Page 1

O C T . 1 9 – N O V . 1 , 2 0 1 6 // V O L . 3 N O . 2 1

Searching for Bigfoot | P18

How to Halloween | P20

Return to Wizard World | P24


2 // CONTENTS

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


NOW OPEN!

TULSA’S PREMIER SPORTS BAR DOWNTOWN ACROSS FROM DRILLERS STADIUM 325 E M.B. BRADY • 918.986.9910 • WWW.ELGINPARKBREWERY.COM • FACEBOOK/ELGINPARKTULSA

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

CONTENTS // 3


4 // CONTENTS

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


17

Psychics, Satanists, and lasagna

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // Vol. 3, No. 21 ©2016. All rights reserved.

BY M.W. VERNON

PUBLISHER Jim Langdon MANAGING EDITOR Joshua Kline ART DIRECTOR Madeline Crawford ASSISTANT EDITOR Liz Blood DIGITAL EDITOR John Langdon GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Georgia Brooks, Morgan Welch PHOTOGRAPHY/MULTIMEDIA Greg Bollinger AD SALES MANAGER Josh Kampf

Spiritual exploration in Tulsa

18

INTERNS Mary Budd, Emerald Dean, Laura Dennis, Emma Giddens, Morgan Krueger, Lindsay McClain

Gone squatchin’

CONTRIBUTORS Jeremy Charles, Alicia Chesser, Phil Clarkin, Melissa Kohl Eubanks, Gavin Elliott, Angela Evans, Barry Friedman, Mitch Gilliam, Valerie Grant, Jennie Lloyd, Melissa Lukenbaugh, Katie Martin, George Miller, Joe O’Shansky, Oklahoma Policy Institute, John Tranchina, M.W. Vernon The Tulsa Voice’s distribution is audited annually by

BY JENNIE LLOYD

Investigating the myth, mystery and mischief at Oklahoma’s annual Bigfoot festival

Member of

20

The Tulsa Voice is published bi-monthly by

The Happening BY JOHN LANGD ON 1603 S. Boulder Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 P: 918.585.9924 F: 918.585.9926

A Halloween event nearly every day between now and October 31

PUBLISHER Jim Langdon PRESIDENT Juley Roffers VP COMMUNICATIONS Susie Miller CONTROLLER Mary McKisick RECEPTION Gloria Brooks, Gene White

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD Send all letters, complaints, compliments & haikus to: voices@langdonpublishing.com FOLLOW US @THETULSAVOICE ON:

NEWS & COMMENTARY 8

BLACK AND BLUE

FOOD & DRINK 12 THE BREAKFAST CLUB BY ANGELA EVANS

BY JOHN TRANCHINA

A matter of life and death

Legs and eggs at Cloud 9

Roughnecks close out disappointing season

10  PUT TO THE STATE

14  TULSA TASTEMAKERS

BY OKLAHOMA POLICY INSTITUTE

BY JOSHUA KLINE

Summaries of state questions on Oklahoma’s Nov. 8 ballot

Provisions owners Scott and Kala Large influence local drink

38 THE DEVIL HERSELF  B Y MITCH GILLIAM

DJ Afistaface will host a Halloween dance party at Soundpony on Oct. 29

40 NEVER UNEASY, NEVER UNCOMFORTABLE  B Y JOHN LANGDON

Dustin Pittsley plays the Voice courtyard

Searching for Bigfoot | P18

How to Halloween | P20

Return to Wizard World | P24

ON THE COVER

Maiken Martin as Hopper, Marlo Martin as Eleven, Eleanor Kampf as Barb and Miles Kampf as Dustin from “Stranger Things” Makeup by Melissa Kohl Eubanks | Costumes sourced and tailored by Katie Martin | Photo by Greg Bollinger

30 WINLESS STREAK

BY BARRY FRIEDMAN

MUSIC

O C T . 1 9 – N O V . 1 , 2 0 1 6 // V O L . 3 N O . 2 1

ARTS & CULTURE

FILM 44  TEN KILLERS BY JOE O’SHANSKY

32 SEE HER BY ALICIA CHESSER

Women 40 and over challenge the norm of invisibility

34 ROOTS

BY LIZ BLOOD

 Tulsa Artist Fellow Akiko Jackson’s practice

A horror playlist

ETC. 16 DOWNTHEHATCH 36 THEHAPS 42 MUSICLISTINGS 46 THEFUZZ 47 CROSSWORD

RETURN TO WIZARD WORLD

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

P24 CONTENTS // 5


editor’sletter

A

s has become tradition, this October B edition of The Tulsa Voice once again focuses on all things Halloween and Comic Con. Inside, you’ll find a schedule of this weekend’s Wizard World convention, a list of Halloween parties happening between now and the end of the month, and several stories with spooky or supernatural themes: Jennie Lloyd hunts for Bigfoot in the Kiamichi Mountains, M.W. Vernon reflects on her search for enlightenment in Tulsa’s Pagan subculture, and Joe O’Shansky crafts a playlist of extreme horror movies in lieu of the more mainstream usual suspects. Halloween is a fun theme to build a paper around, but it feels trivial given

the current state of things at home and around the world. As I write this, the most disturbing, disheartening presidential campaign of my lifetime is in its final weeks. The contest between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton has played like a real-life horror movie, exposing a cancerous rot in the heart of our democracy, and revealing the latent psychosis of a sizeable portion of the American public—like some twisted mash-up of “They Live,” “The Crazies,” and “Alien vs. Predator” (whose tagline, “Whoever wins, we all lose,” could be the official slogan of this election). Regardless of how you vote on November 8, we all know that Trump will win Oklahoma (polling guru Nate Silver

gives him a 99 percent chance of taking the state). But that doesn’t mean you should stay home. A series of state questions will be posed to Oklahoma voters, and how we answer them will have palpable consequences for all of us. Our friends at OK Policy Institute have crafted a guide to understanding each state question, which you can find on page 10. Look for more election coverage in our November 2 issue. For now, have a safe holiday. a

JOSHUA KLINE MANAGING EDITOR

Thank you, Voice Readers! THE TULSA VOICE

BEST OF TULSA READERS’ CHOICE 2016

w in ner!

Best Museum • Best Place to Learn Something New

Two locations, one world-class art museum. Stay connected. philbrook.org

6 // NEWS & COMMENTARY

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


Communities don’t change on hopes and dreams alone

There’s more at stake than just Trump vs. Clinton. Oklahoma’s state questions and legislative races will shape our city for decades to come. From liquor law modernization to criminal justice reform, be the generation that changes things.

ON NOVEMBER 8TH, OWN TULSA’S FUTURE.

Sponsored by

Bama Companies

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

NEWS & COMMENTARY // 7


viewsfrom theplains

Black and blue A matter of life and death by BARRY FRIEDMAN

I

n April of 1999, the morning after my mom died of breastto-bone cancer, her oncologist called the house. “Sorry for your loss,” he said, “but you want to hear some truly awful news?” “I don’t understand.” “A woman came into my office today with colon cancer.” “What? I—” “Her cancer is worse than your mom’s. And this woman has so much to live for. A real tragedy.” “You don’t think my mother’s death was tragic?” “Regrettable, but your mother, frankly, was no angel. She was uncooperative during treatment. The other woman, though—that’s sad.” “I could burn down your office right now.” “You people always react like that, typical. Mr. Friedman, all cancers matter, all patients matter.” That conversation never occurred, but you know where I’m going with this. Black Lives Matter. All Lives Matter. Blue Lives Matter. First the coupling, then the deflection, then the eclipse. A few days after Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby killed Terence Crutcher, this happened.1 A small group supporting law enforcement gathered at Hunter Park Tuesday afternoon to give support to officer Betty Shelby.

In the story, Crutcher’s name doesn’t even appear. Newson6 no doubt figured it had covered that “angle” already—the dead guy. “My heart goes so deep with Betty Shelby and her family,” said Charlotte Bates, the wife of former sheriff reserve deputy Robert 8 // NEWS & COMMENTARY

ted considerable time to smearing Eric Garner as a “career criminal” who somehow caused his own death by resisting arrest.

“I think both Black Lives Matter and the police want the exact same thing —

Sandra Bland smoked pot.5

better conditions in black neighborhoods

At a news conference discussing the preliminary findings of an autopsy following Bland’s alleged suicide at the Waller County Jail in Texas last week, officials placed heavy emphasis on marijuana reported to be found in the young woman’s system.

and a stop to the killing,” said Brandon Jenkins, Sergeant of the Robbery Unit for the Tulsa Police Department. “But I do agree that All Lives Matter

Tamir Rice was too big for a 12-year-old.6

misses the point entirely and

It’s not uncommon for police to overestimate the age and size of black boys. Various studies have found that the general public and police tend to see them as less innocent and older.

certainly does nothing to move the conversation forward.” Bates who was convicted of shooting Eric Garner. “They are going to go through some absolutely horrible nightmares.” Does your heart go out to Frenchel Johnson, Terence’s common-law wife, who found out her husband had been shot while she was in jail? Or does she not matter because she was in jail? How about Terence’s mother, Leanna? Or does she not matter because her son had previous problems with the law? How about the four kids and their nightmares? Or do they not matter because the family wasn’t intact? Is the message, that the men and women in blue matter more those they kill?

I know. And Crutcher2 wasn’t an angel.3 Shelby’s attorneys claim they received a call from a man saying he saw Crutcher firing a gun up and down East 52nd Street on September 15. Police found PCP in the vehicle used by Terence Crutcher the night he was fatally shot by an officer, a Tulsa Police Department official confirmed to the Tulsa World on Tuesday afternoon.

Eric Garner had a record.4 Outlets from Breitbart to Fox News to The New York Post to NewsMax dedica-

None were angels. It’s how we blame the victim. Crutcher was a “big bad dude,” a hulking black guy who didn’t listen to a diminutive, church-going, short white female officer.7 “As Tulsans, and as Oklahomans, let’s stand up for Betty, for our police department and our sheriff ’s department, for these men and women who are out on the streets protecting all of us,” [Charlotte Bates] told NewsOn6. “I’m here to support our law officers who have not been supported.” Marq Lewis, founder and organizer for We The People Oklahoma, has had it with the conflation. “I think we have to understand that there would have not been a Blue Lives Matter or All Lives Matter if it wasn’t for first Black Lives Matter. These movements

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


that are not related to Black Lives Matter are just a slap in the face,” Lewis told me. And when isn’t law enforcement supported, honored? When are their deaths not accompanied by rage and horror? When does America ever talk about African American deaths at the hands of police officers without first prefacing the conversation with how hard cops work, how most are honest, and how they put their lives on the line for us every single day. But today, that line is a tripwire.8 Paired with official government mortality data, this new finding indicates that about one in every 65 deaths of a young African American man in the US is a killing by police.

You would think we could hold those two thoughts—1) that innocent African American men are being killed in alarming numbers by law enforcement, and 2) policeman deserve our respect and admiration—simultaneously. But, apparently, not. Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton said, “We support people who put on the uniform and do a job that most people would run from.”

That’s the criteria—cops getting dressed in the morning and going to work? We can’t expect more? The cop who tells a dying Eric Harris, “Fuck your breath,” is a hero9 because most of us wouldn’t do his job; the cop who kills him because he can’t tell his taser from his gun deserves a rally? “I think both Black Lives Matter and the police want the exact same thing — better conditions in black neighborhoods and a stop to the killing,” said Brandon Jenkins, Sergeant of the Robbery Unit for the Tulsa Police Department. “But I do agree that All Lives Matter misses the point entirely and certainly does nothing to move the conversation forward.” Whether we’re all on the same side is debatable, but Jenkins is a thoughtful guy, a cop for more than 20 years, who sees the faulty logic, the inequities, the well-

springs of mistrust between black and blue. “For instance, look at the trafficking weight of crack and meth. Crack takes 5 grams to make a trafficking charge and meth takes 10 grams—guess which one is seen as a ‘black’ drug?” He doesn’t, won’t, can’t talk about the Shelby case, but understands the outrage. “I’ll admit I didn’t understand the Black Lives Matter movement at first since it never occurred to me that black people didn’t know that we valued their lives. It absolutely never occurred to me. That’s my fault for not trying to understand it earlier.” And this. “But I do appreciate Blue Lives Matter.” He does, he says, because not a day goes by in Tulsa where a police officer doesn’t come within seconds of killing someone … but doesn’t. “That’s a part of our world that’s hidden from everyone else. It’s terrifying for anyone to look at another person and think he/ she wants to kill you. It’s just as terrifying to realize you might have to kill that other person.” It’s not an excuse; it’s an explanation. Marcus Harper, a sergeant with the Tulsa Police Department, says racism, sexism, homophobia in police forces are reflections of those in society. Perhaps. But they have the guns, and the authority. I ask Jenkins about the politics, the perception of the police in Tulsa. “We’ve been a political football for the last three mayors.” And nationally? “Back then the Democrats were our champions because we were a union. Now the GOP seems to be championing us because it’s politically convenient to them and the Democrats seem to be calling us racist because it’s politically convenient to them.” He remembers better days, days he could take some time to play a game of football, basketball with kids in a community. Tulsa spends $100 million on police protection and yet our cops can’t take 20

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

minutes a day to shoot hoops with kids. A game of HORSE doesn’t save Terence Crutcher, doesn’t make Betty Shelby a better cop. But you find the time to play, anyway, because it’s how community happens, how humanity happens. Protect and serve. So what do we do now? “I’ve talked about the shootings and institutional racism with some friends of mine who are black officers,” said Jenkins. “Not a single one of them believes any of the shootings, including Betty’s, has to do with racism. But every one of them believes that institutional racism exists and is very real. You can’t disagree.” It’s not about race, until it is, unless it’s not. Paralysis. And Tamir Rice, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Walter Scott, Laquan McDonald, Eric Harris and Terence Crutcher are still dead. a

1) newson6.com: Shelby Family Going To Go Through Nightmares, Wife Of Bob Bates Says 2) tulsaworld.com: Police say PCP found in vehicle occupied by Terence Crutcher on Friday 3) fox23.com: Shelby attorneys say witness saw Crutcher firing gun day before he was killed 4) alternet.org: 5 Times the Media Has Smeared Black Victims of Police Killings Since Michael Brown 5) huffingtonpost.com: Sandra Bland Marijuana Smear Is Another Cheap Trick of Racist Drug War 6) vox.com: Cleveland police shooting of Tamir Rice: city to pay $6 million after 12-year-old’s death 7) washingtonpost.com: Tulsa officer faces outrage and pressure, but also ‘felt the love and it’s wonderful’ 8) guardian.com: Young black men killed by US police at highest rate in year of 1,134 deaths 9) gawker.com: “Fuck Your Breath”: Video of “Inadvertent” Police Shooting Released NEWS & COMMENTARY // 9


okpolicy

VOTE ON NOVEMBER 8

Put to the state

Summaries of state questions on Oklahoma’s Nov. 8 ballot by OKLAHOMA POLICY INSTITUTE

S

even state questions will be on the Oklahoma ballot on November 8. Read on for a summary of each. More background information and what supporters and opponents of the state questions are saying is available at okpolicy.org. There you can also download a 2-page summary of the seven questions as a pdf, or a combined pdf with the summaries and individual fact sheets for each state question. A consortium of organizations led by the League of Women Voters has created a comprehensive voter guide with information on the state questions, legislative and other elections. The elections page at okpolicy.org offers information on how to vote in Oklahoma.

