagecasinos.com

Continued on p. 62

60 Tulsa Guest Guide


Delicious food in a relaxing atmosphere

THE MELTING POT OF TULSA The Melting Pot of Tulsa is the perfect place to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries and all of your special occasions.

MOUTHWATERING STEAKS AND SEAFOOD. VACATION ATMOSPHERE IN A SPRAWLING LOG CABIN ON 10 WOODED ACRES.

Molly’s Landing HIGHWAY 66 BY THE BRIDGE BETWEEN CLAREMORE AND CATOOSA 3 MILES FROM THE HARD ROCK CASINO 918-266-7853 • WWW.MOLLYSLANDING.COM

(918) 299-8000 • 300 RIVERWALK TER STE 190 RIVERWALK JENKS, OK 74037 RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED • MELTINGPOT.COM

Thank you, tulsa, for voting us best BBQ!

TH E TU LS A VO IC E

BE OF TUSLTSA

READERS ’ CHOICE 2016

1738 S. Boston Ave. | www.BurnBBQ.com | Tulsa Guest Guide 61


RESTAURANTS & BARS Palace Café p. 31

Local, seasonal ingredients are the hallmark of Palace Café’s lunch and dinner menus, which are well-loved for their myriad vegetarian options. The eatery offers gourmet cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere — a perfect haven along the buzzing Cherry Street shopping district.

Continued from p. 60

Roosevelt’s p. 15

Named for the U.S. president who repealed prohibition, this relaxed Cherry Street gastropub boasts an extensive beer list and high-quality pub fare. A live-feed beer system allows you to read beer details and keg levels from the enormous patio.

1301 E. 15th St., 918-582-4321, palacetulsa.com

1551 E. 15th St., 918-591-2888, rooseveltstulsa.com

Perfect Cup at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa p. 55

Roppongi p. 21

Proudly brewing Starbucks® Coffee so you can start your day with the perfect cup. 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Polo Grill p. 59 Polo Grill is an award-winning restaurant known for its extensive wine list, exceptional service and fine dining. Stop in for lunch during a day of shopping at Utica Square or reward yourself with a delectable dinner at the end of a long day. 2038 Utica Square, 918-744-4280, pologrill.com

Prairie Brewpub p. 15

The Brady Arts District is home to Prairie Brewpub, featuring beers brewed onsite by Prairie Artisan Ales. The lunch and dinner menus are filled with hearty dishes and sandwiches such as the “Loosen Your B.E.L.T” with crispy pork belly, fried egg, Bibb lettuce and tomatoes with lemon aioli. 223 N. Main St., 918-936-4395, prairiepub.com

Prhyme p. 5

This downtown dining establishment is an upscale, modern interpretation of the American steakhouse. Choose from classic cuts of beef, seasonal seafood, New Zealand lamb chops, artistically plated appetizers, classic caviar service and delectable desserts.

111 N. Main St., 918-794-7700, prhymetulsa.com

R Bar and Grill p. 15 Located along Tulsa’s Restless Ribbon — the Brookside shopping and dining district — R Bar features succulent dishes ranging from its famous chicken and waffles to a monstrous pork chop, specialty pizzas and the best burgers in Tulsa. 3421 S. Peoria Ave., 918- 392-4811, rbartulsa.com

The Restaurant at Gilcrease p. 39

Dine in style among the Osage Hills. Lunch dishes such as the classic Gilcrease Remington Buffalo Burger have a touch of Southwest influence — a nod to the museum’s premier collection of Southwestern and Western art — and Sunday brunch is a must-try.

Inside Gilcrease Museum, 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road, 918-596-2720, gilcrease.org/restaurant

Ricardo’s p. 58

Find traditional Mexican fare and Tex-Mex favorites at Ricardo’s, a Tulsa staple since 1975. The casual restaurant is famous for its chili relleno stuffed pepper, but you can’t go wrong with any of its tempting lunch and dinner items, beers or frozen drinks.

5629 E. 41st St., 918-622-2668, ricardostulsa.com

62 Tulsa Guest Guide

Named for a Tokyo district popular for its nightlife and entertainment, Roppongi ramen bar elevates this traditional Japanese favorite with a healthy, delicious addition: lots of fresh vegetables. Choose from several appetizers, four ramen variations — including daily specials — and Boba tea.

