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THE WAR ON THE “WAR” ON CHRISTMAS

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BLUE DOME JOINT TRADES BBQ FOR BURGERS

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JD MCPHERSON COMES HOME TO THE CAIN’S

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‘WOLF OF WALL STREET’ AMONG SCORSESE’S BEST

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Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Tracy Letts visited Tulsa to spend Thanksgiving with his mother, the best-selling author Billie Letts, after completing the last leg of his publicity tour for the upcoming film “August: Osage County.” The Tulsa Voice caught up with the native Oklahoman to talk about his process of writing the screenplay, his 2013 Tony Award for lead acting, and more.

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F R E E • I N D E P E N D E N T • A LT E R N AT I V E

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Greetings, Tulsa. It is my honor and pleasure to introduce you to The Tulsa Voice, a new alternative newspaper for Tulsa. As many of you already know, the Urban Tulsa Weekly shut its doors last month after 22 years as Tulsa’s alternative weekly. In the wake of that announcement, we at Langdon Publishing discussed at great length the void this development created in Tulsa’s media landscape. We know without doubt that Tulsa needs and deserves an alternative voice in the press, and decided we’d rise to the task of providing it. And it’s true: Tulsa does need an alternative newspaper. Not because of any deficiency with our daily newspaper (I’m a former employee and current admirer of the Tulsa World), but because alternative newspapers, by their very nature, provide a different service to readers. Whether in news, commentary or coverage of arts and culture, an alternative can give writers a longer leash, a license to toe the edges of journalistic decorum (and sometimes to plunge headlong over that edge). In a self-governing society — in which journalism is essential — we need daily newspapers to keep a firm grip on that leash. But it’s also fun to see what happens when the boundaries get wider. To me, that’s what alternative newspapers are all about, and it’s why a city like Tulsa — bursting at the seams with energy, creativity and diversity — needs one. So here we are. Some of the things we’re doing will be new to you. Most noticeably, we’ll publish bi-weekly — that’s every other week in case you’re as confused by that term as I

am. You’ll encounter plenty of new voices in these pages, but you’ll recognize familiar ones as well. We hope this paper is and continues to be worthy of our vibrant, brilliant, one-ofa-kind city. And we hope you’ll make a habit of picking it up. Before I pipe down and let you go ahead and read it already, I must say: I’ve worked for plenty of publications in my time. I’ve seen a lot of barely-made deadlines and last-minute heroics. But I’ve never seen anything like what has happened in the Langdon Publishing offices over the past couple of weeks. The target publication date we set for ourselves, and the lightning-fast turnaround it required, would cause lesser souls to turn tail and run for the suburbs. There were times I thought it was impossible, and that we’d look like a pack of hapless rookies when our issue didn’t come out as announced. (I’m writing this on Monday, Dec. 16, you’ll read it as early as Wednesday, Dec. 18, and exactly one week ago, this 56-page newspaper was a blank document — a cursor blinking on a lonely screen.) I mention that only to shamelessly brag on our team — new hires and old hands alike — who pulled together like a crackling machine and worked tirelessly to pull off this trying task. Through late nights and long weekends, icy roads and noisy office construction, their effort was mighty indeed, and should not go unheralded in these pages. With that, I bid you a happy day. Enjoy the read. MATT CAUTHRON ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

D E C . 1 8 , 2 0 1 3 - J A N . 1 , 2 0 1 4 // V O L . 1 N O . 1 The Tulsa Voice is published bi-weekly by

1603 S. Boulder Ave. Tulsa, OK 74119 P: 918.585.9924 F: 918.585.9926

PUBLISHER Jim Langdon

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Flying into the future Without forethought, more turbulence ahead for Tulsa by RAY PEARCEY

F

or part of the 18th century, most of the 19th and a portion of the 20th, the most important industries in America were whale oil producers/providers and ice procuring operations. These now-neolithic industries are obviously no longer with us, but their demise is a signature indication of how massively our industrial landscape, the architecture of our economy, can change. Great News Few rational or compassionate folks in Tulsa received the news that the Justice Department had settled it's antitrust complaints against the American Airlines/US Airways merger proposal without feeling warm and fuzzy. As readers may know, there are nearly 7,000 employees at the American Airlines maintenance facility, and dozens of contractors and vendor firms with as many as another 10,000 employees who will directly and immediately benefit from the resolution of the Justice Department roadblock. And Thomas Horton, the new chief executive of the combined enterprise, describes it as the biggest commercial airline operation on Earth. So, as Mayor Dewey Bartlett said recently, Tulsa is now the home of the biggest airline maintenance operation on the planet. While it was widely derided in Tulsa during the fall — many local observers regarded the DOJ intervention as yet another instance of

feckless interference on the part of the Feds in “free markets” — there really was a legitimate concern at the center of the Justice Department action. The DOJ brief complains that the proposed American Airlines/ US Airways merger might dramatically increase ticket prices on critical routes, diminish the access small and middle sized towns have to air transport and reduce the “animal” spirits supposedly key to the health of American aviation. The economic heart of the federal complaint: earlier commercial carrier consolidation efforts were largely positive, since they fortified fragile legacy airlines and improved America's capacity to use commercial aviation as a backbone of our economy. But the DOJ brief also suggested, pretty strongly, that the U.S. may have come to the end of productive carrier consolidations. Some consumer advocates were glad the Justice Department was actually paying attention, this time via some fascinating econometric modeling tools, compelling testimony, and some interesting data sets regarding what had actually happened to passenger service, ticket prices and commercial flight geometries in the wake of several recent airline mergers. Some of the outcomes, they found, are not very good from a consumer vantage. Next It's clearly good news that thousands of Tulsans get to keep their

jobs, and a slew of vendors and contractors get to retain sizable contracts allowing them to prosper and retain thousands of their workers as well. So, is there really a problem? A cardinal challenge may lie ahead. If we're not careful, we may fall victim to the same fate as the ice procuring and whale oil industries of old — highly dependent on industrial lines that will continue in some form, but may morph rapidly before our eyes, creating new forces and wild markets we couldn't have imagined even a decade ago. And here's the important part: these cataclysmic shifts may take large numbers of conventional airline maintenance jobs and many collateral contract opportunities away from our town and perhaps eliminate them altogether. And while markets can do magical, anticipatory things, it's also important to remember that strategic planning and federal resources, as well as active state and local participation in economic and tech development, can be highly material. If you need an example, you can look at Daniel Yergin's magisterial “The Prize,” a history of modern oil and gas, and see the link between Carter-era tax incentives for “unconventional oil recovery” and scope out the beginnings of “new gas.” Morph world Make no mistake about it: Civilian aviation and commercial flight are here to stay and

hundreds of millions of earthlings will continue to use them. But get ready for it: Many of the next wave of planes will be made of unimaginable materials requiring all kinds of novel design and maintenance skills; some of the flights may be unmanned; and some of the trips may soon be deeply personal — that is, made possible by very small aircraft that have nothing to do with craft or flights mediated by the new American Airlines. So here's the great question: can we find a way to create a bit of agility in our aerospace workforce and in the business culture connected to it? Are there around-the-corner things that the Regional Chamber, its aerospace sub-community, our universities and the people at City Hall should be focusing on? How about exploratory business/citizen meet-ups, cool demo projects, early stage joint ventures with pioneering outfits that might help us seize an enduring place in the aviation economy to come?

Ray Pearcey, a technology, public policy and management consulting professional, is managing editor of the Oklahoma Eagle and will be a regular contributor to The Tulsa Voice. Look for his expanded thoughts on the future of the aerospace industry in mid-January.

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At Bank of Oklahoma, we are committed to helping you make the most of your money.

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FREE FINANCIAL TIPS, TOOLS AND ADVICE. That’s why we created LongLiveYourMoney.com. Whether you are buying your first home, starting a business or planning for retirement, you will find many great articles and tips to

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atlarge

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My war on the “war” on the Christmas by BARRY FRIEDMAN

And so this is Christmas. Oy. To review… Tulsa’s traditional downtown holiday parade dropped “Christmas” from its name in 2009 to be more inclusive. The resulting outcry led to the creation of a competing “Christmas Parade” at Tulsa Hills Shopping Center the past two years.1 “Resulting outcry,” my ass. I remember comedian T. Sean Shannon doing a joke about the three wise men and the anger of the guy who brought the gold. “You brought myrrh? Myrrh?” he asks. “Take my name off the card.” Mark Croucher, one of the organizers of the “Christmas” Parade (and, yeah, it’s in quotes. He doesn’t get the name) wanted his name off the card. He and his partners, in fact, were so verklempt over the absence of “Christmas” from the downtown parade, they took their mangers and headed to South Tulsa. That was your “resulting outcry.” There were no angry throngs of protesters, wilding through the streets of Tulsa, screaming, “No immaculate birth, no holiday mirth” because organizers decided to add a subhead to the event. There was this. “Because what people want,” said Croucher, “is a Christmas parade …,” he said, explaining his decision to retain the Tulsa Hills event, “… not a holiday parade, not a parade of lights.” Thank you, Gaspar. Then, after yet another squabble, one in which organizers of the now-named Downtown Hol-

iday Parade of Lights offered to include “Christmas” in the name was rejected by Croucher and Company — because it also included “Hanukkah and other holidays” (and Jesus would weep if we did that) — the Tulsa “Christmas” Parade took place on December 7. While some local parades were canceled or postponed, the festivities at the Tulsa Hills Shopping Center went on as scheduled despite a temperature of 21 degrees when the parade started at 6 p.m.”2 Maybe you heathens will get it now. Okay, so let’s back up — like 2013 years. A careful analysis of Scripture, however, clearly indicates that Dec. 25 is an unlikely date for Christ’s birth. First, we know that shepherds were in the fields watching their flocks at the time of Jesus’ birth (Luke 2:7-8). Shepherds were not in the fields during December. According to Celebrations: The Complete Book of American Holidays, Luke’s account “suggests that Jesus may have been born in summer or early fall. Since December is cold and rainy in Judea, it is likely the shepherds would have sought shelter for their flocks at night.” Second, Jesus’ parents came to Bethlehem to register in a Roman census (Luke 2:1-4). Such censuses were not taken in winter, when temperatures often dropped below freezing and roads were in poor condition. Taking

a census under such conditions would have been self-defeating.”

lexicon only bothers people who like being bothered, like Croucher. “You look at Christmas cards now, and how many say, “Happy Holidays” or “Season’s Greetings?” asked Croucher. “I’m just asking for let’s have Christ in the parade. He stood up for us and died for us 2,000 years ago, and now it’s time we stand up and honor him.”4

And here’s the money shot. “ …the important fact then . . . to get clearly into your head is that the fixing of the date as December 25th was a compromise with paganism” (William Walsh, The Story of Santa Klaus, 1970, p. 62).3 A compromise with paganism? That’s as bad as celebrating Christ’s birth at a mall. While parades, Christmas or otherwise, are commonly associated with downtown areas, holding it at a place like Tulsa Hills affords many multitasking shopping opportunities. That was discussed in Jeremiah 10:2, right? We continue. But you know what? Who cares? Really. Good on them. Good on the “Christmas” parade organizers for keeping the stores open. Who cares if Jesus was actually born on December 25? Who cares if he even existed? Who cares, while we’re on the subject, if Jim Glover Chevrolet references “The Lord Jesus” in its ads. (Okay, I care about that one.) I digress. A baby smiles, a couple married sixty years exchanges pajamas, someone falls in love with Jimmy Stewart … someone loves the BluRay you shopped for after the parade. Ta da. Reason for the season. Or so it seems to many. The abject commercialism and

Oh, for the love of Rudolph, Christianity and America will not become Beelzebub’s chew toys if a cashier at Target decides to say “Seasons Greetings” instead of “Merry Christmas” to a customer — or if our parade organizers try to be inclusive of other faiths in an increasingly diverse community. We’re not all Christian (including Jesus!) — nor want to be. So, yes, there was a manger on wheels at the Tulsa “Christmas” Parade, but there was also a little girl who told FOX23, “My favorite part was the trash truck!” Christ, I love this holiday.  ulsa World: “Tulsa poll: Put ‘ChristT mas’ back in downtown parade’s name, majority says” 2 Tulsa World: “Area residents brave cold weather to see Tulsa Christmas Parade” 3 Good News Magazine: “Biblical Evidence Shows Jesus Christ Wasn’t Born on Dec. 25” 4 Fox News: “With no ‘Christmas,’ Tulsa group plans own parade” 1

Barry Friedman is a touring standup comedian, author and general rabble-rouser. At Large is a twice-monthly look at the DNA of Tulsa and Oklahoma — the politics, the culture, the insanity.

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Hannibal B. Johnson, a Harvard Law School graduate, is an author, attorney, and consultant specializing in diversity issues, human relations, and non-profit leadership. He also teaches at Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. His books include Apartheid in Indian Country?; Black Wall Street; and Acres of Aspiration, works chronicling the African American experience in Oklahoma and its indelible impact on American history. Johnson has received numerous awards and honors for his work and community service.

SPACE

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In his last public appearance, the anti-apartheid revolutionary, former President of the Republic of South Africa, and international statesman proclaimed: “I would like to be remembered not as anyone unique or special, but as part of a great team in this country that has struggled for many years, for decades and even centuries. The greatest glory of living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time you fall.” Mandela understood that nobody does it alone, and that no one goes through life unscathed by failure and misfortune. Despite his wishes to the contrary, this heroic, principled man will be remembered as both unique and special — and deservedly so. Mandela’s tenacity, humility, and compassion shone brightly, even in the darkest days. So, too, did his love of South Africa, despite the abuses it heaped upon him and his people. Mandela’s vision allowed him to see beyond what was to what might be. That same vision revealed a foundational

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Given the contentiousness and vitriol characteristic of modern American politics, Mandela’s example illuminates an alternative path…

truth for the new South Africa: What might be cannot be in the absence of acknowledgement, atonement, forgiveness, and, ultimately, reconciliation. Mandela’s epic activism, suffering, imprisonment, and transcendence dazzled the world. His election in 1994 as the first black president of the democratic republic of South Africa signaled new days and new possibilities ahead, not just for South Africa, but for all of us. Following his meteoric, post-incarceration rise to national leadership, Mandela ceded his power almost as quickly as he had gained it, serving only one term as president. It was never about dominion and control, but rather about people. Given the contentiousness and vitriol characteristic of modern American politics, Mandela’s example illuminates an alternative path: patriotism without partisanship; adversaries without enemies; differences without division. We have much to learn from his journey. Mandela is and always will be a towering inspiration, a role model for the ages, and a oneof-a-kind servant-leader. He will be sorely missed.

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elson Mandela, called “Madiba,” his clan name, by those who knew and loved him, earned his place as a colossal figure in modern history. His life and legacy testify to the power of the unshackled human spirit.

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by HANNIBAL JOHNSON

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Mandela leaves behind legacy of vision, heart

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bottomline Big Tulsa welcome

After a month-long hiatus and a change in ownership, management and just about everything else, Tulsa has an alternative news outlet again. “Urban Tulsa has provided news to this community for over 20 years and we are glad a paper will continue to have a presence in Tulsa,” said Mayor Dewey Bartlett. “We look forward to working with the new publisher and reporters and excited to welcome a new voice to Tulsa.” Bottom line: Tulsa has an alternative newspaper once again!

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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“They had nothing on us,” Hurd told ABC News. “The only reason someone gave me was we were black and Landry was white.” Landry was released late the next morning after Thompson’s mother called Tulsa police for help, according to the Tulsa World. The Houston Police Department released a statement: “Given the age discrepancies between all involved, the fact that all three were from out of state, and the child had no relatives in the area, officers, in an abundance of caution, did their utmost to ensure her safety. In this instance, that involved further investigation by CPS.” Bottom line: This story became a living Rorschach test. What do you think when you see black and white together: danger or dancing?

Hail Satan?

+ Photo by Jen Hoppa

Big Texas welcome: Racial profiling edition When 13-year-old Tulsa hip hop dancer Landry Thompson found herself in handcuffs, a Texas police officer allegedly broke it down for her guardians like this: “You two men are black and she’s white.” Thompson, her dance instructor Emmanuel Hurd, 29, and dance partner, Josiah Kelly, 22, garnered national media attention after a frightening encounter with Houston police left them shaken and alleging racial discrimination. The trio wrapped a video shoot at Planet Funk Academy in the wee hours of Sun., Dec. 2. After a stop at a gas station, officers surrounded their car. Despite guardianship forms, the girl’s original birth certificate and a list of contact numbers, all three dancers were handcuffed. She was taken into Child Protective Services, while the two men were detained but not arrested.

The Satanic Temple, a New York City-based group, proposed a memorial to be placed next to the Ten Commandments monument on Oklahoma’s Capitol grounds.

This summer, the Ten Commandments memorial drew criticism — and a lawsuit — ­ from the American Civil Liberties Union, who remarked on the lone religious symbol: “The monument stands alone, with no other monuments or memorials in the immediate vicinity.” Satan’s memorial would be an homage to His Evilness, designed to complement and contrast the Ten Commandments already in place. In a press release, a temple spokesperson said: “By accepting our offer, the good people of Oklahoma City will have the opportunity to show that they espouse the basic freedoms spelled out in the Constitution … Allowing us to donate a monument would show that the Oklahoma City Council does not discriminate, and both the religious and non-religious should be happy with such an outcome.” So far, members of the Oklahoma legislature have called it a “joke,” (Senate Pro Tem Brian Bingman, R-Sapulpa) and “very offensive,” (Rep. Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville).

Bottom line: When the Ten Commandments monument was constructed on the Capitol, it popped open a big can of religious freedom issues, as well as the door for other faiths to gain a piece of the state’s hallowed grounds (whether you support those faiths or not).

Pants on the ground

Tulsa City Councilor Jack Henderson just can’t take it anymore. He’s proposing a city ordinance amendment and waging a oneman war against baggy, saggy pants. “They just think that it’s the cool thing to do,” Henderson told the Tulsa World. “But it’s not cool when your wife or your mother or your girlfriend has to look at somebody’s dirty shorts.” He said he’d been stewing over this issue for three years, and said Dallas has a saggy pants ordinance, though it does not. Henderson and his staff are researching the issue further. Bottom line: An attempt to turn Tulsa PD into bonafide

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DOG WELL 2014

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Satan can’t catch a break around the Capitol, but Oklahoma legislators are already getting behind the new Merry Christmas bill. House Bill 2317 would “permit school districts to display on school property scenes or symbols associated with traditional winter celebrations.” The author of the bill is Tulsa’s own Republican Rep. Ken Walker, who said in a press conference that he’d like to “put a beacon of light, a safe harbor, if you will in the pages of statutes” that would allow schoolchildren and teachers alike to “express their core beliefs and celebrate winter traditions without fear of lawsuit, retribution or reprisal.” The Texas legislature passed a similar bill that would forestall lawsuits against schools that prefer to spread only Christmas-specific holiday cheer. Bottom line: “This is a way legislators can score political points with the cost being born by school districts,” said American Civil Liberties Union spokesperson Brady Henderson. It’s the perfect gift for the school district that has everything.

