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VOICE T H E

T U L S A

A NEW YEAR A NEW A LT E R N AT I V E NEWSPAPER FOR TULSA

F R E E • I N D E P E N D E N T • A LT E R N AT I V E

J A N . 1 - J A N . 1 5 , 2 0 1 4 // V O L . 1 N O . 2

N I R A E THE Y

G N I H T EVERY

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3 1 0 2 F O T S E B

D N O Y E B D N A

WHAT LIES AHEAD shaping Tulsa in 2014 | pg. 8

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THE YEAR IN HEADLINES

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RESTAURANT RUSH RESUMES

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TULSANS PICK BEST IN MUSIC

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TOP OF THE HEAP IN FILM AND TV


THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music film & tv etc. // Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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MCNELLIE’S SOUTH CITY

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NOW OPEN!

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THE BEER IS WAITING ON YOU.

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Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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McNellie’s Annual St. Patrick’s Day Street Party is on Monday, March 17, 2014. Why a Monday? Because that’s St. Patrick’s Day. Do you wait to celebrate Christmas on the weekend? What about New Year’s Eve, or the Fourth of July? Didn’t think so. Mark your calendar now, and let’s make this the best St. Pat’s yet!

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THE TULSA VOICE


THE TULSA VOICE

contents // Jan. 1 - Jan. 15, 2014

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32 music

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40 f ilm review: “August: Osage County”

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Get your kicks elsewhere

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Top films of 2013

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44 Top tv of 2013

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18 Restaurant rush resumes 22 voice’schoices 25 take a dive 26 boozeclues

34 T ulsans pick best in music 36 live music listings

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voiceover free will astrology advice goddess crossword, games

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

the year in news news from the plains myvoice news of the weird

28 oklahomacool 30 artspotting

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12 14 16 17

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TOP OF THE LIST Sprinkled throughout 2014’s inaugural issue you’ll find our picks for the best of pretty much everything, conveniently arranged in neat little groups of 10. From issues facing Tulsa in the coming year to recaps of last year’s best in news, dining, music, movies and TV — we made a list.

What lies ahead for the city

ARTS & CULTURE

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THE TULSA VOICE etc.

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THE ISSUE Looking ahead, looking back

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T U L S A

F R E E • I N D E P E N D E N T • A LT E R N AT I V E

nother year is in the books and, lo and behold, we’re still here. The human race has yet to disintegrate in a cloud of nuclear hellfire. The U.S. has yet to be enslaved by quasi-benevolent Chinese overlords. Oklahoma has yet to succumb to the dastardly evils of socialist, freedom-hating Obamacare (I’m kidding. Or am I? Hint: I am). And Tulsa has yet to figure out how to keep water in a river. All in all, I’d say we snuck past 2013 in pretty good shape. So what does 2014 hold for humanity, the nation, the great state of Oklahoma and the fair city of Tulsa? OK, maybe we don’t delve that deeply into such existential queries, but resident CitySpeak columnist Ray Pearcey does cover Tulsa’s bases (pg. 8) to identify 10 of the hottest topics, issues, trends and people that are primed to impact the goings-on in Green Country over the next 365 days. And after speculating about the year ahead, we spend a good chunk of the rest of this issue looking back at the year that was — with the help of that most beloved of publication gimmicks, the Top 10. Included in our examination of the best of 2013: News hawk Jennie Lloyd rounds up the 10 local and state

stories that had us glued to the headlines (pg. 12). Foodie extraordinaire Angela Evans takes stock of the 10 best new Tulsa restaurants to open their doors (pg. 18). Ten local musicians of diverse musical backgrounds choose their favorite albums released in 2013 (pg. 34). Movie buff Joe O’Shansky taps the big screen’s best offerings (pg. 42), and television junkie Joshua Kline makes his small screen selections (pg. 44). The great thing about all these Top 10 offerings? Well, great for you is that they’re all enjoyable reads. But for us, the great thing is that published lists that purport to crown the “best” of anything — without fail, from time immemorial — seem to inspire furious rage among those whose favorites were overlooked. Why is that good for us? Because we want to hear from you (as you’ll read in the little blue box below) and maybe our lists will raise your ire to such a degree that you’ll let us know about it. Grease the wheels, as it were. So, happy New Year, Tulsa. We look forward to our first year as Tulsa’s alternative newspaper. Here’s to many more. (RIP UTW.) MATT CAUTHRON ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

// Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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JAN. 1 - JAN. 15, 2014 // VOL. 1 NO. 2

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THE TULSA VOICE //

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Taking stock of the issues, trends and key players poised to shape Tulsa in the coming year and beyond by RAY PEARCEY

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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What does 2014 hold for Tulsa? No one has an ironclad conception of what’s ahead for T-Town or any burg — no matter what they say. Nonetheless, a healthy dose of speculation never hurt anyone. Here are some of the things we might expect this year given key local dynamics and how they entangle with critical national trends. ONE // A return to “making” The manufacturing revolution spawned by dramatically lower costs for electrical power and for other inputs required to produce physical things — a consequence of the “new gas” revolution and its impact on power prices — is rolling into town. This dynamic is abetted and amplified by a hot bevy of transformations in the way objects, entire physical systems, are produced — a change pushed by the maturation of what some call rapid prototyping or 3-D printing, advanced digital

design methods and accelerating use of novel, “engineered” materials. I spoke recently with David Greer, who simultaneously heads up the renowned info security/cyber systems program at The University of Tulsa and Tulsa's new Community Supercomputer project. David told me about a fascinating new ensemble effort that Oklahoma Innovation Institute — a local consortium of all area universities, some leading-edge technology firms, businessman Barry Davis’ venture-capital operation and some of our biggest philanthropic outfits — are sporting. The Project aims to accelerate the outfitting of small and medium-sized metro area companies with access to new 3-D manufacturing, design, employee training and new-wave production techniques. This project is part of the embryonic but portentous return of the production of “things” to the U.S. economy. Epic enterprises like General Electric and Apple Inc., and smaller but strategic ones like Elon Musk’s pioneering Space X venture

and Tesla, his revolutionary electric car gambit, are reanimating domestic production lines and re-domesticating pieces of the product design and manufacturing process. As it happens, there is a giant advanced manufacturing initiative, crafted by the U.S. Department of Commerce, to accelerate the return of “making” to our shores and to help U.S. manufacturers exploit emerging technologies in physical production, materials, bio-systems crafting and aerospace. The new local advanced manufacturing initiative being ramrodded by Greer and others is seeking new federal funding and wants to mark T-Town as a front-line player in this new realm. And Tulsa is well-positioned with our savvy oil patch production/ industrial fabrication culture, our new supercomputing asset, OSU's downtown (tax payer-supported) Helmerich Advanced Manufacturing research facility and our still small, but increasingly renowned Fab Lab.

TWO // Council dominance at City Hall Some City Hall watchers spy a movement on the part of the City Council to lead a strong push for new initiatives in land use planning, service provision, the cost and character of some aspects of police and fire services and perhaps the city’s complex budgeting process itself. The past year has seen a dramatic shift in initiative taking. To be more specific, the impetus for the recently approved capital package and major elements in it — including the new rapid bus transit element, the 36th Street North small area development package, and a sidewalks/ pedestrian trail gambit — came not from the Mayor's Office but from actions undertaken by the City Council. The movers and shakers are Blake Ewing, G. T. Bynum and Jack Henderson. And while this still-emerging council “cadre” doesn’t always hang together and doesn’t win every battle it wages (continued on page 10)


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Most New Year’s resolutions are broken within a few weeks of January 1. But, according to

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Make Your New Year’s Resolution a Little Longer Term. research, most people who make a financial-related resolution actually stick to it. So resolve hour you spend volunteering, the extra savings you put toward your future can make a huge difference down the road. Even if you start with something small.