STATE QUESTION 776: Constitutional Amendment on the Death Penalty SQ 776 is a constitutional amendment that affirms the state of Oklahoma’s right to perform executions. It gives the Legislature the power to designate any method of execution, prohibits the reduction of death sentence due to an invalid method of execution, and prohibits the death penalty from being ruled “cru10 // NEWS & COMMENTARY

el and unusual punishment” or unconstitutional according to the Oklahoma Constitution. STATE QUESTION 777: Constitutional Limits on Regulation of Agriculture SQ 777 is a constitutional amendment that would give Oklahoma residents the right to engage in farming and ranching practices and employ agricultural technology. The amendment bans any new law regulating or prohibiting an agricultural practice unless it can be shown to have a “compelling state interest.” That means any new agricultural regulations would have to pass strict scrutiny, the legal standard used for laws that deprive people of fundamental rights like free speech, gun ownership, or religious freedom. STATE QUESTION 779: Sales Tax for Education SQ 779 is a constitutional amendment that would raise the state sales and use tax by one percentage point. Of the total revenue generated by the new tax, 60 percent would go to providing a salary increase of at least $5,000 for every public school teacher. The remaining funds would be divided between public schools (9.5 percent), higher education

(19.25 percent), career and technology education (3.25 percent), and early childhood education (8 percent). TheState Board of Equalization would be required to certify that revenues from the new tax are not being used to supplant existing funds. STATE QUESTIONS 780 & 781: Criminal Justice Reform SQ 780 changes the classification of simple drug possession crimes from felony to misdemeanor. It also raises the dollar amount that determines whether property crimes are a felony or misdemeanor from $500 to $1,000. Anticipating fewer prison receptions for drug possession, SQ 781 directs the cost savings from SQ 780 to a fund that would be distributed to counties to provide mental health and substance abuse services. The state Office of Management and Enterprise Services is directed to determine the annual savings, which will be distributed to counties in proportion to their population. STATE QUESTION 790: Use of Public Resources for Religious Purposes SQ 790 is a constitutional amendment that would repeal Article 2, Section 5 of the Oklahoma Con-

stitution, which reads, “No public money or property shall ever be appropriated, applied, donated, or used, directly or indirectly, for the use, benefit, or support of any sect, church, denomination, or system of religion, or for the use, benefit, or support of any priest, preacher, minister, or other religious teacher or dignitary, or sectarian institution as such.” STATE QUESTION 792: Alcohol Law Reform SQ 792 would amend the Oklahoma constitution to allow grocery and convenience stores to sell wine and high-point beer. Currently these stores are prohibited from selling beer containing above 3.2 percent alcohol by volume, as well as all wine and all liquor. SQ 792 would also allow Oklahoma liquor stores to sell refrigerated beer and alcohol accessories (i.e., sodas, corkscrews). The measure would allow multiple beer and wine stores to be owned by one corporation (ownership would be limited to two stores per person if spirits are sold). Currently individual liquor store owners are not allowed to have more than one store. If SQ 792 passes, these changes would take effect on October 1, 2018. a

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


It is GOD that girdeth me with strength, and maketh my way PERFECT. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 924 S. Boulder Church & Sunday School • 10:30am Wednesday Meeting • 6:00pm

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INVESTIGATORS: Drs. Jamie Rhudy & Joanna Shadlow CONTACT: The University of Tulsa Psychophysiology Research Laboratory 918-631-2175 or 918-631-3565

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A novel research study is being conducted at The University of Tulsa to identify potential markers of risk for chronic pain in healthy (currently painfree) Non-Hispanic White and Native American individuals.

This study is safe, non-invasive, and does not involve medication. Participants must be able to attend 2 laboratory sessions (4-5.5 hours/day) in which physiological and behavioral reactions to different stimuli are recorded. This is a University of Tulsa, Cherokee Nation, and Indian Health Service Oklahoma Area Office IRB approved research study.

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101 EAST ARCHER STREET NEWS & COMMENTARY // 11


foodfile

THE BREAKFAST CLUB

Legs and eggs at Cloud 9 by ANGELA EVANS

12 // FOOD & DRINK

“I

’ve never done this before,” the scantily clad dancer coos to a man on the barstool next to me. “This is my first time.” “Me, too, sister,” I think to myself. “Me, too.” It’s the middle of the night and I’m at Cloud 9 Gentlemen’s Club with two lady friends—one, a writer who can’t resist a good story; the other, a badass lady-chef who’s no stranger to the establishment—and a gentleman pal we’ll call “Uncle Steve.” We’re not here for the skin, but for the legendary buffet known as “Legs & Eggs,” served every Friday and Saturday from 2 a.m. to 4 a.m. It’s shortly after 2 a.m., and the club is exactly the rowdy escapade you’d expect. It’s difficult to spot the alleged breakfast buffet through the melee of booty shaking and flying dollar bills. (I had never seen someone literally “make it rain” before.) I finally spot it: a red-and-white checked picnic table cloth next to a small buffet station, its little heat lamps shining like a beacon through the black lights and machined fog, an anachronism in the miasma of chrome and mirrors and neon. Initially, I feel too intimidated to break through the bacchanal of lap dances to get to the buffet. But, I push through, squeaking out the occasional “excuse me” and interrupting a dance as I arrive at my destination, Styrofoam plate and plastic silverware in hand. The buffet is stocked with all a drunken heart desires – scrambled eggs, bacon, two kinds of sausage (links and patties), fried potatoes, and a vat of gravy. I’m spooning eggs onto my plate when one of the lap dancers bumps into me. I apologize, but she graciously says “oh honey, don’t you worry,” and continues with her performance, undeterred. Never in my life have I felt more like Leslie Knope as I cheerfully fill my plate with everything the small buffet has to offer while the walls of the small building rumble to Kylie Minogue’s “I Can’t Get You Outta My Head.” It’s rumored that cream cheese is added to the eggs, so they won’t look green. Admittedly, under the black light, it’s tough to

discern the true color of the eggs; but it’s not tough to tell they were of the powder variety. The fried potatoes are emaciated and a bit on the chewy side, but nothing a healthy squirt of ketchup can’t remedy. The bacon is the star of the meat selection—a nice crispy strip with a little bit of give. The sausage patty is crumbly, but the sausage links have a great snap with each semi-flavorful bite. The biscuits, obviously not homemade by grandma, pair perfectly with the gloopy gravy hiding in a seemingly bottomless heated container. The food is reminiscent of the hot breakfasts offered by modest motels, though a make-your-ownwaffle station is sorely missing. Still, not bad, especially at 3 a.m. My chef pal, who had a long day and no food, fills her plate and devours it. “I gotta say, I ate every bite of that and I’m not mad about it. At all.” As we peer around the place, we ponder where they might be preparing the food. I ask the guy bringing fresh pans of vittles. He guffaws. “Yeah, we cook all this up right in the strippers’ dressing rooms!” Still amused by my question, he tells me that Fajita Rita’s caters Cloud 9’s breakfast, as well as an all-you-can-eat $5 lunch on Thursdays and Fridays. As we eat and talk, I forget where I am, until a statuesque dancer—one of the most gorgeous women I’ve ever seen— takes the stage. We ladies are suddenly enraptured. The three of us quietly, simultaneously, light cigarettes as the woman undulates gracefully. Uncle Steve conscientiously delivers dollar bills to the dancer as we sit motionless, hypnotized. As the morning has worn on, the energy of the place has deteriorated from frat party frenzy to a quieter, almost desperate mood. Men sit alone, spooning eggs into their mouths and sipping their complimentary Red Bulls, eyes never moving from the stage. With our plates clean and our visions dirty, we exit, stage left, glad for the adventure but unsure if we’ll ever do it again. a

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


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THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

FOOD & DRINK // 13


tastingnotes

Tulsa tastemakers

Provisions owners Scott and Kala Large influence local drink by JOSHUA KLINE

I

n the Brady Arts District, just behind Saturn Room and across the street from Brady Theater on Boulder Avenue, a warehouse sits—non-descript except for a striking, colorful mural made to look like a vintage postcard, “TULSA” emblazoned across it. From the 50s through the 80s, it housed the Tulsa Tobacco Company. Today, it is home to Provisions Fine Beverage Purveyors, owned by Scott Large, one of Tulsa’s most influential tastemakers in local drinking culture, and his wife Kala. If you’ve worked in the service industry in downtown or midtown, you might recognize Scott, who’s been stocking Tulsa’s restaurants, bars and liquor stores with quality product for the last ten years, first as the founder of Thirst Wine Merchants and now as the owner of the fledgling Provisions. If you’ve ever had a cocktail at Hodges Bend, or a glass of Bergström Pinot Noir at Lucky’s, or a can of Alloy (Field Recordings) ‘Everyday’ Rosé from the liquor store, you’ve tasted his influence. As is often the case in the food and beverage industry, the Larges fell into their field by happenstance. “[In 2005] I was waiting tables,” Scott recalled. “I was at a wine tasting, and I met a wine broker. He said ‘I like the way you sound, you should be my new fine wine sales rep.’ And it just kind of happened really quickly.” Not long after he started, the company sold to Glazer’s, a large out-of-state distributor. Scott immediately noticed a difference in the cultures between local and national distributors.

14 // FOOD & DRINK

we should start our own company,’” Scott said. “Kala immediately got to work on converting that original business plan to a wine brokerage. We didn’t really know what we were doing, we just kind of stumbled our way through it.” They found business partners, and Thirst was born. The company quickly took off and for the next nine years they worked diligently to bring small, family-owned wines from around the world to Oklahoma, while changing the paradigm of how brokers related to the public through Kala’s savvy approach to marketing. “No one had ever come out from behind the veil of the wine brand or the spirit brand to show that there’s a broker behind it… [Kala] started marketing our name to people.” “I remember the first time we heard someone in a liquor store say ‘What’s the new Thirst stuff ?’” Kala said. “I was like, ‘Yes! We did it!’”

Scott and Kala Large, owners of Provisions Fine Beverage Purveyors | GREG BOLLINGER

“When it was the local company, they cared [about the quality of the product], but as soon as the guys came in from Texas, it was like instantly they didn’t care. It could have been tennis shoes—it was just a product to push. Push it, push it, push it, and that’s just not me.”

While he worked for Glazer’s, Kala was writing a business plan as she finished college for a restaurant she and Scott hoped to open. But as Scott’s dissatisfaction with the new corporate culture of Glazer’s grew, he and Kala hatched another plan. “I thought, ‘we should do this,

One of Scott’s more significant finds for Oklahoma was an up-and-coming winemaker in Walla Walla, Washington—a wildhaired, rock ‘n’ roll tour manager-turned-vintner named Charles Smith. “I literally cold called him on the phone, that’s how I got that brand,” Scott said. “I saw a bottle of Kung Fu Girl Riesling when I was traveling, took a photo of it, and called the winery when I got home. He answered the phone himself, and we just kind of hit it off.” Scott started selling Smith’s wines to bars, restaurants and

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


liquor stores in Tulsa and across the state. Thanks to the Larges, Oklahoma became one of Smith’s most faithful customers—so much so that Smith frequently travels to Tulsa to host tastings and parties, and several years ago named a limited run Malbec after his new favorite band, the Tulsa/Norman-based Broncho. Since then, Smith has become an international celebrity in the wine world, a populist known as much for his larger-than-life personality as the quality of his wine. (He recently sold the Charles Smith Wines, LLC arm of his portfolio to Constellation Brands for $120 million.) Two years ago, the Larges parted ways with their Thirst partners and set out on their own. They regrouped, found the warehouse, and opened Provisions in July of last year, specializing in small family-owned and boutique wineries and distillers. They currently op-

erate with a very small crew—one warehouse worker, two salespeople, and Scott and Kala—but plan to expand at a steady pace. In addition to 15 distilleries and a handful of high-end ciders and beers, they work with four import portfolios, including Rare Wine Company, one the country’s premier wine importers and retailers that represents nearly three dozen European producers and boasts perfectly aged wines, as well as a line of Madeira, which has helped revive production of the unique wine. For a city its size, Tulsa has an embarrassment of riches with all things booze-related: a cocktail scene that’s fast becoming nationally recognized; several acclaimed craft breweries, with more on the way; and an unusually diverse selection of world-class wine on the shelves of our restaurants and liquor stores. The Larges have played a significant role in that. a

What to drink, per Scott Large

The Cornpopper Featuring for Halloween...

Honey flavored orange and black popcorn & popcorn balls!

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We also have tins of your favorite College Team!

5584 S. Garnett RD. 918-250-9317

www.cornpopper.com BEST POPCORN YOU EVER TASTED!

BEER

James E. Pepper ‘1776’ Historic Brown Ale • James E. Pepper brewed an American Brown Ale and aged it in bourbon oak barrels. It’s deep and dark, and could be mistaken for a stout. The taste is sweet with coffee, vanilla and oak notes shining through. The rye comes through a bit on the finish. Mikkeller ‘19’ IPA • In cans! A whopping 19 different hop additions make this new IPA crazy complex without being bitter. Incredible.

CIDER

Shacksbury from Vermont • Dry and semi dry cans—one of the hottest brands in recent memory. Tin City cans • Hitting the Oklahoma market last June, Tin City out of Paso Robles is going from strength to strength as their hopped cider is beautifully adorned with Nelson sauvin hops.

SPIRITS

Hanson of Sonoma Organic Vodka • Winning the Philbrook MIX competition was just the start for this red hot American brand. Newly released Boysenberry is made from the only organic boysenberries grown in California. Certified organic, gluten-free and GMO-free grape-based vodka. Letherbee Gin • An autumnal release that’s very sought after from Letherbee. They do limited runs of small batch gins in spring and fall. This year’s fall gin is influenced by beets, dill, salt, lemon and other herbs. Crazy delicious!

October 28 • 7-9 p.m. • FREE You’re invited to discover Kyya’s farm-to-bar chocolate and Topeca’s seed-to-cup coffee at “When Chocolate Meets Coffee.” Sample varieties of chocolates and coffee from local vendors, enjoy live music from Desi and Cody, and explore the relationship between human culture and chocolate with an after-hours tour of the exhibition Chocolate. Gilcrease After Hours takes place on the last Friday of the month Explore the museum, grab a drink, network with other young professionals, and support your local art community. FREE.

WINE Lost By Choice Red Wine from Rebel Coast Winery • From the minds that brought you Sunday Funday comes this crazy drinkable Zinfandel-based blend with eight different adventure/outdoor-themed labels in every case. Txakoli Ameztoi • Pronounced “Chah-koe-Lee,” this Basque Country white wine is all the rage around the country for its brisk minerality and slight effervescence. Try it out of a Porron for real authenticity. So, so good! THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

TU is an EEO/AA Institution.

GILCREASE.ORG FOOD & DRINK // 15


NOW SERVING

downthehatch by LIZ BLOOD

*

Fassler Hall, 304 S Elgin Ave VALERIE GRANT FOR TULSAFOOD.COM

The best ‘wurst place in Tulsa

I

W O N E ’R E W , S R A E Y 2 3 R E AFT ! S T H IG N Y A ID R F N O N E OP HAPPY HOUR, FRIDAYS 4-6 P.M. BILLY’S ON THE SQUARE HOURS: LUNCH, MON-FRI 10:30 A.M.– 2:30 P.M., FRI 4 – 9 P.M. Located in the heart of downtown at 5th and Main St. Family-Friendly / Kid’s Menu / Outdoor Patio 16 // FOOD & DRINK

love Fassler Hall. It’s just gritty enough that I don’t feel like a priss hanging out there; it’s affordable enough I can satiate my appetite for beer or duck fat fries or gin (sometimes all three); it’s big enough for private convos or losing yourself in a crowd; and homey enough that when I first moved to Tulsa, I found it so comfortable and welcoming that I ate there nearly once a week for two months. A few weeks ago I commented to a friend, “I’m really craving Fassler.” It was in the air, and the air was October—Fassler’s favorite month. All over the world—from Australia to Canada, Brazil to Hong Kong—people celebrate the Bavarian Oktoberfest with beer and bratwurst, music and dancing. Tulsa has its own annual world-famous celebration west of the river, but at Fassler, it’s Oktoberfest every day of the year.

Fassler offers eight Euro/ German beers on draft (and of course the delicious, local Marshall Dunkel), house-made bratwurst and cheddarwurst (among other sausages), and a schnitzel sandwich (breaded, deep fried pork loin on German rye with smoked Gouda and mustard) that is just stupid. Confession: I once drunkenly helped myself to a schnitzel left unattended on the bar. It’s that good. Whether you don lederhosen or a dirndl, play the accordion or drink out of a stein, Fassler Hall is the ideal place for a month that celebrates a cultural tradition of rich food, decadent drink and great company. Jawohl! a

In “Down the Hatch,” assistant editor Liz Blood offers a look inside Tulsa’s many bars, pubs, saloons and gin joints. Send suggestions for future columns to liz@langdonpublishing.com or @lizblood on Twitter.