601 S. Boston Ave., 918-221-0818, roppongitulsa.com

Queenie’s Café and Bakery p. 49

Take a shopping break at Queenie’s, known for its delectable breakfast dishes and fresh sandwiches utilizing local meats and veggies. Don’t leave without peeking at the dessert case; we dare you to turn down a slice of house-made pie or cake. 1834 Utica Square, 918-749-3481, queeniesoftulsa.com

Ruth’s Chris Steak House at River Spirit Casino Resort Back cover

also is famed for its Soul Food Sundays. 201 N. Main St., 918-949-9801, taverntulsa.com

Tavolo p. 5

This award-winning Italian restaurant, market and caffè is nestled in the heart of downtown Tulsa’s Deco District. Pastas and baked goods are handmade daily, and diners can choose from lunch specials, chef’s tasting menus and an approachable wine list.

427 S. Boston Ave., 918-949-4498, tavolotulsa.com

Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar and Grill p. 55 Some bars have the inexplicable power to inspire. This bar and grill, though, was inspired by Toby Keith’s monster hit, “I Love This Bar.” Dining, dancing and beer by the pitcher; just find a barstool and feel the love. Inside Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa at 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa; 800-760-6700; hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Torero p. 13

Located just east of the BOK Center event venue, Torero offers Latin- and Spanish-inspired cuisine in small shareable plates. A thoughtfully curated wine, beer and cocktail list round out the appeal of this downtown hotspot.

The nation’s premier steakhouse now has a home in Tulsa. River Spirit Casino Resort’s newest fine dining restaurant provides a picturesque view of the Arkansas River and is the perfect place to host business dinners and celebrations.

2020 S. Cheyenne Ave., 918-894-4004, torerobarandkitchen.com

8330 S. Riverside Parkway, 918-995-8080, riverspirittulsa.com

Savor succulent seafood; feast on tender, juicy beef, chicken and pork; and don’t forget to leave room for dessert. Whatever you crave, Visions Buffet is sure to satisfy. So, grab a chair at the largest casino buffet in the state.

Sisserou’s p. 60

Sisserou’s adds Caribbean flair to the Brady Arts District. Monthly “Caribbean Cruisines” take diners on culinary voyages, and the menu keeps Tulsa tropical all year.

107 N. Boulder Ave., 918-576-6800, sisserousrestauranttulsa.com

SMOKE. On Cherry Street p. 15

Creating imaginative dishes with locally sourced ingredients is Smoke’s game, and it wins every time. The unique Cherry Street venue houses a humidor and full bar with an impressive selection of draft beers and wine.

1542 E. 15th St., 918-949-4440, smoketulsa.com

Sushi Hana Japanese Fusion p. 1

Sushi Hana offers some of the most creative rolls around. But this restaurant is more than just sushi. Try a variety of Asian entrees such as Crispy Duck in Tamarind Sauce, Yaki Udon and NYC Style Maifun.

9904 Riverside Parkway, 918-528-6688; 3739 S. Peoria Ave., 918-712-9338; sushihanatulsa.com

The Tavern p. 63-64 The Tavern brings upscale gastropub fare to the Brady Arts District. The bar features an inspired menu of craft cocktails and artisan beers. The Tavern

Visions Buffet at River Spirit Casino Resort Back cover

8330 S. Riverside Parkway, 918-995-8080, riverspirittulsa.com

The Vault p. 21 The Vault serves classic American fare and craft cocktails in a mid-century modern setting. Food is made using organic or all-natural meats, along with fresh vegetables and fruit. 620 S. Cincinnati Ave., 918-948-6761, vaulttulsa.com

Wild Fork p. 35 Come as you are for breakfast, lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Wild Fork is a restaurant like no other, serving eclectic creations from fresh ingredients, with the greatest little cocktail bar in town. Everything prepared to please every palate, every time. The art of dining in Utica Square since 1995. 820 Utica Square, 918-742-0712, wildfork.com

Yokozuna p. 63-64 Yokozuna is an Asian restaurant and sushi bar featuring an array of clever cocktails and some seriously sassy fortune cookies. Enjoy classic rolls alongside Tulsa-centric creations. 309 E. Second St., 918-508-7676; 9146 S. Yale Ave., Suite 100, 918-619-6271; yokozunasushi.com


WHAT ARE YOU CR AVING? DILLY DINER THE DUST BOWL

EL GUAPO’S FASSLER HALL

MCNELLIE’S ELGIN PARK

THE TAVERN YOKOZUNA

Tulsa Guest Guide 63


The Most Popular Dining Destinations In Tulsa... 244

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Downtown Tulsa’s Favorite Diner 402 East 2nd Street 918.938.6382 • dillydiner.com

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Noodles, Sushi, Cocktails, Happiness 309 East 2nd Street 918.508.7676 • yokozunatulsa.com

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Hotel Guest Guide