Find new articles weekly on how to help you live a financially secure lifestyle. Including: • Create holiday memories that won’t break the bank • Women’s unique retirement struggles

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• 10 smart retirement moves to make in your 20s

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Let LongLiveYourMoney.com help you keep your resolution.

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to give to yourself a little bit more this year. Like that extra mile you pledge to run or that extra

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Tulsa: 918.588.6010 | Oklahoma City: 405.272.2548 | www.bok.com |

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

Planning | Saving | Budgeting | Retirement | Financial Advice and Guidance

©2014 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.

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THREE: Hardesty Arts Center

ONE: Fab Lab

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THE TULSA VOICE

practices and may become a hub in what OU Tulsa president Gerald Clancy calls the “phonemics revolution,” a convergence of smartphone technology, giant health care data sets, computing power and genetics that looks likely to deeply alter medical practice, doctor usage, the work of allied professions and the crazy costs of many medical things. There is a sick irony associated with Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin’s rejection of the Medicaid expansion track, a “street” that would have provided many hundreds of thousands of Oklahomans with unfettered access to the Obamacare insurance initiative. Fallin’s rejection posture may simply require more local ingenuity that includes the futurist phonemics thrust, but goes well beyond to game-changing medical education, prevention and behavioral medicine innovations.

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SIX: Greenwood District

continued from page 8) when there’s a conflict with the Mayor’s Office, they seem to have a deep bias for action. Their concerted action to change the character of the recently approved capital package and to add a number of economic development, advanced transportation and mobility-related items is simply the most tangible evidence of a new dynamic. A second avenue: efforts on the part of Ewing and, to some extent, Henderson to actually execute pieces of PlaniTulsa. This is manifested in the inclusion of a promised effort to improve Tulsa’s bus system with additional operating funds, a continuing struggle over downtown parking, and fights on land use policy in the city core. THREE // Tulsa art entrepôt accelerates We are witnessing accelerating consolidation of Tulsa’s emerging role as a music, art and gallery exhibition enclave. This new and rapidly emerging super space is powered by a dazzling array of new

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art galleries and performance spaces, a re-animated Jazz Hall of Fame, the new Hardesty Arts Center, the 108 Contemporary Gallery, the Woody Guthrie Archive, aggressive programming from Living Arts, and a slew of new eateries and related facilities now in play in the Art District/Mathew Brady Corridor. Many of these new pieces have some connection to philanthropic investments made by the George Kaiser Family Foundation, but there are other smaller pieces that have a life of their own. There is a strong rumor afoot that the Kaiser Foundation and allies want to fashion a set of concepts for the next stage of the art zone. If previous plans are indicative, there will be an opportunity for folks outside of the inner circle to participate in envisioning the future of what already looks like one of the most promising new art districts in all of America. FOUR // Medical flagship? Tulsa has become a dark horse leader in an astonishing array of high-end health care and biomedical

The two “quad” killing episodes during 2013 — one near 61st Street and Peoria Avenue and the other at Fairview Apartments in north Tulsa — have induced a good deal of head scratching. Why are these multi-kill events taking place? Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan and Mayor Dewey Bartlett succeeded together with a whole cadre of north-side neighborhood activists in rapidly resolving the still haunting 2012 Good Friday killings — a ruthless conflation of obsession and hate killings in which two now-convicted assailants were recently sentenced to multiple life terms without parole. But the question remains: Will Jordan, Bartlett and some of the veterans of TPD come up with a new strategy for dealing with all this seemingly drug- and gang-related crime? Crime and policing scholar David Kennedy and others have worked with local police departments and mayors to cobble together aggressive gang intervention strategies that arguably can forestall gun violence. In the months to come, will Bartlett and Jordan — or whoever heads up TPD — unpack this question? SIX // A bolder presence for Greenwood Downtown Tulsa is clearly in the grip of a gigantic, quite unexpected growth spurt. Residential housing, eateries and the rise of the Art

Corridor on Mathew B. Brady Street is all the evidence a rational observer needs to know something fantastic is afoot. But the missing part of the equation so far has been any salient, real role for black/minority businesspeople. For a long time, local observers assumed this was a key mission of Tulsa’s Greenwood Chamber of Commerce — an organization that’s been asleep at the wheel arguably for at least a half a decade even though the operation brokered deals to do the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park and apparently pondered other projects. All effort tethered to the Greenwood District, it’s interface with the Blue Dome area and the Mathew B. Brady Arts District. The Greenwood Chamber is now under new management — veteran board member Art Williams is the interim chief, and Thomas Boxley is an energetic newcomer on the board. They and others are trying to re-mobilize, to spark up the energy and critical diversity that could once again make the Greenwood area a kinetic part of the downtown scene. SEVEN // Internet play that pays Tulsan Harry Willis is trying to reinvent Internet radio. With Apple’s recent launch of iTunes Radio, a whole range of reliable, easy ways of accessing the signals of conventional radio stations and Internet-only outfits has emerged. Internet radio is an alternative universe of news, music, interviews, business information and other streams available for anyone with a rudimentary smartphone, a laptop or tablet device. But the problem has been the business model — creating viable revenue streams from advertising, subscribers and other sources that could make these ether-world audio ventures profitable players in the world of media. Harry's idea is quite simple and powerful: He wants to tightly link his IDLRadio with Tulsa brickand-mortar space, in search of a regime that might spark sustained advertising revenues from real-world eateries, arts and entertainment spots, and downtown retail and commercial operations that might want a new, relatively inexpensive avenue for promoting their services, goods, hours and features. It will be interesting to see how Willis and his


EIGHT // Print comes alive

NINE // Courting creativity

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NINE: Tulsa Film and Music Office

TEN // New ways to watch

Ray Pearcey, a technology, public policy and management consulting professional, is managing editor of the Oklahoma Eagle and is a regular contributor to The Tulsa Voice.

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“Did you hear?”

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Cable “cord cutting” continues and consumption of immersive and increasingly sophisticated television series redefines entertainment.

There is a local angle to this phenomenon. Stay tuned for more on this next month.

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hasn’t done in the past? And, more importantly, what imaginative incentives and/or incubator assets can our community make available to film, music, digital game and animation teams who can often take their pick of where to bring job-rich projects? A stout strategy is essential.

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Last year saw the creation of a local film and music board. The brainchild of City Councilor Ewing, and a notion endorsed by Mayor Bartlett and the rest of the Council, the Tulsa Film and Music Office now has a physical space and a part-time executive director. Having a city-based film and music board that promotes Tulsa for commercial film shootings and offers up other incentives is hardly a new idea. Oklahoma’s been doing it for many years through a statewide film and music commission — which most recently led to the filming of Tulsa native Tracy Letts’ “August: Osage County” almost entirely in Oklahoma. But Tulsa probably needs an additional push if it wants to be a bigger player in this arena — hence the local group’s conception. The strategic question: what is it that Tulsa can do that the state

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On another front — one that, apart from this brief note, someone with real detachment and less bias should tackle — is the continuing health and evolution of the alternative print world in Tulsa. Of course, the paper you’re reading right now — The Tulsa Voice — is the newest entrant in that realm, attempting to occupy and re-imagine the space left vacant by the shuttering of Urban Tulsa Weekly. Other outlets continue to evolve and grow, including the long-form literary journal This Land Press, the Tahlequah-based monthly entertainment magazine Currentland, and the Oklahoma Eagle, a paper historically aimed at African-American readers that is now attempting to broaden its market and the range of topics associated with its weekly offerings. (Full disclosure: I’m currently the managing editor of the Eagle.) Change is often met with skepticism, but it yields additional options for consumers. In this instance, it

will be interesting to watch the ways a more varied and energetic competition will enliven the alternative media landscape in Tulsa.