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


Psychics, Satanists, and lasagna Spiritual exploration in Tulsa by M.W. VERNON

“A

re you here with the pagans?” the host asked me. “Uh... Yeah.” “Follow me,” he said and led me past diners snarfing 15-layer lasagnas over red-and-white checkered tablecloths and into a backroom. “Can you get naked in the woods out there?” I heard one man ask. “I just wanna frolic.” “I can neither condemn nor condone that,” another said. “We will be at a state park, and so that would generally be frowned upon. But after the sun goes down…” “You can get naked at my house anytime,” someone shouted. “Not at my house! All my neighbors are Christians.” I liked this group already. They meet at Spaghetti Warehouse one evening every month—a large group of Tulsans identifying as witches, pagans, heathens, or something else, with eclectic interests in zodiac, astrology, runes, palmistry, crystals, and Tarot. I’d joined them for ritualistic breadsticks to see if I could learn anything useful. When a woman sitting across from me went outside to smoke and asked the man next to her to watch her purse and drink, he flashed his concealed handgun. The way everyone went around the room and introduced themselves—“Hi, my name is…”—followed by how they self-identify reminded me of a different kind of meeting. Witches, heathens, druids. Some mediums and psychics. Maybe a Luciferian satanist. Quite a few libertarians in a place where you could be whatever you want with no burden of proof. Self-description was the ultimate authenticity—just say it out loud and it becomes so, almost a spell in its own right.

MORGAN WELCH

At my turn, I said, “This is my first time here. I don’t know what my path is.” A short man with tiny feet and a kind smile mouthed the word “seeker,” as if I should have known already. It’s true, though: I had come to a casual-dining restaurant chain that evening searching for some kind of enlightenment. Something of a spiritual opportunist, I’ll take all the help I can get. The first time I went to a fortune-teller was on a New Jersey boardwalk when I was a pre-teen. She predicted that someone was secretly in love with me and that I would have a passion for music. But she was no Madam Marie—I still don’t know whom she was talking about and have yet to find an instrument I can play. The next time I sought out the help of a psychic was the year I

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

graduated college. A quarter-life crisis inspired me to Google “cheap tulsa psychic.” When I found one I emailed her to set up a 30-minute session. I figured I had made worse decisions with $80 before, and resolved to go in with an open mind and an open heart, which is why it was so disheartening when she canceled on me the day of. Fine, things happen. I won’t even make the joke that most people would make right now. But, she canceled the next time. And the next time. I guess I should have seen that one coming. About a year later, I found a Vedic astrologist’s business card in my pocket. When I made an appointment, she asked me before the reading if there was an area in my life I wanted to focus on. I told her that I was most confused about my love life and career. She was kind

enough to reassure me: “Sounds like you’re just in your twenties.” Our appointment was at Peace of Mind, in one of their conference rooms. She already had my reading figured out based on the time and place of my birth and she brought along some cards with the corresponding Hindu iconography to help me visualize my chart. Astrologists like to say stars incline, not compel. It’s like driving on an icy road. You don’t have to crash your car, but it’s easier to. In my reading she told me not to get married until I’m 32. By then my dashas, or planetary time cycles, will apparently be better aligned. I asked her to tell that to my mother. Earlier this year, I was gifted my first deck of Tarot cards. Though I typically don’t believe anyone who tells me they can tell the future from Tarot cards, I’ve come to think of them as an excellent tool for analyzing the present. From the Jungian perspective, there’s an overall synchronized pattern to the cards, compiled from ancient archetypes and imagery that plays in the subconscious. I’ve found playing with Tarot cards with friends, even casually, almost always leads to conversations that we otherwise wouldn’t have. It creates an opportunity to engage in a dialogue that would otherwise feel off limits, especially on topics relating to the past, hopes, and fears. Playing alone, it’s a meditative exercise, a way of constructing narratives around issues in your life, which can help make sense of things—what I’ve been going to psychics, astrologists, and other parapsychologists for since I was a kid. You can still call me a seeker. I probably always will be. a FEATURED // 17


onthehunt

O

GONE SQUATCHIN’ Investigating the myth, mystery and mischief at Oklahoma’s annual Bigfoot festival by JENNIE LLOYD

18 // FEATURED

ver a roaring campfire in the foothills of the Kiamichi Mountains, Bigfoot believers still tell the bloody tale of the Siege at Honobia (pronounced “Hoe-nubby” by the locals). The winter was unusually harsh sixteen years ago, they say, when a deer hunter and his family noticed fresh-shot carcasses stolen from their outdoor freezer. He and his family lived in a two-story cabin on 30 acres of dense woods in rural Honobia, an unincorporated dry little town in southeastern Oklahoma, where hungry predators were frustrating but not extraordinary. They chalked up the missing meat and mischief to bears, nothing more, and emptied out the freezer. Problem solved. But soon the hungry predators began to target the fresh meat living inside their cabin. The creepy beings came back almost nightly, jiggling doorknobs, scratching at their doors, bending gates. According to reports* and campground lore, the persistent beasts stood more than eight feet tall and smelled of musk, urine and burnt hair. They say the wintry woods surrounding their cabin echoed with screams and strange chattering and the thrashing of trees. With each terrifying night, the predators grew more ferocious in their attempts to break into the cabin. The family became convinced these were not bears. The mother and children fled. The deer hunter and his friends loaded assault rifles and waited on the porch. They’d had enough. Story goes, they didn’t have to wait long. The man shot a massive, red-eyed monster prowling a hundred yards from the cabin. He hit the beast in the head, and it ran howling into the timberline and out of sight. They heard pained screams all for the rest of the night. The woods seethed. The southeastern edge of the expansive Ouachita Forest churned with noise until daybreak. No one slept. Townspeople searched the woods the next day, following a trail of blood to the leafy bedding

of a massive being. They found rudimentary attempts at first aid, bits of brain matter, more blood. The injured predator was gone. Out-of-state volunteer investigators with the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization arrived on the scene within 16 hours of the shooting. The official report, filed in the BFRO’s online database of Sasquatch investigations, concluded the blood trail led to a rifle-shot deer, not an injured Bigfoot. The Okies were nervous and riled up as the woods. They fired assault weapons into the winter dark at the slightest flash of glowing red or movement beyond the timberline. The BFRO investigators, keen on preserving and observing Bigfoot life, politely disagreed with their shoot-firstand-find-the-body-later method. But it worked. The mischief and the screams around the cabin slowed. Weeks later, the menacing hilltop hollering ended for good. Sixteen years later and a mile away from the besieged cabin, enthusiasts and experts now gather the first weekend in October for the annual Honobia Bigfoot Festival & Conference. The Tulsa Voice sent a crack investigative camp crew to the Honobia festival, held at the Kiamichi Mountains Christian Mission on Christ’s 40 Acres (RV & Campgrounds), a worthwhile three-hour drive south of Tulsa. The day after we arrived, we were approached by a large man in black overalls. He rode into the middle of our crew’s site at the outermost edge of Christ’s 40 Acres and cut the engine. “Are ya’ll tryna to get abducted by Bigfoot?” he asked, exasperated. “You tryna become his love slave?” He took off his camo baseball hat and shook the sweat from his head. Noontime sun in southern Oklahoma is still warm in early October. We were bright-sun confident around a dying breakfast fire, cavalier after a skillet of scrambled eggs and bacon. And we hadn’t heard the Siege at Honobia tale told around the campfire yet. The man in the overalls revved his ATV, tossed us a “Suit yourself ” smirk and rode off down the

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


grassy-green ravine and back to the safety of the center of camp. It was true. We had pitched our tent just a Bigfoot-stomp from the wild woods, once roiling with angry predators and nervous rifle-fire, to get up close and personal with an Okie monster legend. We’d also come for the genuine fun of this quirky Oklahoma festival. For one weekend each year, Christ’s 40 Acres plays host to NDN taco trucks and local high school bands, to dreamcatcher stands selling rattlesnake bracelets, truck-stop wolf t-shirts and Trump hats. In the brickred chapel, Bigfoot experts run through PowerPoint presentations and theories and sell self-published books. At dusk, hundreds gather in camp chairs around a communal fire and tell stories. They talked of hanging six-pound bags of butter-drenched popcorn in trees to lure Bigfoot (fresh apple fritters are also effective), of coming across immense, humanoid footprints, of the Siege at a Honobia. Church is held in the chapel on Sunday morning and everyone’s welcome. The happy whooping of kids and the chatter of grown-ups drift into nearby trees like campfire smoke till long past 11pm. It’s a great weekend to be alive in Squatchin’ country. (Verb: Squatch. Meaning: To go out in search of Sasquatch. Common accoutrements: Walking stick. Cargo shorts. Headlamp. Flask, filled with whiskey. Balls.) In the morning, women in the communal bathroom, in between toweling off kids and brushing their teeth, asked, “Did you experience anything last night?” One woman said she heard grunts. We heard nothing but the whirring of insects. So we packed a whiskey-filled flask and took a rocky, dry creek-bed trail marked with painted-yellow wooden feet (size large). We tripped down stones through a dense forest of elm, oak, pine and walnut trees, spun with cottony bagworm nests. The trees quickly muffled the safety of camp. Rocks gave way to soft sand, and we heard a stubbedtoe whoop-howl bounce off the

tions, whom he identifies as the Bigfoot race. Latest self-published book, $10 on his merch table: “The Sasquatch Message to Humanity: Conversations with Elder Kamooh” by SunBow with foreword by Kewaunee Lasperitis, MS, MH. Noon, Lunch hour 12.30pm M.K. Davis. TL; DR. 1.30pm Lyle Blackburn. The Criss Angel of monster hunters. Black cowboy hat, tight black T, tattooed biceps. Drew a standing room onl y crowd of brunettes in Bigfoot shirts, mom jeans and slip-resistant black shoes. Wikipedia entry says he’s a musician, author, actor and cryptozoologist from Fort Worth, Texas. Promoted his co-producer and onscreen role in an upcoming documentary from Small Town Monster Films, “Boggy Creek Monster.” Release date, Nov. 11. 2.30pm Shel Dron. (Couldn’t even.)

Attendees at the Honobia Bigfoot Festival and Conference | PHOTOS BY GAVIN ELLIOTT

murky Little River from deeper in the woods. We shushed quiet. Another group of Squatchers were throwing out Bigfoot calls to attract the real deal. We returned the call, belly-out, full-force. Thirty seconds later, another yowl bellowed across the copperhead-ridden river water. A few birds took flight. We called again. No response. After turning up empty-footed on the trail, we checked into the conference on Saturday morning. In white plastic chairs, attendees drank church coffee and ate church soup (white bean & ham with a thick slice of cornbread, $5) and listened to Sasquatch experts in the chapel. The windows are taped over with aluminum foil, the walls are wood-paneled, the lighting, rec-room overhead fluorescence. The lineup of speakers for the 2016 Honobia Bigfoot Festival &

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

Conference was only available in one place: handwritten on a sheet of lined paper in a soft-bound journal on a card table set up outside the chapel doors. “You can take a picture of it if you like,” said a church lady sitting at the card table in front of the journal and a cash-box. We did. Here’s the roster with TTV field notes: 9am, Dr. Webb Sentell. Self-described Jungian clinical psychologist and hard-knock rationalist. Listed physical symptoms of a nearby Bigfoot: sizzling brain, rumbling tummy, mindspeak (out-of-body thoughts like STAY OUT OF THE WOODS), sudden sleepiness, dysphoria, dream intrusion. 10.30am, Kewaunee Lasperitis. Awakened at night for the last 37 years by inter-dimensional living appari-

That evening, imitation Bigfoot calls boomed back and forth across the ravine for hours. We sent up our fair share of throatopen, hand-cupped hollers, too. No dice. In the morning, someone went for church coffee and church biscuits (free) for soppin’ up bacon grease. We rolled up the tents, burned trash, ate the biscuits, poured water on the campfire. Groups of campers were already out squatchin’; the sound of gunshots boomed throughout the woods near Christ’s 40 Acres. On the winding road back to Tulsa, we stopped at a crew member’s family home not far from Honobia and told them about striking out in our search for Bigfoot. An uncle in camouflage coveralls who had just spent two days in a deer stand said, “Bigfoot? You don’t gotta find him. He’ll find you.” Just ask the deer hunter and his family. a

* For the full repor t of the Siege at Honobia, check the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization’s online database at bfro.net. FEATURED // 19


THURSDAY, OCT. 20

THURSDAY, OCT. 27

Foolish Things Coffee Co. is celebrating their fourth anniversary with an 80’S-THEMED HALLOWEEN PARTY with a costume contest, raffles, and some adult trick or treating from local businesses including Retro Den, Hi, Juice, and Middle West Chocolate.

Kitchen 66 is holding a SPOOKTACULAR HALLOWEEN DINNER, featuring a five course meal by Preston Cooks for You with wine pairings by Mix Co, entertainment by Peaches Lennox, and hosted by Hexi Lee Voodoo: The Pin Up Ghoul.

6:30 P.M. TO 10 P.M., FOOLISHTHINGSCOFFEE.COM

6:30 P.M., $85, PRESTONCOOKS.COM

The Max Retropub and Wizard World team up for a ZOMBIE DANCE PARTY with music by DJ Moody. The most realistic zombie will receive a pair of weekend tickets to Comic Con.

Halloween gets wild at the Tulsa Zoo’s HALLOWZOOEEN, with Goblin Stops full of treats, pumpkin patch carnival games, and spooky (but nottoo-scary) activities in a Royal Castle and Pirate Island.

9 P.M. TO 2 A.M., FACEBOOK.COM/THEMAXRETROPUB

10/27-31, 6:30 TO 8:30 P.M., TULSAZOO.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 21

Trick or Treat among pirates and sharks at The Oklahoma Aquarium’s HALLOWMARINE, and maybe see some mermaids swimming among the coral.

Tokyo in Tulsa is hosting a HALLOWEEN BLOCK PARTY at Guthrie Green, featuring a scavenger hunt, carved pumpkin contest, cosplay contest, video games, laser tag, prizes and giveaways, and plenty of candy. 6 P.M. TO 11 P.M., FACEBOOK.COM/TOKYOINTULSA

An entire Halloween Village awaits every Friday and Saturday in October at the CASTLE OF MUSKOGEE’S HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL, with activities for all ages and fright levels. 6 P.M. TO 10 P.M., $3-$15, OKCASTLE.COM

10/27-31, 6:30 P.M. TO 9 P.M., $6-$10, OKAQUARIUM.ORG

FRIDAY, OCT. 28 Inner Circle Vodka Bar is hosting a HALLOWEEN ASYLUM PARTY with Soundsquatch playing a “crazy” themed show and the bar offering themed drinks and a Candy Corn infused shot. 8 P.M. TO 1 A.M., ICVODKABAR.COM

The Venue Shrine is having a HALLOWEEN BLOWOUT with Andy Frasco and Spoonfed Tribe.

SATURDAY, OCT. 22

9 P.M., $15-$20, TULSASHRINE.COM

The Luchadors at Elote are getting into the spirit early with LUCHAWEEN, which will feature such hair-raising bouts as Abra Cadaver vs. El Zombie.

Electronic music duo WE MAKE SHAPES are holding their third annual Halloween party at the Yeti with special guest, Mr. Burns, and paying homage to the 1979 cult classic “The Warriors.”

9 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT, ELOTETULSA.COM

10 P.M. TO 2 A.M., YETITULSA.COM

MONDAY, OCT. 24

Tulsa offers a different Halloween event nearly every day between now and October 31 BY JOHN LANGDON

Find spooky family fun at the SPOOKTACULAR HALLOWEEN PARTY at All Souls Unitarian Church, with crafts, games, prizes, haunted halls, and more. 5:30 P.M. TO 7:30 P.M., ALLSOULSCHURCH.ORG

The Centennial Lounge at VFW Post 577 is celebrating all weekend with their MONSTER MASH HALLOWEEN BASH, featuring live music from Dustin Pittsley on Friday and James Groves Blues Machine on Saturday, themed drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and a costume contest. 10/28-29, 9 P.M. TO 1 A.M., $5, FACEBOOK.COM/CENTENNIALLOUNGE577


Halloween on the Green

caz’s pUb

Sat. Night the 29th & Sun. Night the 30th!

TRICK OR TREAT HALLOWEEN PARTY!

October 29th

22nd HALLOWEEN birthday BASH!

T U L S A’ S P R E M I E R E D A N C E C L U B

$$$ Prizes for Best Costumes!