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Have a merry ‘Winter Tradition!’

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European Values

A Swedish TV show, "Biss och Kajs," found itself in the spotlight in November — in Russia, where government-run television apparently used it to send a political message to Ukraine by highlighting the program's theme of teaching children about bodily functions. The episode Russia chose featured three bulkily-costumed actors sitting around talking — with one dressed in yellow, one in brown, and the other unmistakably as a large, nude human posterior. (“Biss och Kajs” is highly regarded in Sweden; “biss” and “kajs” refer, respectively, to the yellow and brown functions.) Ukraine (against Russia's wishes) is considering a trade agreement with the European Union, and, the Russian station director said, pointedly, "There you have European values in all their glory."

Compelling Explanations

The Bank of England, arguing before the U.K.'s Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards in October, warned against limiting the bonuses that bankers have come to expect from their lucrative deals — ­ because that might encroach on their "human rights." The Bank suggested it is a human rights violation even to ask senior executives to demonstrate that they tried hard to comply with banking laws (because it is the government's job to prove violations).

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Slick Talkers

A young woman, accosted by a robber on Washington, D.C.'s Capitol Hill in October, told the man she was a low-paid intern — but an intern for the National Security Agency, and that within minutes of robbing her, the man would be tracked down by ubiquitous NSA surveillance. She said, later (reported the Washington Examiner), the man just "looked at me and ran away (empty-hand-

ed)." (2) A 29-year-old cafeteria worker at Sullivan East High School in Blountville, Tenn., swore to police on the scene in October that she was not the one who took money from a co-worker's purse, and she voluntarily stripped to near-nakedness to demonstrate her innocence. "See? I don't have it," she said. Moments later, an officer found the missing $27 stuffed in the woman's shoe.

Karma

Larry Poulos was stopped on an Arlington, Tex., street in September, bleeding from a head wound and complaining that he had just been robbed by two men. A friend of Poulos later corroborated that, but police also learned that the money Poulos had been carrying was the proceeds of his having robbed a credit union earlier that evening. He was treated for his wounds and then arrested. (2) At least 44 health workers were struck with a suspected norovirus in September at a Creative Health Care Management convention in Huron, Ohio. (Noroviruses are sometimes called the "Norwalk" virus, named after one notable outbreak in 1968 in Norwalk, Ohio, about 12 miles from Huron.)

Not My Fault

Conscience-Cleansing: Greg Gulbransen of Oyster Bay, N.Y., announced in September that he was about to sue the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for dragging its feet in implementing the Gulbransen-inspired 2007 federal legislation that he said would save lives, especially those of toddlers. The unimplemented law would force car manufacturers to install rear-facing cameras as standard equipment, a cause Gulbransen embraced after accidentally, fatally, backing over his own toddler in the family's BMW SUV.

Perspective

An exhaustive American Civil Liberties Union report in November showed that more than 3,200

people are serving life sentences in the U.S. for non-violent offenses (about 80 percent for drug crimes). Most were sentenced under "three-strikes"-type laws in which the final straw might be for trivial drug possession, for instance, or for a petty theft such as the $159-jacket shoplifting in Louisiana, or the two-jersey theft from a Foot Locker. Said the jacket thief, Timothy Jackson, "I know that for my crime I had to do some time but . . . I have met people here whose crimes are a lot badder with way less time." Added his sister, "You can take a life and get 15 or 16 years," but her brother "will stay in jail forever. He didn't kill the jacket!"

Ironies

The Seattle City Council voted in October to seize a waterfront parking lot by eminent domain from the 103-year-old owner after negotiations to buy the property on the open market broke down. The state is funding a six-year tunnel-digging project in the area, and the city has decided it needs the property for not-yet-specified uses ­— except that in one part of

the property, the city said it plans to operate a parking lot.

A News of the Weird Classic // April 2009 Australian Marcus Einfeld (a prominent lawyer, federal judge, and Jewish community leader) was once so revered that one organization named him a "living treasure," but he fell into total disrepute in 2006 by deciding to fight a simple speeding ticket. By March 2009, Einfeld had been sentenced to two years in prison for perjury and obstructing justice for lying in four elaborate detailed schemes to "prove" that he was not driving that day. His original defense (that he had loaned the car to a friend who then passed away) was accepted by the judge, but dogged reporting by Sydney's Daily Telegraph revealed that Einfeld lied, and lied to cover up each successive lie. Encouraged, reporters went on to uncover Einfeld's bogus college degrees and awards and a double-billing fraud against the government. (The speeding ticket would have cost about $80.)

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Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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Moving beyond Woody & Will in search of the new Oklahoma canon

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OK/L.A.

Joe Goode led a stable of Okie artists who took the Los Angeles art world by storm in the 1960s and beyond by JEFF MARTIN

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onsider Joe Goode. More than half a century ago, the Oklahoma City-born painter headed to the City of Angels like some artistic Tom Joad seeking inspiration instead of income, though some income would have been nice. He wasn’t alone. Other Okie artists made the same pilgrimage including the much-celebrated painter Edward Ruscha and photographer Jerry McMillan. They all ended up students at L.A.’s Chouinard Art Institute not long before the school merged with Los Angeles Conservatory of Music to establish the California Institute of the Arts, more popularly known as CalArts. Keep in mind, late 50s L.A. was not a hotspot for art in America. New York had fought long and hard to steal the crown from Paris and at the height of Abstract Expressionism, there was no sign that it would be relinquishing the title any time soon. Then came Pop. More specifically, Andy Warhol’s first-ever solo exhibition at L.A.’s legendary Ferus Gallery in 1962. This show introduced the world to his famous Campbell’s soup cans. It was a shot across the bow. All of a sudden, the world was paying attention to the L.A. art scene. Still in his early 20s, Goode had already started working on a series of paintings that would become his trademark. Like Ruscha’s depictions of gas stations and other everyday life subjects, Goode focused on an object familiar to eyes from Midwest City to Culver City and everywhere in between, the humble milk bottle.

THE GOODE STUFF In 1962 Goode takes part in the groundbreaking exhibition, “New Painting of Common Objects” at the Pasadena Art Museum. The show is curated by Walter Hopps, the man behind Warhol’s soup can show. At 24, Goode was the youngest artist featured in the exhibition. Goode’s work can be found in museums throughout the country and around the world including The Art Institute of Chicago, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, MoMA, The Smithsonian, The Whitney, and museums in Sweden, Israel, England and many more. Okies stick together. After moving to Los Angeles, the various Oklahomans (Goode, Ruscha, McMillan) moved in together eventually adding more Oklahoma transplants to the mix.

“Small Spaces,” by Joe Goode, 1963, oil on canvas with painted glass bottle Photo cour tesy of Jo e Goode St udios

“I just paint the same painting over and over and over again, just trying to find a new way of seeing it. And that’s what I do.” – Joe Goode Thrown in with the other Pop artists of the day (Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Indiana, Wayne Thiebaud), Goode’s realistic portrayals of the objects, often sitting on a step, are more in line with the trompe

l’oeil tradition. He would move on to more nebulous subjects like clouds. Now in his mid-70s, Goode continues to work and show around the world. To put it simply, Goode is great. To go a little deeper I highly recommend reading the recent book, “Rebels in Paradise: The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s” by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp. The book is much more enjoyable than trying to pronounce the author’s name and there is an entire chapter (Chapter 5, “Okies”) on Goode and his cohorts.

Goode’s first group exhibition was in 1960 at the Oklahoma Art Center (now the Oklahoma City Museum of Art). The show was called “Four Oklahoma Artists.” The original Oklahoma Art Center, located on the Oklahoma City Fairgrounds, was born in the 30s from the Oklahoma Federal Art Project, an extension of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). The L.A. art scene Goode inhabited is explored in the can’t-miss 2008 documentary, “The Cool School.” The film is available to stream on Amazon or to check out through the Tulsa City-County Library. Did you know that Oklahoma has an official “State Art Collection”? Included in the collection are works by Goode, Alexandre Hogue and Leon Polk Smith. Explore the collection online at arts.ok.gov.

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Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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White Flag 116 S. Elgin Ave. Fare: Gourmet burgers Price: $ $ $ $

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“Sometimes it’s good military strateg y to surrender and live to fight another day. And that has sort of been the running joke with the new place.” — Blake Ewing

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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BBQ out; burgers in Blake Ewing waves the ‘White Flag’ and retools a downtown restaurant by ANGELA EVANS

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hen downtown was starting to emerge from ghost-town status, there were a few brave souls who established themselves in the uncertain terrain. The first barbecue joint to set up shop was Back Alley Blues & Barbecue. But downtown, it’s a-changin’, and downtown’s first BBQ joint has now transformed into White Flag Burger Bar. “When we opened Back Alley, it was because I thought we needed a barbecue restaurant downtown, not because I was some barbecue enthusiast,” said Blake Ewing, owner of the Blue Ox Restaurant Group. “Now, with five other barbecue restaurants within a mile and a half, many of which are Tulsa favorites — my favorites, too — it was time to raise the white flag and do something else,” Ewing said. “Sometimes it is good military strategy to surrender and live to fight another day. And that has sort of been the running joke with the new place.” Ewing’s latest conquest for the hearts and tummies of Tulsa features a full arsenal of tasty burger choices and bar grub with

the signature quirkiness of a Ewing-owned business. The interior has changed up a bit to accommodate a walk-up bar where you place your order, a stage was added for live music and a large projector screen allows sports fans to catch the big game. But what really sets the tone for a White Flag experience is the menu. The burgers feature “locally-sourced, fresh, never frozen ground brisket and chuck with grilled-in white onions.” The menu offers straightforward Basic Burgers ($4.95), but the specialty burgers are hard to resist. With options like the Yoko Oh No! ($7.95) with sesame peanut slaw, green tomatoes, sriracha mayo and wonton cream cheese; or the appropriately named Back Alley Fail Burger ($7.95) with pulled pork, green apple slaw, Back Alley BBQ sauce, red onion and cheddar jack cheese, it is obvious that this place is heavy on kitsch and unafraid of exotic ingredients. But the big question is: can White Flag back up the running jokes with serious burgers? I was drawn to the Tacky Southwest Art ($7.95) with shredded lettuce, guacamole, smoked

bacon, cheddar jack, spicy pickles and chipotle ranch. The first thing to notice about these burgers is the bun. Baked fresh by local bakery Pancho Anaya, these buns blow anyone else’s out of the water. This gloriously golden bun, with a hint of a sourdough chew, easily handled the payload of ingredients. The flavor of the burger was outstanding. Not overloaded with seasoning, the quality of the beef was unmistakable. The combo of guacamole and chipotle ranch really added a southwestern flair that was more tasty than tacky. My fellow burger aficionado decided to go big with the The Mile High ($7.95) with green chiles, a fried egg, Mexican white cheese and barbecue ranch. For $1.00 more per patty, we substituted buffalo for the regular beef. This burger arrived sky-high, but so were the expectations. It did not disappoint. Instead of ingredient overkill, the flavors really worked together to create a heady burger experience. There was a distinctive difference in the taste of the buffalo, and the addition of the fried egg was sublime. Side options include fries, onion rings and sweet potato tots. I’m a tot

gal, and I was overjoyed that these tots delivered a crisp, slightly sweet potato experience without being mushy. White Flag also has a ton of bar snacks to accompany a frosty beverage, such as chips and queso ($6.95), fried pickles ($5.95) and candied bacon ($5.95). The dessert menu features hand-spun milkshakes, root beer floats and, a state fair favorite, fried Twinkies ($4.95). Instead of throwing in the towel like a level-headed human, I ordered up a fried Twinkie. It arrived piping hot with whipped topping and a red berry glaze. As much as I hate to admit it, it was delicious. Turns out I have been eating Twinkies wrong all these years. Who knew? There is something going on every night at this new burger joint, like Tuesday’s Kids Eat Free or Beer Dinner Thursday, which features the chance to taste a local brewery’s latest draught. After scrambling on the scene with guns blazing, it seems Ewing’s group has established its niche in the downtown landscape. Despite its self-deprecating name and menu of tongue-in-cheek selections, White Flag Burger Bar is a great place to go for a damn good burger.

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Purchase any new Kia vehicle at Primeaux Kia and receive TWO TICKETS to THREE THUNDER HOME GAMES! *while supplies last

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4747 South Yale (918)622-3160 www.PrimeauxKIA.com

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

Free ticket offer good December 15th through January 15th, 2014, or until all tickets are distributed.

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Efrén Romo prepares his signature churros at Pancho Anaya Bakery Photos by Juan Miret

Deep-fried delicioso An artisan baker shares the secret behind his December specialty by JUAN MIRET

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he roads are practically empty. It’s still very dark and cold. Although it’s just 4:30 a.m., artisan baker Efrén Romo, 61, has been up for a while. He has been hard at work mixing, shaping and frying batch after batch of his specialty — a classic Mexican confection called the churro, a hand-crafted, elongated pastry, crispy and golden on the outside, but soft and white on the inside. Sprinkle a little sugar on top, and the churro becomes the perfect companion for a bitter, cold day. Approaching the door leading into the Pancho Anaya Bakery, near Admiral and Garnett Road in east Tulsa, the peace and silence of early morning is shattered. A radio is blaring, playing some “música norteña,” a Mexican ensemble of accordions and drums. Several bakers are inside, banging trays full of bread. A gigantic mixer grinds away. Being up and running so early has a wonderful

reward: The air is fragrant with the smell of baking bread. A native of Aguascalientes, Mexico, and a proud Tulsan for the past 10 years, Romo has been perfecting his churro method for nearly 40 years. He and his team turn out 600 to 1,000 churros at a time. “There’s nothing better to fight the freezing temperatures in December than a freshly made churro,” Romo says, as he heats the oil to fry his pastries. “If someone does not know what time of the year it is, then that person should see if churros are being sold. If you can find it, then it’s December.” To make his churro, Romo eschews the traditional pastry piping bag in favor of a huge metal syringe. The dough is fashioned into cylindrical strips with the typical exterior grooves and a hollow center so a filling can be added. “The concept is the same. The process is similar, but also a little different,” Romo says. He says with modern kitchen machinery,

he no longer has to press the dough with a piece of wood. “It’s easier, but you still need your hands. A machine cannot do this. And that’s beautiful, because this is a demonstration of our roots.”

“The best thing is to eat them when they are still ‘calienticos’” — pretty hot, that is — and “of course, they taste better with a ‘champurrado’ (thick Mexican hot chocolate).”

“My hands, that’s the secret. Our recipe is very traditional, very authentic. But our hands make the difference.” Everything is done very quickly. “Timing is key,” says Romo, as he methodically shapes the dough, checks the oil and loads a tray with mountains of sugar. “But you cannot use a watch or be checking the clock every second. It’s a matter of feeling and smelling. That’s how you know when the churros are ready for the next step.” Once the churros have rested enough — based only on Romo’s innate sense — they are coated in sugar. Then, they are ready to eat, and the quicker the better.

Immediately after that fleeting moment of joy, Romo starts over again. “Today will be very cold. That means more churros,” he says while turning around and getting ready for a new frying cycle. Asked why his special method makes such tasty churros, Romo stops for a moment, adjusts his baseball cap and says: “My hands, that’s the secret. Our recipe is very traditional, very authentic. But our hands make the difference. That’s why they taste so good.”

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SINCE 1992

LANNA THAI RESTAURANT & BAR

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« « « « « FINE DINING « « « « «

Ranked in the top 50 nationally.

Surveyed more than 4000 Thai Restaurants by Focus Thai Cuisine 2007

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Voted Tulsa’s Best Thai Restaurant 1st Place Award for 14 Consecutive Years

Lunch Specials Daily

NOW OPEN DOWNTOWN!

Daily Happy Hour Special 1/2 Off All Appetizers from 4 to 6 p.m.

Ranked in the Top 10 in 2011 For Best New Restaurant by the Tulsa World

Voted Tulsa’s Best Vegetarian Restaurant 2013 Visit us online at TheTropicalTulsa.com 49TH & MEMORIAL BEHIND DEALERSHIP 918.895.6433 | FIND US ON

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ALBERTGS.COM 421 E 1ST ST - 918.728.3650 2748 S HARVARD AVE - 918.747.4799

“Thai Styled Fresh Seafood”

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Same award-winning BBQ from owner Chuck Gawey; reasonable prices and friendly atmosphere. Dine-in, take-out, catering, private parties. Serving lunch and dinner. Enjoy!

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See our full menu at LannaThaiTulsa.com 7227 S. MEMORIAL • 918.249.5262 • FIND US ON

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Brunch on Saturday & Sunday

Prime House Ground Burger Smoked Trout Salad Daily $8 Blue Plate Specials

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$2 Mimosas $4 Bloody Mary Bar Chicken Fried House Bacon and Waffles

Lunch Daily

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TulsaFood.com’s recommend “MUST try at SMOKE.”

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INSPIRED AMERICAN, LOCALLY SOURCED

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Nightly Butcher Block Specials Fresh Market Fish Daily Special Goat Cheese Gnocchi Oklahoma Grass Fed 18 oz. Ribeye

LIVE MUSIC • HERMETICALLY SEALED CIGAR LOUNGE 1542 E. 15th St., Tulsa • 918.949.4401 • SmokeTulsa.com 21

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421 E. First St. • 918.728.3650

The recently opened downtown location of this longtime Tulsa favorite features an expanded menu that includes this crowd-pleasing appetizer. The Route 66 Nachos feature tortilla chips smothered in white queso with your choice of chopped brisket or pulled pork, topped with tomatoes, green onions and pepperoncinis and sides of salsa and sour cream.

MON–THU, 11 A.M.–10 P.M. // FRI-SAT, 11 A.M.-11 P.M. // SUN, 11 A.M.–8 P.M.

El Rio Verde

38 N. Trenton Ave. • 918.592.2555 The “claim to fame” of this authentic Mexican restaurant just north of downtown, the Wet Burrito is loaded with your choice of pulled beef, pork or chicken, refried beans and fresh pico de gallo. It’s then drenched in a tangy enchilada sauce and queso blanco, and topped with healthy dollops of sour cream and guacamole.

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EVERY DAY, 8:30 A.M. - 9 P.M.