THE TULSA VOICE

IDLRadio venture fare in 2014. Lots of people are watching closely.

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THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music film & tv

LIST

{NEWS }

The year in news

2013’s top stories from Tulsa and around the state by JENNIE LLOYD

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// Tornado devastates Moore The swirl of numbers surrounding the May 20 tornado in Moore are mindboggling: At 2:56 p.m., a mile-wide EF5 tornado tore through 17 miles of Oklahoma City and its suburbs on an otherwise pretty nice Monday afternoon in May. In 39 minutes, 24 children and adults died; 377 were reported injured; an elementary school was destroyed; 1,150 homes were gone; neighborhoods were obliterated; 61,500 power outages and $2 billion in damages were suffered in less than an hour. When the skies cleared, love poured in from everywhere. More than 100 people were rescued. One minute of silence was observed in the U.S. Senate at noon on May 21. President Obama arrived on May 26. Dozens of celebs and private sector groups offered aid (including members of the Oklahoma City Thunder such as Kevin Durant, and companies such as Devon Energy). The Healing in the Heartland benefit concert tugged the nation’s heartstrings and raised $6 million for the United Way of Central Oklahoma.

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2 // Fallin’s anti-gay antics Governor Mary Fallin rankled many progressive nerves when she vowed to stop Oklahoma’s National Guard offering benefits to married same-sex couples, despite a Pentagon directive and presidential decree. When the Pentagon insisted, Fallin cut spousal benefits for the entire Oklahoma National Guard. In a statement, Fallin became a late-night punchline when she reasoned, “The state of Oklahoma does not recognize same-sex marriages, nor does it confer marriage benefits to same-sex couples. The decision reached today allows the Oklahoma Guard to obey Oklahoma law without violating federal rules or policies. It protects the integrity of our state constitution and sends a message to the federal government that they cannot simply ignore our laws or the will of the people.” On Nov. 22, lovable fauxhawk pundit and comedian Stephen Colbert, host of The Colbert Report, responded to the governor’s words, in part, with this: “We wouldn’t even have this problem if gays weren’t allowed in the military. So no one should be allowed in the military… “Governor Fallin, I heard that gay people in Oklahoma enjoy the scent of your state flower the Oklahoma Rose just as much as straight people do. So you should order everyone in your state to cut off their noses to spite the gays.” 3 // Tulsa mayoral race “bitter” and “expensive” It definitely felt as though most of those dollars were thrown at an endless parade of slick and cheesy campaign ads. You couldn’t turn on a Tulsa television set without a barrage of political endorsements

for incumbent Mayor Dewey Bartlett and former mayor Kathy Taylor. Bartlett captured “55 percent of the vote after a bitter 10-month campaign that became the most expensive mayor’s race in city history,” the Tulsa World declared on Nov. 13. Despite Taylor’s healthy fundraising lead (she spent $3.32 million to Bartlett’s $958,000), Bartlett pulled out a win in an election with a higher-than-usual turnout. Bartlett’s second threeyear term began on Dec. 2. 4 // Barresi’s battle over public education Oklahoma School Superintendent Janet Barresi’s A-F grading system came under fire after many schools received D’s and F’s. But her biggest battle this year was over Common Core, a curriculum patterned after Florida’s (whose reforms were spearheaded by then-Governor Jeb Bush) and now adopted by several other states. Congressman Jim Bridenstine, Glenn Beck and Focus on the Family have all come out against Common Core; more importantly, many local superintendents also oppose the reform. 5 // Baby Veronica and the question of justice A Cherokee man named Dusten Brown and his daughter Veronica kicked off what the Los Angeles Times later called a “four-year legal odyssey” after Brown responded to a text message. You probably already know the details of the story as it was covered extensively in local and national media this year. Brown found himself on the wrong side of legal loopholes from here to the U.S. Supreme Court. Veronica’s adoptive parents,

Matt and Melanie Capobianco gained custody of the girl in September. Indian Country Today wrote a tender account of Veronica’s goodbye that speaks more to the concern of family and of justice: “In Oklahoma, she was surrounded by her large extended family, which included her grandparents, her father and stepmother, her sister Kelsey from Brown’s first marriage and a chatty phalanx of half a dozen cousins, with whom she had grown close. She had made friends at preschool and loved her pets. “In South Carolina, Veronica will be the only child on both sides of her adoptive parents’ families. … Time will tell what the ultimate outcome will be for Veronica, who will undoubtedly be given the best of what the Capobiancos can afford in terms of education and the trappings of an older, upper middle income childless couple.” 6 // The war on “Obamacare” Governor Mary Fallin appears twice in our list for 2013 on the hot-button issue of the year: healthcare. The Affordable Care Act, nicknamed “Obamacare,” met with resistance – and lots of longshot lawsuits – in Oklahoma and around the nation. Gov. Fallin

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10 // Goodbye Steve’s Sundries For generations, this cozy bookshop and deli was a respite for Tulsa’s book nerds. Thanks for the memories. We’ll miss you.

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If you found a NEW friend under your tree …

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...we want to see! Bring the new furry member of your family to see us during January and we’ll say “thank you” with a free tasting bag of healthy treats for your pup. And while you’re here, check out our free all-natural food samples, our Pupcakes, and January Clearance merchandise for dogs and cats.

Lab Rescue Ok, Inc. 918-902-3800, www.labrescue.net

Animal Aid of Tulsa 3307 E. 15th St., 918-744-8280, www.animalaid.org

Oklahoma Airedale Rescue 918-836-5508, www.okairedales.com

Animal Rescue Foundation 622-5962, www.arftulsa.org

Oklahoma Aussie Rescue www.okaussies.org

Animal Rescue Foundation of Bartlesville 127 N.E. Washington Blvd., Bartlesville 918-766-0991, www.arfok.org

Partnering for Pets, Inc. 918-376-2525, www.PartneringforPets.org

Bonhaven Scottish Terrier Rescue bonhaven@cox.net, www.bonhaven.org

City of Tulsa Animal Welfare Shelter 3031 N. Erie Ave., 918-669-6280 www.cityoftulsa.org/city-services/animal-welfare.aspx

Halfway Home Greyhound Adoption 918-224-5359, www.halfwayhomegreyhounds.com

Sooner Golden Retriever Rescue 405-749-5700, www.sgrr.org Spay Oklahoma 501 E. 36th St. N., 918-728-3144, www.spayok.com Streetcats, Inc. 6520 E. 60th St., 918-298-0104, www.streetcatstulsa.org Tulsa Boxer Rescue 918-860-2697, www.tulsaboxerrescue.net

Homeward Bound Pug Rescue 405-706-1492, www.homewardboundpugs.com

Tulsa Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 2910 Mohawk Blvd., 428-7722, www.tulsaspca.org

Humane Society of Tulsa 6232 E. 60th St., 918-495-3647, www.tulsapets.com

Whippet Rescue and Placement 284-4512, www.whippet-rescue.com

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

Golden Retriever Rescue 918-816-228-1458, www.goldenrecovery.org

Small Paws Rescue www.smallpawsrescue.org

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German Shepherd Rescue of Tulsa 918-291-2703, www.gsrtulsa.com

Poodle Club of Tulsa 918-346-7121, www.poodlecluboftulsa.org

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Cat Adoption Center 918-486-7727, www.catadopttulsa.org

Pet Adoption League 918-365-8725, www.pet-adopt.org

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Because of You Chihuahua Rescue 405-216-3994, www.becauseofyourescue.org

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Note 4 the Hounds Bassett Rescue, Inc. www.4thehounds.org

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If you are looking to adopt a NEW special friend in 2014… Area Pet Adoption Resources In a perfect world, every dog would have a home and every home would have a dog.