21 E. Brady St. 918-585-8587 PUB

Costume Contests & Cash Prizes! 124 N. Boston Ave • 918-584-9494 clubmajestictulsa.com

3rd Annual Presentation of

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Monday, 10/31 at 8:30 pm guthriegreen.com // 111 E. MB Brady Street

$1,000.00

8

COSTUME CONTEST

DJ KYLIE DEMKO PHLUF N STUPH

6 1 0 2 , h t 9 2 R E B O SATURDAY OCctT IDL Ballroom ric Circus Enso Bar

Costume Party Only

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

Ele

9pm - 2am

forced! en y kl ric st be ill w . I.D y nl O 21+

FEATURED // 21


and ghoulish attractions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. At night, the party is for teens only, with a Zombie Hunt, a dance pit, and a costume contest with a $250 grand prize. 6:30 P.M. TO 11 P.M., $12, SAFARIJOESH2O.COM

The Blackbird on Pearl is hosting A NIGHTMARE ON 6TH STREET, a horror-themed dance party with classic movie scenes projected around the room, a costume contest, and spooky tunes from DJs Robbo, Lynn K, Axis, and Xylo. 8 P.M. TO 2 A.M., $5, FACEBOOK.COM/BLACKBIRDTULSA

Who ya gonna call? Hard Rock Hotel & Casino is holding a GHOSTBUSTERS PARTY and a costume contest with a $5000 grand prize. 8 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT, HARDROCKCASINOTULSA.COM

Mix Co hosts an 80S ZOMBIE PROM with food and drink specials and Mark Gibson Band performing hits of the 80s. 8 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT, MIXCOTULSA.COM

The second annual BLACK MOLD HALLOWEEN BASH features eight bands as eight other bands! Kiss by Lizard Police, The Velvet Underground by Noun Verb Adjective, Nirvana by Negative Creeps, The Kinks by Wavy Dots, Dwight Yoakam by Hot Ranch, The Moldy Peaches by Par-Time Lovers, The Cramps by The Girls Room, and Minutemen by Joe McCarthy’s Ghost. 8:30 P.M. TO 2 A.M., YETITULSA.COM

Circle Cinema will screen the original vampire movie, “Nosferatu,” with a score performed live by Austin, TX band, The Invincible Czars. 9 P.M., $10-$12, CIRCLECINEMA.COM

SATURDAY, OCT. 29 Oklahoma’s largest Halloween Celebration is Brookside’s BOOHAHA, where kids can trick or treat at Brookside businesses, and enjoy activities, costume contests for kids and pets, and more, all culminating in the BooHaHa Parade. 8:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M., BROOKSIDETHEPLACETOBE.COM

The 8TH ANNUAL SPIDER BALL at IDL Ballroom, Enso Bar, and Electric Circus will have music by DJ Kylie, Demko, and Phluf N Stuph, and $1000 grand prize costume contest. 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M., $10-$20, TULSASPIDERBALL.COM

It’s a night of Boos and Booze at The Fur Shop’s FRIGHT NIGHT, which will have themed drinks, a costume contest, live music upstairs, and a DJ downstairs. 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M., $5, FURSHOPTULSA.COM

Safari Joe’s H2O is throwing two parties to celebrate HOWL-GO-GREEN. Kids and families can enjoy pony rides, animal shows, a kids’ costume contest, 22 // FEATURED

Ponder the duality of life while getting properly sloshed at HEAVEN AND HELLOWEEN at The Pearl District

Building on 3rd and Peoria, featuring costume and cocktail contests, and music by DJ JoJo. 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M., $5, FACEBOOK.COM/MARYFENCLEVENTS

Things will get gruesome at HEAVY HALLOWEEN at The Venue Shrine, with Screaming Red Mutiny, Machine in the Mountain, and 3Eighty3. 9 P.M.. $5, TULSASHRINE.COM

Caz’s Pub will host its 22nd (!) annual HALLOWEEN BIRTHDAY BASH, with a costume contest and cash prizes. The party starts at 9 p.m., and costume awards will be handed out at 11:30 p.m. 9 P.M., FACEBOOK.COM/CAZSPUB

On both Saturday and Sunday nights, Club Majestic is throwing a TRICK OR TREAT PARTY with booze, dancing, costume contests and cash prizes. 9 P.M., FACEBOOK.COM/CLUBMAJESTICTULSA

SUNDAY, OCT. 30 Spend this All Hallows Eve eve with the fam at GHOULS ON THE GREEN at Guthrie Green. Activities include a kids creepy crawly art crawl, arts and crafts, a costume contest, and live music. 2:30 P.M. TO 6:30, GUTHRIEGREEN.COM

MONDAY, OCT. 31 Yeah, it’s a Monday, but if you aren’t Halloweened-out by the actual day of the holiday, The MAX RETROPUB has you covered with one more costume contest, giveaways, and funky jams by DJ Ali Shaw of the Weekend Rewind on 105.3 KJAMZ. 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M., FACEBOOK.COM/THEMAXRETROPUB

Guthrie Green will once again host an outdoor screening of the cult classic “ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW.” Audience participation encouraged; parental discretion advised. 8:30 P.M., GUTHRIEGREEN.COM

You can belt out your last feelings about Halloween at Inner Circle at their Halloween SCARYOKE COMPETITION Finale Round with a $500 cash prize. To participate, sing at Monday Karaoke on the 24th and wow the judge enough to earn a spot in the finals. 9 P.M. TO 1 A.M., ICVODKABAR.COM a


30 TS N E S E PR FRIDAY OCT 28

HALLOWEEN ASYLUM PARTY STARTING AT 9PM

MONDAY OCT 31

HALLOWEEN SCARYOKE COMPETITION

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE BY ONE ” Y “CRAZ IN NIGHT A TULS

$500 CASH PRIZE!!!

410 N MAIN ST • 918.794.2400 • ICVODKABAR.COM

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

FEATURED // 23


FAMILY

WIZARD WORLD COMIC CON RETURNS TO TULSA, UNITING GEEKS

OF ALL STRIPES

THIS WEEKEND, October 21-23, the Cox Business Center will once again be ground zero for all things sci-fi, horror, fantasy and comic book-related, as Wizard World Comic Con returns to Tulsa for a third year with a diverse array of panel discussions, special guests, gaming tournaments and costume contests. The roster this year is especially impressive—guests include, among others, Sebastian Stan (Bucky Barnes from “Captain America”), Evanna Lynch (Luna Lovegood from “Harry Potter”), Michael Rooker (“Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer”) and Captain Kirk himself, William Shatner. READ ON FOR A GUIDE TO THE WEEKEND; TTV’S PERSONAL RECOMMENDATIONS ARE HIGHLIGHTED IN YELLOW. Nicci Atchley as Harley Quinn from “Suicide Squad,” Cory Hope as Deadpool, and Krystle Morris as Eleven from “Stranger Things” MAKEUP BY GEORGE MILLER AND PHOTO BY JEREMY CHARLES

For tickets, panel summaries and more information, visit wizardworld.com/ comiccon/tulsa.


COURTESY WIZARD WORLD

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21ST 3:00PM TOURNAMENT REGISTRATION AND CHECK IN OPENS (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR) 4:00-4:45PM ARE FAN BOYS TOO MEAN? 3.0 (CONFERENCE HALL A)

If you’ve ever found yourself on the wrong end of an argument with a fan boy, you’ll want to chime in at this lighthearted, irreverent panel discussion, back for its third year.

4:00-6:00PM MYSTERY PARTY GAMES! (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR) 4:30-5:15PM GETTING STARTED IN GAME DEVELOPMENT (CONFERENCE HALL B) 5:00-5:45PM BATMAN AND PSYCHOLOGY: A DARK AND STORMY KNIGHT (CONFERENCE HALL A) Dr. Travis Langley (“Batman and Psychology”; “Captain America vs. Iron Man”) takes a deep dive into the Batcave and explores the dubious psychology of our most tortured hero.

5:00-5:45PM VIPS OF SELF PUBLISHING (CONFERENCE HALL D) 5:00-5:45PM THE CREATIVE MIND: TOP ARTISTS DRAW COMICS with SPIDER-MAN’S STEVE GEIGER, BATMAN’S BO HAMPTON, GRIMJACK’S STEVE ERWIN AND DR. STRANGE’S GEOF ISHERWOOD (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

5:30-6:15PM VILLAINS VERSUS VILLAINS (CONFERENCE HALL B)

Why do some villains win our hearts while others creep us out? Genese Davis (“The Holder’s Dominion”), Jack Burgos (“Dark and Dangerous Things”) Shannon A. Thompson (“Bad Bloods”), and RA Jones (“Wolverine”) share their perspectives and creative process, including what key ingredients they focus on when creating vicious characters.

7:00-7:45PM START YOUR CREATIVE ENGINES! AND YOUR CREATIVE CAREER! (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 7:30-8:00PM INSIDE THE RING WITH WWE® SUPERSTAR BECKY LYNCH™ (CONFERENCE HALL B) Moderated by Ryan Ball (WrestlingAudio.com, Figuratively Speaking podcast).

6:00-6:45PM DRAWING DISNEY with CLINTON HOBART (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 6:00-6:45PM WONDER WOMAN DAY! TRIPLE DC ANNIVERSARY: FLASH, BATMAN & WONDER WOMAN with “BATMAN AND PSYCHOLOGY’S” TRAVIS LANGLEY and “SUPERMAN’S” DANNY FINGEROTH (CONFERENCE HALL A)

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22ND

6:00-8:00PM TEKKEN 7: THE KING OF THE IRON FIST - PLAY A PRO! (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR)

11:00-11:45AM LONGING. RUSTED. SEVENTEEN. DAYBREAK. FURNACE. NINE. BENIGN. HOMECOMING. ONE. FREIGHTCAR. SEBASTIAN STAN. (BALLROOM A)

6:30-7:15PM ALL THINGS PRO WRESTLING with WRESTLINGAUDIO.COM (CONFERENCE HALL B) 7:00-7:45PM COSPLAY 101: TIPS & TRICKS with WIZARD WORLD COSPLAY GUEST SUPER KAYCE (CONFERENCE HALL A)

Veteran cosplayers offer tips of the trade and advice for aspiring cosplayers on how to get started.

11:00AM STREET FIGHTER V - DOUBLE ELIMINATION TOURNAMENT POOLS (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR)

Actor Sebastian Stan will discuss his role as Bucky Barnes/The Winter Soldier in the “Captain America” film series, as well as his experiences acting in “Black Swan,” “Gossip Girl,” and “The Martian,” among others.

11:00-11:45AM IT TAKES TWO: HOW ARTISTS AND WRITERS WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE COMICS AND GRAPHIC NOVELS YOU LOVE (CONFERENCE HALL A) 11:00-11:45AM HOW TO DRAW THE HULK THE MARVEL WAY (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) FEATURED // 25


COURTESY WIZARD WORLD

11:30-12:15PM THE ART OF ROB SCHAMBERGER (CONFERENCE HALL B) 12:00-12:45PM ADVENTURES IN MIDDLE EARTH WITH BILLY BOYD (BALLROOM A) 12:00-12:45PM RETURN TO HALLOWEENTOWN with KIMBERLY J. BROWN (ASSEMBLY HALL) 12:00-1:45PM THE ART OF SATURDAY MORNING CARTOON PRODUCTION WITH ANIMATOR/DIRECTOR TOM COOK (CONFERENCE HALL A)

World-renowned animator Tom Cook (“Tarzan,” “Flash Gordon,” “He-Man and the Masters of the Universe”) will discuss his life and career, and demonstrate the process of animating from script to screen.

12:00-12:45PM DRAFTING AN UNDERBUST CORSET PATTERN with WIZARD WORLD COSPLAY GUEST BRIT BLISS (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 12:30-1:00PM INSIDE THE RING WITH WWE® SUPERSTAR FINN BALOR™ (CONFERNCE HALL B) 12:30-1:15PM STORYTELLING WITH MICHAEL GOLDEN (CONFERENCE HALL D) 1:00PM OFFICIAL BANDAI NAMCO ANIME COSPLAY GROUP PHOTO (BANDAI BOOTH / SHOW FLOOR) 1:00-1:45PM BACK TO HOGWARTS with EVANNA LYNCH (BALLROOM A)

Luna Lovegood herself will stare into the audience and make matter-of-fact observations about life. And she won’t blink once.

1:00-1:45PM THE MARVEL LEGACY: THE 77-YEAR HISTORY OF THE HOUSE OF IDEAS, FROM THE BEGINNING TO DEADPOOL TO CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR with SPIDER-MAN’S DANNY FINGEROTH (CONFERENCE HALL A) 1:00-1:45PM BODY PAINT BASICS with WIZARD WORLD COSPLAY GUEST PRINCESS MORGAN COSPLAY (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 1:30-2:15PM SYNERGY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF ENTERTAINMENT: HOW TV, FILM, BOOKS, VIDEO GAMES AND TECHNOLOGY COLLIDE (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR)

Transmedia is influencing entertainment at large, intertwining TV, video games, film, technology and the literary industry. TV series pull from novels, video games incorporate filmic cutscenes, and many movies blend all of the above. How does this impact creators and how will this synergy impact these industries in the future? Join Genese Davis (“The Holder’s Dominion”), Alex Langley (“The Geek Handbook” series) RA Jones (“Wolverine”) and Richard Cook (Game Developer and Filmmaker) as they divulge their perspectives and discuss these colliding genres.

1:30-2:15PM (STILL) CHASING WHIMSY: THE JOURNEY CONTINUES! (CONFERENCE HALL B) 2:00-2:45PM BOLDLY GOING WITH WILLIAM SHATNER (BALLROOM A) 2:00-2:45PM TAKING THE STAGE: JOEY FATONE (ASSEMBLY HALL) 2:00-2:45PM Q&A PANEL WITH TMNT ARTIST STEVE LAVIGNE (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 2:00-2:45PM STAR WARS DEBATE: SITH VS. JEDI (CONFERENCE HALL A)

Star Wars portrays the Jedi as noble heroes and the Sith as self-centered villains, but is it really that simple? “Action Flick Chick” Katrina Hill moderates the battle between the Henderson State University’s warriors for the light and dark sides. For the Jedi: Coley Henson, Cameron Nickels, Oscar Mandragon, Hunter Cox. For the Sith: Evan Seale, Jackson Ables, Jessie Hickerson, Elliott Jackson. This is the fight you’re looking for....

2:30-3:15PM WHO RUNS THE WORLD: GIRLS IN THE COMICS INDUSTRY (CONFERENCE HALL B)

Three teen comic creators discuss the challenges they have faced as young women in the comic industry and how they are working to overcome them, all while trying to inspire the newest generation of female creators.

2:30-3:15PM UNBREAKABLE SKIN?: HOW TO CRITIQUE CREATIONS OF COLOR WITHOUT SOUNDING…YOU KNOW (CONFERENCE HALL D) 3:00PM TEKKEN 7: THE KING OF THE IRON FIRST TOURNAMENT POOLS (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR) 26 // FEATURED

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


3:00-3:30PM MICHAEL ROOKER VS THE AUDIENCE (BALLROOM A)

Character actor Michael Rooker (“Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer”) will engage—no doubt, intensely—with the audience.

3:00-3:45PM DRAWING DISNEY with CLINTON HOBART (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 3:00-3:45PM ONE-ON-ONE WITH THE GREEN POWER RANGER: JASON DAVID FRANK (ASSEMBLY HALL)

5:30-6:15PM WHO: WHAT NOW? (CONFERENCE HALL B)

There will be no new “Doctor Who” episodes until 2017, but that doesn’t mean new adventures aren’t coming out. This panel will help those having “Who” withdrawls. Presented by The Tulsa Doctor Who Viewing Society.

5:30-6:15PM JASON DAVID FRANK MEET & GREET *PAID EVENT* (CONFERENCE HALL D)

Must purchase separate admission to attend this event.