Boston Deli Grill & Market The Boston Deli Grill & Market’s glazed baby back ribs, smoked to perfection on a Hasty Bake grill, are a special menu item only available on Saturdays starting at 5 p.m. They’re served until they’re gone, which can often be as early as 7 p.m., so get there early.

MON. 11 A.M.-3 P.M. // TUES.-SAT. 11 A.M.-9 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAY

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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6231 E. 61st St. • 918.492.4745

McNellie’s South City 7031 S. Zurich Ave. • 918.933.5250

The south Tulsa counterpart to Elliot Nelson’s flagship downtown pub offers this piled-high Rueben sandwich with fresh, beer-braised corned beef served on marble rye bread with Russian dressing, big eye swiss cheese, sauerkraut and onions. Side item choices include pub fries, tabouli, sweet potato fries, cottage cheese, Irish mashed potatoes and seasonal vegetables.

MON–SUN, 11 A.M.–2 A.M.

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Terwilliger Heights: Bill & Ruth’s Blue Rose Café The Chalkboard Dalesandro’s Elwoods Mansion House Café Ron’s Hamburgers & Chili La Villa at Philbrook

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North Tulsa: Admiral Grill Bill & Ruth’s Christy’s BBQ Evelyn’s Golden Saddle BBQ Steakhouse Hank’s Hamburgers Harden’s Hamburgers Hero’s Subs & Burgers Ike’s Chili Los Primos The Restaurant at Gilcrease White River Fish Market

Cherry Street: Andolini’s Pizzeria Café Cubana Chimi’s Mexican Food Chipotle Mexican Grill Coffee House on Cherry Street Daylight Donuts Doe’s Eat Place Full Moon Café Genghis Grill Heirloom Baking Co. Hideaway Jason’s Deli Kilkenny’s Irish Pub & Eatery La Madeleine Lucky’s Restaurant

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Downtown: Baxter’s Interurban Grill Billy’s on the Square Boston Avenue Grille The Boulder Grill Café 320 Casa Laredo Coney Island Courtyard Deli Daily Grill Elote Café and Catering Foolish Things Coffee Grand Selections for Lunch The Greens on Boulder Heavy Metal Pizza Lou’s Deli Mazzio’s Italian Eatery Mexicali Border Cafe Mod’s Coffee & Crepes New Atlas Grill Oneok Café Oklahoma Spud on the Mall S&J Oyster Company Seven West Café Sheena’s Cookies & Deli Steakfinger House The Sushi Place Tabouli’s Tallgrass Prairie Table Tavolo Bistro at Atlas Life Ti Amo Topeca Coffee Trula The Vault Williams Center Café

Lot a Burger Maxxwell’s Restaurant Moonsky’s Cheesesteaks and Daylight Donuts Mr. Taco Nelson’s Ranch House Oklahoma Style BBQ The Phoenix Pie Hole Pizza Pollo al Carbon Rib Crib BBQ & Grill The Right Wing Route 66 Subs & Burgers Tacos Don Francisco Tally’s Good Food Cafe Umberto’s Pizza

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Blue Dome: Dilly Deli El Guapo’s Cantina Fassler Hall Joe Bots Coffee Joe Momma’s Pizza Juniper McNellie’s White Flag Yokozuna

TU/Kendall Whittier: Big Al’s Health Foods Bill’s Jumbo Burgers Billy Ray’s BBQ Brothers Houligan Burn Co. BBQ Capp’s BBQ Corner Café Duffy’s Diner El Rancho Grande Freddie’s Hamburgers Guang Zhou Dim Sum Jim’s Coney Island Las Americas Super Mercado & Restaurant

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Brady Arts District: Abear’s Caz’s Chowhouse Chimera Draper’s Bar-B-Cue Fat Guy’s Gypsy Coffee House Hey Mambo The Hunt Club Laffa Lucky’s on the Green Mexicali Border Café Oklahoma Joe’s Prhyme Downtown Steakhouse The Rusty Crane Spaghetti Warehouse The Tavern Zin Wine, Beer & Dessert Bar

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dininglistings Mary’s Italian Trattoria Mi Cocina Palace Café Panera Bread Phat Philly’s Qdoba Mexican Grill SMOKE. Te Kei’s Tucci’s Café Italia White Owl Zanmai Brookside: Antoinette Baking Co. Biga Billy Sims BBQ Blue Moon Bakery and Café The Brook Brookside By Day Café Ole Café Samana Charleston’s Claud’s Hamburgers Cosmo Café & Bar Crow Creek Tavern Doc’s Wine and Food Egg Roll Express Elmer’s BBQ Fuji La Hacienda The Hen Bistro Hibiscus Caribbean Bar and Grill In the Raw Keo Lambrusco’Z To Go Leon’s Brookside Mazzio’s Italian Eatery Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano Old School Bagel Café Pei Wei Asian Diner R Bar & Grill Rons Hamburgers & Chili Señor Tequila Shades of Brown Sonoma Bistro & Wine Bar Starbucks Sumatra Coffee Shop Super Wok The Warehouse Bar & Grill Weber’s Root Beer Whole Foods Market Yolotti Frozen Yogurt Zoës Kitchen Utica Square: Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar Goldie’s Patio Grill McGill’s Olive Garden P.F. Chang’s China Bistro Pepper’s Grill Polo Grill Queenie’s Café and Bakery Starbucks Stone Horse Café Wild Fork

Midtown: Albert G’s The Alley Bangkok Thai Super Buffet Celebrity Restaurant Daylight Donuts Supershop Eddy’s Steakhouse Felini’s Cookies & Deli Golden Gate Mary Jane’s Pizza My Thai Kitchen PJ’s Sandwich Shoppe Phill’s Diner Steve’s Sundries Trenchers Delicatessen I-44/BA Interchange: Big Anthony’s BBQ Bill & Ruth’s Subs Billy Sims BBQ Binh-Le Vietnamese Chop House BBQ D’Oro Pizza Desi Wok Fiesta Cozumel Hideaway Pizza Himalayas – Aroma of India Ichiban Teriyaki Jumbo’s Burgers Las Bocas Las Tres Fronteras Le Bistro Sidewalk Cafe Mamasota’s In & Out Mazzio’s Italian Eatery Monterey’s Little Mexico Nelson’s Buffeteria Pho Da Cao Pickle’s Pub Rice Bowl Cafe Rib Crib BBQ & Grill Royal Dragon Sezchuan Express Shawkat’s Deli & Grill Speedy Gonzalez Grill Spudder Steak Stuffers USA Tacos Don Francisco Thai Siam Tokyo Garden The Tropical Restaurant & Bar Viet Huong Villa Ravenna Watts Barbecue Southern Hills: BBD II Baja Jack’s Burrito Shack Bamboo Thai Bistro Bellacino’s Pizza & Grinders Bodean’s Seafood Restaurant The Brook Camille’s Sidewalk Café Cardigan’s Charleston’s Cimarron Meat Company Dona Tina Cocina Mexicana El Samborsito Elements Steakhouse & Grille

The Fig Café and Bakery First Watch Five Guys Gencies Chicken Shack Gyros by Ali Hebert’s Specialty Meats Helen of Troy Mediterranean Cuisine India Palace La Flama Mahogany Prime Steakhouse McNellie’s South City Mr. Goodcents Subs & Pastas Naples Flatbread & Wine Bar Nordaggio’s Coffee OK Country Donut Shoppe Redrock Canyon Grill Ripe Tomato Ron’s Hamburgers and Chili Sushi Hana Japanese Fusion Thai Village Tres Amigos Mexican Grill & Cantina White Lion Zio’s Italian Kitchen Woodland Hills: Asahi Sushi Bar Baker Street Pub & Grill Billy Sims BBQ Bistro at Seville Bluestone Steakhouse and Seafood Restaurant Brothers Pizza Bucket’s Sports Bar & Grill Charlie’s Chicken Chuy’s Chopsticks El Tequila Fat Guy’s Burger Bar Fish Daddy’s Seafood Grill Fuji FuWa Asian Kitchen Firehouse Subs The Gaucho Brazilian Steakhouse Haruno Hungry Howie’s Pizza In the Raw on the Hill Jameson’s Pub Jamil’s Jason’s Deli Jay’s Original Hoagies Keo Kit’s Takee-Outee La Roma Lanna Thai Louie’s Mandarin Taste Marley’s Pizza Mekong River Mi Tierra Oliveto Italian Bistro Ri Le’s Rib Crib BBQ & Grill Ridge Grill Ron’s Hamburgers & Chili Savoy Shogun Steakhouse of Japan Siegi’s Sausage Factory & Deli

Ti Amo Italian Ristorante Wrangler’s Bar-B-Q Yasaka Steakhouse of Japan Zio’s Italian Kitchen West Tulsa: Arnold’s Old-Fashioned Hamburgers Burger House Charlie’s Chicken Go West Restaurant & Saloon Jumpin J’s Knotty Pine BBQ Linda Mar Lot a Burger Monterey’s Little Mexico Ollie’s Station Rib Crib BBQ & Grill Sandwiches & More Union Street Café Westside Grill & Delivery East Tulsa: Al Sultan Grill & Bakery Big Daddy’s All American Bar-B-Q Birrieria Felipe Bogey’s Brothers Houligan Casa San Marcos Casanova’s Restaurant Charlie’s Chicken Cherokee Deli Darby’s Restaurant El Centenario El Gallo Loco El 7 Marez El Refugio Azteca Super Taqueria Fiesta Del Mar Flame Broiler Frank’s Café Fu-Thai Garibaldi’s The Gnarley Dawg Hatfield’s Jay’s Coneys Josie’s Tamales Kimmy’s Diner Korean Garden Lot a Burger Maria’s Mexican Grill Mariscos Costa Azul Mariscos El Centenario Mekong Vietnamese Pizaa Depot Porky’s Kitchen Ron’s Hamburgers & Chili RoseRock Cafe Señor Fajita Seoul Restaurant Shiloh’s of Tulsa Shish-Kabob & Grill Stone Mill BBQ & Steakhouse Tacos San Pedro Taqueria la Cabana Timmy’s Diner

“The atmosphere at Cosmo sets the mood for good friends, food and drinks! Love it!” - Karis Jones, Owasso “Love this place & recommend it to everyone.” - Ivan Orndorff Jr, Tulsa “I try something different every time I come & have never been disappointed! Thanks for all the veggie options!” - Pamela Neuok, Broken Arrow

CAFÉ & BAR

“Friendly people work here.” - Judi Gaddy, Tulsa

3334 S. Peoria | (918) 933-4848 | www.cosmo-cafe.com 24

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by JOSHUA KLINE

etc. // Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

This is not a review, nor is it meant to promote already-popular midtown establishments. For suggestions on his next drink, email joshua.s.kline@gmail.com.

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jukebox shaped like a giant iPod occasionally blasts a country song between stretches of silence. Our bartender, a laidback fellow in his late 20s, wears a Red Sox jersey and Titleist baseball cap and speaks with a friendly, unassuming Okie drawl. He welcomes us but recoils when my friend orders a PBR and a shot of Jameson. “This is a Bud bar,” he exclaims. “I just have the basics.” Though PBR is absent, the whiskey is not a problem. We both order the same — Budweiser and Jameson ($12.50 for two shots and two beers). He quickly calls us out as interlopers. “What brings y’all down here? Never seen ya ‘round before.” And over several rounds he engages us while the curious drinkers eavesdrop.

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and it’s immediately apparent that Torchy’s is no different. Though they’re scattered across the bar, it’s clear these folks all know each other in that way barflies do — outside they may be strangers to each other, but inside, the warmth and solidarity of alcohol makes them family.  The room is spacious, more so than its exterior would suggest. Several pool tables and a shuffleboard occupy the well-lit main area, along with scattered tables and chairs. A flat-screen above the bar broadcasts a rerun of the earlier Dolphins/Steelers matchup (3428, Dolphins). Christmas lights and glowing knick-knacks emblazoned with beer and liquor logos festoon the walls and hang from the ceiling. A TouchTunes internet

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105 S. Adams Road Sand Springs

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Torchy’s

He tells us he’s originally from Paris, Texas, a small town just south of the Oklahoma border. “Torchy’s reminds me of a bar I would go to in Paris. I love it. But this place used to be a mess,” he volunteers. He tells us it was known as a “fighting bar,” rife with violence and drugs (“One of the bartenders used to shoot up in the bathroom”). Then, Torchy, who’s owned some version of the bar for decades, remodeled the place, made some staffing changes, started advertising and placed the list of rules at the entrance. Now, it’s a comfortable home for blue-collar workers and area residents looking to decompress and find respite from the day’s grind. Poker games are occasionally held in a front corner of the room. “Most of the guys that come in here now are in their 50s, been drinkin’ since they were 12.” As he says this, a young, tired-looking couple approaches the bar. “Two rattlesnakes and a pitcher,” the kid mumbles. With that, our bartender disappears to make the syrupy-sweet whiskey shot. The jukebox kicks on and a gloriously weird country/hip hop mash-up fills the room. As we finish our drinks and prepare to leave, the bartender waves and gives us a friendly smile. “Come back and see me,” he says. And he means it.

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ou can spot it from a block away: the old Braum’s building wrapped in neon signage, a lone glowing beacon of hot pink planted in the parking lot of a drab Sand Springs shopping center dressed in varying shades of gray, a stone’s throw from Highway 412.  The first thing you notice when approaching the front entrance of Torchy’s is a circular, red-andwhite sign that reads “Torchy’s Club Rules.” The rules are split into two columns — ­ the “Yes’s” and the “No’s.” Yes, Unwind. Yes, Relax. Yes, Enjoy Yourself. Most importantly, Yes, Spend Money (“Because my grand babies Porsche payment is due,” a parenthetical aside offers).  The “No’s” are surprisingly gritty for a neighborhood bar in the suburbs: No drugs. No gang colors. No bad manners (“Must Smell Good,” another parenthetical clarifies). “We Will Call the Police. Thanks, Torchy.” Duly warned, I press my face into my shirt and hope nicotine-tinted Speed Stick falls under the “smells good” category. I’d rather they not call the police.  It’s 11 p.m. on a Sunday night and the roads are still covered in snow and ice from the previous week’s winter storm. The place is nearly empty. When we enter, a handful of patrons who braved the inclement weather turn in unison to face us. At most bars, Sunday night is a night for regulars,

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Follow it all the way to Torchy’s, but remember to play by the rules

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A neon beacon summons

TAKE A DIVE is a running column in which Joshua Kline explores the fringes of drinking culture in Tulsa County by visiting the dives, holes, beer bars and neighborhood pubs that keep Green Country drunk and happy. 25

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The Soundpony // 409 N. Main St. the bartenders:  Lindsey Killebrew and Amy Pullen the cocktail: The Pony Shot the ingredients: One hollowed-out hot dog wiener, one ounce of blackberry-flavored brandy the secret: Use an apple corer to turn your wiener into the perfect vessel, which doubles as a tasty postshot snack.

Pony Shot

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I don’t always spend New Year’s in Tulsa

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But when I do, it’s at my favorite bars.

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$1 Domestics till 8pm, $3 Wells all day everyday $7.50 Buckets after 8pm

Voted Best Karaoke Bar with Rick Berry

106 S. Atlanta (Owasso) 918-274-8202

1120 S. Harvard 918-584-4867

8215 E. Regal Court 918-364-2625

1849 S. Aspen Ave. 918-251-1973

Broken Arrow’s Hottest New Pub

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Voted Best “Hole in the wall” 8 years in a row

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Voted Broken Arrow’s Best Bar

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

1385 N. Aspen 918-286-1990

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Midtowns Hidden Gem

South Tulsa’s Newest Hot Spot Come try our food & specials

5058 S. 79th E. Ave 918-627-3777

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6529 E. 31st St 918-664-5078

6214 S. Sheridan Rd 918-491-1200

8921 S. Yale 918-921-3530

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w r itin g his own

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Photos by Evan Taylor

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by JOHN LANGDON

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Tracy Letts on bringing his most famous work from stage to screen, his lasting love of Oklahoma, & what it’s like to best Tom Hanks

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But I was able to come down for the first day, the table read, and this is when all the people arrive. They get a chance to read it out loud for the first time, to ask me questions, find out some things about me, see if I can give them some insight. And it was a nervous first day, because it’s always a nervous first day. First days are nervous. People showing up, and they want to please. They don’t want to humiliate themselves. Everyone wants to make a good impression. And in this instance, these are actors who are finding out who their sisters and mothers and cousins and lovers are going to be. So the stakes feel pretty high on that first day, though the

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TL: That process is a painstaking process. One thing that’s been common to all three is that we’ve never — and when I say we, I'm referring to myself and the director — we’ve never approached it by saying, “What can we cut? What can we lose? How much can we cut? What does our page count have to be?” We’ve always approached it, I hope, a bit more

TL: I went down to Bartlesville for the very first day. I wasn’t able to be there for any of the shooting, which is probably just as well. I don’t know that a writer’s real helpful on a movie set.

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TV: This is your third play that you’ve turned into a screenplay. What is that process like?

TV: What do you think of the actors in the film? Have you spoken to them about it?

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Because the film is so different from the play, as films necessarily have to be, my response to it is complicated. I think the film’s terrific. I think it’s very recognizably “August: Osage County,” and I think (Director) John Wells did a lovely job. I think it contains a lot of terrific performances, so I’m excited that the movie’s going to get out there and that people are going to get a chance to see it who wouldn’t get a chance to see the play otherwise.

I heard (George) Clooney being interviewed at some sort of panel discussion about the film, and they were asking him about that, about losing material, and he said, “Look, I’ve never taken part in a film that didn’t lose material in the editing room.” Well, that’s right. That’s why it’s the editing room. So we lost a lot of material out of the play, moving from the play to the screenplay, and then moving from the filmed material to the finished edited product, we lost a lot more material there. That’s how we wind up with a two-hour film, as opposed to a three-plus-hour play. So it’s a slow, painstaking process.

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Tracy Letts: Well, I think it’s great. I’m probably a biased observer. I mean, my reaction to it is a complicated one, not only because the story is so personal to me and my family, but also because I’ve lived with the play for so many years — as a written work, and then as a performed work, and then as the many iterations of it as a performed work.

At the same time, you’re trying to preserve the things that made the play popular or successful to begin with. You don’t want to lose all the language, all the humor, all the characterization that’s in it, so you spend some time trying to find that balance. But then there also comes a place after all that highfalutin talk, there comes a place where you get down to it and you say, “All right, we’ve gotta lose some stuff.” And that’s happened on every film that's ever been made.

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Tulsa Voice: First of all, what do you think of the film?

thoughtfully than that. We’ve said, “How can we tell this story in pictures? Where are the places where moving pictures can substitute for spoken word?” That’s the governing principle going into it, trying to figure out the ways in which it’s a movie and not a play.