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9 // The sky fell, sort of All eyes focused on the partisan

and some local civilian personnel were furloughed. The biggest little story of 2013 had the biggest bark without much bite after all.

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8 // Tulsa’s trash woes Tulsa’s switch to once-a-day service with new contractor NeWSolutions and snazzy trash and recycling bins didn’t go as smoothly as anyone hoped. But much of the kerfuffle focused on an ailing green waste program. The Tulsa World reported that the city’s green waste was being burned rather than recycled into mulch, as promised. We knew

stalemate in Washington this summer as many wondered how a federal government shutdown would play out nationwide and here in Tulsa. Apocalyptic postgovernment scenarios were floated, and many wondered if the sky might really fall. After the dust settled, the shutdown did affect us, just a little: federally run parks closed briefly

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7 // Knee deep When OKC Thunder all-star point guard Russell Westbrook and Houston Rockets player Patrick Beverley collided during an April 24 game, no one thought much of it. He played the rest of the game, but was then diagnosed with a torn lateral meniscus, which became known as “the injury that arguably reshaped the NBA’s entire Western conference,” per Bleacher Report. Westbrook has since undergone surgery, recovery and then more complications. But the Thunder held their own, with a trip to the Western Conference semifinals and another scoring title for superstar Kevin Durant.

things had gone from bad to worse when the trash board lawyered up in November. Ongoing trash concerns will affect us in 2014, though this is one story we’d like to take out to the curb (in clear plastic, stickered bags, natch) in 2014.

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rejected the expansion of Medicaid, which could leave many without health insurance who would have otherwise qualified. Fallin said she wanted to implement an Oklahoma Plan instead, but there’s no ETA on expanded coverage. Meanwhile, state attorney general Scott Pruitt is certain Oklahoma’s latest legal challenge to the ACA will work this time. In a Dec. 1 Wall Street Journal editorial, Pruitt opined that if his lawsuit (and others like it) succeed, “the structure of the ACA will crumble.”

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14

You say politics, I say fakakta by BARRY FRIEDMAN

F

irst, the headline. It’s Yiddish; it’s onomatopoetic. Fa-kak-ta — if it hasn’t already, it’ll come to you. Speaking of which, our elected representatives are acting like pigeons around a three-bean casserole on an abandoned picnic table. We begin in the Second District, where Congressman Markwayne Mullin, fresh from schooling us on the four branches of government, decided to not stand idly by while the television career of a self-conscious, This I know for the bible tells me so ignoramus is stilled by political correctness and the missionary position. “The fundamentals that founded our great nation included the freedom of speech and religion. Unfortunately a man who simply voiced his religious belief, which is protected by our constitution, is now being punished.1

Phil Robertson of “Duck Dynasty” — a man of God, a man of Madison. “It seems like, to me, a vagina—as a man—would be more desirable than a man’s anus,” Robertson told GQ in a now-infamous diatribe. “That’s just me. I’m just thinking: There’s more there! She’s got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I’m saying? But hey, sin: It’s not logical, my man. It’s just not logical.” Jesus wept. “Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there,” Robertson continued. “Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men.” Jesus then repeatedly pounded a Duck Commander Cold Blooded Copperhead Duck Call® into his forehead. Meanwhile, Mullin must

have pulled a groin getting from Robertson’s encyclical to other homophobes to here … “I support their rights and their view of traditional marriage that is between a man and a woman.” 1 Yeah, that was Papa Duck’s point. And why is it only when morons-turned-millionaires-turned-morons (yeah, I know, he’s a college graduate) take their hatred out for a spin (and use scripture as cover) does the right wing trot out the First Amendment? So if Martin Bashir couched his criticism of Sarah Palin in biblical terms—like using Ephesians 4:18 (“They are darkened in their understanding, alienated from the life of God because of the ignorance that is in them, due to their hardness of heart”)— Mullin would have treated him like a martyr, too, yes? Maybe the Dixie Chicks can write a song about it. A horse, a horse, your hypocrisy for a horse Jim Inhofe, recently recovered from his successful quadruple bypass surgery — paid for by his government-sponsored healthcare (you’re welcome again, sir) — rode his horse at the Owasso Christmas Parade (because Jesus was invited), dismounting long enough to talk about statue envy in Oklahoma City: Sign my petition and stand against Satanists trying to put a statue next to Ten Commandments in Oklahoma! 2 You stand against Satanists, Mountain Man, I’m wearing a garlic and amaranth necklace and calling a priest. Inhofe, incidentally, along with

Oklahoma First District Congressman Jim Bridenstine, introduced a joint resolution earlier this year that would ensure “the U.S. Government protect religious minority freedoms internationally.” But apparently not in Oklahoma City if there’s a pentagram present. While we’re at the capitol, let’s check in on state leaders and see what they’re doing to fund the building of storm shelters so Oklahoma young’uns won’t be strewn along I-44 like litter next time a Category 5 storm comes a-calling. … the plan, which would use revenue from the state franchise tax to pay the $500 million debt, does not have the governor’s support.3

term, and rhetoric, instead of soaring and doing a pas de deux with angels, fell pathetically from the back of NeWSolutions truck, was slapped with a “green waste” sticker, and set on the curb for a Friday pick-up. “And there will be water in the river,” said the mayor. “I can’t tell you how it’s going to happen, specifically, but there will be water in the river.” 4 Water. OK. Got it. We have hopes in the months ahead our new/old mayor will be a sane voice in Oklahoma politics (admittedly, a low bar to clear), lose Rick Santorum’s number, refrain from talking about guns and ACA, and stop torturing the English language. “I won’t kick the can down the road of passivity.” 4

To wit … “I am not sure that is the best way of doing it,” Fallin said.3

Even the can thought, “What kind of fakakta analogy is that?”

And what is the best way? Why, tax cuts, of course. But Republican leaders maintain that eliminating taxes, especially those on businesses, will encourage more investment in the state, generating more money for communities to pay for their own needs.3 Perfect. Let’s wait for companies to have a profitable first quarter before we start pouring concrete. Younger generation, Pfft! In my day, ma and pa just put us in the cellar and covered us with mattresses. And we conclude … There’s no place like home, no place like home Ooops! Wrong musical. Here in Tulsa, Dewey Bartlett was sworn in as mayor for a second

 ulsa World: “Oklahoma congressman T backs ‘Duck Dynasty’ star” 2 In-A-Gist: Sign my petition and stand against satanists trying to put a statue next to Ten Commandments in Oklahoma! ­– Jim Inhofe 3 StateImpact Oklahoma: “Why Gov. Mary Fallin Won’t Back School Storm Shelter Ballot Measure” 4 Tulsa World: “Bartlett sworn in for second term” 1

“News from the Plains: All this RED can make you BLUE” appears each issue and will cover Oklahoma politics and culture—the disastrous, the unseemly, the incomprehensible … you know, the day to day stuff. Barry Friedman is a touring stand-up comedian, author and general rabble-rouser.