6:00–6:45PM VAMPIRES: NIGHTMARES 2.0 (CONFERENCE HALL A) 6:00-7:00PM TAKE ONE IMPROV COMEDY SHOW (ASSEMBLY HALL) 6:30-7:00PM ELI ROTH’S CRYPT TV FIRST LOOK (CONFERENCE HALL B)

CryptTV will give fans an early look at never before seen Crypt TV original horror shorts and showcase its most exciting content. (Recommended for ages 18+)

7:00-9:00PM WIZARD WORLD COSTUME CONTEST SPONSORED BY BANDAI NAMCO (BALLROOM A)

The Wizard World Costume Contest is no joke; be prepared for some serious cosplay. Special guest judges Super Kayce, Brit Bliss, Anna Quinn and Princess Morgan Cosplay. Anyone interested in participating can sign-up at the Wizard World Information booth on the exhibition floor on Saturday. Registration closes at 5 p.m. (Recommended for ages 13+)

3:00-3:45PM USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO DEVELOP YOUR BUSINESS AND PROMOTE YOUR WORK with WIZARD WORLD COSPLAY GUEST ANNA QUINN (CONFERENCE HALL A) 3:30-4:15PM ODE TO LEADING LADIES (CONFERENCE HALL B) Women leads and female heroes are rapidly evolving. What have creators fought for in the past for their women title characters and what key ingredients do creators pour into their female leads today? Hear from Genese Davis (“The Holder’s Dominion”), Tamara Grantham (“Dream Thief”) and Sabrina A. Fish (“Shine” Series) as they share their creation process for women heroes, what they think about when creating a female lead or collaborating on women superheroes, and what they foresee happening to female heroes in the future.

4:00-4:45PM OUT FOR A BITE WITH JAMES MARSTERS (BALLROOM A) 4:00-4:45PM YOU CAN LEARN TO DRAW IN 30 MINUTES! (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY) 4:00-4:45PM IN-CHARACTER COSPLAY with WIZARD WORLD COSPLAY GUEST PRINCESS MORGAN COSPLAY (CONFERENCE HALL A) 4:30-5:15PM THE STATE OF TREK 2016: STAR TREK TURNS 50 (CONFERENCE HALL B)

2016 is the 50th anniversary of one of the most beloved franchises in fandom and so far, many hardcore Trek fans have felt…underwhelmed… by the “celebration.” This panel is an attempt to discuss with Trek Fans the current – and possibly lacking – state of the “Star Trek” franchise.

5:00PM NARUTOF SHIPPUDEN: ULTIMATE NINJA STORM 4 TOP 8 FINALS (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR) 5:00–5:45PM CREATE-A-COMICS -STORY with SPIDER-MAN’S DANNY FINGEROTH AND DR. STRANGE’S GEOF ISHERWOOD (CONFERENCE HALL A) THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

FEATURED // 27


COURTESY WIZARD WORLD

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23RD 10:00-12:00PM MYSTERY PARTY GAMES! (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR)

What happens when you pin 4 gamers in a multiplayer mystery game? Stop by and find out as Tasty Steve, TempoRip, Sajam, and a mystery guest play party games!

12:00-12:45PM DOES GENDER MATTER? (CONFERENCE HALL A)

From how a movie reboot should cast its characters to how a comic should draw its female superheroes, questions of gender remain a powerful issue in the world of sci-fi, fantasy, horror, gaming, films, and more. A panel of local authors, comic book experts, and fans will discuss what’s working, what isn’t, and where to go from here.

2:00PM TEKKEN 7: THE KING OF THE IRON FIST TOURNAMENT - TOP 8 FINALS (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR) 2:00-2:45PM JUMPING THE SHARK! HENRY WINKLER (ASSEMBLY HALL)

The Fonz comes to Tulsa. ‘Nuff said.

12:30-1:15PM THE ART OF PROP MAKING (CONFERENCE HALL B)

2:00-2:45PM WORDS INTO PICTURES: HOW TO WRITE COMICS with WOLVERINE/CAPTAIN AMERICA’S R.A. JONES, CAPTAIN NEMO’S MICHAEL VANCE and SPIDER-MAN’S DANNY FINGEROTH (CONFERENCE HALL A)

12:30-1:15PM NERDS IN MODERN DAY (CONFERENCE HALL D)

2:00-2:45PM THE 8 BIT GUY RETURNS (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY)

11:00-11:45PM U CRE-8 COMICS PRESENTS: CHARACTER CRAFTERS (CONFERENCE HALL D)

1:00-1:45PM HOW TO DRAW THE MARVEL WAY (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY)

2:30-3:15PM SO BAD THEY’RE GREAT: PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE! BIRDEMIC! DEATH BED! SAMURAI COP! TROLL 2! THE ROOM! AND MORE! (CONFERENCE HALL B)

11:30-12:15PM DISCOUNT DRESSINGS – BEGINNING COSPLAY ON A BUDGET (CONFERENCE HALL B)

1:00-1:45PM THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE: ADRIAN PAUL (ASSEMBLY HALL)

12:00PM STREET FIGHTER V - TOP 8 FINALS (GAMING STAGE / SHOW FLOOR)

1:00-1:45PM WHO’S THE MOST NEUROTIC SUPERHERO? (CONFERENCE HALL A)

11:00–11:45AM LIVING IN THE MARGINS (CONFERENCE HALL A)

This panel discussion will center around current and past representation of people of color, women, handicapped, and LGBTQ people, among others, in popular media. Emphasis on the importance of representation, on media that’s doing it well and places where we could still improve.

11:00-11:45PM YOU CAN LEARN TO DRAW IN 30 MINUTES! (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY)

12:00-12:45PM BEHIND THE VOICES with WILL FRIEDLE and CHRISTY CARLSON ROMANO (ASSEMBLY HALL)

12:00-12:45PM DRAWING WITH KATIE COOK (CREATIVE STAGE / ARTIST ALLEY)

A round table discussion on the way things have changed in the nerd culture.

Inside the minds of Batman, Spider-Man, Captain America, Jessica Jones, and more, with “Batman and Psychology’s” Dr. Travis Langley, “The Geek Handbook’s” Alex Langley, “She-Hulk’s” Renee Witterstaetter, “Origin Unknown’s” Victor Dandridge, and “Spider-Man’s” Danny Fingeroth.

Why are some terrible movies so much fun to watch? How guilty should we feel about our guilty pleasures when we find ourselves enjoying ridiculous dialogue, illogical plots, stiff acting, idiotic direction, and cheesy visual effects? A panel discussion of the love of movies produced by “stupid, stupid minds.” Ready to discuss their love of movies produced by “stupid, stupid minds.”

3:00-3:45PM KIDS COSTUME CONTEST (CONFERENCE HALL A)

Children ages 13 and under are invited to strut their stuff in this costume contest. (Light-hearted competition. Not intended for serious competitors.) a

1:30-2:15PM FROM CONCEPT TO CONTRACT: TIPS ON CREATING AND PUBLISHING (CONFERENCE HALL B) 28 // FEATURED

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


GEEK EXPOSED CHRIS RANSDELL BUILDS A BUSINESS FROM HIS POP CULTURE OBSESSION // BY JOE O’SHANSKY

CHRIS RANSDELL IS A GEEK. “[There’s a] holy trinity of sci-fi: ‘Doctor Who,’ ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Star Trek.’ A lot of things are important in geekdom, but those three are the pinnacle for me,” said Ransdell, as we sat in his office, festooned with set photos, sci-fi art, and other nerd tchotchkes. “The earliest memory of my life is going to see ‘Return of the Jedi’ in a theater when I was three years old.” A not so long time ago (2013) in a galaxy nearby (Tulsa), Ransdell started Geek Expos with close friends Wade Balzer and John Michael Peyton. In 2013, Balzer built a Tardis, the blue call box time machine made famous in “Doctor Who,” which has since become known as the “Tulsa Tardis.” “[Wade] showed up one day right around my birthday and gave me a key, which I recognized as a Tardis key. Little did he know he’d actually built the most screen-accurate Tardis in North America. The BBC said they could use it for filming. It was that accurate,” Ransdell said. “That Tardis started the whole thing as far as our involvement with comic conventions.” Since then, Ransdell and company have worked with over 30 conventions spread across the country, wrangling props and supporting showrunners. They built a solid reputation, and soon various talents from “Game of Thrones,” SyFy Channel, and “Star Trek” were approaching them, expressing confidence in their work. “They were like, ‘If you guys are at a convention, we’ll be there,’” Ransdell said. Armed with the approval of the only audience that mattered, they set about building their own convention. “Comic cons became a place of acceptance, beyond comics to pop culture, and then cosplay. It was a world of acceptance. That’s what plucked my heartstrings. It played to my faith. It played to my beliefs, and the idea that we should love everybody, and THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

Chris Ransdell, founder and event promoter of Geek Expos | COURTESY

we should accept everybody. I’m like, ‘There’s a world that’s actually like that?’ Especially with cosplayers because for a while they get to escape reality and be who they are inside on the outside.” Their maiden outing, Geekinomicon in OKC, took place last Labor Day, and for it, they assembled the cast of the 1996 Doctor Who movie in honor of its 20th anniversary. “We did something even the BBC couldn’t pull off. It took us eight months to orchestrate that moment. The cast said it felt like a family

reunion to them.” Ransdell said. “But the weekend date killed us. There were twelve other major comic cons that weekend. We’re friends with those convention chairs. It sucked for them, too. We just happened to be the new kid on the block. But it didn’t matter that we lost money because everyone that went said it was the best convention they’d ever been to. The celebrities walked away saying, ‘I’ll be here next year, this was amazing.’” Promotion might be Ransdell’s natural gift, but filmmaking is his passion.

Originally from Ft. Lauderdale, he moved to Tulsa at the age of 10. As a child, he acted, and by age 13 he’d developed a solid resume of local productions, including the Christian variety show “Fire by Nite,” and a few ‘90s era religious Westerns starring Willie George and Kenneth Copeland—yes, that Kenneth Copeland—in addition to local plays and musical theater. He later became a 3D animator and SFX artist, then got into video production, which led to television. All of that knowledge came from being, in his words, an “overachieving homeschool kid.” He landed a lead position at a 3D FX firm at 18 and then freelanced through his 20s. “My claim to fame right now is we entered a production for a ‘Who’ spinoff … Unofficially the BBC was giving us the nod, [like], ‘if you do a good job we’ll include you, if you make money we’ll want you.’ … We made two episodes, entered into the Florida Supercon Film Festival, and won.” Ransdell then did some FX work with Balzer on a film called “Addiction: A ‘60s Love Story.” Directed by another Okie, Tate Steinsiek—who did make-up FX on “The Soldier Stories”—the film went to Cannes where it was bought for distribution. “They filmed in New York and we did post production here. It was edited in L.A. Everybody working on it never even met each other.” This weekend, Ransdell and Geek Expos will be at Wizard World Comic Con. Though he’s working the convention, Ransdell is looking forward to one major geek moment: meeting “Addiction” star Evanna Lynch, who also played Luna Lovegood in “Harry Potter.” “I’m looking forward to meeting her, since we physically never met,” but, he emphasized, the logistics of working the convention render any usual “Potter” nerdery an afterthought. Ransdell may be a geek, but he’s also a professional. a FEATURED // 29


sportsreport

Tulsa Roughnecks | RICH CRIMI

Winless streak

Roughnecks close out disappointing season by JOHN TRANCHINA

F

or the Tulsa Roughnecks FC, the final game went pretty much as the entire season did. The Sacramento Republic FC jumped out to a 2-0 lead after just 19 minutes, carried a 3-0 advantage into halftime and closed out the Roughnecks’ second United Soccer League season with a 4-0 triumph on Sept. 24 in front of 4,158 faithful fans at ONEOK Field. Tulsa finished the year on a 10-game winless streak (0-9-1), a stretch in which they were outscored 24-3, winding up with a final record of 5-21-4, the worst mark in the USL. The Roughnecks scored a league-low 25 goals in 30 games, while surrendering a USL-high 64 against. In the second half of games, Tulsa was outscored 36-11. Still, they finished eighth in the 29team league in average attendance with 3,950. “I’m glad it’s over,” said Tulsa coach David Irving, the frustration of the season clearly wearing on him. “It’s been very disappointing. We got to really look to 2017 and, obviously, we got to do a lot better than this, that’s for sure. It’s been a challenging year for everyone—the organization, the players, me—everyone.”

30 // ARTS & CULTURE

Clearly, a lack of quality offense was an issue in the club’s disappointing performance, although striker Sammy Ochoa enjoyed another outstanding year. After leading the Roughnecks with nine goals last year, Ochoa scored a team-high of 11 this time around, tied for eighth in the USL, accounting for a full 44 percent of the team’s overall offensive output. He also added six assists to finish sixth in the league with 28 points. No other player had more than local product (Union High School, University of Tulsa) Cristian Mata’s four goals and no one else had more than two assists. Last year, six different players notched four or more goals. But the biggest Achilles’ heel for the squad was shaky goalkeeping. Tulsa starting goalkeeper Alex Mangels once led the USL in saves and save percentage, but he also dealt with nagging injuries, suiting up for just one of the final six matches. Despite playing in just 17 games, he finished second in the league with 93 saves, while his final save percentage of .782 was fourth among ‘keepers who played a minimum of six games. But Jake Feener, who claimed the starting job midway through last season but ended up serving

as Mangels’ backup for most of this year, didn’t fare as well. In 14 appearances, Feener allowed 37 goals—tied for second-most in the USL—for a league-high 2.93 goals-against average, with a save percentage of .584. “We let awful goals in, it’s just terrible,” Irving said. “You can’t legislate for that, it’s been every game. The goalkeeper, pretty poor. And he knows it, but what are you going to do? We win as a team, we lose as a team, but that’s just the way it’s been going. It’s tough to change. You can’t beat yourself.” The lone bright spot for the Roughnecks in the season finale was the play of rookie goalkeeper Hunter Harrison, who made his first appearance coming in to replace Feener after halftime, with Tulsa already down 3-0. Harrison, who played a year at Oral Roberts University and spent most of the season inactive as the Roughnecks’ third goalkeeper, made three saves, all of them difficult ones, and generally looked solid. “It felt nice to finally play in my first game,” Harrison said. “It’s been a year since I played, so it takes hard work, a lot of training, a lot of progress. It takes a lot of help from your teammates to

keep your confidence going when you’re not playing. And when you get your chance, you got to go out there and play.” The Republic scored the last goal just seconds before the final whistle as Harry Williams drilled a 15-yard shot past the diving Harrison just inside the right goalpost—one final kick in the Roughnecks’ pants to close out the year,. Somehow that seemed like a fitting end to a frustrating season for Tulsa, one that started out with an encouraging 2-0 win in the first game but was quickly followed by an 0-5-1 winless skid. Things spiraled from there, as the Roughnecks lost five straight games and were 2-10-2 after 14 outings. A promising 3-2-1 stretch followed that, but the Roughnecks couldn’t sustain the momentum, last tasting victory on July 30. But as Irving pointed out, while the results didn’t go their way, they always put forth an inspired effort. “A least I can say this – we always tried, they never quit on me, and regardless of the results, they worked their socks off,” Irving said. “We weren’t quite good enough … but all credit to them, they could have lied down and rolled over, but they showed up for practice every day.” a

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


SPOTLIGHT ON CERTIFIED HEALTHY OKLAHOMA. Certified Healthy Oklahoma organizations are helping to shape Oklahoma’s future by meeting a higher health standard. Isn’t it time you became Certified Healthy? Oklahoma communities, schools, businesses, restaurants, congregations, early childhood programs and campuses throughout the state strive to become certified healthy venues. Certified Healthy organizations are recognized for promoting health and wellness activities for employees. They’re setting a positive example and shaping a brighter future for Oklahoma.

Application deadline is November 1.

Visit CertifiedHealthyOK.com to apply online and learn more about how you can become Certified Healthy.