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racy Letts wrote the screenplay for “August: Osage County,” the upcoming star-studded, Oscar-hopeful, Oklahoma-based (and shot) dramatic comedy, based on his Pulitzer Prize-winning play. This is no new task for the Tulsa-born playwright and actor, who also wrote screenplay adaptations of his first two plays, “Killer Joe” and “Bug,” which both became William Friedkin films. This year, Letts broke out as an actor, winning a Tony Award for his performance in the Broadway revival of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf ?” and entered the households of millions when he joined the cast of Showtime’s “Homeland” as Sen. Andrew Lockhart. Letts was in town over Thanksgiving to visit his mother (and best-selling author) Billie Letts, and we caught up with him to talk about the Oklahomans who inspired “August,” the dichotomy of writing and performing, and his Tony win against the likes of Tom Hanks.

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The title of Tracy Letts’ award-winning play and upcoming film comes from the title of a poem by one of Letts’ mentors, Howard Starks, a poet and professor at Southeastern Oklahoma State University in Durant. “I've always treasured Howard's poems,” Letts said. “Several of them are real touchstones in my life, one of those being ‘August: Osage County.’ I thought it was just a great jumping off place for me, in that I found the title so evocative. It said so much about a few of the things I was trying to get out in my play. And, you know, the poem itself almost runs counter to the themes of the piece, but it's still evocative in that way.”

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

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Dust hangs heavy on the dull catalpas; the cicadas are scraping interminably at the heat-thickened air— no rain in three weeks, no real breeze all day. In the dim room, the blinds grimly endure the deadly light, protecting the machined air, as the watchers watch the old lady die. “I’m eighty-six,” she said; “it’s high time— now John’s gone.” And to the town’s new doctor, “You’re a good boy” (she had a great-grandson who was older), “so don’t fiddle around. When fighting was needed, I fought— but I’m all fought out.” and later— “John left when he was due—well—I’m due now.” “I promise,” he whispered; “I’ve learned when right is right.” Now, her daughters sit—and her granddaughters— and at night, her grandsons— and her pampered sons-in-law. One of these, not known for eloquence— or tears—said, last week, “Ola, chance gave me a mother, but God gave me two.” She smiled at that, “yes, I had one boy; God gave me seven more.” She lies under the sheet, thin as one of her old kitchen knives, honed by years and use to fragile sharpness, but too well-tempered to break just yet. It’s two days since she spoke— “Don’t cry, Bessie; puppies just die, that’s all.” (A girl again, gentling baby sister.) All the watchers can do is wipe her dry mouth with gentle wetness. They watch her old hands and murmur— How many biscuits and pans of gravy? How many babies soothed and bee-stings daubed with bluing? How many lamp-wicks trimmed? How many berries picked? words circling as her quiet breath winds down to silence. No sobs, for she was due, but tears, a few, selfish ones, before the calls, the “arrangements” to put her to bed, beside John, on the dusty hilltop. Standing there, we look up from the dry clods and the durable grey stone, upwards— expectantly— westwards— where the clouds grow dark.

truth is it’s just the first day of work. And their questions were traditional “actor questions” that get asked at that point. “Who am I?” “What do I want?” “What am I doing to get it?” “Tell me some more about where this character comes from.” They're just looking for some very general things before they begin to color it in. And I’ve spoken to them a great deal since the movie’s been completed. They seem pleased with the product. They seem happy with the film, and they’re extremely excited to see how people are reacting to it. Audiences seem to be responding very favorably to the piece, and so I think they’re pleased. TV: How was the decision made to shoot in Oklahoma? TL: Well, John Wells was trying to figure out where to shoot the film, and the Oklahoma Film Commission was working hard to get the movie made here. They thought it was important it was shot here. They've been embarrassed about the movie “Oklahoma!” not being shot in Oklahoma for a very long time. They didn’t want to let that happen again. So John, doing his due diligence, said to his producers, “Well we ought to go to Oklahoma to at least look at it and see if it’s doable.” So he came here and he went to Osage County and he looked around and said, “Well you have to do it here. There’s no place else that looks like this.” Not only because of that particular part of the country, the Tallgrass Prairie, but John also pointed out that there’s a quality of light here in Oklahoma that is different than you get elsewhere. I brought my wife with me on this trip to Oklahoma. She had never been here before, and I brought her on this trip, and she saw it immediately. We went outside and she was like, “My god, the quality of light here is really special.” And it is. TV: Are there any concerns that the dark story in “August: Osage County” will stereotype Oklahoma in a less than positive way? TL: Oh … crap. I don’t even know where to begin. First of all, it’s a very specific story about a specific family, so there is no way in hell that we are saying, “This is what all the families in Oklahoma are like.” There are as many different kinds of families in Oklahoma as there are families. The truth is, too, that I think we Oklahomans have been stereotyped so often in popular culture. We’re so often shown as hicks and rubes and rednecks. The family in “August: Osage County” are, by and large, academics. They’re educated people. Those are the people I grew up around. Now, there's a crazy-ass family in the center of it, but all families have complication to them. I think that if anything, I'm blowing up some stereotypes about Oklahoma. TV: What do you like most about Oklahoma? TL: What I like best about Oklahoma are the rich, funny, fascinating, complex people that I’ve known here. They’re the people that made me. Not just my family, but friends and friends of family. People often talk to me after they see “August: Osage County” about the women. They say, “How do you write middle-aged women so well?” I say, “Well, I've known some strong personalities in my life. Some of them were middle-aged women, and they came from Oklahoma.” TV: Let’s talk about your work as an actor. And congratulations on your Tony win, by the way. TL: Thank you. TV: Have you ever considered, or would you ever consider acting in a work that you’d written?

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TL: I love both. I don’t think I would ever give up one for the other. The writing career has for some years now sort of surpassed my acting career, but then in the last few years my acting career seems to be catching up a little bit. I’ve always liked doing both, and I think they both make me better at the other thing.

TL: Well, hell, I don’t know, you’d have to ask him. He sure was a sweet guy. I got a chance to meet all those fellows and see all of their shows. I was really pleased to be in their company. They’re really lovely guys. So I don’t know. To tell you the truth, I thought they had done Tom a disservice. These people, they write all these goddamned prediction sites about who’s going to win and who’s a lock to win and all this stuff and, boy, if you read all that stuff, you’d have thought Tom Hanks was just going to win the award. I thought after awhile that they really should not do that. They’re not doing him any favors. Maybe they made him feel bad. I don’t want to make Tom Hanks feel bad!

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TV: Which do you enjoy most, acting or writing?

TV: One final question: What was Tom Hanks' reaction to losing the Tony to you?

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TL: Well, never say never, I guess, but I really have no interest in it. I just don’t think I’d do either job as well if I was trying to do both at the same time. They’re both hard jobs. I find them hard. I’m not a savant; I work hard at the things that I do. I just think if I split my focus in that way, I wouldn’t do either job as well. Orson Welles is not entering the building any time soon.

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 “August: Osage County,” originally slated for a Christmas Day release, will now open in Tulsa theaters on Jan. 10.

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“You have to be conscious of the fact that you’re intruding upon people’s lives,” Wells told NewsOK’s Brandy McDonnell last month. “They’ll initially be excited and interested by the idea that there’s a film shooting, but that wears off pretty quick when you’ve got your driveway jammed up with a big truck.” The amiability of the cast and crew was appreciated by he locals. Clooney was “really friendly, he seemed laid back and casual,” Bartlesvillian Jerry Stahl told Fox News. But not only did the people say nice things of the production, the production had nice things to say of Oklahoma — particularly of the progressive Oklahoma Film Enhancement Rebate system, without which “August: Osage County” would not have been shot in its namesake location. “The film wouldn’t have been made here without the [incentives] and the film office and Jill Simpson and her people,” Wells told HispanicBusiness.com. The state incentive offers to cover 37 percent of the production costs of a major film, and has posted positive economic gains for every year it has been properly funded. Despite the Oklahoma Film and Music Office’s hard work and clear success, the law has been under attack at the Capitol and is set to expire in 2014. Left unfunded, the stars could very well disappear, along with a vibrant future for Oklahoma’s cultural prestige.

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The signs that a high-profile Hollywood movie is shooting near Tulsa begin to bubble up in ways you don’t see on the news. A bartender friend who mixed George Clooney’s drinks one night, or a gleeful shot on someone’s Instagram feed of Juliette Lewis waiting in line at Phat Philly’s. Somewhere, I knew, Ewan McGregor was holed up in a hotel room — perhaps over at The Mayo — tweeting about his new and unfamiliar surroundings. Maybe they were all there, on one rented out floor full of stars. That cadre of Hollywood legendry, including Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts, were gathered together in late 2012 to bring the words and characters of Tulsa-born playwright Tracy Letts to cinematic life with their film adaptation of his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, “August: Osage County.” Taking place in Pawhuska, “August” introduces us to the Weston clan, who come together at their ancestral home to mourn the death of the family’s patriarch. Of course, when sundered siblings are reunited under trying circumstances, emotions and resentments can (and do) set off the fireworks. The Tennessee Williams-inspired tale is a darkly comedic examination of familial dynamics, though not as black as Letts’ previous works, “Killer Joe” and “Bug.” By October, filming began in Bartlesville and Pawhuska, which had just played host to hometown prodigy Terrance Malick’s newest film, “To the Wonder.” Before the sheen of Affleck had worn off, locals were being star-struck all over again. Director John Wells (“The Company Men”) along with producer Clooney seemed keenly aware of the excited hospitality of the local residents.

Julia Roberts, Meryl Streep and Julianne Nicholson star in “August: Osage County.” Photo by Claire Folger/The Weinstein Company

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• H O L I DAY E V E N T G U I D E •

by ANGELA CHAMBERS

Between obligatory shopping trips and family get-togethers, Tulsa offers plenty of activities for your enjoyment (and dare we say escape?) until New Year’s Day. Whether you need to entertain the kids or have an adults-only evening, theaters, nightclubs, museums and more are there to keep your spirits high through the remaining season. Here’s a roundup of our favorite events:

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Merry music If you can still snag a ticket, Cain’s Ballroom will host a free 98.5 KVOO Jingle Jam at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 18. Performers include country artists Brett Eldredge, “American Idol” winner Scotty McCreery, Uncle Kracker, Charlie Worsham and Love & Theft. The radio station is giving away tickets to listeners. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Trans-Siberian Orchestra’s music has become as traditional as “Jingle Bells.” See the group perform “The Lost Christmas Eve” rock opera Dec. 19 at the BOK Center. Another radio station — rock alternative Z-104.5 The Edge — will present its Christmas concert Dec. 21 at Brady Theater. Don your ugly Christmas sweater and join the party with bands Thirty Seconds to Mars, New Politics, Filter and IAMDYNAMITE. Broken Arrow native Kathryn Zaremba comes home for Christmas with Kathryn Zaremba, an evening of music and conversation with her husband, Jeremy Ney, at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center on Dec. 21. Also on the 21st is the “Home for the Holidays II: All about a Bubble” featuring Tulsa-based musicians Jason Ferguson, K-Sides, Roots and Lost Things, and Zeke Duhon at Vanguard Music Hall. For jazz lovers, the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame will welcome inductee Joey Crutcher in a Christmas gospel concert Dec. 22. The Gospel Workshop Choir of America will join the hall-of-famer.

Bring the kids During their time off from school, get the kids out of the house for a little creativity. The Gilcrease Museum is planning a Winter Workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 26 and 27. Each day, three different art stations will have activities such as making paper ornaments and snowflake sun catchers. Plus, participants can visit the museum’s collections. Children ages 4-15 with an adult may attend. Cost is $5 per child. The Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education is planning a Winter Break Art Camp Dec. 30 to Jan. 3. Separate classes for ages 5-8 and 9-12 are in the mornings and afternoons. Each class is $25, and parents may choose to send their children to one or more classes – even the full week. For an additional $5, daycare is extended until 5 p.m. The young artists will experiment with projects for the Chinese New Year, Olympic games, frosty friends and other subjects using mixed media. Outdoors, Chandler Park is planning a Winter Break Day Camp with hikes, scavenger hunts and field trips. Ages 6-12 may join the camp on Dec. 20, 26, 27 and 30 or Jan. 2 and 3 from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Cost is $80. Learn about winter holidays around the world at the preschool story time from 11 a.m. to noon Dec. 19 at the Skiatook Public Library. Newborns through 6-year-olds and their caregivers will gather for stories, songs and a craft. No cost to attend.

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Week-long Kwanzaa celebrations begin Dec. 26, and north Tulsa’s Rudisill Regional Library will host a gathering at 6 p.m. to kick-off the festivities. Kwanzaa, which is based on harvest festivals, comes from the Swahili phrase, “matunda ya kwanza,” meaning “first fruits.” Each of the seven days honors African culture and community with a different principle. To mark the first day’s theme — unity — the library invites families to join together for singing, dancing, playing musical instruments and reciting poems. To remember relatives who have passed away, anyone present may light a candle and speak about their loved ones. The free event includes light snacks and drinks. Those interested in sharing artistic talents may contact Alicia Latimer at the library by calling 918-548-7645. On Dec. 31, families have a large feast called karamu with African dishes. Celebrations continue until Jan. 1 — the day gifts are given.

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Classic tales and a cheeky opera are part of this year’s holiday-themed repertoire. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center is presenting three shows this week. See the miserly Scrooge find redemption in the American Theatre Company’s production of “A Christmas Carol” Dec. 18-23. Watch the Sugar Plum Fairy pirouette to Tchaikovsky’s score in “The Nutcracker” Dec. 20-22 — performed by the Tulsa Ballet. With the $99 VIP package, guests will receive a souvenir nutcracker along with a post-show backstage tour and dancer meet-and-greet. Also at the PAC, Theatre Pops will perform “The Eight: Reindeer Monologues” Dec. 19-22. Santa is accused of sexual harassment by one of his reindeer, leading to a media frenzy in this comedy by television writer and playwright Jeff Goode. Fans of the film may see Tulsa Project Theatre’s “Miracle on 34th Street: The Musical” Dec. 19-24 at the Cox Business Center. Leave your cynical spirit at home. For the unconventional, tripped-out Texas rock group Attic Ted will present “Mary’s Little Secret” at Soundpony Dec. 22. The Christmas “opera” speculates alternatives to Mary’s conception story. It’s not for the faint-hearted — ages 21 and older only.

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Admire downtown Tulsa’s architecture while ice skating or by carriage ride at the annual Winterfest (continuing until Jan. 5). The 44-foot outdoor Christmas tree — Oklahoma’s tallest — sits near the BOK Center. Other activities include live entertainment, a Red Cross blood drive and half-price days (with donations of nonperishable food items, children’s books and clothing). Shop local at 10 holiday pop-up shops in the Deco District through Dec. 28. Items include jewelry, bicycles, books and more. Every Wednesday, shops and restaurants will have $2 deals. Santa and Mrs. Claus will make an appearance, along with street performers and carolers. Live music is performed each Friday and Saturday evening.

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Does the season really begin before we see the first home or tree brighten the dark winter nights? Feel better after a bad day by driving (or taking a carriage ride) through Rhema Bible Church in Broken Arrow. Starting with an impressive 60,000 lights 31 years ago, the show has grown to two million. See it now through Jan. 1. In west Tulsa, Chandler Park’s Holiday Lights on the Hill is a three-mile stretch of lights and decorations. Festivities (through Dec. 31) include carriage rides and a visit from Santa. Stay close to Tulsa’s heart with a self-guided tour. Start by taking in downtown decorations, which were first presented Dec. 1 during a progressive lighting. Next, wind your way through midtown streets to see beautifully decorated 100-year-old homes. Finally, drive among the trees adorned with white lights at Utica Square.

Get down.. . town

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Light up the night

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PERFORMING ARTS ‘A Christmas Carol’, ‘The Nutcracker’, and ‘The Eight: Reindeer Monologues’ Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. Second St. tulsapac.org 918-596-7111 ‘Miracle on 34th Street: The Musical’ Cox Business Center 100 Civic Center coxcentertulsa.com 1-877-TULSA-CC Attic Ted’s ‘Mary’s Little Secret’ Soundpony 409 N. Main St. thesoundpony.com 918-582-PONY

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For tickets, show times and more information:

D E C. 20-22

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Trans-Siberian Orchestra BOK Center 200 S. Denver bokcenter.com 918-894-4219

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Z-104.5 The Edge Christmas concert Brady Theater 105 W. Brady St. 866-977-6849 edgetulsa.com

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MERRY MUSIC 98.5 KVOO Jingle Jam Cain’s Ballroom 423 N. Main St. kvoo.com

‘Home for the Holidays II: All about a Bubble’ Vanguard Music Hall 222 N. Main St. thevanguardtulsa.com Joey Crutcher Christmas gospel concert Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame 111 E. First St. okjazz.org 918-281-8600

DOWNTOWN SCENE Winterfest Third & Denver tulsawinterfest.com Holiday pop-up shops Deco District Between Fifth & Sixth in the Enterprise & Thompson buildings decodistricttulsa.com CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES Winter Workshop Gilcrease Museum 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Rd gilcrease.utulsa.edu 918-596-2700 Winter Break Art Camp Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education 124 E. Brady utulsa.edu/facilities/ zarrow-center 918-631-4401 Winter Break Day Camp Chandler Park 6500 W. 21st St. parks.tulsacounty.org 918-591-6053 Preschool story time: winter holidays Skiatook Public Library 316 E. Rogers, Skiatook tulsalibrary.org/Skiatook 918-549-7676 CELEBRATE 2014 Crystal Ball IDL Ballroom 230 E. First St. tulsacrystalball.com Stoney LaRue and Uncle Lucius concert Cain’s Ballroom 423 N. Main St. cainsballroom.com 918-584-2306 NYE Rave Vanguard Music Hall 222 N. Main St. thevanguardtulsa.com

HOLIDAY LIGHTS Rhema Christmas lights Rhema Bible Church 1025 W. Kenosha, Broken Arrow rhemabiblechurch.com 918-258-1588

Brady New Year’s Eve Brady Theater 105 W. Brady St. bradytheater.com 866-977-6849

Holiday Lights on the Hill Chandler Park 6500 W. 21st St. parks.tulsacounty.org 918-591-6053

Midnight @ The Mayo The Mayo Hotel 111 W. Fifth St. themayohotel.com 918-582-6296

KWANZAA Unity celebration Rudisill Regional Library 1520 N. Hartford tulsalibrary.org/rudisill 918-548-7645

Polar Bear Plunge River West Festival Park tatur.org/polarplunge 918-244-6918

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Gifts for Pets & Pet Lovers!