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Purchase any new Kia vehicle at Primeaux Kia and receive TWO TICKETS to THREE THUNDER HOME GAMES! *while supplies last

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Back to the drawing board A renewed commitment to educational parity and equality — not overly simplistic letter grades — would better address problems in public education by HANNIBAL B. JOHNSON

R

emember that now-famous United Negro College Fund slogan, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste”? Suppose we apply that as a sort of metric for public education. We set aside Oklahoma School Superintendent Janet Barresi’s much-maligned A-F grading system that, theoretically, allows us to gauge our public schools’ effectiveness, and take a look at how we’re really doing enriching the minds of our students. The answer depends on whom one asks and, to a great extent, the demographic about which one inquires. How students fare within our educational system too often depends on their individual backgrounds — race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and more. These demographic criteria too often become predictors of student academic achievement. Yet great things are happening. For example, Tulsa Public Schools can boast gains in capacity-building, mentoring, and performance evaluation for teachers and school leaders; wrap-around services in some schools (i.e., community

schools); and the infusion of young, robust teachers through programs like Teach for America and City Year. Still, at least in the short term, the gulfs between high-performing and low-performing schools, and between the highest-performing and lowest-performing students within those schools, remain remarkably persistent. The deficits are too great and the gaps too wide to be overcome instantaneously or with simplistic, unsustainable approaches.

We — educators, parents, students, and concerned citizens — must expect better, do better, and be better. Too many young people continue to fall through the cracks, drop out, and leave schools ill-prepared for work, citizenship, and life. The problem is especially acute among students of color. Our future depends on supporting initiatives that will right

our listing educational vessel and steer her toward parity and excellence for all. We — educators, parents, students, and concerned citizens — must expect better, do better, and be better. Education has been called one of the “essential amenities of human progress.” The African American experience is illustrative. Slave masters withheld formal education from enslaved Africans in an effort to keep them under control. Still, our African American forebears took great risks to educate themselves. Jim Crow segregation created a system of underfunded, underequipped black schools. Yet, those schools managed to produce some remarkable results. Staunch segregationists impeded the drive to desegregate our schools. Nonetheless, the African American civil rights movement produced reforms that led to increased educational access. Potential excuses abound. They always have. But they do little to propel us forward. And so here we are today, still searching for equity and parity, and

still disappointed by disparities in educational achievement in our community. How do we recapture the longing for and love of education that is our legacy? How do we diminish the educational disparities that still bedevil us? Some of the best minds in our community are wrestling with those very questions. Let’s join them. Let’s support them. Let’s re-commit ourselves to excellence in public education: no excuses; no exceptions.

Hannibal B. Johnson, a Harvard Law School graduate, is an author, attorney, and consultant specializing in diversity issues, human relations, and non-profit leadership. He also teaches at Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. His books include Apartheid in Indian Country?; Black Wall Street; and Acres of Aspiration, works chronicling the African American experience in Oklahoma and its indelible impact on American history. Johnson has received numerous awards and honors for his work and community service.

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news of the weird by CHUCK SHEPHERD

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Johnny Deleon, 20, was arrested in Houston in October, caught in the act of removing wheel caps from a Cadillac Escalade in a deli’s parking lot. Even in the daylight, Deleon apparently failed to notice the many police cars in the lot (as a ceremonial planning meeting was underway in the deli). Officers, from among 30 inside, dashed out and arrested Deleon.

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In criminal cases, DNA is usually a smoking gun for the prosecution -- except, of course, if there is an "evil twin." In November a judge in Colorado Springs ruled that a suspect, Army Lt. Aaron Lucas, should have the opportunity to blame his brother Brian for a string of sexual assaults because the DNA might be Brian's. Brian has not been charged and denies any involvement, but Aaron said Brian was in two crime-scene states that Aaron was never in. Said a Denver defense lawyer, "The only time I have seen (the evil-twin defense) was on 'Law and Order: SVU.'"

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Coughlan elementary school in Langley, British Columbia, announced to parents in November that henceforth it would not just prohibit abusive or unwanted physical contact among its kindergarteners, but all contact. Officials said they were responding to parents who objected to "rough play," but, said another parent, incredulous, "No tag, no hugging, no touching at all. ... I am not going to tell my daughter she can't touch her friends at school. I am going to teach her boundaries."

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The evangelical educational organization Answers in Genesis, which has established a series of children's books and a creationist museum, announced recently that it would enter the bond market to fund its most ambitious project ­— a creationist amusement park centered around a "life-size" reconstruction of Noah's Ark, for which it estimates it will need at least $73 million from investors. Issuing bonds might be seen as desperate since AiG has raised only $13.6 million privately since proposing the Ark-park, but a Georgetown University finance professor, contacted by Slate. com, suggested that the bonds' terms place them in the high-risk "junk bond" category (perhaps

better described as "faith-based," having virtually no resale value and without an independent bond rating).

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Each Nov. 1 is a day (or two) of craziness in the isolated mountain village of Todos Santos Cuchumatanes, Guatemala, where Mayan tradition commands continuous horse races through town, jockeyed by increasingly drunk riders, until only a sober-enough winner remains. Collisions occur in the Race of the Souls, and occasionally someone dies, but the misfortune is met with a collective shrug and regarded as a spiritual offering for fertile crops during the coming year, according to an eyewitness this year reporting for Vice.com. Ironically, for the rest of the year, the village is largely alcohol-free except for that on hand to sell to tourists.

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America's foremost advocate for frontal lobotomies as "treatment" for mental disorder, the late Dr. Walter Freeman, performed an estimated 3,500 lobotomies during the 1940s and 1950s before opposition finally solidified against him, according to a December 2013 investigation by The Wall Street Journal. At the peak of his influence, he was so confident that he demonstrated the procedure to skeptics by hammering an icepick ("from his own kitchen," the Journal reported) into both eye sockets of an electrical-shocked patient and "toggling" the picks around the brain tissue, certain that he was severing "correctly." For years, Freeman (a neurologist untrained in surgery) marshaled positive feedback from enough patients and families for the procedure to survive criticism, and he spent his

final years (until his death in 1972) securing patient testimonials to "prove" the validity of lobotomies.

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Laffa Medi-Eastern Restaurant

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Ten standouts in a delicious year for new eateries in Tulsa

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by ANGELA EVANS

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he restaurant business has been booming in Tulsa, and the class of 2013 continued the upward trend of great new dining options. From the barbecue rush downtown to the expansion of old favorites to the south, the rise of the Brady Arts District to the roster changes on Brookside, the tenacity and passion of Tulsa’s restaurateurs provides a lush landscape of eateries to choose from. Here are just a few of 2013’s stand-out restaurants, in no particular order. Tavolo 427 S. Boston Ave. Justin Thompson’s take on Italian cuisine hastily swept in to replace Edward Delk’s in the As downtown’s Philcade Building said goodbye to Edward Delk’s this year, Justin Thompson’s upscale Italian concept swiftly swept in to fill the void. Thompson transformed the space to create the kind of ambience you’d expect from a high-end Italian restaurant — with a menu to match.