All proceeds benefit the TYPros Foundation. To purchase tickets, visit boomtownawards.com

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Friday, November 4, 2016 River Spirit Casino Resort Ballroom

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

BOOMTOWN AWARDS SUPPORTING SPONSORS Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma OK2Grow · Party Pro Rents & Events SemGroup Corporation · The Tulsa Voice

ARTS & CULTURE // 31


onstage

The women of Echo Theatre Company’s “The Invisibility Project” outside TU’s Kendall Hall | GREG BOLLINGER

See her

Women 40 and over challenge the norm of invisibility by ALICIA CHESSER

T

he current presidential campaign has given us all a nasty dose of a particular, toxic worldview that depends on silencing, caricaturing, or making invisible the other. It sounds like diversion tactics, gaslighting, mansplaining, and often straightup lying. The other often ends up being a woman. But every woman has a story to tell. Not just the pretty ones or the wealthy ones. And not just as wife, daughter, mother, sister, or aunt. Each has her own dismantling to do, often involving letting go of (or blowing to smithereens, depending) the notion that she look and act a certain way, or else she will be unheard and invisible. These stories drive “The Invisibility Project,” an evening of monologues and songs based on the personal stories of the women who will perform them: Lisa Cole, Michelle Cullom, Machele Miller Dill, Christina Elizabeth, Kelley Childers Friedburg, Liz Masters, Rebecca Ungerman, and Shelly Watson. (Full disclosure: I turned 40 in the spring and have the pleasure of choreographing and performing a movement solo 32 // ARTS & CULTURE

for the show.) The project is the latest from Echo Theatre Company, a relatively new organization in town that recently presented its original work “The Low Down Dusty Blues” at the prestigious Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Some of the stories are raw— even harrowing, some are funny and bittersweet, and all are examples of the kind of honesty that comes easily to women when they realize nobody’s looking at them anyway, so they might as well say what they want. Dill, who heads the theater department at the University of Tulsa and directs Echo, said inspiration for the project came when she was walking with a much younger female student. “A gentleman, not too far off my age, held the door and spoke to her and I was completely ignored,” said Dill. “And then I realized: ‘Oh lord, I’m fat and over 40. Invisibility has hit!’ But then I realized that what once bugged me, I don’t give a rat’s ass about anymore. But I wanted to talk about it.” Why do women over 40 feel invisible? In part because, in the media, they pretty much are. You

don’t see many women with gray hair in fashion magazines or in prime Hollywood roles. If women aren’t what the male gaze wants to see, then they aren’t made perceptible. There’s another invisibility, too, that comes from surviving painful or traumatizing life events while having to keep up appearances. Without a framework that supports being seen in their truth, these women can become invisible to themselves. Cole’s monologue describes her abuse as a teenager, her descent into alcoholism, and, finally, her willingness to commit to a new reality: “I am not nothing.” The show deals with many experiences of invisibility: a woman who’s a Jew and a lesbian, a Native father dying of neglect in a nursing home, a teenage mother. Dill wrote many of the monologues based on interviews she conducted with other women, a process she described as “humbling.” “They trusted me with their stories and the ones who wrote their own are trusting me to showcase their stories. So much trust, so much passion and pathos ... so much wisdom in one room.”

Many of the women in “The Invisibility Project” are veteran Tulsa performers. Like Billie Sue Thompson and Melanie Fry, whom Dill describes as “people who built our theater community,” they have helped shape and strengthen the arts in Tulsa over the decades, making it a city in which creative women and men are equally vocal and visible. Half the ticket sales on opening night will go to Dress for Success, the mission of which is to empower women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools. One performance will feature an interpreter for the deaf. “This [kind of show] is what Echo is meant to do,” Dill said. “We focus on work that is global in scope, socially conscious in substance, and educational in outlook … this show lives that.” a

THE INVISIBILITY PROJECT Fri., Oct. 28 through Sun., Oct. 30 Nightingale Theater 1416 E. 4th St | Tickets $15 Nightingaletheater.com

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


UPCOMING EVENTS

@ the PAC

October

20 An Evening With Sheridan Road Sheridan Road Vocal Ensemble 21, 23 The Pearl Fishers Tulsa Opera 21 The Man Who Planted Trees Tulsa PAC Trust 28-30 Onegin Tulsa Ballet 28-11/6 Cabaret Theatre Tulsa

Marcello Angelini | Artistic Director

JOHN CRANKO’S

November

2 Vintage Voices PAC Trust Brown Bag It 2-30 Illumination of the Spirit Jo Sullivan/PAC Gallery 4 Dave Barry Tulsa Town Hall 5 Raiders of the Lost Ark Tulsa Symphony Pops 12 Kings of Cowtown World Comedy Tour Cowboy Bill Martin & Chad Prather 13 Modigliani Quartet Chamber Music Tulsa 15-20 Elf the Musical Celebrity Attractions 20 Kelli O’Hara

Ti c k e t s S t a r t a t $ 2 5

Choregus Productions

OCTOBER 28-30 | TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER C A L L 9 1 8 . 7 4 9 . 6 0 0 6 o r V I S I T T U L S A B A L L E T. O R G F O R M O R E I N F O

BIZET’S

THE PEARL FISHERS

Escape to paradise this weekend. Tulsa Opera presents Georges Bizet’s The Pearl Fishers, featuring a cast of internationally renowned performers and Tulsa’s own Kripalaya dancers. Purchase your tickets today!

FRIDAY October 21, 2016 | 7:30pm and SUNDAY October 23, 2016 | 2:30pm

Great Seats at

$

25

PURCHASE TICKETS NOW: 918-587-4811 or online at TulsaOpera.com THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

ARTS & CULTURE // 33


inthestudio

Roots

Tulsa Artist Fellow Akiko Jackson’s practice by LIZ BLOOD

A

kiko Jackson and I walked through downtown on a bright mid-October day from her Cameron Street studio to Living Arts. Jackson, a Tulsa Artist Fellow, was invited by the gallery to exhibit there this month. She chose work that displays, almost as a chronological survey, what she has been working on over the past ten years. Visitors to Living Arts will notice Jackson’s love affair with black, though recently she’s transitioned into working with a blackand-gold color pallet. One piece in the show demonstrates this: black springs from a mattress with gold leaf sitting inside of their circles. Jackson uses affordable materials, most often clay, found objects, and hoarded and discarded materials. “I collect these things often when I have some connection to them,” Jackson said. “This mattress I once slept on, then tore apart to make a sculpture. “I reference nostalgia a lot … My concepts begin from my cultural traditions or practices I had growing up with my mom and the things she instilled in me—like this idea of ‘mottainai,’ which is using everything that’s useful, not letting anything go to waste.” Jackson’s mother is Japanese and grew up in a family of farm workers. Mottainai, a Japanese word, called for Jackson to use her black clothing to make an massive, quilt-like piece, “boro: patchwork,” that hangs now at her Living Arts show. “Boro,” which looks to reference map-making, is made entirely from clothes that Jackson once owned and wore. Boro is another Japanese word signifying wasting nothing. Jackson’s mother often made aprons, blankets, quilts, and sacks with old clothes.

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Tulsa Artist Fellow Akiko Jackson | MELISSA LUKENBAUGH

“It’s the whole idea of repurposing something’s original intent. But then there’s a discussion on art—is it practical? What is it good for? For me, it’s about the experience people will have by looking at art. Hopefully it brings on some kind of dialogue, conversation, memory, referencing your own experience, which is exciting.” Jackson loves hearing viewers’ personal relation to her art, rather than being the “artist in front of the art.” “It detracts from me, which I love,” she said. “I feel very open and on display when I’m exhibiting. It’s a scary moment. I’m an inner-person, I guess, and the way you display something shows the way your mind works.” As evidenced by her work and show, Jackson’s mind is concerned with traditions, roots, culture, and even race.

On the easternmost wall of Living Arts hang “roots, embraced,” and “heritage braided,” two pieces that use hair as subject matter. “When my hair is down, long and black, I find different types of interactions with people who haven’t seen a person like me before,” Jackson explained. “The appearance of long hair turns you into very much like an animal. People focus on petting me or touching me. They make comments—racial comments and epithets. They stay resonant with me. And this happens nationwide. But I also embrace my culture and don’t want to hide myself, and I love moving and traveling. So I started talking a lot about identity and hair and roots and where you come from and embracing that kind of culture and outlook and that difference is beautiful. This is

a very autobiographical piece. It’s about embracing your roots.” “Roots” looks as it sounds. The piece is an expansive vision of black hair roots (made of ceramic and epoxy on metal wire) coming out of the wall. There are roughly 500 in the installation, each handmade by various individuals. Some are tightly wound, some big and chunky, some skinny, some fat. The contrast between each one evokes the different people Jackson employed to help her make the install. Imprints of fingertips on each recall the human nature of hair; of, very literally, roots. Next to “Roots,” a 1000-foot black braid snakes up and down, up and down the wall—“Heritage braided,” which speaks to the idea of taming and tying down hair. There’s a need—whether from yourself or the society you live in—to tie it down, braid it, control it. “Hairnets were part of my research. They came from wanting to tie back wild, black hair. What was interesting was that it was never about sanitation; it was a psychological sanitation. To see someone wearing a hairnet, for someone who didn’t want to touch that person, there was an ease for them to know that the hair was tied back.” But the braid also evokes human relationships, bodies, touch between the braider and the braided person, the storytelling that might occur between the two. Jackson will be here as a Tulsa Artist Fellow through 2017, and has recently received a large amount of stained glass from the local First Presbyterian Church. Next year, she plans to work in metal and stained glass, so Tulsans can look forward to seeing her body of work grow and change. a

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


BENEFITTING

FA M I LY & C H I L D R E N ’ S S E R V I C E S

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VISIT CARECARDOK.COM TO LEARN MORE. 105 E. Main St. | 918-299-3888 facebook.com/Attic-Treasures

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3336 S. Peoria Ave. | 918-949-6950 idaredgeneralstore.com THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

317 S Trenton | 918-592-3382 www.GardenDeva.com

3515 S Peoria Ave | 918-280-0177 facebook.com/thehaleyboutiquetulsa

7890 E. 106th Place S. | Bldg. V, Ste. 10 918-970-4747 nothingbundtcakes.com

13160 S. Memorial Dr. | 918-943-3246 twistedsoulsisters.com CARE CARD // 35


thehaps

Linde Oktoberfest Thurs., Oct. 20 through Sun., Oct. 23

T

ulsa’s celebration of Bavarian culture is one of the biggest Oktoberfests in the country. Polka your heart out to the sound of international German bands, and fill your liederhosen-clad gut to the brim with beer and bratwurst. This year’s festival features around 80 brands of beer, including requisite German beers like Warsteiner and Spaten, American favorites like Goose Island and Kona, and an entire tent dedicated to Oklahoma breweries. Dozens of touring German bands and local musicians will play all weekend There will also be MassKrug relay races, The Daschsund Dash, and other games and competitions, an Arts & Crafts Markthaus, and activities for young and old.

River West Festival Park $7-$10, tulsaoktoberfest.org

OPERA

CONCERT

Tulsa Opera opens its season with Georges Bizet’s The Pearl Fishers, featuring a cast of world-renowned singers and costumes by fashion icon Dame Zandra Rhodes. Oct. 21 & 23, $25-$118, Chapman Music Hall, PAC, tulsaopera.com

Recent Nobel Prize winner Bob Dylan will perform with his band at Brady Theater, his first time in Tulsa since his Archives moved to town. Oct. 23, 8 p.m., $50-$85, bradytheater.com

NERD ALERT

AUTHOR

Where else can you run into The Hulk, The Fonze, AND Captain James T. Kirk? The answer, of course, is Wizard World Comic Con. Oct. 2123, $40-$80, Cox Business Center, wizardworld. com. For more info see pg. 24

New York Times cocktail expert Robert Simonson returns to Tulsa to discuss his book, “A Proper Drink,” which tells the full, unflinching story of the contemporary craft cocktail revival. Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Chimera, booksmarttulsa.com

HORSE SHOW

ART

Expo Square will host thousands of horses and professional riders for the 50th U.S. National Arabian & Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show. Oct. 21-29, arabianhorses.org

Sound artist and experimental ambient musician Tim Kaiser will perform at PH Community House on his handmade acousto-electric contraptions. Oct. 25, 8:30 p.m., $3-$5, facebook.com/ thenotulsasound

80S PARTY

COMEDY

Oklahomans for Equality celebrate their 37 Anniversary at 1980 – The Year It All Began Party, with music, 80s costume contest, lip syncing contest, and a disco drag show. Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m., $5, Dennis R. Neill Equality Center, okeq.org

Saturday Night Live and “Ghostbusters” star Leslie Jones will perform at The Joint at the Hard Rock Casino. Oct. 28, 8 p.m., $55-$65, hardrockcasinotulsa.com

BOOK TALK

BALLET

Best-selling author and historian Michael Wallis will discuss his book on larger-than-life Dust Bowl bank robber Pretty Boy Floyd. Oct. 23, 2 p.m., Woody Guthrie Center, woodyguthriecenter.org

Tulsa Ballet opens its season with Onegin, based on Alexander Pushkin’s verse-novel and choreographed by John Cranko. Oct. 28-29 at 8 p.m., Oct. 30 at 3 p.m., $25-$105, Chapman Music Hall, PAC, tulsaballet.org

th

36 // ARTS & CULTURE

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


thehaps

BEST OF THE REST Laughing Matter // 10/20, 8 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $5, comedyparlor. com Psychostick // 10/21, The Venue Shrine, $10-$14, tulsashrine.com Sunday Night Stand Up // 10/23, 8 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $5, comedyparlor.com The Round Up Boys w/ Cowboy Jones // 10/23, The Venue Shrine, $1, tulsashrine.com By George! // 10/27, 8 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $5, comedyparlor.com Hullabaloo Revue // 10/28, 10 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $10, comedyparlor. com T-Town Famous // 10/28, 8 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $10, comedyparlor.com Andy Frasco Halloween Bash // 10/28, The Venue Shrine, $15-$20, tulsashrine.com Hammered! A Drunk Improv Show // 10/29, 10 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $10, comedyparlor.com News Junkie // 10/29, 8 p.m., Comedy Parlor, $10, comedyparlor.com Kristin Key, Roger Keiss // 10/19-10/22, Loony Bin, $2-$12, loonybincomedy. com/Tulsa Hypnotist Doug T // 10/26-10/29, Loony Bin, $2-$12, loonybincomedy. com/Tulsa Without Getting Killed or Caught: The Life and Music of Guy Clark // WGC hosts Tamara Saviano to discuss her book on the late country singer Guy Clark. // 10/19, 7 p.m., Woody Guthrie Center, woodyguthriecenter.org

$5, livingarts.org/day-of-the-dead

Day of the Dead Arts Festival Tuesday, Nov. 1, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.

T

his year marks Living Arts’ 23rd Día de los Muertos celebration. Altars honoring the lives of deceased family members fill the galleries, while the festival outside celebrates Hispanic culture and heritage. The festival features an art market, authentic Latino performances and food, children’s activities, and the annual Skeleton Parade. Featuring performances by “Tortilla Oracle” Jorgé Rojas, dance company Sur Oeste Arte Estancia, and Flying Heart Puppet Theatre, as well as mariachi and salsa bands.