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Planet Dog Orbee-Tuff Mint Chew Toy West Paw Design Nature Nap Beds

West Paw Design Merry Bones

OPEN ON SUNDAYS IN DECEMBER

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Located in The Farm Shopping Center at 51st & Sheridan • 10 - 6 Mon. - Sat. 918-624-2600

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Our Bakery Case is Brimming with Holiday Treats!

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Planet Dog Orbee-Tuff Coal Chew Toy

arts & culture music film & tv etc. // Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

3336 S. Peoria Avenue • 918-949-6950 • www.idaredboutique.com facebook.com/idaredtulsa • Mon-Wed 10:30-7:30, Thurs-Sat 10:30-9:00 • GIFT GUIDE •

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Children’s Clothing & Gift Shop 918-551-6867 3718 S. Peoria Ave. facebook.com/littlestash

May your days be

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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Merry & Bright

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1338 E 15th St • Tulsa • 918.949.6089 • StyleLabTulsa.com 36

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GIFT GUIDE

37

• GIFT GUIDE •

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music film & tv etc. // Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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Celebrate

the new year

YOUR GUIDE TO RINGING IN NEW YEAR’S EVE AND DAY by ANGELA CHAMBERS A number of Tulsa locales will help you ring in the new year. The IDL Ballroom will host its fourth annual Crystal Ball featuring a masquerade party with local DJs, a photo booth, balloon drop at midnight, champagne and dessert. The centerpieces, chandeliers and walls will be decked out in a “crystal wonderland.” Each guest will receive a complimentary mask. Fans of country music may join Stoney LaRue and Uncle Lucius for a New Year’s Eve concert at Cain’s Ballroom. Tulsa-based DJ Cole Patterson will mix trap, house and dubstep at the NYE Rave at Vanguard Music Hall. Knic Knac (Patrick Kaltenbacher), also a Tulsa native, will join in with dubstep and electronic trap. Additional artists to be announced. Brady Theater’s party features the Brady Orchestra, a live DJ and a champagne toast at midnight. Also joining the gathering is Tulsa-based band The Sellouts, which plays a variety of styles — from classic rock to hip hop. Another local group, the Jumpshots, performs hits from various decades.

Midnight @ The Mayo includes a one-night stay at The Mayo Hotel Dec. 31 with two tickets to the “Neon Nights” party featuring music by internationally known DJ Brandon Olds. You’ll also have access to the penthouse and stunning Crystal Ballroom. Hors d’oeuvres begin at 8 p.m. followed by midnight snacks and a champagne toast. Stay an extra night on Jan. 1 for $99. For the brave (or crazy), overcome your hangover with the Polar Bear Plunge on New Year’s Day. Adults may try some liquid courage — Rumple Minze peppermint schnapps — to get them going. The 2-mile run begins at 1 p.m. from River West Festival Park. Participants will continue north along the paved running path until they reach the Westport on the River apartments, where they’ll jump into three ice-cold pools. Medals are retrieved from the final pool. The particularly courageous have the option to submerge themselves in an ice bath for two seconds during the last 100 yards. At the end, runners will have a large, warm tent as well as a hot tub and two bonfires. No need to stay in the wet clothes, as changing rooms are available. Children and adults are welcome to join the run.

THE TULSA VOICE

eventlistings

// contents

“2 Bucks on Boston”

Mod’s Coffee & Crepes

BOK Center // Arvest Winterfest – Ice-skating under the Tulsa skyline. // $5 - $10 // through 1/5 Garden Diva // Holiday Art Sale & Celebration with live music from Ray Rodgers & Jared Tyler // 12/19, 4 p.m. // 8 p.m.

Handel’s Messiah // Tulsa Oratorio Chorus and instrumentalists from the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will present selected movements of G.F. Handel’s signature work. // $20, $5 students. 12/19 at 7:30 p.m. // Lorton Performance Center; 550 S. Gary Pl. (918) 631-5722

Isaac Witty // Featured on Late Night with David Letterman and Garrison Keiller’s A Prairie Home Companion, Witty delivers a bottomless arsenal of precisely worded jokes. // $10. 12/20 at 9 p.m., 10:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St. Christmas with Kathryn Zaremba // Broken Arrow native Kathryn Zaremba comes home for an evening of music and conversation with her husband, Jeremy Ney. Zaremba rose to fame in 1993 when she originated the role of Annie in an off-Broadway production of Annie Warbucks, and has recently launched a house of design, Kate Zaremba Company. Ney is the Music Specialist at Washington D.C.’s Phillips Collection, where he produces a chamber

Reynolds Center // TU Men’s Basketball vs. Grand Canyon // 7 p.m. // Wed. Dec. 18 Spirit Bank Event Center // Tulsa 66ers vs. Reno Bighorns // 7 p.m. // Thurs. Dec. 19

John Evans // The Former emcee of the Tulsa Comedy Club returns home for a string of shows at the Loony Bin. Evans has opened for such comedic giants as Hedberg, Chappelle and Carlin. Feature comic: Brian Stevens. // 12/26, 8 p.m. $2; 12/27-28 at 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., $10. // The Loony Bin, 6808 S Memorial Dr. Ste. 234; (918) 392-5653

BOK Center // Tulsa Oilers vs. Quad City Mallards // 7:35 p.m. // Fri. Dec. 20

Comedy Night at Club 209 // Justin Tomlinson hosts. // 12/26 at 10 p.m.

Cox Business Center // Tulsa Revolution vs. Dallas Sidekicks // 2 p.m. // Sat. Dec. 21

Steve Lancaster // The comic performs at the Comedy Parlor. // $10. 12/27 at 7:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

BOK Center // Tulsa Oilers vs. Allen Americans // 7:05 p.m. // Thurs. Dec. 26

RFX // RFX brings you the crossroads of music and mime. This improvised a capella stomp troupe creates inspiration from sound. // $10. 12/27 at 9 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St. Michael Jordan Dunn // The comic performs at the Comedy Parlor. // $10. 12/27 at 10:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St. Squeaky Clean Stand Up // Stand up comedy that’s appropriate for all ages. Featuring Jane Bevan, Hilton Price, Matthew Spruill and Michelle Vandusen. // $10. 12/28 at 7:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St. Blue Late Special with Jeff Brown // This absurdist late night talk show features guest interviews, fake news, music and audience participation games with prizes. // $10. 12/28 at 10:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

Mabee Center // ORU Men’s Basketball vs. Dallas Baptist // 1 p.m. // Sat. Dec. 21 BOK Center // Tulsa Oilers vs. Missouri Mavericks // 7:35 p.m. // Sat. Dec. 21

BOK Center // Tulsa Oilers vs. Wichita Thunder // 7:35 p.m. // Fri. Dec. 27 SpiritBank Event Center // Tulsa 66ers vs. Austin Toros // 7 p.m. // Fri. Dec. 27 Cox Business Center // Tulsa Revolution vs. Texas Strikers // 6 p.m. // Sat. Dec. 28

VOICE T H E

T U L S A

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

Miracle on 34th Street // Tulsa Project Theatre presents a musical adaptation of this holiday favorite. // $28.80-$39. 12/19-21, 23 at 7:30 p.m., 22, 24 at 2 p.m. // Cox Business Center; 100 Civic Center; 918 894-4350

The Chairold // A combination of two longfrom improve techniques, “Chairs” and “The Harold”, characters and relationships developed through a game of musical chairs provide inspiration for scenes that are entertaining and will keep you laughing. // $10. 12/20 at 7:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

Sports

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Claude Stuart // Recognizable from several TV appearances on The Tonight Show and Last Comic Standing among others, Claude Stuart combines physical comedy reminiscent of Steve Martin, Robin Williams and Jim Carrey with the crowd interaction of Don Rickles to be “the world’s first physical insult comedian.” Feature comic: Henry Coleman, Opener: Hilton Price. // 12/18, 8 p.m., $7; 12/19, 8 p.m., $2; 12/20-21, 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., $10. // The Loony Bin, 6808 S Memorial Dr. Ste. 234; (918) 392-5653

The Nutcracker // Tulsa Ballet’s annual production of Tchaikovsky’s timeless ballet about a girl who dreams her toy nutcracker becomes her prince. // $20-$99. (VIP Experience tickets include souvenir nutcracker.) 12/20-22 at 7 p.m., 21-22 at 2 p.m. // Chapman Music Hall, Tulsa Performing Arts Center; 110 E 2nd St.; (918) 596-7122

The Cheril Vendetti Experience // Clio Award-winning entertainer, comedienne, tv personality and comical cookbook writer, Cheril Vendetti performs her musical holiday show. // $10. 12/21 at 9 p.m., 10:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

etc.

A Christmas Carol // American Theatre Company’s annual production of the Dickens classic. // $24, $21 seniors and students, $12 kids. 12/18-21, 23 at 7:30 p.m., 22 at 2 p.m. // John H. Williams Theatre, Tulsa Performing Arts Center; 110 E 2nd St.; (918) 596-7122

The Spontaniacs! // Performing together since 2007, The Spontaniacs! mix short sketch work with improv, games and scenes created by live suggestions from the audience. // $10. 12/21 at 7:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

Matt Sadler // A winner of the HBO Talent Search, Matt Saddler comes to Tulsa for a Special Engagement at the Loony Bin after recently headlining both the Out of Bounds Comedy Festival and the Moontower Comedy Festival. Feature comic: David Beck, Opener: Ron Shively. // 12/31, 7:30 p.m.: $12.50. 10 p.m. $25. Engagement extends through 1/4. // The Loony Bin, 6808 S Memorial Dr. Ste. 234; (918) 392-5653

film & tv

Performing Arts

Raw Meat: Commedia Senza Arte // The Mix Theatre Company’s Commedia Senza Arte combines the formats of the traditional Commedia dell’Arte with that of modern long-form improvisational theatre. The characters’ basic habits and mannerisms never change, but everything from their names to their professions, lifestyles, and backgrounds are entirely made up on the spot. // $5. 12/19 at 9 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

The Drunkard and The Olio // A Tulsa tradition for more than 60 years, Tulsa Spotlighters perform “The Drunkard and The Olio” every Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. // $15, $13 seniors, $10 kids. // Tulsa Spotlight Theatre; 1381 Riverside Dr. (918) 587-5030

Sunday Night Stand Up // Finish off the weekend laughing with some of Tulsa’s up and coming stand up comics // $5. 12/29 at 7:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

music

Mohawk Park // Freezin’ for a Reason // Whether you’re young or young at heart, all ages will enjoy running or walking for a good cause through the scenic trails of Mohawk Park. Freezin’ for a Reason 10K run/walk is $30 and 2K fun run/walk is $20. Register online at www.LIFESeniorServices.org or call SeniorLine at (918) 664-9000 or in-person at LIFE Senior Services, 5950 E. 31st St. All proceeds benefit LIFE Senior Services, a non-profit Tulsa Area United Way organization specializing in services that promote healthy aging and aging-in-place for seniors, as well as support for family caregivers. // 12/28, 9 a.m.

The Eight: Reindeer Monologues // A North Pole scandal ensues when one of Santa’s reindeer accuses him of sexual harassment in this comedy by Jeff Goode, presented by Theatre Pops. // $15, $10 seniors and students. 12/19-21 at 8 p.m., 22 at 2 p.m. // Charles E. Norman Theatre, Tulsa Performing Arts Center; 110 E 2nd St.; (918) 596-7122

music series. // $26. 12/21 at 7:30 p.m. // Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center; 701 Main St., Broken Arrow, (918) 259-5778

arts & culture

Elote // Meet Lucha Claus // Luchador Wrestling, margaritas and tacos! // 12/21, 8 p.m. – 11 p.m.

Rumble-ish: The Improv Competition // The audience are the judges as some of Tulsa’s best improv comedians compete for the coveted Golden Ponyboy. // Pay what you can. Every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. // Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

featured

Events

food & drink

The Deco District celebrates “2 Bucks on Boston” with $2 deals up and down the street. Elote has $2 Puffy Tacos, The Vault has $2 High Life, $2 Hot Cocoa and Gelato at Mod’s, $2 1/2 lb gummies at Candy Castle and much more.  Live music in the streets, Pop Up Shopping and free photos with Santa! 12/18, 5 p.m // 9 p.m.

news & commentary

12/18

F R E E • I N D E P E N D E N T • A LT E R N AT I V E

NEXT ISSUE: JANUARY 2, 2014

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THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured

Let’s talk about sex

“My Maggie” by Joan Snyder Cour tesy of Hebrew Union College Museum

A Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art exhibit explores sexual identity

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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etc.

film & tv

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arts & culture

by BRITT GREENWOOD

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D

oes sexual orientation fall on a spectrum? Dwelling in the Bible Belt can create a hush-hush demeanor toward sexual diversity. “The Sexuality Spectrum” shatters the smokescreen and creates a vessel for dialogue — especially in Tulsa. Traveling from the Hebrew Union College in New York, “The Sexuality Spectrum” showcases more than 50 contemporary artists. For a religious museum to hold such a daring show in New York and now Tulsa is a bold move, especially in the typically conservative Jewish culture. Karen York, curator at the Sherwin Miller Museum, has no reservations about the exhibit. “I grew up here in Tulsa,” York said. “My family has been here since 1845. Having grown up here, I have always known that Tulsa has always had a strong and diverse arts community. In the arts, Tulsa will accept some controversial topics even though we are a very Christian city.” The subject matter of the exhibit is wide-ranging, reaching far beyond a Jewish audience. “The images are about relation-

ships between women and women, men and men — about parents and children,” York said. “It really covers so many more topics than just ‘The Sexuality Spectrum.’ It covers community attitudes and interpersonal relationships. It might be a little more than people expect from the title.” Hebrew Union College Museum Curator Laura Kruger held focus groups with artists regarding their experiences as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning and intersex. The words “isolation,” “exclusion” and “marginalization” were heavily repeated among the groups. “They shared their long years of concealment as well as the wrenching experience of coming out — their relationships with family members, employers and friends that disintegrated; and the search for life-long partners,” Kruger said. Among the pieces in the exhibit is artist Judy Chicago’s examination of the torture of homosexual Jews by the Nazis during the Holocaust. Another is photographer Trix Rosen’s take on biblical stances through her photo

depicting a human figure wrapped in scripture — Leviticus 18:22 — which declares same-sex relations an abomination. The figure lies with curled knees anchored on the floor and pulled in toward the chest. The spine twists so the ambiguous face is looking upward with wrenching hands nearing the cheeks. A page in bold letters repeating the word “abomination” frames the model’s face.

“It feels so warm and loving,” she said. “Two women — late 50s, mid-60s — short gray hair, warm smiles. They obviously have been together a long time. I guess there is so much controversy on the subject, to see something so sweet was nice. The entire show isn’t hard edges and challenges.” Overall, “The Sexuality Spectrum” presents itself as a plea

“It really covers so many more topics than just ‘The Sexuality Spectrum.’ It covers community attitudes and interpersonal relationships. It might be a little more than people expect from the title.”

Work from other well-known contemporary artists such as Joan Snyder, Mark Podwal, Archie Rand and Albert Winn will also be on display. Although the issue being explored is a serious one, many of the pieces take a lighter approach. One artwork, “Civil Union,” by Deirdre Scherer, particularly moved York.

for compassion and an attempt to make the challenging societal conversations not so tough in the future. The opening reception for “The Sexuality Spectrum” will be held from 5-7 p.m. Dec. 19. The exhibit runs through March at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Art, 2021 E. 71st St. For more information, visit jewishmuseum.net.

THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured

DECEMBER

12-22: The Eight: Reindeer Monologues Theatre Pops

VETRI: Glass Show and Sale // An exhibition of blown, sculpted, and kiln-fired glass works by area artists, as well as works by special guest artist Scott Darlington. // Through 1/12.

A collection of work by Oklahoma native Stephen Smith showcasing his use of the impasto technique, in which paint is applied in thick visible brushstrokes, creating texture and depth. // Through 12/31. PAC Gallery, Tulsa Performing Arts Center; 110 E. Second St.; (918) 596-7122

13-22: The Nutcracker Tulsa Ballet 11: Mozart and Prokofiev Tulsa Symphony 19: Tony Bennett TCG Productions 21-26: Chicago Celebrity Attractions 24-2/2: I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change Theatre Tulsa

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

Impasto, Impasto, Impasto!!!

12-23: A Christmas Carol American Theatre Company

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12/31

Invisible Eve // Photographer Yousef Khanfar presents black and white images of incarcerated women on their way to rehabilitation. The artist “decided to take on this project not to condemn, but to serve as

5-31: Impasto, Impasto, Impasto!! Stephen Smith, PAC Gallery

etc.

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Warriors: Photographs by Gertrude Käsebier // After witnessing Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show’s grand parade through the streets of New York City to Madison Square Garden in 1898, inspiration struck Gertrude Käsebier. She began a project photographing the Lakota (Sioux) travelling with the show at her Fifth Avenue studio. The resulting work captures

The Four Elements // This annual show features work that incorporates the four elements of the ancient world, clay, fiber, metal and wood. The artists featured this year are Melissa Burkart, Teresa J. Wilber, Frank Campbell & Barbara Buell, and Peggy Upham. // Through 12/21. Living Arts; 307 M.B. Brady St.; (918) 585-1234

Unexpected: Vernacular Photography from the Collection of Marc Boone // An exhibition of photography taken by non-professional photographers poses the following questions: Can a photograph taken by a citizen photographer rise to the level of artistic importance? Where does documentation end and art begin? Does vernacular photography have a place in our digital present or future? // Through 5/11. Philbrook Museum of Art; 2727 S Rockford Rd.; (918) 749-7941

CO

J A N U A RY

Annual Small Works 2013 // An exhibition of new work by local and nationally represented artists. // Through 1/5. M. A. Doran Gallery; 3509 S. Peoria; (918) 748-8700

Kaleidochromatic // An exhibition of the colorful work of artists Jaff Ham, Benjamin Cobb, and Erika Pochybova. // Through 12/21. Lovetts Fine Art Gallery; 6528 E 51st St.; (918) 664-4732

g Tulsa Performin r te en >> >> Arts C … MING TO THE PAC

film & tv

Alexander Calder: Abstraction/Creation // A collection of the artist’s lithographs. // Through 2/2. Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art 2021 E 71st St. (918) 492-1818

Collective Future // Philbrook Museum celebrates its 75th Anniversary by looking back at the generous contributions of donors throughout the museum’s history, as well as showcasing some of the most recent donations, including works by Edward Ruscha, Willem de Kooning, Milton Avery, Andrew Wyeth, and Mathieu Ignace. // Through 1/26. Philbrook Museum of Art; 2727 S Rockford Rd.; (918) 749-7941

bridges of understanding,” and to help these women “transcend their own tragedy.” // 108 Contemporary; 108 E. M.B. Brady St.; (918) 895-6302

music

On Common Ground // This exhibition of artworks and cultural items made by people of many different backgrounds and cultures serves to remind us of the basic common needs that all humans share, regardless of cultural or geographical differences. // Opens 12/22; ongoing exhibit. // Gilcrease Museum; 1400 Gilcrease Museum Rd.; (918) 596-2700

the strength and character of her subjects, real-life warriors playing staged versions of themselves. // Through 1/26. Gilcrease Museum; 1400 Gilcrease Museum Rd.; (918) 596-2700

arts & culture

Visual Arts

Tickets and info: 918.596.7111 & TulsaPAC.com DOWNTOWN AT 3RD & CINCINNATI

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THE TULSA VOICE

musiclistings 12/30

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Cheech & Chong light up the Joint

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Legendary comedy duo Cheech & Chong will bring their strain of high-spirited comedy and music to the Joint at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Catoosa. Also on the bill is classic funk band War, a fitting pairing, as the band’s 1975 hit “Low Rider” plays over the opening scene of Cheech & Chong’s first film “Up In Smoke.” Sure to be an evening that will leave the audience anything but low. $25-$35. 12/30 // 8 p.m.