Tallgrass Prairie Table 313 E. 2nd St. The newest kid on the block, Tallgrass Prairie Table, was one of 2013’s most hotly anticipated new offerings. Rock star executive chef Michelle Donaldson and owner Hope Egan have upped the ante on the farm-to-table, “locavore” theme. Working with local farmers and ranchers, the menu is filled with must-taste dishes. Housed in the space formerly occupied by the Blue Dome Diner, the restaurant’s stunning transformation must be seen to be believed. Trencher’s Delicatessen 2602 S. Harvard Ave. Amid the high-end and exotic options listed here, one newcomer focuses on the humble sandwich — though not the kind your momma made. Zach and Melinda Curren, owners of Shades of Brown coffee shop in Brookside, opened a new deli in midtown to much praise. What makes their sandwiches so special? Everything is made from scratch. Several

styles of bread, roasted meats, condiments and salads make up a solid menu of artisanal items made in-house. Zanmai 1402 S. Peoria Ave. #200 On the edge of Cherry Street, we all watched as a sleek new building slowly took shape. After much anticipation, the Japanese Steakhouse finally opened — and, judging by the early buzz, it was worth the wait. Dry-aged steaks and fresh sushi are top draws, and guests are treated to a show put on by a talented staff of hibachi chefs and a divine view of downtown. Laffa Medi-Eastern Restaurant 111 N. Main St. Laffa Medi-Eastern Restaurant has added a little zest to the steak and potato joints in the Brady Arts District. Featuring cuisine from the Mediterranean and Middle East, Miranda Kaiser’s latest scheme has become a favorite (continued on page 20)

SOUTHERN EXPOSURE It’s typicall y a good sign when a restaurant feels confident enough to expand its horizons. Though many new restaurants seem to gravitate toward downtown, there are hungry masses in south Tulsa who are gleefull y chowing down on some Tulsa mainstays. Notable migrating favorites include Keo South, McNellie’s South City and Brownie’s Burgers.

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(continued from page 18) destination for those with adventurous palates. Laffa’s walk-up shawarma window has also become a favorite for late-night snacking and downtown lunching. The Hen Bistro & Wine 3509 S. Peoria Ave. Brookside got a French twist with the arrival of The Hen. This bistro features French favorites and elegant entrees in the tradition of its “mother” restaurant, The French Hen. This location, though, is a little less matronly and takes a more modern approach. The restaurant opened up quietly this summer, but the praise has grown louder from discerning foodies and Francophiles alike. Maxxwell’s Restaurant 2636 E. 11th St. Located in the historic Campbell Hotel on Route 66, Maxxwell’s big and bright interior is a welcome respite for the road weary. It has a great selection of comfort foods, such as meatloaf and mac and cheese, along with a full bar. Comfortable yet polished, this hidden gem will fulfill your craving for some down-home cooking.

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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From the barbecue rush downtown to the expansion of old favorites to the south, the rise of the Brady Arts District to the roster changes on Brookside, the tenacity and passion of Tulsa’s restaurateurs provides a lush landscape of eateries to choose from.

White Flag Burger Bar 116 S. Elgin Ave. When a wave of well-known barbecue restaurants swept into

downtown to open up shop, Blake Ewing decided to wave the “White Flag” and retool his Back Alley Blues & Barbecue as a gourmet burger joint, and the change is a welcome one for the downtown dining scene. The menu is filled with burgers with funny names, but they deliver serious flavor. Downtown barbecue Downtown is quickly becoming the Barbecue District. Long-time Okie-grown ‘cue joint Rib Crib took up residence on the corner of 1st Street and Detroit Ave., just on the cusp of the Blue Dome District. Then Albert G’s Bar & Q set up shop in a renovated space next door to McNellie’s. These two formidable opponents sent Back Alley Blues & Barbecue running for Hamburger Hill.

Zanmai head chef Yutaka Miyazato

Albert G’s Downtown

Food Trucks The food truck frenzy continues at a break-neck pace. This year, the number of regularly-operating food trucks in Tulsa nearly doubled. From donuts to pizza, barbecue to sushi, Tulsa has embraced mobile meals in a big way. You can spot a fleet of food trucks often on Wednesdays at Guthrie Green, but as they’re always on the move, you never know where you’ll spot one next.

Dearly Departed As we say goodbye to 2013, we also sadly say goodbye to some fine Tulsa eateries. Gone but not forgotten are Local Table, Casa Frida, Diamond Jack’s, Oui3, Great Wall and Wolfgang Puck Bistro. 20

Food trucks converge on Guthrie Green


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Voted Tulsa’s Best Thai Restaurant 1st Place Award for 14 Consecutive Years Ranked in the top 50 nationally.

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without leaving Tulsa with a $100 French Hen gift certificate.

31-2/2: Beauty and the Beast Celebrity Attractions

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Jan. 31 – Take a trip to France

26: Funkades! Tulsa Children’s Museum

$100 Celebrity Restaurant gift card.

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25: Feet Don’t Fail Me Now! PAC Trust

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performance of “Beauty and the Beast,” presented by Celebrity Attractions Jan. 31-Feb. 2 at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, and a $50 Full Moon Café gift certificate.

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1924 Riverside Dr. • 918.582.4600 A Tulsa favorite since Blue Rose’s days on Brookside, the Blue Rose Special is a ½ pound chargrilled burger, topped with fresh blue cheese crumbles and crisp bacon. Served with fries or, for a slight mark-up, Blue Rose’s Famous Cheese Fries, topped with bacon and Jack and cheddar cheeses

MON – THU, 11 A.M. – 10 P.M. FRI­– SAT, 11 A.M.­– 1 A.M. SUN, 11 A.M. – 11 P.M.

Phat Philly’s

1305 S Peoria Ave. • 918.382.7428 Whether it’s for lunch, or a late-night snack to absorb whatever it is you’ve been drinking all night, the Philly Cheese Steak at Phat Philly’s is tough to beat. Pictured here are the classic Cheesesteak with grilled onions and bell peppers, smothered in melted cheddar cheese, and the Chicken Cheesesteak with Monterey Jack. They’re open until 4 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, just when you’ll be needing them most.

MON – THU, 10 A.M. – 10 P.M. FRI­– SAT, 10 A.M.­– 4 A.M.

Juniper

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324 E 3rd St. • 918.794.1090 One of Tulsa’s most delicious brunch offerings is Juniper’s Pork Belly Eggs Benedict. An English muffin is topped with maple-glazed pork belly, poached eggs, and béarnaise. This dish will ensure that brunch is the best meal of the week.

TUES – FRI, LUNCH: 11 A.M. – 4 P.M. TUES – FRI, DINNER: 4 P.M. – 11 P.M. SAT, BRUNCH: 10 A.M. – 4 P.M. // DINNER: 4 P.M. – 11 P.M.

Hideaway Pizza

Various locations • hideawaypizza.com Deciding on a pizza topping that will satisfy everyone in your party can be complicated. Luckily, we have Hideaway, where these kind of tough decisions can be avoided altogether by ordering the Hideaway Special. Each slice has a different topping, and half are topped with meat, half with veggies. Now you just need to decide between hand-tossed, thin, or gluten-free crust.

VISIT HIDEAWAYPIZZA.COM FOR HOURS OF OPERATION. 22


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from your friends at The Blue Ox Dining Group

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Happy New Year

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Terwilliger Heights: Bill & Ruth’s Blue Rose Café The Chalkboard Dalesandro’s Elwoods Mansion House Café Ron’s Hamburgers & Chili La Villa at Philbrook

Here’s to a great 2014.