RUN

Thousands of runners will fill the streets downtown and in midtown for the 39th annual Tulsa Run. For more information on the 2K, 5K, and 15K race, visit tulsasports.org. Oct. 29, 7:45 a.m. to noon, $20-$70

For the most up-to-date listings

thetulsavoice.com/calendar THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

Kalamazoo Gals // This WGC Book Discussion features John Thomas’s book on the young women who carried Gibson guitar production through World War II and crafted some of the finest acoustic guitars ever built. // 10/30, 2 p.m., Woody Guthrie Center, woodyguthriecenter.org Food Truck Wednesday // Food from Tulsa food trucks, family fun and live music. // 10/19, 10/26, 11:30 a.m., Guthrie Green, guthriegreen.com The Julia Child Experience // Celebrate America’s favorite cook with her nephew and official biographer Alex Prud’homme. // 10/24, 7 p.m., The University of Tulsa - Chapman Lecture Hall, utulsa.edu Neo-Soul Poetry Slam // A night of powerful and entertaining poetry from National Poetry Slam competitors. // 10/21, 8 p.m., Living Arts, $10$15, livingarts.org Big Band Broadway // Signature Symphony performs Broadway classics with Tony Award-winning actress and singer Debbie Gravitte. // 10/21, 7:30 p.m., VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education, $32-$47, signaturesymphony.org The Man Who Planted Trees // Puppet State Theatre Company performs this multi-sensory adaptation of Jean Giono’s tale of a man who turns a barren wasteland into a forest. // 10/21, 7 p.m., Tulsa Performing Arts Center - Liddy Doenges Theatre, $10, tulsapac.com/index.asp The Invisibility Project // Echo Theatre Company presents this show, which

explores what it’s like to be fabulous, female, and over 40. // 10/28-10/30, Nightingale Theater, $15, nightingaletheater.com Cabaret // Theatre Tulsa presents the beloved Broadway hit about a romance set in the seedy Kit Kat Klub of 1930s Berlin. // 10/28-11/6, Tulsa Performing Arts Center - John H. Williams Theatre, $30-$32, tulsapac. com/index.asp High Lonesome Bluegrass Mass: Come Away to the Skies // Bluegrass, shape note singing, and gospel music combine in this choral celebration of the music of Appalachia by Tulsa Oratorio Chorus. // 10/29, 7:30 p.m., Lorton Performance Center, lpc.utulsa.edu Movie in the Park: Teen Witch // 10/20, 8:30 p.m., Guthrie Green, guthriegreen.com Mutt Strut: DVIS Awareness Event // Domestic Violence intervention Services will host an awareness event for the kennel at its emergency shelter. // 10/22, 9 a.m., Hunter Park, tulsawalk.com Gilcrease After Hours: When Chocolate Meets Coffee // This month’s After Hours event at Gilcrease will feature KYYA chocolate, Topeca coffee, and music from Desi & Cody. // 10/28, 7 p.m., Gilcrease Museum, gilcrease.utulsa.edu Movie in the Park: The Rocky Horror Picture Show // 10/31, 8:30 p.m., Guthrie Green, guthriegreen.com ORU Volleyball vs South Dakota // 10/21, 7 p.m., Oral Roberts University - Aerobics Center, oru.edu Tulsa Oilers vs Indy Fuel // 10/21, BOK Center, $15-$57, bokcenter.com ORU Volleyball vs North Dakota State // 10/22, 7 p.m., Oral Roberts University - Aerobics Center, oru.edu Heart & Sole 5K // 10/22, 7:30 a.m., Riverwalk Crossing, $30, riverwalktulsa.com TU Football vs Tulane // 10/22, Skelly Field at H. A. Chapman Stadium, $15$55, tulsahurricane.com Tulsa Oilers vs Atlanta Gladiators // 10/22, BOK Center, $15-$57, bokcenter.com ORU Women’s Soccer vs South Dakota // 10/23, 1 p.m., Oral Roberts University - Case Soccer Complex, oru.edu Tulsa Oilers vs Atlanta Gladiators // 10/23, BOK Center, $15-$57, bokcenter.com ORU Men’s Soccer vs Missouri State // 10/25, 6 p.m., Oral Roberts University - Case Soccer Complex, oru.edu Tulsa Oilers vs Allen Americans // 10/25, BOK Center, $15-$57, bokcenter.com TU Women’s Soccer vs UCF // 10/27, 7 p.m., The University of Tulsa - Hurricane Stadium, $5, utulsa.edu TU Volleyball vs Tulane // 10/28, 7 p.m., Reynolds Center, tulsahurricane.com TU Volleyball vs Houston // 10/30, 1 p.m., Reynolds Center, tulsahurricane.com TU Women’s Soccer vs USF // 10/30, 1 p.m., The University of Tulsa - Hurricane Stadium, $5, utulsa.edu ARTS & CULTURE // 37


musicnotes

DJ Afistaface will host a Halloween dance party at Soundpony on October 29 by MITCH GILLIAM

O

n Saturday, October 29, Soundpony will be set aflame as DJ Afistaface takes the stage and Chernabogs her way through her own “Night On Bald Mountain,” beckoning to all ghouls, goblins, and the inevitable Hillarys and Trumps on the dance floor. “I’ll obviously be dressed as the devil,” said Afistaface, whose human name is Andey Delesdernier. “He has all the fun ideas. And I’m all about temptation.” Unless there’s a Bacardi 151 mishap, the Pony will not actually be on fire, but Delesdernier assures me the bar will look hellish enough. “I’m gonna be making flames to fi ll the window behind me and set up red lights and a smoke machine,” she said. “So it will basically looks like I’m engulfed in flames.” Consistent turnouts for her weekend gigs at Soundpony have granted her a transformative license over her home bar, but the devilish DJ had an angelic beginning. “I started making mixtapes when I was 9, but, like, obsessively,” she told me. She carried that obsession with her to college where she would make mixtapes for her studio art class. “It was so rad that they kept an old jam box in the print studios.” Friends began asking her for her mixes, and she obliged, posting them online for easy dissemination. She eventually took

38 // MUSIC

THE DEVIL HERSELF Andey Delesdernier aka DJ Afistaface | GREG BOLLINGER

the leap from studio boombox to turntable and began DJ’ing her own “insane” house parties. “I never thought I could muster up the courage to try and actually play in public and make money,” she said. After several successful weekday gigs at the Pony, owner Josh Gifford pushed her to DJ a weekend. “It scared the shit out of me,” she said. “Champagne and bodies flying everywhere like they do and my precious tonearms in such

close proximity to the madness.” Limbs and champagne were kept to themselves, and Delesdernier became a monthly fixture of Pony, while also assuming the weekly host role of Vinyl Brunch at Chimera. Every Sunday at Chimera, someone, whether DJ or civilian, brings in their favorite wax and spins for the brunch crowd. Delesdernier keeps the wheels of steel on track. “I come in every Sunday and set up my own gear, be there to

run sound, keep up with social media, and book people,” she said. “It’s so great to meet new people every week, or even get to know friends better based on their private record collections.” Delesdernier, a record fanatic, keeps her sets 98 percent vinyl. “Using a computer and having my music on it scares me, like, if it breaks, then what? But if my house burns down, I’m fucked.” Apart from her own sets, Afistaface has teamed with DJ Kylie (aka Kylie Wells) under the duo name Femme Fatale, who have hosted a series of “kikis.” “A kiki is essentially a party where you can come and be yourself without fear,” Delesdernier said. Kikis originate from gay ballroom culture, and flourished in a hostile climate that necessitated discretion in the face of arrest or violence. A recent documentary, simply titled “Kiki,” and the Scissor Sisters’ song, “Let’s Have A Kiki,” have ushered the term into mainstream lexicons. “We do this as a way to bring more people in this great city together, to love and embrace our differences and to just dance it out.” That element of inclusivity will be present at Afistaface’s “Up In Flames” event at Soundpony, and love will be love, whether it be between Wolfman and Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein and Banshee, or Trump mask and Trump mask. As for what one will hear at “Up In Flames,” it’ll be a mixture of Halloween classics of all genres, certainly including the “Ghostbusters” theme and, of course, the song Delesdernier considers to be the greatest Halloween song of all time. “Dude, ‘Thriller.’ I won’t even let myself listen to it outside of October.” a

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

MUSIC // 39


Dustin Pittsley | PHIL CLARKIN

CYCS

D

ustin Pittsley has a place in Tulsa’s long lineage of great blues-rock guitarists. Songs imbued with a laidback country feel and a love for John Prine boil over into soaring rockand-roll power, with Pittsley’s solos channeling Hendrix, Clapton, and Warren Haynes. Pittsley’s rare acoustic performance in our Courtyard with keyboardist Chris Kyle was a testament to the fact that in the right hands, you don’t need big amps and stompboxes to melt faces. Before their set, Pittsley and I talked about finding inspiration in the small town lifestyle, sharing the stage with a legend, and not wanting to play on “Saturday Night Live.” Catch Dustin Pittsley Band every Tuesday at Soul City and on Friday, October 29 at the Centennial Lounge’s Monster Mash Halloween Bash.

NEVER UNEASY, NEVER UNCOMFORTABLE Dustin Pittsley plays the Voice courtyard by JOHN LANGDON

FIRST SONG LEARNED: I think my friend showed me how to play “God of Thunder” by Kiss. It’s not the one I wanted to learn, but it’s what he showed me. LAST MUSIC PLAYED ON SPOTIFY: The new Doyle Bramhall II album, Rich Man. DESERT ISLAND DISCS: Tedeschi Trucks Band – Revelator. Pink Floyd – Dark Side of the Moon…or Animals. I don’t know if I can pick between the Pink Floyd. And then it’d have to be a Hendrix record, probably Axis: Bold As Love. BEST SHOW SEEN IN TULSA: Gosh, there’s so many. One I didn’t really expect that was just incredible was Ben Harper at Cain’s. I like Ben Harper, but it caught me by

40 // MUSIC

surprise and ended up being really incredible. ANTICIPATED UPCOMING SHOWS: I’m going to see Black Sabbath [at the BOK Center.] I’ve never seen them, and I figure I’ve gotta see Black Sabbath at least once. MOST MEMORABLE SHOW: The most memorable was playing at Buddy Guy’s in Chicago, and he got up to play with us. He got up and sang for fifteen or twenty minutes and just had us back him up. It’s the most incredible thing I’ve ever done. DREAM VENUE: I don’t know why, but I’ve always wanted to do Letterman or Stephen Colbert, something like that. I used to always want to do “Saturday Night Live,” but I don’t think I want to as much anymore from what I see on it. I don’t think we’re gonna be on it any time soon. That and the Fillmore. I think that would be amazing. NON-MUSICAL INFLUENCE: My family. A lot of them live down in Chandler. It’s just kind of a more laidback lifestyle, and that has a big influence over me and where I take things, how I view music and life in general. It’s the country vibe out there that I really like. MUSIC IS: That’s heavy. I’ve always been socially awkward, or just not comfortable completely, so for me it’s a way to get out. I’m never uneasy onstage, I’m never uncomfortable. It’s my release from feeling kind of awkward. It allows me to be me. a

Video of Pittsley’s Courtyard Concert is available at thetulsavoice.com.

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

MUSIC // 41


musiclistings Wed // Oct 19 Cain’s Ballroom – Eric Paslay, Lindsay Ell – ($20-$35) Cimarron Bar – Framing the Red Hunt Club – Open Mic w/ The Brothers Moore Mercury Lounge – Travis Linville Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame – Eicher Wednesdays – ($10) On the Rocks – Don White Soul City – Shrimp n’ Grits w/ Papa Foster’s Creole Trio Soundpony – Live band punk/metal karaoke w/ Satanico and the Demon Seeds The Colony – Tom Skinner’s Science Project The Fur Shop – Unsung Alibi, Digisaurus, Animal Library – ($5-$7) Vanguard – Toothgrinder, Auras, Moon Tooth, Via the Verge – ($10)

Thurs // Oct 20 Boom Boom Room – DJ MO Brady Theater – The Pretty Reckless – ($24$163.50) Cain’s Ballroom – ZEDS DEAD, Illenium, Hunter Siegel – ($32-$47) Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Cabin Creek – Carl Acuff Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – Scott Ellison, Chad & Keith Hunt Club – Ego Culture Mercury Lounge – Paul Benjaman River Spirit Casino - 5 O’Clock Somewhere Bar – Ayngel & John Soul City – The Writer’s Block Songwriters Night Soundpony – The Fights The Colony – Honky Tonk Happy Hour w/ Jacob Tovar The Fur Shop – Dan Martin The Run – RPM The Vault – Jazz Night w/ Jordan Hehl & Friends Tulsa Performing Arts Center - John H. Williams Theatre – An Evening with Sheridan Road – 7:30 p.m. – ($25) Zin Urban Lounge – Smoochie Wallus

Fri // Oct 21 American Legion Post 308 – Double “00” Buck Boom Boom Room – DJ MO Cain’s Ballroom – Big Gigantic – ($24-$39) Dusty Dog Pub – James Groves Blues Machine Ed’s Hurricane Lounge – The Heather Buckley Band Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Cabin Creek – Chad Lee Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – The Dirty Saints, Travis Kidd Hunt Club – Smunty Voje Mercury Lounge – Jake Penrod, Jacob Tovar and the Saddle Tramps* River Spirit Casino - 5 O’Clock Somewhere Bar – Mass FX River Spirit Casino - Margaritaville Stage – Hook Soul City – The Red Dirt Rangers Soundpony – Phre Written Quincey Project Presents: Push Gang, K.O.K., I Am Des, Nephew* The Colony – The Greyhounds, Paul Benjaman Band* The Fur Shop – Zero 2 Panic, The Big News

42 // MUSIC

The Run – Deuces Wild Vanguard – Astronautalis, Ceschi & Factor Chandelier, Transit – ($15-$18) Woody’s Corner Bar – DJ Mikey B Yeti – Alan Doyle Yeti – The Outsiders, Saganomics, DJ Kylie, NOIZMEKKA, Darku J, Kudos

Sat // Oct 22 Boom Boom Room – DJ MO Crow Creek Tavern – RPM Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Cabin Creek – Chad Lee Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – FM Live, Chad & Keith Hunt Club – Hosty Duo Mercury Lounge – The New Offenders River Spirit Casino - Margaritaville Stage – Chris Hyde Soul City – Brunch w/ Mark Bruner Soul City – Groovement* Soundpony – Pony Disco Club The Colony – Hold The Run – Empire Vanguard – Finish Ticket, Run River North, Irontom – ($15-$40) Woody Guthrie Center – Smokey & The Mirror – 7 p.m. – ($15) Yeti – Rock Against Violence w/ Creepozoidz, Girls Club, Brother Rabbit, Tip Top Secrets, Queenager, Holy Void, Daüclaü, Scales of Motion

Sun // Oct 23 Brady Theater – Bob Dylan and His Band* – ($50-$125) Cain’s Ballroom – SKILLET, Sick Puppies, Devour the Day – ($27-$42) East Village Bohemian Pizzeria – Mike Cameron Collective Guthrie Green – Jessy Aycock, Ramsay Midwood, Isayah’s All Stars – 2:30 p.m. Mercury Lounge – Brandon Clark Soul City – Soulful Sunday w/ Mark Gibson – 1 p.m. The Colony – Paul Benjaman’s Sunday Nite Thing The Fur Shop – The Goddamn Gallows, Gallows Bound, Vagittarius – ($8) Utopia Bar & Lounge – DJ MO Vanguard – Citizen, Nicole Dollanganger, Free at Last, Piece of Mind – ($14-$40)

Mon // Oct 24 Downtown Lounge – He Is Legend, Sleepwalking Home Hodges Bend – Mike Cameron Collective Mercury Lounge – Chloe Johns The Colony – Singer/Songwriter Night w/ Dan Martin The Fur Shop – Joe Wannabe and the Mad Man’s Blues Band, Cabot Unknown – ($5-$7) Yeti – Cypher 120

Tues // Oct 25 Gypsy Coffee House – Tuesday Night Open Mic Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – Great Big Biscuit Mercury Lounge – Wink Burcham Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame – Depot Jazz and Blues Jams Soul City – Tuesday Bluesday w/ Dustin Pittsley

Woody’s Corner Bar – DJ Spin Yeti – We Make Shapes, Mr. Burns

Soundpony – No Bunny The Colony – Beau, Hugs N Harmony Tin Dog Saloon – Dan Martin Yeti – Writers Night

Sat // Oct 29

Wed // Oct 26 Cain’s Ballroom – Cole Swindell, Cole Taylor, Travis Denning – ($37-$52) Hunt Club – Modlin’s Mayhem Mercury Lounge – Travis Linville MixCo – Mike Cameron Collective Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame – Eicher Wednesdays – ($10) On the Rocks – Don White Soul City – Shrimp n’ Grits w/ Papa Foster’s Creole Trio The Colony – Tom Skinner’s Science Project Vanguard – The Jayhawks, Folk Uke – ($25-$60) Zin Urban Lounge – Jim Tilly

Thurs // Oct 27 Boom Boom Room – DJ MO Brady Theater – Charlie Puth, Joel Adams, Hailey Knox – ($25-$403) Cain’s Ballroom – Beats Antique, Thriftworks, Holiday Mountain – ($23-$38) Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Cabin Creek – Runnin On Empty Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – The Rumor, Travis Kidd Mercury Lounge – Paul Benjaman River Spirit Casino - 5 O’Clock Somewhere Bar – The Duo Soul City – The Writer’s Block Songwriters Night Soundpony – Higher Learning Academy, Master Chambers The Colony – An Evening with Jared Tyler The Fur Shop – Darlington, Cabot Unknown The Vault – Jazz Night w/ Jordan Hehl & Friends Whiskey Dog – Cole Lynch

Fri // Oct 28 American Legion Post 308 – Halloween Dance, Costume Contest w/ Wiskey Bent Baker Street Pub – Drive Boom Boom Room – DJ MO Cain’s Ballroom – The Floozies, Manic Focus, Chet Porter, Recess – ($20-$35) Gypsy Coffee House – Marilyn McCulloch Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Cabin Creek – Redland Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – The Crush, The Hi-Fidelics Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - The Joint – Leslie Jones – ($55-$65) Hunt Club – Interlaced Mercury Lounge – Ben Miller Band MixCo – Jeremy Thomas Quartet w/ Branjae* River Spirit Casino - 5 O’Clock Somewhere Bar – Fuzed River Spirit Casino - Margaritaville Stage – The Hi-Fidelics Soul City – The Washitas Soundpony – DJ Sweet Baby Jaysus The Colony – Randy Crouch Band* The Fur Shop – Hold Close, Strikes Back, NeoRomantics, Redneck Nosferatu, When The Clock Strikes, Goodfella The Run – Another Alibi VFW Post 577 - Centennial Lounge – Dustin Pittsley