Wed. // Dec. 18

Mercury Lounge // CowGirl’s Train Set // 8 p.m.

Mystic River Lounge // Hi-Fidelics

Mystic River Lounge // Traveler // 8 p.m.

Baker St. Pub // Tango & Thrash // 10 p.m.

On the Rocks // Thayer, Pendergrass & Armstrong

Osage Casino, North Tulsa // Muskogee’s Wild Card Band

Recess // PDA

Pepper’s // Barrett Lewis Band

Shades of Brown // Gwen’s Kids

Pickles // The Luxtones

The Shrine // DJ P // $10 // 9 p.m.

Rooster’s // Rick Berry

Riffs, Hard Rock Casino // Darren Ray, Rock Show // 9 p.m.

Soundpony // DJ Sweet Baby Jaysus

The Colony // Tom Skinner Science Project

The Shrine // Green Corn Rebellion, Weston & The Outsiders, Cody Woody // 8 p.m.

Rooster’s // Mike Barham

Crow Creek Tavern // The Swan Band

Ti Amo // Mark Bruner // 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Dirty Knuckle Tavern // Military Jam

Undercurrent // Tulsa’s Rockin’ Christmas Concert & Live Shout Out to the Troops feat. Creeler, Dane Trout’s 420 Project, Sittin’ Ducks, Josh Yarbrough & the Boogie Rhythm Boys, a live JukeZoo Webcast, and All Star Open Jam // 8 p.m.

Cellar Dweller // Jazz w/ Michael Cameron Cimarron Bar // Echo

Elephant Run // Old School Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) // Annie Ellicott w/ Mark Bruner & Shelby Eicher // 7 p.m. Hey Mambo // 7 Blue Trio // 7:30 p.m. – 10 p.m.

arts & culture

Infuzion // Jon Glazer // 5 p.m.

music film & tv

The Vanguard // Beats for the Cure // $10 - $25 // 7 p.m.

Main Street Tavern, B.A. // Jazz w/ Angie Cockrell // 6 p.m.

Woody’s Corner Bar // Aaron Woods Band // 9 p.m.

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame // Jazz Lunch w/ 7 Blue Trio // 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Yeti // Move Trio

On the Rocks // Don White

Recess // Wild Card The Silver Flame // Bobby Cantrell // 7 p.m – 10 p.m. Soundpony // Mr. Elevator and the Brain Hotel // 10 p.m.

etc.

Riffs, Hard Rock Casino // Scott Ellison // 8 p.m.

The Vault // Live Jazz w/ Jordan Hehl and guests // 6–8 p.m.

Rooster’s // Travis Kidd

Woodland Hills Mall // The 5th Annual Barking Bassett Bassoon Band Holiday Jam – Listen to holiday music played by a band of 40 bassoons on the first floor of Woodland Hills Mall at the Sears Entrance. // 7 p.m.

Thurs. // Dec. 19 Baker St. Pub // Hi-Fidelics // 10 p.m. BOK Center // Trans Siberian Orchestra // Doors: 6:30 p.m.

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Pickles // Jim Sweney & Chris Campbell

Just 1 More // Steve McCabe & Sheldon Clark

Pickle’s // Billy Snow

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

Rooster’s // T3 Trio

Osage Casino, Sand Springs // The Jumpshots

Cain’s Ballroom // 98.5 KVOO Jingle Jam 2013 – Brett Eldredge, Scotty McCreery, Uncle Kracker, Love & Theft, Charlie Worshan // Doors: 7 p.m.

The Hunt Club // Ayngel and John

Cabin Creek, Hard Rock Casino // James Muns // 8 p.m.

Recess // Play The Shrine // Captain Comfy Reunion Show // $5 // 9 p.m. Soundpony // JBrown // 10 p.m. Undercurrent // Sextion 8 The Vanguard // Rockers for Toddlers, Oldman, Bruce Flea, Badroot, Constant Peril, Benny’s Little Weasel, Stonecrow // $10 // 7:30 p.m. The Yeti // Cucumber & the Suntans, The Dull Drums, Pillage People, Dirty Creek Bandits

Sat. // Dec. 21 Baker St. Pub // Imzadi // 10 p.m.

Fri. // Dec. 20

Blue Rose Cafe // Luxtones // 9 p.m.

Cimarron Bar // Open Jam w/ The Kevin Phariss Blues Band // 4:30 p.m. The Colony // Paul Benjaman’s Sunday Night Thing w/ special guest Crow Creek Tavern // Jacob Dement

Cabin Creek, Hard Rock Casino // Carl Acuff // 9 p.m.

Cabin Creek, Hard Rock Casino // Rivers Edge // 9 p.m.

Full Moon Café (Broken Arrow) // Mark Gibson & Ryan Magnani // 8 p.m.

Cimarron Bar // Sweatin Bullets CJ Moloney’s // Cory B

Cain’s // The Floozies, MONTU, CenterOfTheUniverse // Doors: 7 p.m.

The Hub, Wagoner // Bobby Cantrell & the Midland Valley Boys & special guest

Cherokee Casino, Claremore // Nick Gibson

Cherokee Casino, Claremore // TJ McFarland

Mercury Lounge // Brandon Clark

Cherokee Casino, Ramona // Runnin’ On Empty

Cherokee Casino, Ramona // Big Skillet

Club 209 // DJ $erious $tanley // 10 p.m.

CJ Moloney’s // Let’s Zepplin

The Colony // Klondike 5 Stringband

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame // Christmas Gospel Celebration with Dr. Joey Crutcher and the Gospel Music Workshop of America // GA $15; Reserved Table Seating $20; Seniors $10; Middle and High School Students $5 // 5 p.m.

Club 209 // Austyn King & Ensemble // 10 p.m.

Crow Creek Tavern // 4 Going Gravity

Recess // So Fresh

The Colony // Desi and Cody

Ed’s Hurricane Lounge // David Dover Band

Slo Ride // American Hero Jam // 5 p.m.

Crow Creek Tavern // David Dover

Electric Circus // House Party w/ Darku J, Zach Fast, Krewx

Ed’s Hurricane Lounge // Open Jam w/ The Salty Dogs

Soundpony // Attic Ted’s Christmas Opera: “Mary’s Little Secret” // 10 p.m.

Elephant Run // Another Alibi

Cimarron Bar // Sweatin’ Bullets

Cimarron Bar // Harry Williams & Friends Jam w/ Mike “SaxMan” Winebrenner & more

Full Moon Café (both locations) // Dueling Pianos // 9 p.m.

Fat Daddy’s // Ben & Nick

CJ Moloney’s // DJ Spinning

Gypsy Coffee House // Luke Wade

Crow Creek Tavern // Melissa Hembree

Hey Mambo // 7 Blue

Full Moon Café (both locations) // Dueling Pianos // 9 p.m.

Fishbonz Owasso // Cory B

Hibiscus // Friday Jam

Harvard Sports // Glam R Us

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) // The Fabulous Two Man Band // 8 p.m.

The Hunt Club // Dante and the Hawks

The Hunt Club // Christine Jude Trio

IDL Ballroom // Assimilation’s Nightmare Before Christmas Party // $5 for 21+; $7 for 18-20; $10 after 11 p.m. // 9 p.m.

Infuzion // Dante & the Hawks

Magoo’s // DJ TIMM-A

Sun. // Dec. 22

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) // Mark Bruner & Shelby Eicher // 6:30 p.m.

Elephant Run // Stix & Stones

Lanna Thai // Scott Musick Acoustic

Woody’s Corner Bar // Jenny Simms and Shiloh Station // 9 p.m.

C:Note, Hard Rock Casino // Uncrowned Kings // 9 p.m.

Fishbonz Owasso // Matt Breitzke

The Hunt Club // Ego Culture

The Vanguard // Holmes for the Holidays II, All About a Bubble, Jason Ferguson, K-Sides, Roots and Lost Things, Zeke Duhon // $5 - $7 // 7:30 p.m.

C:Note, Hard Rock Casino // Uncrowned Kings // 9 p.m.

Electric Circus // DJ Jonny Tsunami, Falkirk and Peppermint, Fingerbangs

Harwelden Mansion // Yuletide Candlelight Concert w/ Appassionata Viola Harp Duo // 7 p.m.

Undercurrent // Awake in Theory, Kicktree, Bruce Flea, Oldman

Baker St. Pub // The Sellouts // 10 p.m.

Fat Daddy’s // Scott Ellison

Garden Deva // Ray Rodgers & Jared Tyler // 4–8 p.m.

Tallgrass Prairie Table // Jennifer Marriot, QuasiMojo

Brady Theater // Z104.5 The Edge Christmas Concert 2013 – 30 Seconds to Mars, New Politics, Filter, IAMDYNAMITE // Doors: 6 p.m.

Centennial Lounge, VFW Post 577 // Gypsy Hot Tub

Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education // TU Jazz Happy Hour // 5 p.m.

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Riffs, Hard Rock Casino // Darren Ray, Lost on Utica // 9 p.m.

Infuzion // Jon Glazer // 4 p.m. // Lost on Utica // 10 p.m.

Fishbonz Owasso // Rock Show

Kenosha Station // Dirty Crush Lil Dixie // Johnny Duke Magoo’s // G-FORCE

Lil Dixie // Johnny Duke

Mystic River Lounge // Hi-Fidelics

Magoo’s // Jennifer Marriott

Osage Casino, North Tulsa // Muskogee’s Wild Card Band

Mercury Lounge // Brandon Clark’s Birthday Bash & CD Release show w/ BC3-0, Lenoro, Jake Moffat Band // 8 p.m.

Pepper’s // Christine Jude Pickles // Dave & Friends

Downtown Lounge // Beasley & Hopper, DTL’s Acoustic Sundays // 8 p.m.

Mon. // Dec. 23 Celebrity Club // Mark Bruner The Colony // Open Mic Night Creative Room // Open mic for poets, MCs and musicians Dusty Dog // Steve Pryor Acoustic Elephant Run // Old School Infuzion // Brian Lee // 5 p.m. The Shrine // Andy Skib & Neal Tiemann and Friends Undercurrent // The Sellout’s Jacob Dement

Crow Creek Tavern // Open Mic w/ Rusty Swan

Mystic River Lounge // The Sellouts On the Rocks // Thayer, Pendergrass & Armstrong Pickles // Jim Sweney & Chris Campbell Riffs, Hard Rock Casino // Taria // 8 p.m.

Gringo’s // Open Mic w/ Austin K Haworth & The Silver Lining Band

Soundpony // Oilhouse Birthday Show with New Dream City // 10 p.m.

Gypsy Coffee House // Open Mic // 6:30 p.m.

Ti Amo // Mark Bruner

Lambrusco’Z // Don Morris & Dylan Layton // 5-8 p.m.

The Vanguard // Hammer Down CD Release Party, Garrett Brown Band, Fly County Coalition // $8 - $25 // 8 p.m.

Mercury Lounge // Wink & Friends

The Vault // Live Jazz w/ Jordan Hehl and guests // 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Scotty’s // Billy Snow

The Yeti // Bass Tribe

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame // Depot Jam // 5:30 p.m. The Yeti // Smitty Jones’ Open Stage

Wed. // Dec. 25 Baker St. Pub // Jacob Dement // 10 p.m.

Fri. // Dec. 27 Baker St. Pub // Jumpsuit Love Blue Rose Cafe // Mary Cogan // 9 p.m. C:Note, Hard Rock Casino // Hi Fidelics // 9 p.m.

Crow Creek Tavern // Merry Christmas Show w/ Darrel Lee Hopper

Cain’s Ballroom // JD McPherson, Hayes Carl // Doors: 7 p.m.

Downtown Lounge // Christmas Show w/ Jankins “The Artist formerly known as PDA”

Cherokee Casino, Claremore // Beer & Chicken

Market Pub // Ugly Sweater Party w/ Rick Berry Karaoke

Cimarron Bar // 4Going Gravity CJ Moloney’s // Cory B The Colony // Brian Payne and Wink Burcham Electric Circus // House Party w/ Darku J, Zach Fast, Krewx

Blue Rose Cafe // Hosty Duo // 8 p.m.

Fat Daddy’s // Chris Clark

Cabin Creek, Hard Rock Casino // Ricky Fugitt // 8 p.m.

Fishbonz Owasso // T3 Trio Full Moon Café (both locations) // Dueling Pianos // 9 p.m. Hey Mambo // 7 Blue

Cimarron Bar // Harry Williams & Friends Jam

Hibiscus // Friday Jam

CJ Moloney’s // DJ Spinning

The Hunt Club // Brandon Clark Band

The Colony // JJ Cale Night w/ Paul Benjaman, Wink Burcham, Beau Roberson & friends playing JJ Cale songs all night. // $5 // 9 p.m.

Infuzion // Tom Basler // 4 p.m. // Another Alibi // 10 p.m.

Fishbonz Owasso // Cory B Full Moon Café // The Fabulous Two Man Band // 8 p.m. The Hunt Club // Fine as Paint

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Infuzion // Brian Lee // 5 p.m. // Dueling Pianos // 8 p.m.

Bruce Flea

Mon. 23 // Andy Skib & Neal Tiemann And Friends

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Dusty Dog // Chuck Dunlap & Friends

Kicktree, Oldman,

Sat. 21 // Dj P

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Baker St. Pub // M.I.C. // 10 p.m.

Elephant Run // Octane Blue

Centennial Lounge, VFW Post 577 // Gypsy Hot Tub

Awake in Theory,

Cherokee Casino, Ramona // Kinsey Sadler

Crow Creek Tavern // Curt Hill

Thurs. // Dec. 26

SAT DEC 21

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Soundpony // XXXMAS PARTY with Falkirk and Kylie // 9 p.m.

Sextion 8

Fri. 20 // Capt. Comfy Reunion Show

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The Colony // Cody Brewer and Friends

Cabin Creek, Hard Rock Casino // Runnin’ On Empty // 9 p.m.

FRI DEC 20

DECEMBER

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Moose Lodge // Ballroom Dancing w/ The Kings of Music

Christmas Blues Fest

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Full Moon // Charlie Redd

THU DEC 19

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Pepper’s // Pete & Jenny Marriott // 8:30 p.m.

Lanna Thai // Scott Musick Acoustic

Pickles // The Luxtones

Magoo’s // DJ TIMM-A

Riffs, Hard Rock Casino // Taria, Stars // 9 p.m.

Wed 12/25

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Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

Tue 12/31

EVENTS

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Hear a unique take on your favorite holiday tunes as a band of 40 bassoonists gather to spread cheer to weary shoppers at the 5th Annual Barking Basset Bassoon Holiday Jam. The band will be set up on the first floor of Woodland Hills Mall, in front of Sears. 12/18 // 7 p.m.

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Paul Benjaman Photo by Phil Clarkin

Thing w/ special guest Crow Creek Tavern // Jacob Dement

Undercurrent // Dusty Pearl

Downtown Lounge // Beasley & Hopper, DTL’s Acoustic Sundays // 8 p.m.

Woody’s Corner Bar // DJ Spin

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Baker St. Pub // Squadlive // 10 p.m. Blue Rose Café // Curt Hill // 9 p.m. BOK Center // Zac Brown Band, The Wood Brothers, AJ Ghent Band C:Note, Hard Rock Casino // Travis Kidd, Joe Worrel // 9 p.m. Cabin Creek, Hard Rock Casino // The Tiptons // 9 p.m. Cherokee Casino, Claremore // Lower Forty // 8 p.m. Cimarron Bar // G-FORCE CJ Moloney’s // Mikey B Club 209 // Mindy Bartlett // 10 p.m.

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Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) // Mark Bruner & Shelby Eicher // 6:30 p.m. Full Moon Café (Broken Arrow) // Mark Gibson & Ryan Magnani // 8 p.m.

Come discover new wines for the holiday season from our unrivaled selections. Enjoy.

Mercury Lounge // Nikki Hill and Matt Hill // 8 p.m.

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Slo Ride // American Hero Jam // 5 p.m.

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Mon. // Dec. 30 Celebrity Club // Mark Bruner The Colony // Open Mic Night Creative Room // Open mic for poets, MCs, and musicians // 8 p.m.

Join us in the

Dusty Dog // Steve Pryor Acoustic Elephant Run // Old School

Historic Brady District!

Infuzion // Brian Lee // 5 p.m.

Crow Creek Tavern // Bad Flannagan

The Joint // Cheech and Chong w/ War // $25 - $35 // 8 p.m.

Dixie Tavern // Glam R Us

Undercurrent // The Sellout’s Jacob Dement

Ed’s Hurricane Lounge // Open Jam w/ The Salty Dogs Elote // Brujo Roots // 7 p.m. Fat Daddy’s // Brandon Clark Fishbonz Owasso // Lost on Utica Full Moon Café (both locations) // Dueling Pianos // 9 p.m. The Hunt Club // DJ Matt Infuzion // Replay // 10 p.m.

etc.

Purveyors of the “New Tulsa Sound” honor a Tulsa music icon. Paul Benjaman, Wink Burcham, Beau Roberson and friends will play nothing but JJ Cale songs all night at the Colony, 2809 S. Harvard Ave. $5. 12/26, // 9 p.m.

Soundpony // Heady P // 10 p.m.