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North Tulsa: Admiral Grill Bill & Ruth’s Christy’s BBQ Evelyn’s Golden Saddle BBQ Steakhouse Hank’s Hamburgers Harden’s Hamburgers Hero’s Subs & Burgers Ike’s Chili Los Primos The Restaurant at Gilcrease White River Fish Market

Cherry Street: Andolini’s Pizzeria Café Cubana Chimi’s Mexican Food Chipotle Mexican Grill Coffee House on Cherry Street Daylight Donuts Doe’s Eat Place Full Moon Café Genghis Grill Heirloom Baking Co. Hideaway Jason’s Deli Kilkenny’s Irish Pub & Eatery La Madeleine Lucky’s Restaurant

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Downtown: Baxter’s Interurban Grill Billy’s on the Square Boston Avenue Grille The Boulder Grill Café 320 Casa Laredo Coney Island Courtyard Deli Daily Grill Elote Café and Catering Foolish Things Coffee Grand Selections for Lunch The Greens on Boulder Heavy Metal Pizza Lou’s Deli Mazzio’s Italian Eatery Mexicali Border Cafe Mod’s Coffee & Crepes New Atlas Grill Oneok Café Oklahoma Spud on the Mall S&J Oyster Company Seven West Café Sheena’s Cookies & Deli Steakfinger House The Sushi Place Tabouli’s Tallgrass Prairie Table Tavolo Bistro at Atlas Life Ti Amo Topeca Coffee Trula The Vault Williams Center Café

Lot a Burger Maxxwell’s Restaurant Moonsky’s Cheesesteaks and Daylight Donuts Mr. Taco Nelson’s Ranch House Oklahoma Style BBQ The Phoenix Pie Hole Pizza Pollo al Carbon Rib Crib BBQ & Grill The Right Wing Route 66 Subs & Burgers Tacos Don Francisco Tally’s Good Food Cafe Umberto’s Pizza

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Blue Dome: Dilly Deli El Guapo’s Cantina Fassler Hall Joe Bots Coffee Joe Momma’s Pizza Juniper McNellie’s White Flag Yokozuna

TU/Kendall Whittier: Big Al’s Health Foods Bill’s Jumbo Burgers Billy Ray’s BBQ Brothers Houligan Burn Co. BBQ Capp’s BBQ Corner Café Duffy’s Diner El Rancho Grande Freddie’s Hamburgers Guang Zhou Dim Sum Jim’s Coney Island Las Americas Super Mercado & Restaurant

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Brady Arts District: Abear’s Caz’s Chowhouse Chimera Draper’s Bar-B-Cue Fat Guy’s Gypsy Coffee House Hey Mambo The Hunt Club Laffa Lucky’s on the Green Mexicali Border Café Oklahoma Joe’s Prhyme Downtown Steakhouse The Rusty Crane Spaghetti Warehouse The Tavern Zin Wine, Beer & Dessert Bar

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THE PHOENIX

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THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink featured arts & culture music film & tv etc. // Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

dininglistings Mary’s Italian Trattoria Mi Cocina Palace Café Panera Bread Phat Philly’s Qdoba Mexican Grill SMOKE. Te Kei’s Tucci’s Café Italia White Owl Zanmai Brookside: Antoinette Baking Co. Biga Billy Sims BBQ Blue Moon Bakery and Café The Brook Brookside By Day Café Ole Café Samana Charleston’s Claud’s Hamburgers Cosmo Café & Bar Crow Creek Tavern Doc’s Wine and Food Egg Roll Express Elmer’s BBQ Fuji La Hacienda The Hen Bistro Hibiscus Caribbean Bar and Grill In the Raw Keo Lambrusco’Z To Go Leon’s Brookside Mazzio’s Italian Eatery Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano Old School Bagel Café Pei Wei Asian Diner R Bar & Grill Rons Hamburgers & Chili Señor Tequila Shades of Brown Sonoma Bistro & Wine Bar Starbucks Sumatra Coffee Shop Super Wok The Warehouse Bar & Grill Weber’s Root Beer Whole Foods Market Yolotti Frozen Yogurt Zoës Kitchen Utica Square: Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar Goldie’s Patio Grill McGill’s Olive Garden P.F. Chang’s China Bistro Pepper’s Grill Polo Grill Queenie’s Café and Bakery Starbucks Stone Horse Café Wild Fork

Midtown: Albert G’s The Alley Bangkok Thai Super Buffet Celebrity Restaurant Daylight Donuts Supershop Eddy’s Steakhouse Felini’s Cookies & Deli Golden Gate Mary Jane’s Pizza My Thai Kitchen PJ’s Sandwich Shoppe Phill’s Diner Steve’s Sundries Trenchers Delicatessen I-44/BA Interchange: Big Anthony’s BBQ Bill & Ruth’s Subs Billy Sims BBQ Binh-Le Vietnamese Chop House BBQ D’Oro Pizza Desi Wok Fiesta Cozumel Hideaway Pizza Himalayas – Aroma of India Ichiban Teriyaki Jumbo’s Burgers Las Bocas Las Tres Fronteras Le Bistro Sidewalk Cafe Mamasota’s In & Out Mazzio’s Italian Eatery Monterey’s Little Mexico Nelson’s Buffeteria Pho Da Cao Pickle’s Pub Rice Bowl Cafe Rib Crib BBQ & Grill Royal Dragon Sezchuan Express Shawkat’s Deli & Grill Speedy Gonzalez Grill Spudder Steak Stuffers USA Tacos Don Francisco Thai Siam Tokyo Garden The Tropical Restaurant & Bar Viet Huong Villa Ravenna Watts Barbecue Southern Hills: BBD II Baja Jack’s Burrito Shack Bamboo Thai Bistro Bellacino’s Pizza & Grinders Bodean’s Seafood Restaurant The Brook Camille’s Sidewalk Café Cardigan’s Charleston’s Cimarron Meat Company Dona Tina Cocina Mexicana El Samborsito Elements Steakhouse & Grille

The Fig Café and Bakery First Watch Five Guys Gencies Chicken Shack Gyros by Ali Hebert’s Specialty Meats Helen of Troy Mediterranean Cuisine India Palace La Flama Mahogany Prime Steakhouse McNellie’s South City Mr. Goodcents Subs & Pastas Naples Flatbread & Wine Bar Nordaggio’s Coffee OK Country Donut Shoppe Redrock Canyon Grill Ripe Tomato Ron’s Hamburgers and Chili Sushi Hana Japanese Fusion Thai Village Tres Amigos Mexican Grill & Cantina White Lion Zio’s Italian Kitchen Woodland Hills: Asahi Sushi Bar Baker Street Pub & Grill Billy Sims BBQ Bistro at Seville Bluestone Steakhouse and Seafood Restaurant Brothers Pizza Bucket’s Sports Bar & Grill Charlie’s Chicken Chuy’s Chopsticks El Tequila Fat Guy’s Burger Bar Fish Daddy’s Seafood Grill Fuji FuWa Asian Kitchen Firehouse Subs The Gaucho Brazilian Steakhouse Haruno Hungry Howie’s Pizza In the Raw on the Hill Jameson’s Pub Jamil’s Jason’s Deli Jay’s Original Hoagies Keo Kit’s Takee-Outee La Roma Lanna Thai Louie’s Mandarin Taste Marley’s Pizza Mekong River Mi Tierra Oliveto Italian Bistro Ri Le’s Rib Crib BBQ & Grill Ridge Grill Ron’s Hamburgers & Chili Savoy Shogun Steakhouse of Japan Siegi’s Sausage Factory & Deli

Ti Amo Italian Ristorante Wrangler’s Bar-B-Q Yasaka Steakhouse of Japan Zio’s Italian Kitchen West Tulsa: Arnold’s Old-Fashioned Hamburgers Burger House Charlie’s Chicken Go West Restaurant & Saloon Jumpin J’s Knotty Pine BBQ Linda Mar Lot a Burger Monterey’s Little Mexico Ollie’s Station Rib Crib BBQ & Grill Sandwiches & More Union Street Café Westside Grill & Delivery East Tulsa: Al Sultan Grill & Bakery Big Daddy’s All American Bar-B-Q Birrieria Felipe Bogey’s Brothers Houligan Casa San Marcos Casanova’s Restaurant Charlie’s Chicken Cherokee Deli Darby’s Restaurant El Centenario El Gallo Loco El 7 Marez El Refugio Azteca Super Taqueria Fiesta Del Mar Flame Broiler Frank’s Café Fu-Thai Garibaldi’s The Gnarley Dawg Hatfield’s Jay’s Coneys Josie’s Tamales Kimmy’s Diner Korean Garden Lot a Burger Maria’s Mexican Grill Mariscos Costa Azul Mariscos El Centenario Mekong Vietnamese Pizaa Depot Porky’s Kitchen Ron’s Hamburgers & Chili RoseRock Cafe Señor Fajita Seoul Restaurant Shiloh’s of Tulsa Shish-Kabob & Grill Stone Mill BBQ & Steakhouse Tacos San Pedro Taqueria la Cabana Timmy’s Diner