Billy and Renee’s – Oldman, Had Enough Boom Boom Room – DJ MO Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center – Lyle Lovett* – 7:30 p.m. – ($25-$65) Cain’s Ballroom – The Floozies, Buku, Chet Porter, Dalton Richmond – ($20-$35) Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Cabin Creek – Rivers Edge Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Riffs – Almost Kiss, Travis Kidd Hunt Club – Dante and the Hawks Mercury Lounge – The 24th Street Wailers River Spirit Casino - Margaritaville Stage – Chris Hyde Band Soul City – Brunch w/ Mark Bruner Soundpony – Afistaface The Colony – Chris Blevins Band, Deer Paw The Run – Infinity Unit D – Kelli Lynn and the Skillet Lickers, Shane West & His Fabulous Pharaohs, The Loaded Dice, The Domino Kings Vanguard – Flobots* – ($15) VFW Post 577 - Centennial Lounge – James Groves Blues Machine Yeti – Black Mold Halloween Bash*

Sun // Oct 30 Cain’s Ballroom – Ghostland Observatory – ($35-$50) East Village Bohemian Pizzeria – Mike Cameron Collective Mercury Lounge – Brandon Clark Soul City – Soulful Sunday w/ Mark Gibson – 1 p.m. Soundpony – Brujoroots* The Colony – Paul Benjaman’s Sunday Nite Thing The Run – Mojo Risen Utopia Bar & Lounge – DJ MO

Mon // Oct 31 Cain’s Ballroom – Rae Sremmurd, Lil Yachty, Earz, Bobo Swae, Impxct – ($35-$95) Hodges Bend – Mike Cameron Collective Hunt Club – Halloween w/ The Brothers Moore Mercury Lounge – Chloe Johns Soundpony – DJ Trigger Warning, DJ Swang Em The Colony – Singer/Songwriter Night w/ Dan Martin Vanguard – One Way System, Total Chaos, Merlin Mason, The Penny Mob – ($13) Yeti – Cypher 120

Tues // Nov 1 Gypsy Coffee House – Tuesday Night Open Mic Mercury Lounge – Wink Burcham Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame – Depot Jazz and Blues Jams Soul City – Tuesday Bluesday w/ Dustin Pittsley The Colony – Seth Lee Jones & Cooper Waugh Yeti – Writers Night

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

MUSIC // 43


filmphiles

Elijah Wood in “Maniac” | COURTESY

Ten killers A horror playlist by JOE O’SHANSKY

A

s is my tradition every October, my favorite month, I’ve begun a daily mainlining of horror movies—at least one a day, some days upwards of eight. Each choice informs the next. Some are old favorites, others are new stuff recommended by friends, and a few I revisit to see if I like them better than I remember. It’s sort of an on-thefly mixtape, though if these were music, they’d be songs for your funeral. I didn’t want to waste time writing about mainstream horror. These picks are not comfort food. You don’t need me telling you to

Tulsa’s independent and non-profit art-house theatre, showing independent, foreign, and documentary films.

44 // FILM & TV

watch “The Shining” or “Gremlins.” Most of these selections are meant for the hardcore horror hound. I think of them as extreme art. Like a car wreck you can’t look away from. You’ve been warned. The Devil’s Rejects (2005) Reprising their roles from Rob Zombie’s 2003 debut, “House of 1000 Corpses,” “Rejects” finds the Manson-esque Firefly clan (Bill Mosely, Sherry Moon Zombie, Sig Haig, and Leslie Easterbrook) running from the vengeful Sheriff Quincy Wydell (William Forsythe); while kidnapping, torturing, and gleefully killing anyone who looks like fun, or gets in their way. With a great genre cast, this is the pinnacle of Zombie’s psychobilly, ‘70s-inspired exploitation films. He revels in the sleaziness of his characters, the terror they inflict, and even has the balls to make the killers anti-heroes— while embodying the look and tone of true grindhouse flick. Gore effects from Robert Kurtzman punctuate the bombastic and bloody Wild West inside of Rob Zombie’s head. The Mist (2007) It might seem like I’m taking it easy on you here with a Stephen King adaptation from the cre-

ator of “The Walking Dead.” A socio-political, dark satire that centers on a group of Mainers trapped in a grocery store—surrounded by an endless fog that hides Lovecraftian beasties— much of “The Mist” is standard issue monster movie stuff. That is, until the Twilight Zone-inspired finale, wherein director Frank Darabont squats over the toilet of our expectations and merrily drops a bomb. Love it or hate it, you will admire his nerve. Necromantik 2 (1991) Ok, back to stuff that’ll make you unfriend me on Facebook. This sequel to the Jörg Buttgereit’s 1987 necrophilia classic (what a phrase!) finds the now-dead Rob (Daktari Lorenz) exhumed and in the loving arms of Monika (Monika M.), who quickly finds she can’t get off with him, despite his eternal turgidity. She decides to try a normal relationship with a still-breathing boyfriend instead (Mark Reeder). But her twisted compulsions soon reclaim her sexual desires, to which the new guy isn’t privy until it’s far too late. Perverse doesn’t even come close to describing the depths of discomfort this film elicits. You can almost smell the putrefaction wafting off the screen. Complete-

ly repulsive, you’ll want to take a long shower afterwards. Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989) This bizarre, body-horror exhibit from Japanese director Shinya Tsukamoto defies much in the way of narrative description. A man called Metal Fetishist is hit and seemingly killed by a car driven by an office drone and his girlfriend, who hide the body and then have sex nearby. Thinking they got away with it, the salaryman soon finds bits of circuitry sprouting from his skin, as he’s pursued by a woman who is possessed by the Fetishist—leading to a showdown as both grow into metallic monsters. Robotized dildo drills (drilldos?), bloody biomechanical metamorphosis, and cyberpunk eroticism converge into a David Lynch-induced nightmare, with a great soundtrack for those who love their crushing anxiety industrial-strength. Piranha 3D (2010) Alexandre Aja’s remake of the 1978 Roger Corman shlock-fest is a ridiculously gory blast that had me wondering how it got away with an R rating. (Full-frontal lesbian underwater ballet is complemented by the kid from “Stand By Me”

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


getting his manhood bitten off and burped up by a fish. In 3D.) Prehistoric, man-eating piranha, loosed from a fissure in the earth, feast upon drunk and horny spring breakers at a gorgeous desert lake. Blood, boobs, and mayhem. Maniac (2012) This remake of the 1980 slasher turned out to be one of the best films of 2012. Frank (Elijah Wood) runs an arty mannequin shop and scalps hapless women to make wigs for his lifeless creations. When he meets a gorgeous photographer (Nora Arnezeder) Frank feels the pangs of real love. But his stab at normalcy quickly crumbles under the weight of his psychosis. Shot entirely from Frank’s point-of-view, “Maniac” is brutal. But it’s also incredibly well-made and nuanced, as Wood expertly walks a Norman Bates tightrope between sympathetic casualty and pure evil. Phantasm II (1988) After some of the selections here, writer/director Don Coscarelli’s second film in the “Phantasm” franchise seems positively lighthearted. Picking up where the first one leaves off, Mike and Reggie (James LeGros and Reggie Bannister) join with Liz (Paula Irvine), a psychic woman, to hunt down The Tall Man (Angus Scrimm) who’s still stealing dead bodies and sending them through an interdimensional portal to be transformed into undead, grave robbing Jawas. Stoner horror, at its finest. Dead Alive (1992) While Peter Jackson is best known for his epic “Lord of the Rings” adaptations, this batshit zombie comedy already had him on the radar of horror fiends. Lionel (Timothy Balme) is a nerd living with his domineering mother, who takes a dim view of her son’s interest in the girl from the corner shop. When mum is bitten by a Sumatran Rat Monkey, she turns into a ravenous zombie that Lionel has to protect from discovery. This thing is loaded with more blood, pus, and gloopy gore than just about anything out there. It’s literally in the Guinness Book for using over 20,000 gallons of fake blood. And not only is there zombie sex, but even better, a zombie baby is born.

Martyrs (2008) The French have been on a tear, making some of the most brutal horror films of the last decade. “High Tension,” “Inside,” and “Frontiers” could have all made this list, but something about the way “Martyrs” delights in pain and suffering—combined with the French predilection for extremely sadistic violence—puts this Pascal Laugier film over the top. As a child, Anna (Morjana Alaoui) befriends the abused Lucie (Mylène Jampanoï) in an orphanage. Years later, Lucie murders the family she believes responsible for her basement tortures. Anna, at first, attempts to save a survivor. But she learns Lucie was right all along, when she meets the Mademoiselle, an elderly member of a secret society that believes extreme agony opens a window into the afterlife. “Martyrs” will make you wonder what the hell is wrong with French people. A Serbian Film (2010) Miloš (Srdan Todorovi´c, who also produced and directed) is a past-his-prime Serbian porn star-turned-family man who takes a mysterious job from an indie smut kingpin. Sold as art, with no script, Miloš is soon coerced into filming increasingly depraved scenes of sexual violence and eventual murder, becoming the architect of his own demise in the most extreme terms possible. You think “A Serbian Film” is getting transgressive in the first act. It’s not. What follows is too fucked up to describe in this newspaper (and yes, I say that after describing “Necromantik 2”). Banned in many countries, the Serbian government investigated the production after its release. It’s a film born of extreme anger and pain, and it shows. In response to the controversy, director Todorovi´c said, “This is a diary of our own molestation by the Serbian government ... It’s about the monolithic power of leaders who hypnotize you to do things you don’t want to do. You have to feel the violence to know what it’s about.” Indeed, “A Serbian Film” will have you questioning everything you know about human nature—especially your own, if you actually finish watching it. a

THE TULSA VOICE // October 19 – November 1, 2016

FILM & TV // 45


THE FUZZ THE TULSA VOICE SPOTLIGHTS: TULSA SPCA

2910 Mohawk Blvd. | MON, TUES, THURS, FRI & SAT, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 918.428.7722

MILES is a little guy full of energy who loves to run. This one year-old Terrier mix is looking for someone to play ball and tug-a-war with him. He gets along with almost all other dogs, but he can be a bit dominant. Though he’s agile and fast, he’d also be content to stay in bed with his chew toy and let the day pass him.

Beetlejuice

Jason

RIO, a very sweet one year-old Chihuahua mix, is great with other dogs and is fine with cats. He knows how to sit and is eager to learn new tricks. He likes to be picked up and carried, but not all the time. He’s an observer; when you look at his face you can tell he wishes he could talk. This little guy would make a great family pet.

Bat

Dr. Spock

The Tulsa SPCA has been helping animals in our area since 1913. The shelter never euthanizes for space and happily rescues animals from high-kill shelters. They also accept owner surrenders, rescues from cruelty investigations, hoarding, and puppy mill situations. Animals live on-site or with foster parents until they’re adopted. All SPCA animals are micro-chipped, vaccinated, spayed/neutered, and treated with preventatives. Learn about volunteering, fostering, upcoming events, adoptions, and their low-cost vaccination clinic at tulsaspca.org.

HOWIE is great with other dogs and people. This one year-old Hound mix knows no stranger and wants to play with everyone. Tug-a-war with the leash is one of his favorite pastimes. He would be great in an active lifestyle—he needs to stay busy. How can anyone pass up those beautiful and unique eyes?

Freddy Krueger

Fifties Girl

CARAMEL is a very mellow gal. This five month-old Domestic Short Hair enjoys belly rubs and ear scratches. She likes to chase laser pointers and toys on a string. She enjoys being the center of attention; she will quietly follow you around until you notice her and pet her. She’s not very vocal and she is very patient.

Aviator

MAXIE is a very curious girl; this five month-old Manx checks out everything. She would be glad to inspect your purse, your jacket, or anything else you may need investigated. She likes to ride on your shoulders and be queen of her domain. She wants to be spoiled but she won’t ask you. She speaks softly and is a loving kitten.

Ghostbuster

1778 Utica Square 918-624-2600 Mon-Sat, 10-6

Squirrel

Come see our selection of dogwear, from favorite team jerseys and sweatshirts... to sweaters for autumn walks... to Halloween costumes. And, our Halloween baked treats will surely inspire a trick! 46 // ETC.

October 19 – November 1, 2016 // THE TULSA VOICE


ACROSS 1 Girl in Scotland 5 Site for a tiny flag 10 Hold ’em alternative 14 Proto or ecto attachment 19 Drop, as from a list 20 Egg producer 21 Tiny amount 22 Jouster’s need 23 Infatuated 24 Do without 25 Checked garment 26 Essential flower oil 27 On “board” observation (Part 1) 31 Took for granted 32 Con votes 33 Tiny arachnid 34 Very small amounts 35 Secure, as a fat contract 36 Word of invitation 37 Undergrad degs. 40 Concubines’ confines 43 Roasting platform? 44 Word with “order” or “bet” 45 Hooked wrigglers 46 Words before a witnessed kiss 47 Halloween apparitions 50 Easy to get into 52 Matchstickremoving game 53 Relating to the Boston Pops, e.g. 55 Pizza feature 56 Anonymous John 57 Beverage in Kensington 58 Warty hopper 59 Half a colon 60 On “board” observation (Part 2) 69 Not hold one’s tongue 70 A pretty fruit it’s not

71 Quaker tidbit? 72 By way of 73 Writing of King David 76 Willingly jumped out of a plane 80 Kay follower 81 Undone, as laces 83 Ultimatum’s end 85 Make a tach needle jump 86 Bird in a crazy simile 87 Diplomat’s forte 88 Kind of casserole 89 Nostalgic fashion trend 91 Sheepcote mama 92 Casino cubes 93 Sound an arched-back cat makes 94 What Floyd Mayweather used to do 96 Dandy’s companion 97 Out of the oven 98 Chemical-free 102 On “board” observation (Part 3) 108 Sweet spread 109 Presidential caucus state 110 Scrap, as a space mission 111 Noisy shoe attachments 112 ___ artery (kidney’s blood supplier) 113 Far from nice 114 Office machine supply 115 Bounced-back sound 116 Throw into confusion 117 Makes a miscalculation 118 It may require a fee 119 Indian dish of stewed legumes

DOWN 1 Sayings of Jesus, e.g. 2 Gather, as a fortune 3 Speaks without speaking 4 Legislative product 5 Tossed high in the air 6 Tries not to meet 7 Wife who survived Henry VIII 8 Cogito, ___ sum 9 Cooked with onions 10 Commanded a dog to attack 11 Some traffic sounds 12 State of the Union 13 Product of software engineering 14 Missouri feeder 15 Carpenter’s machine 16 Chip for a poker hand 17 Line of surgery? 18 ___ mortals 28 Muslim VIPs 29 Electrically charged particles 30 Uses a stopwatch 35 Cardinal number that is the fifth power of ten 36 “Seventeen-year” insect 37 Indian “sir” 38 Feels sick 39 “Never mind,” to a proofer 40 Language in Kolkata 41 Goodbye, in Mexico 42 Balcony climber of Shakespeare 43 Dwarf with spectacles 44 Paper fragment 45 Personal delivery? 48 Coral colony member

49 50 51 54 57 59 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 82 84 88 90 92 93 94 95 96 97 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107

Common cookie Tiny bit of matter Coretta ___ King Unemotional Texas Revolution battle site Twosomes Woman’s stocking material Subtle distinction Plumed bird Not nude Caroler’s offering Redirect, as one’s eyes Bathroom flooring installer Round of fire, as a salute Emulate a crybaby Winter blanket? Common lotion ingredient Tranquil period for a country Rent sharer Footed vases Green drink? What angry bees do Muse for a lyricist Louise, Turner or Yothers Flew off the handle Small wooded hollow or dell “___ Heroes” (old sitcom) Noisy napper Food closet Vital exam Handle on a flask? Target of some motel ads? Omega’s opposite Disinfectant spray brand Actress Sorvino Got the highest grade on Compassionate One performing ground strokes? Black, in poetry ___ Blanc (French peak)

Universal sUnday Crossword ParTy oF one By Timothy e. Parker

© 2016 Universal Uclick

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