Elephant Run // Octane Blue

Kenosha Station // Dirty Crush Magoo’s // David Dover

Baker St. Pub // NYE Bash w/ Uninvited Guest // $10 Brady Theater // The Second Annual Brady New Year’s Eve Party – Live DJ, Brady Orchestra, The Sellouts, Jumpshots w/Jenny Labow // Doors: 8 p.m. Cain’s // Stoney LaRue, Uncle Lucius // Doors: 8 p.m. Cherokee Casino, Claremore // Darrel Cole, Heath Wright // 7 p.m.

Mystic River Lounge // The Jumpshots Osage Casino, North Tulsa // The Sellouts

Cimarron Bar // Under the Gun

Osage Casino, Sand Springs // Imzadi

CJ Moloney’s // Mikey B

Pickles // Dave & Friends

The Colony // Phish NYE Watch Party

Riffs, Hard Rock Casino // Travis Kidd, Taria // 9 p.m.

Open Christmas Eve & Day New Year’s Eve Party

Tues. // Dec. 31

Cherokee Casino, Ramona // Bobby Cantrell // 7 p.m. // New Year’s Bandstand Bash w/ The Bop Cats // 10 p.m.

Mercury Lounge // Brandon Jenkins // 8 p.m.

//

-Benjamin Franklin

The Shrine // Moai Broadcast // $5 // 9 p.m.

The Colony // Pilgrim // $5 // 10 p.m.

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

…is of greater moment than the discovery of a constellation. The universe is too full of stars.”

Dear John

Sat. // Dec. 28

Crow Creek Tavern // The Replay Band New Year’s Eve Show

Happy Hour 4-7 daily

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IDL Ballroom // Crystal Ball New Year’s Eve Masquerade featuring Darku J, Zach Fast, Just Jon, Kylie, Steve Cluck and Speed Bump // $35 or $60 for couples // 9 p.m. Infuzion // New Year’s Eve Masquerade Ball w/ Fuzed Joe Momma’s // DJ Spinning Lambrusco’Z // Don Morris & Dylan Layton

Rooster’s // Cory B Soundpony // Klondike 5

Elephant Run // Jumpsuit Love

Shades of Brown // Gwen’s Kids // 7 p.m.

Fassler Hall // New Year’s Extravaganzo w/ Paul Benjaman & friends – Champagne toast at midnight, party favors. // $10 // 9 p.m.

Main Street Tavern, B.A. // New Year’s Eve Party w/ A Band Called Horse

Undercurrent // Severmind, Dryvr, Absence of Ink The Yeti // Sam and the Stylees

Cimarron Bar // Open Jam w/ Kevin Phariss Blues Band // 4:30 p.m. The Colony // Paul Benjaman’s Sunday Night

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Dixie Tavern // Lorri Williams & Ricky Paul Band

Sun. // Dec. 29 44

“The discovery of a wine…

12/26

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Legends Dance Hall // DJ Spinning

The Max Retropub // DJ Spinning

Fishbonz Owasso // OMG

Mercury Lounge // Blackfoot Gypsies, The Ghost Wolves // 8 p.m.

The Fur Shop // DJ Spinning

Mystic River Lounge // Limelight

Gringo’s // Open Mic w/ Austin K Haworth & The Silver Lining Band // 7 p.m.

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame // Depot Jam // 5:30 p.m.

Gypsy Coffee House // Open Mic // 6:30 p.m.

Osage Casino, North Tulsa // Easy Street

The Hunt Club // Able the Allies

Osage Casino, Sand Springs // Back Roads Band

Hyatt Regency // New Years Bash w/ Imzadi, Downtown Fever, The Outside

Rooster’s // TNT

Bar46Tulsa.com

Recess // 6 DJ’s Spinning Scotty’s // Billy Snow // 7 p.m. The Shrine // NYE Masquerade Party w/ DJ D3V // $7 ADV, $10 DAY OF Toby Keith’s, Hard Rock Casino // Travis Kidd Undercurrent // Blackwater Rebellion, Warchestra, The Joint Effect The Vanguard // NYE Rave featuring Cole Patterson and Knic Knac, support acts TBA // $15 - $20 // 7 p.m. White Flag // DJ Spinning The Yeti // John White Zin // BranJae & Sam

Listings compiled in collaboration with CurtsList.com. For the most up-to-date listings, visit CurtsList.com.

THE TULSA VOICE

JD McPherson Hayes Carll Friday, Dec. 27 at 7 p.m. $20-$35

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Cain’s Ballroom 423 N. Main St. cainsballroom.com 918.584.2306

news & commentary food & drink featured Photo by Jim Her ring ton

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Digging rock’s roots

music

JD McPherson’s vintage-inspired tunes propelled him from Tulsa bars to worldwide tours by JARROD GOLLIHAIRE

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

Starkweather Boys. Eventually, he decided to attend graduate school at The University of Tulsa for a degree in open media. During this time, McPherson also met Jimmy Sutton, a Chicago-based, roots rock bassist/producer/label owner. “I was trying to get some weekend gigs up in Chicago for my band,” McPherson says. “So, I approached him on MySpace. He listened to our music and got us some gigs. As time went on, we started talking a lot. He hired me to play guitar for The Jimmy Sutton Show at a weekender in Seattle. That led to us ultimately making a record together on his label.” The two musicians, along with drummer/pianist/organist Alex (continued on page 46)

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“I had heard a lot of older music on the radio growing up, but it didn’t affect me much,” McPherson says. “It was always presented like ‘This is what happened before Led Zeppelin.’ My older brother always called it the ‘roots of rock.’ Later on though, I got a hold of some Buddy Holly stuff. It was great. It just really hit the mark for me.” It led him to explore the genre’s history, re-examining Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis, then Little Richard, Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Larry Williams. It profoundly altered his musical direction. After graduating from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in media arts, McPherson married, moved to Broken Arrow, had his first child and worked a number of odd jobs … all while pursuing a music career with his band, The

etc.

A rancher’s son, McPherson grew up in Buffalo Valley, Okla. By age 13, he discovered an abiding interest in classic rock — Led Zeppelin, the Allman Brothers, etc., based on his big brother’s record collection. His brother also began showing McPherson how to play guitar. He was hooked. “When I started learning how to play, it’s all I wanted to do,” McPherson says. “I was practicing all the time.” Not surprisingly, this led McPherson to get involved in numerous garage bands. By the time he discovered alternative and punk rock in high school, McPherson had begun penning his own songs and making demos. Then he discovered vintage rock ’n’ roll. It would change the trajectory of his life.

film & tv

O

ld school meets new school. So far, that has been the game plan for the solo career of roots rocker JD McPherson. And it’s a strategy that’s working well for the Broken Arrow musician. Since summer 2011, McPherson’s band has appeared on “The Conan O’Brien Show,” “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “The Late Show with David Letterman” … all after inking a deal with Rounder Records. The band also has toured the U.S. and Europe, bringing its infectious 1950s-inspired sound to ever-larger crowds of adoring fans. All this rapid success is partially due, however, to a very modern social networking phenomenon: YouTube. More on that later.

45

THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink

Hall, formed the core players for McPherson’s 12-track debut, “Signs and Signifiers.”

promotional and booking agencies. “Then we started fielding requests from label people,” he says. “We were talking to major label

“We were talking to major label bigwigs who had absolutely no idea what to do with us. Some of their ideas were pretty funny.” “We wanted to make a record for the roots rock lovers, but we wanted to package it more like a modern record,” McPherson says. Recording commenced in 2009 at Sutton’s vintage gear-filled studio. Just as “Signs and Signifiers” was reaching completion, McPherson was hired at Holland Hall as an art and technology teacher, but he was laid off in May 2011 because of budget cuts. “We had enough steam in the roots rock scene to do a couple of tours” until he could get another teaching job, McPherson says. Luckily, he never had to. Buzz from McPherson’s popular YouTube videos had generated interest from management agencies. The group eventually signed with one that quickly hooked them up with

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(continued from page 45)

bigwigs who had absolutely no idea what to do with us. Some of their ideas were pretty funny.” Eventually, the band signed with longtime, well-respected indie label Rounder Records. The label released “Signs and Signifiers” in April. Along with appearances on late-night TV shows, the band has been the subject of articles in Rolling Stone and MOJO, and received glowing coverage on several NPR programs, including “All Things Considered.” Looking back on his band’s potentially risky decision to fuse modern and classic sensibilities for its debut release, McPherson is grateful. “Luckily, the rockin’ scene didn’t push it away,” he says. “They embraced it.”

Your

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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VOICE For

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Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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PARTY

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Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

by ANDY WHEELER

I

f you have not been paying attention: The left lane is still for passing, and Sunday brunch has become a phenomenon — one in which the food and beverages (adult or otherwise) get served up while the atmosphere gets dialed down after a hardfought weekend. Everyone wants to relax and have fun doing it; ergo, “Sunday Funday” has become part of the popular lexicon. Chimera Coffee Shop (212 N. Main St.) has gone all in for laid back “Sunday Fundays” by hosting the Tulsa Vinyl Society for Sunday Vinyl Brunch, which features a different guest each weekend to spin a selection of their favorite records for the assembled egg-noshing, mimosa-sipping masses.

ing about going the all-vinyl route. Then I started thinking about a free-for-all where people could bring whatever record they want — but I thought that might get too sloppy, so I settled on a weekly guest. “To up the ante,” Hargrave added, “I decided to record it and interview the guests for a podcast. That’s something I always wanted to do. It feels more adult than throwing dance parties. But I still like to do that on occasion, don’t get me wrong.” Hargrave said the general reception to the series has been overwhelmingly positive. “It’s all been a surprise to be honest,” Hargrave said. “I didn’t really know where I was going

“The biggest surprise has been the response from

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A new spin on Sunday brunch

the community. All these people just want to come out and share their record collections.” The driving force behind TVS and its Chimera showcase is Dillon Hargrave (aka DJ Dilation). “I started DJing in Tulsa in 2008,” said Hargrave, “and college in Stillwater a year or two before that. I produced my own music for a long time, then started DJing at dance parties.” In a stroke of serendipity, Hargrave was looking for something other than dance parties at the same time Rob Stuart (who co-owns Chimera along with Jack Wood) mentioned he was looking for something new to offer patrons on Sundays. “Since it was on Sunday afternoons, I didn’t want to throw a big dance party in a coffee shop,” Hargrave said. “So I started think-

with this when I first started. I just ran with it. The biggest surprise has been the response from the community. All these people just want to come out and share their record collections. “I rely on the community and that’s why I created the Tulsa Vinyl Society. I didn’t want to have my own personal identity attached to it. I wanted people to take ownership of it as a community.

// To listen to Hargrave’s podcast recaps of Chimera’s Sunday Vinyl Brunch, visit mixcloud.com/ TulsaVinylSociety

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tvreview

// contents

Homeland’s brilliant third season closer resolves series-spanning threads

A

film & tv etc. // Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

whose allegiance to the agency routinely trumps human decency. The thematic backbone of the show has always been one of intersecting and conflicting loyalties, personified by the mercurial Brody, but this season that theme has been both fine-tuned and amped up, and the resulting cloak-anddagger intrigue — centered on an elaborate CIA plot to assassinate the head of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard — has never been more compelling. In many ways, Sunday night’s devastating season finale felt like the logical end to a series that’s always had an expiration date. It’s far and away the most accomplished episode to date, distilling the show’s themes and concerns into one paradigm-changing hour. For its brutal, audience-punishing inevitability, the finale earns a place next to the year’s other two most talked-about hours of television — Game of Thrones’ “Red Wedding” and Breaking Bad’s “Ozymandias.” But unlike Game of Thrones, Homeland’s central conflict has now been definitively resolved, and unlike Breaking Bad, it’s been renewed for another season. Where it goes from here is murky; the only sure thing is that when Homeland returns next year it will be a completely different show. That may not be a good thing.

music

question was the engine that drove the show. That question was more or less answered by the end of season one, and season two — brilliant moments (the “Q&A” episode) aside — floundered without a solid through-line. The plotting became more outrageous, the character conflicts devolved into soap opera, and the shocking second season finale felt less earned than contrived. It seemed as if Fonzie was mounting the water skis. With season three, showrunners Alex Gansa and Howard Gordon have, thankfully, offered a major course correction by sacrificing initial plot momentum in favor of slowing down to consider the consequences of season two’s events (and in the process, imbuing them with a retroactive credibility). They first focus on Brody’s shell-shocked family, particularly his teenage daughter, before shifting to the political fallout of last season’s Langley bombing and the subsequent ascent of Carrie’s chief mentor/sympathizer Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin) to acting head of an all-but-broken CIA. Saul, always thoughtful and simmering, must now contend with grandstanding Sen. Andrew Lockhart (a scene-stealing Tracy Letts) and black ops specialist Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham), an ally

arts & culture

Homeland Since its premiere in 2011, Showtime’s off-the-rails CIA thriller “Homeland” has been as wildly uneven, impulsive and occasionally batshit crazy as its protagonist

Carrie Mathison, the bipolar spy portrayed with unhinged aplomb by Claire Danes. Danes is fantastic in the role, bringing empathy and a lived-in authenticity to a character who in the hands of a lesser actress would be an unwatchable, screeching mess, but the show itself has often fallen short of her courageous performance. The first several episodes were quiet, brilliantly constructed mysteries that focused as much on the tortured inner workings of its characters as it did on the broader machinations of the CIA. The show begins when an Iraqi asset tells Carrie that an American soldier has been turned by al-Qaeda. At the same time, Marine Sergeant Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis) is rescued by U.S. Special Forces after years of torture and imprisonment at the hands of the Bin Laden-like Abu Nazir. Brody returns home a war hero, but Carrie is convinced that his rescue was an orchestration by the enemy, a cog in the wheel of a larger terror plot of which Brody may be the key player. Carrie’s frantic uphill battle to prove her hunch to both her superiors and herself and Brody’s heartbreaking struggle to reconnect with his family made for enthralling, addictive television. But the “Is-He-Or-Isn’t-He”

featured

by JOSHUA KLINE quick word about television and the nature of this column: I spent more time in the last year consuming the myriad serial offerings of HBO, Showtime, AMC, Fox, FX, NBC, et al. than I did watching movies, which may be a first for me. And yet I don’t have cable. What I do have is Netflix, HuluPlus, a friend-ofa-friend’s HBOGo password, and a decent grasp on navigating the dubious cyber underground of streaming sites. The new way of watching is whatever I want it to be, on my schedule, and I take full advantage. Even without the conventional 700+ channel Cox digital package, I have access to more programming than ever before, ranging from the abjectly stupid to the sublime. So bear with me. Television as a storytelling medium has never been more exciting, more sophisticated, more morally complex or intellectually challenging than it is today. It’s also never been more sprawling; I’ll always have a lot of catching up to do.

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Finale finality

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Claire Danes in “Homeland”

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Voice rating: 9/10

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

//

etc.

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SoundBite: “It’s as if the movie is on as much cocaine as the people inhabiting it.”

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//

Wolf of Wall Street In theaters: Dec. 25

50

Leonardo DiCaprio in “Wolf of Wall Stre et”

Dazzling decadence Scorsese’s ‘Wolf of Wall Street’ a relentlessly-paced, darkly hilarious romp by JOE O’SHANSKY

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t’s said that youth is wasted on the young. But in the world of film, youth is often the time when a director does his or her best work. That’s not a given, obviously, though the roster of directors whose later films fall short of their earlier, sometimes more stratospheric achievements is long. Francis Ford Coppola doesn’t have another “Apocalypse Now” or “Godfather” in him. His latest film, “Twixt,” marks the continued downward trajectory in a spiral that began with 1996’s “Jack.” Legendary horror master Dario Argento’s newest, “Dracula 3D,” almost seems like a joke when compared to such assured and iconic entries as “Suspiria” and “Tenebrae.” I’ll take Kathryn Bigelow’s “Near Dark” over “The Hurt Locker” any night. Don’t get me started about George Lucas or Peter Jackson. Martin Scorsese’s filmography is loaded with classics and masterworks, and like any director, he’s not perfect — though he’s gotten closer than most. There’s simply major and minor Scorsese with the occasional bum note in an otherwise uninterrupted symphony of cinema. It’s arguable whether or not he’s ever made a flat out bad movie (he hasn’t, so shut up already) but there’s one thing that’s

certain: “Wolf of Wall Street” is as vibrant, propulsive and masterfully made as any of his best films. Based on the memoirs of corrupt, drug-fueled stockbroker Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio), “Wolf ” tells the true story of how Belfort, after losing a high profile brokerage gig during Black Monday, starts back at the bottom, shilling penny stocks out of a strip mall office to unsophisticated investors. Eventually, Jordan meets restaurant manager Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill, with some disconcerting teeth); and Donnie, impressed with Belfort’s take-home pay and magnetic personality, immediately quits and takes shelter under Belfort’s wing. They found their own brokerage, Stratton Oakmont, and — with the crew of bush-league but unscrupulous brokers from the strip mall — go on to make illegal billions and indulge in most of the known forms of debauchery before it all comes crashing down. The narrative parallels to “Goodfellas” are apparent. Even the delivery and inflection of DiCaprio’s narration is reminiscent of Ray Liotta’s Henry Hill, as Belfort regales ordinary Joes with decadent anecdotes of how the better 1 percent live. There’s

the meteoric, criminal rise of our anti-hero and his ultimate, barely sympathetic fall; the theme of how living outside the law not only pays off in spades but that the line between making your fortune legally — or not — is razor thin. Henry Hill wasn’t as smart as Jordan Belfort, but they were both perfectly adapted to rise to the top of their respective, nearly Darwinian socioeconomic jungles. Though it’s Belfort’s hubris that ultimately cuts him down to size, the system he gamed is sadly still the same. The implication being that gangsters and Wall Street operate by whatever thin rules exist and they both get away with it, unrepentantly suffering the minimal consequences. “Goodfellas” echoes notwithstanding, “Wolf ” is very much its own animal. One parallel that doesn’t exist between this or any of his past work is Scorsese’s gleefully unapologetic eye for the absurdity of Belfort’s story. Midgets are tossed on Velcro targets for sport; all manner of sexual depravities are indulged (in lieu of his trademark violence). There’s the roller skating office chimpanzee. And the scene between a Quaalude-addled Hill and DiCaprio has to go down in history as

one of the most blackly funny comedy-of-errors sequences ever put to film. The pace is amazing. “Wolf ” blows through its 179-minute runtime like a freight train. It feels in no way like the work of a 71 yearold director. Terrence Winter’s script is lean and muscular, establishing an intoxicating tone that stays the course under Scorsese’s borderline frenetic direction. It’s as if the movie is on as much cocaine as the people inhabiting it. Longtime editor Thelma Schoonmaker and newcomer Rodrigo Prieto’s (“Argo”) deft cinematography ice the cake in expertly crafted cinematic style. DiCaprio is on fire here. He’s the star and it’s his show. But despite the risks he takes (and he takes quite a few) it’s really Jonah Hill who kind of steals the flick. His Donnie Azoff is creepy and charismatic, and Hill proves his range yet again after his Oscar nomination for 2011’s “Moneyball.” With “Wolf,” Scorsese humors our classist prurience to the point that it becomes its own thematic bit of satire, resulting in one of the year’s more hilarious comedies, and (I have to imagine) the funniest three-hour long film ever made.

THE TULSA VOICE

free will astrology WEEK OF DECEMBER 19 // by ROB BREZSNY

//

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

// Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

This we ek’s homework: What do you want to b e when you g row up?

etc.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Leonardo da Vinci created the painting St. Jerome in the Wilderness around 1480. It now hangs in the Pinacoteca Vaticana, a museum in Vatican City. For several centuries, though, the treasured work of art was missing. Legend tells us that in the early 19th century, Napoleon’s uncle found the lower half of the painting in a junk shop in Rome. Years later he stumbled upon the top half in another back alley, where it was being used

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Between 2002 and 2009, Buddhist monk Endo Mitsunaga spent a thousand days meditating as he did a ceremonial walk around Mount Hiei in Japan. In 2006, English writer Dave Cornthwaite took 90 days to skateboard across the entire length of Australia, a distance of 3,618 miles. The first man’s intentions were spiritual, the second man’s adventurous. The coming months will be prime time for you to contemplate both kinds of journeys, Scorpio. The astrological omens suggest that you will generate extra good fortune for yourself by seeking out unfamiliar experiences on the open road. To get yourself in the mood, ruminate on the theme of pilgrimage.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When did you first fall from grace? Do you remember? It has happened to most of us. We spend time being privileged or cared about or respected, and then, suddenly, we no longer are. We lose our innocence. Love disappears. Our status as a favorite comes to an end. That’s the bad news, Leo. The good news is that I think the months ahead may be time for you to climb back up to one of those high states of grace that you fell from once upon a time. The omens suggest that even now you’re making yourself ready to rise back up -- and sooner than you think, there will be an invitation to do so.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Italian painter Tintoretto (1518-1594) was a Libra. He worked with such vigor and passion that he was nicknamed Il Furioso -- The Furious. One of his crowning achievements was his painting Paradise, which is 74 feet long and 30 feet tall -- about the size of a tennis court. It adorns a huge wall in the Doge’s Palace, a landmark in Venice. I propose that Tintoretto serve as one of your inspirational role models in 2014. The coming months will be an excellent time for you to work hard at crafting your own personal version of paradise on earth. You may not be so wildly robust to deserve the title “Il Furioso.” But then again, you might.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Life is best organized as a series of daring ventures from a secure base,” wrote psychologist John Bowlby.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A horticultural company in the UK is selling TomTato plants to home gardeners. Each bush grows both cherry tomatoes and white potatoes. The magic was accomplished through handcrafted hybridization, not genetic engineering. I foresee a comparable marvel in your long-term future, Gemini. I’m not sure about the exact form it will take. Maybe you will create a product or situation that allows you to satisfy two different needs simultaneously. It’s possible you will find a way to express two of your tal-

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “To destroy is always the first step in any creation,” said the poet E. E. Cummings. Do you buy that idea, Cancerian? I hope so, because the cosmos has scheduled you to instigate some major creative action in 2014. In order to fulfill that potential, you will have to metaphorically smash, burn, and dissolve any old structures that have been standing in the way of the future. You will have to eliminate as many of the “yes, buts” and “I can’ts” and “not nows” as you possibly can.

as a wedge in a shoemaker’s bench. I foresee the possibility of a comparable sequence unfolding for you in 2014, Virgo. You just may manage to restore a lost beauty to its proper place of honor, one step at a time.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2014, you will have the mojo to escape a frustration that has drained you and pained you for a long time. I mean you can end its hold on you for good. The coming months will also provide you with the chance to activate and cultivate a labor of love that will last as long as you live. While this project may not bloom overnight, it will reveal its staying power in dramatic fashion. And you will be able to draw on the staunch faith you’ll need to devote yourself to it until its full blessings ripen.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s a tale of three renowned Taurus brainiacs: Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, and Bertrand Russell. They all had IQs over 175 and all made major contributions to philosophy. Yet all three were physically inept. Kant had trouble keeping a sharp point on his writing instrument, the quill, because he was clumsy using a knife. Mill was so undexterous he found it a chore to tie a knot. Russell’s physical prowess was so limited he was incapable of brewing a pot of tea. Chances are that you are neither as brilliant nor as uncoordinated as these three men. And yet, like them, there is a disconnect between your mind and body -- some glitch in the way the two of them communicate with each other. The coming year will be an excellent time to heal the disconnect and fix the glitch.

ents in a single mode. Or perhaps you will be able to unite two sides of you that have previously been unbonded. Congratulations in advance!

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Artists who are content merely to hone their gifts eventually come to little,” says the Belgian writer Simon Leys. “The ones who truly leave their mark have the strength and the courage to explore and exploit their shortcomings.” I’d like to borrow that wisdom and provide it for you to use in 2014, Aquarius. Even if you’re not an artist, you will be able to achieve an interesting kind of success if you’re willing to make use of the raw materials and untapped potential of your so-called flaws and weaknesses. Whatever is unripe in you will be the key to your creativity.

Some of you Aries enjoy the “daring venture” part of that formula, but neglect the “secure base” aspect. That’s why your daring ventures may on occasion go awry. If you are that type of Ram, the first half of 2014 will be an excellent time to correct your bad habit. Life will be offering you considerable help and inspiration in building a strong foundation. And if you already appreciate how important it is for your pursuit of excitement to be rooted in well-crafted stability, the coming months will be golden.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Derrick Brown has a poem entitled “Pussycat Interstellar Naked Hotrod Mofo Ladybug Lustblaster!” I hope that at least once in 2014 you will get up the nerve to call someone you love by that name. Even if you can’t quite bring yourself to utter those actual words, it will be healing for you to get to the point where you feel wild enough to say them. Here’s what I’m driving at, Capricorn: In the coming months, you will be wise to shed any inhibitions that have interfered with you getting all of the free-flowing intimacy you’d love to have.

news & commentary

Many farms in California’s Tulare County grow produce for supermarket chains. Here’s the problem: Those big stores only want fruits and vegetable that look perfect. So if there are brown spots on the apples or if the zucchinis grow crooked or if the carrots get too big, they are rejected. As a result, 30 percent of the crops go unharvested. That’s sad because a lot of poor people who live in Tulare don’t have enough to eat. Fortunately, some enterprising food activists have begun to work out arrangements with farmers to collect the wasted produce and distribute it to the hungry folks. I gather there’s a comparable situation in your life, Sagittarius: unplucked resources and ignored treasures. In 2014, I hope you take dramatic action to harvest and use them.

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SAGITTARIUS

Testify at Fre ewillastrology.com. 51

THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music

rock and roll crossword Smells Like Teen Puzzle by Todd Santos

Across 1 How Eels get to the “Moon”? 6 Houses favorite shades? 10 Beastie Boys “Just a ___” 14 What you get in a Spinal Tap song 15 Sign you look for during bad band performance 16 Nirvana “I ___ Myself and Want to Die” 17 Successful rockers 18 Jackson Browne “The LoadOut/___” 19 ’70s Walter 20 Harrison-penned Beatles song “I ___ You” 22 What the Goo Goo Dolls did? 23 Repeated word in The Byrds song title 24 Faith No More “Zombie ___” 26 Nile Rodgers’ band 30 Pioneering Seattle grunge band 31 Elton John title? 32 Foos “There goes my ___ …” 33 This Is Serious Mum Aussies, for short 35 Kind of maid, to Beatles 39 Sabbath classic 41 British Sea Power “___ the Skies” 43 Pearl Jam “Present ___” 44 What Aimee Mann wanted you to do to her in “Magnolia”? 46 Bruce Springsteen “The ___ That Bind” 47 Fred Durst’s accessory 49 Cult “Trancing like a cat on a hot ___ shack” 50 Arrange collection 51 Where some big bands play nowadays 54 Look heartthrob rockers get 56 Ben Folds song after curfew? 57 Recycled Kinks song? 63 The ___ Parsons Project 64 After-show reward in England 65 Deep Purple’s Ian 66 What some teens join instead of band (abbr.) 67 Famous jazz/soul singer James 68 “Break the Spell” folky singer 69 How “Deep in the Hoopla” Starship was 70 Tupac “Starin’ Through My ___ View” 71 Placebo “Special ___” Down 1 Nirvana “Pen Cap ___” 2 Classic song “Be-Bop-A-___” 3 “Friday ___ Love” 4 Ian Hunter? 5 Folk/pop Dennen

Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

//

etc.

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6 What security does to overzealous fan 7 Adds more shows 8 Replacements “Left of the ___” 9 Grunge and nu metal, for example 10 “A Grand Don’t Come for Free” Brit band 11 Don Henley? 12 Stage is a giant one? 13 Dylan “True Love ___ to Forget” 21 Ashlee Simpson “___ My Head” 25 What Ted Nugent does during stage show 26 What music rags are full of, with chat 27 Nirvana “___ we are now, entertain us!” 28 ___ and Wine 29 Eminem might have a “Guilty” one 34 “Crystal Ball” Prince track about acting? 36 Nirvana, e.g. 37 Korn “___ Be” 38 Nirvana “Take a ___, as a friend, as an old memory” 40 “I Didn’t ___ to Turn You On” Robert Palmer 42 R&B crooner Eric 45 Home to Chastain Park Amphitheater 48 Blues Traveler frontman John 51 Dave ___ Five 52 Unsung soulster Butler 53 Kinks “___ of Confusion” 55 “Just can’t ___ underwater” Panic! at the Disco 58 Deee-__ 59 Velvet Underground John 60 Eminem movie “8 ___” 61 Queens of the Stone Age “Battery ___” 62 Punk rock singer Mike

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

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© 2014 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

Smells Like Teen Puzzle

THE ADVIC E

goddess by AMY ALKON

Why do "helpless" women have men constantly doting on them, while women like me are deemed "too strong"? I was raised by a 1970s feminist and single mother. ("A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle!") At 21, I became a widowed single mother. I put myself through school and own a home and a business. I now have a boyfriend who feels I don't "need" him enough. He says I need to drop some of the balls I'm juggling so he can pick them up. "Just take them!" I say. We recently had a yard sale, and I did everything and was resentful and exhausted. I threw a little fit and walked away. My man then put forth a superhuman effort and cleaned everything up. But, as usual, he didn't handle things until I was unable to. —SUPERWOMAN

The modern damsel doesn't have to be in distress, but it helps if she at least has a few items not yet crossed off her to-do list. Otherwise, what is there for Superman to do but smoke a bowl and make YouTube videos of the cat riding the Roomba? No sooner did you find a man who says he wants to help than you immediately raised the bar. It isn't enough that he's willing to take out the trash from under the sink. You expect him to sense that you want him to and then wrestle you for the bag. What's with this? Did you get comfy with the belief that women don't need men and are you now intent on confirming that? Could it be that having him help conflicts with your self-image as the suburban Joan of Arc -- if not burning at the stake, cooking up the steak while burning with rage about how you have to do it all? You can have the martyrdom merit badge or a relationship; pick any one. Consider that maybe being a strong woman means being strong enough to admit that you need a man for something besides yelling at when he gives the wrong answer to "Do I look fat in this?" You will have to ask for help, which may be easier if you think of this as sending your boyfriend on little "quests" to make him feel needed. Though you probably don't need a Holy Grail, you could ask him to wield power tools or run up to Rite Aid to get your kid some cold meds. While he's gone, here's a suggestion: Write out that dumb fish/bicycle quote. Burn it. Scatter the ashes. And replace it in your head with an update on a classic: "It's the squeaky wheel that gets the grease -- that is, if it doesn't run off and grease itself before anybody else can get up out of his chair to go look for the can." Although I regularly tell my boyfriend how much I appreciate him, he repeatedly reminds me of how well he treats me, often saying "You sure have a great boyfriend" or "Your boyfriend's so good to you" -- even when I've just done something super-nice for him! I'm not sure why he does this, but he often tells me he's "very confident," which screams insecurity to me. He also loves telling stories about people complimenting him and every day tells me about someone's seeing him and saying, "Hi, Chris." —­­ANNOYED

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish for compliments and you annoy the crap out of everyone who knows or encounters him. Of course, if your boyfriend didn't feel like a skin tag among men, he wouldn't be marching around putting out mini-manifestos on his greatness. You can probably get him to cut back on the incessant self-congratulation simply by telling him it grates on you and makes you feel unappreciated. (A woman likes a man who's quick with a compliment, but especially when at least a few of the compliments are for her.) The question is, do you even know the man you're with? Chances are, he hides his real feelings out of fear that you'll leave him if you get a glimpse of what he probably sees as his shamefully loserish true self. Unfortunately, somebody chasing inner security all around town is never going to find it, and if your boyfriend's happy in your relationship, he's unlikely to feel motivated to get into the grubby business of digging inward. Relationships involve tradeoffs, and maybe being with him is worth it to you. But you may ultimately find it too hard to respect a guy who does stuff like bragging when people say, "Hi, Chris." Yes, it's the highest achievement of the human spirit: "Wow, people know me, and they don't shun me!" Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com). Alkon is the author of "I See Rude People: One Woman's Battle To Beat Some Manners Into Impolite Society."

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THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music etc. // Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

No matter what holiday you celebrate, we wish you the most joyous season with your family and friends. Woody’s message is one of inclusion and unity as we build a better world. We are honored to be the caretakers of his work and this message. The new year is already shaping up to be an incredible one for the Woody Guthrie Center and the spreading of Woody’s legacy. Peace, unity, love to all!

film & tv

woodyguthriecenter.org

address 102 East Brady Street, Tulsa, OK 74103 Phone 918.574-2710 email info@woodyguthriecenter.org 53

THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music film & tv etc. // Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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How to play: Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition ACROSS 1 Madrid home 5 Early Irish alphabet 10 “Little Pigs” number 15 Ask for divine guidance 19 Imitative sort 20 Camel kin 21 Den din 22 “General Hospital” regular Sofer 23 Blue-eyed feline 25 Greek column style 26 Concerning the ears 27 Movie workplace 28 Tony Shalhoub TV series 29 Neon tetra, for one 32 Reykjavik is its capital 34 Await judgment 35 “___ you kidding?” 36 After taxes 37 Relative of a canary 38 “What Kind of Fool ___?” 40 Appear to be 43 Kindles, as interest 45 Gangster movie lead-spitter 47 Lennon’s bride 49 Part of a Three Stooges routine 51 Brought action against 52 Thai monetary units 54 Rosemary or basil 56 Ford model 58 Traditional cold remedy 59 Room at the top of stairs 61 Tailless burrowing creature 64 Their identities are unknown 65 Honorific for McCartney

66 Wish one could take back 68 Enact 70 ___ Cooper (compact car) 71 With arms and legs extended 74 Oscar-winning Thompson 75 Loud speaker 77 The final word in many movies 78 Any ship at sea 79 Robin Hood’s friend ___ Tuck 80 Sheep with massive horns 82 Rich dessert 84 Laid eyes on 85 “Jane Eyre” writer 87 Blast of wind 88 Irregularly notched, as a leaf 89 Santa ___, Calif. 91 Bivouac item 93 Power-drill accessory 94 “To ___ is human ...” 95 Clothing retailer since 1969 97 Roman 1102 99 ___ and don’ts 101 “Love Boat” bartender 105 ___ and abet 106 Annoy by persistent faultfinding 108 Hillside on a Scottish golf course 110 “Great Expectations” girl 112 Koala, by another name 116 “Fifteen Miles on the ___ Canal” 117 “Danse” step 118 Chemical ending or compound 119 “... but I could be wrong” 120 Striped sea predator 123 “___ Wonderful Life”

124 Talk show host Gibbons 125 Totally pointless 126 Tip-top 127 Evened, as a score 128 Pele’s first name 129 Concluded 130 Worst place in a race DOWN 1 Black currant flavor in wines 2 Individually 3 Two-___ (Miata, e.g.) 4 Set, as a detonator 5 “Maximus to Gloucester” poet Charles 6 “A Touch of Class” star Jackson 7 Cabbie 8 Physician’s org. 9 Certain finish 10 Certain electron tubes 11 Basketball rim 12 Indian noble 13 “All My Children” role 14 Steep slope (var.) 15 High-ranking teacher, for short 16 Personal personnel 17 Aromatic seed 18 Pricey vessels 24 Originates 30 They work with MDs 31 Salmon-fishing spear 33 Firefly 34 Car air freshener shape 39 Sweater material 41 North Pole assistant 42 Critically injure 44 Animal raised to run 1,320 feet 46 Airport worker’s org. 48 Food morsel 50 Boys, women, men and girls

52 Madonna hit, “La Isla ___” 53 One making amends 55 Hunting canine 57 ___ gin fizz 58 Meats for bad actors? 60 Prompter’s offering 62 Groups of troops 63 Wrapped Tijuana treat 65 100-meter race, e.g. 67 Bloomingdale’s Manhattan setting 69 36 inches 71 Alone 72 Animated Woody Allen character 73 Area in an Elvis tune 76 Encino neighbor 79 Types of pure iron 81 Blossom holder 83 Chafe 84 Busy bug 86 SASE, for one 89 Dry, red wine 90 Rudolph’s bright feature 92 Dalai Lama, for one 95 “___ to the Limit” (Eagles hit) 96 Conditional release from prison 98 Your financial advisor advises it 100 Composed 102 Andes native 103 Smoke detectors, e.g. 104 Pallbearer’s burden 107 Injured in the bullring 109 “The Sopranos” chef Bucco 111 Begat 113 Cheerful 114 “This ___ on me!” 115 Clown of renown 116 “Heavens to Betsy!” 121 Country lodge 122 “2001” computer

Universal sUnday Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker

CreaTUres larGe and sMall By Milton Bonney

© 2014 Universal Uclick

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Dec. 18, 2013 – Jan. 1, 2014

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2,014

$

• • •

Hourly Drawings 6 pm – 2 am

Free Party Favors while supplies last

Free live Music 9 pm – 1am

Party River Spirit style on New Year’s Eve! Kick off 2014 with the ultimate party band, Limelight! Indulge at Tulsa’s favorite casino buffet and cash in on hourly drawings for $2,014! New Year’s Eve is just the beginning of more FUN to come!

81st & R i v e R s i d e | t u l s a | R i v e R s p i R i t t u l s a .c o m


The Tulsa Voice | Vol. 1 No. 1