“The atmosphere at Cosmo sets the mood for good friends, food and drinks! Love it!” - Karis Jones, Owasso “Love this place & recommend it to everyone.” - Ivan Orndorff Jr, Tulsa “I try something different every time I come & have never been disappointed! Thanks for all the veggie options!” - Pamela Neuok, Broken Arrow

CAFÉ & BAR

“Friendly people work here.” - Judi Gaddy, Tulsa

3334 S. Peoria | (918) 933-4848 | www.cosmo-cafe.com 24


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Drunk cowboys and ‘Screaming Idiots’ by JOSHUA KLINE

etc. // Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

This is not a review, nor is it meant to promote already-popular midtown establishments. For suggestions on his next drink, email joshua.s.kline@gmail.com.

film & tv

he slurs. “Rumple, Goldschlager and 151.” Oh. I mumble another meek “thanks,” and toss the minty, high-octane poison down the hatch. My post-shot facial contortions make the Cowboy howl. “That there will make your sticker peck out,” he whoops. We all laugh except for the Cowboy’s wife, who rolls her eyes and glares at no one in particular. Drunk Cowboy notices Wife’s glare and decides to include her. He directs our attention to her and another man at the bar and makes a half-assed introduction. “This is my wife, and that’s my brother.” At this, his wife speaks up. “Fuck you! He’s my brother, not yours.” She doesn’t seem angry, just exasperated. The Cowboy laughs. His wife looks at us and

music

friend and I return to our conversation as a burly, long-haired biker takes the karaoke stage and delivers a passionate rendition of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Simple Man.” A few minutes pass and the Cowboy makes a new appearance. He’s moved over a seat and is now right next to my friend. But his demeanor has changed and he’s looking past her, squarely at me. “I got four DUI’s,” he volunteers with no prompting. “Really?” I’m not sure I believe him. “Yes sir.” And then he reaches across the bar, shot in hand. I hold my beer up and try to “cheers” him, but he shakes his head. The shot is for me, and it feels like an apology. I accept and nod a thank you to him. “What is it?” I ask. “That’s a Screaming Idiot,”

arts & culture

1005 S. Sheridan Road

featured

The Dirty Knuckle Tavern

food & drink

I

deadpans, “My family disowned me because I married him twice.” Later in the night, my friend ambles onto the stage and sings “Son of a Preacher Man” for the 20 or so people in the bar. As she finishes, she has a quick exchange with the karaoke master and then returns to her seat, looking slightly embarrassed. She tells me there was a misunderstanding: the karaoke master got it in his head that she’s visiting from California and possibly famous. The bartender, a friendly, tattooed woman I recognize from her previous stint at Mercury Lounge, introduces us to the owner, who insists on buying us a round. Word of visitors from California has spread throughout the bar and we’re approached by several more people. Perhaps due to our BAC, we decide to roll with the misunderstanding. We’re having too much and fun and everyone is warm and inviting. As we tab out, an unusually affable bouncer approaches us and launches into his own welcome speech. “I hear you guys are from California,” He says. My friend and I exchange a guilty glance and then nod to him. “I am, as well!” he continues. “Welcome. Anything you guys need, let me know. We’re a very family-oriented bar. You guys keep coming in here, you’ll be a part of the Knuckle family, too.”

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At the Dirty Knuckle, you’re family (especially if you’re from California) t’s karaoke night at the Dirty Knuckle and a drunk, bearded cowboy who just butchered a Garth Brooks tune keeps eyeballing my lady friend. Several times I catch the Cowboy’s lascivious gaze; his eyes wander away from his wife, who wears a shitfaced scowl over a bottomless domestic beer and eternally lit cigarette, across the bar and onto my friend. The drunken staring feels benign, but his shamelessness is making me laugh. My friend, aware of the attention she’s receiving, keeps casting me sheepish glances. The Cowboy’s wife is aware, too. I watch her watch him watch my friend. It’s awkward. The rowdy bar currently occupying the long-running drinking space at 10th Street and Sheridan Ave. (formerly Kenny’s sports bar and a swingers club, among others) entertains a crowd of gregarious, roughneck drinkers — cowboys, bikers, manual laborers — who take turns belting out classic rock anthems and ‘90s country hits between games of pool and foosball. The atmosphere is lively and jovial, the décor an epileptic feast of colored lights, holiday flourishes, mismatched oddities and assorted curios. Several giant stuffed animals lord over a nearly empty vending machine. The Cowboy sizes up my friend again, looks past her to me, and for a brief, uncomfortable moment he and I make eye contact. He averts his stare and returns his attention to his agitated wife. My

THE TULSA VOICE

take a dive

TAKE A DIVE is a running column in which Joshua Kline explores the fringes of drinking culture in Tulsa County by visiting the dives, holes, beer bars and neighborhood pubs that keep Green Country drunk and happy. 25


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the

boozeclues (

tips on drinking well in Tulsa )

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WESTERN

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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Cellar Dweller // 417 W. Seventh St.

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the bartender: Western Doughty  the cocktail: The Western the ingredients: Malibu rum, Bordeaux cherry juice, pineapple juice, cherry on top the secret: “The Bordeaux cherry juice is the key. Grenadine is just syrupy awfulness.” bonus: Doughty, also a photographer, will open his exhibition “Route 66: Room #116” at Living Arts of Tulsa on Jan. 3. More on pg. 32


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s TV’ n 4 1 r ree OveBig Sc ve a 72” an C oard M fleb f Shu Pool le nhokey r o C Hoc Air

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Whether hankerin’ to watch your favorite team... Cool and casual, loud and crowded, Bucket’s Sports Bar & Grill is the best place in Tulsa to grab a cold one and watch your favorite game!

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WE GOT YOUR GAME!

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GREAT FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

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$1.50 Domestics till 8pm $3 Wells All Day-Every Day $5 Burgers During Thunder games $7.50 Buckets after 8pm

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$1 Domestics till 8pm, $3 Wells all day everyday $7.50 Buckets after 8pm

Voted Best Karaoke Bar with Rick Berry

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Midtowns Hidden Gem

South Tulsa’s Newest Hot Spot Come try our food & specials

5058 S. 79th E. Ave 918-627-3777

etc.

6529 E. 31st St 918-664-5078

6214 S. Sheridan Rd 918-491-1200

8921 S. Yale 918-921-3530

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

1385 N. Aspen 918-286-1990

106 S. Atlanta (Owasso) 918-274-8202

1120 S. Harvard 918-584-4867

8215 E. Regal Court 918-364-2625

1849 S. Aspen Ave. 918-251-1973

Broken Arrow’s Hottest New Pub

Great Food & Live Entertainment

Voted Best “Hole in the wall” 8 years in a row

Weekly Live Music & Entertainment

Voted Broken Arrow’s Best Bar

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oklahomacool

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Moving beyond Woody & Will in search of the new Oklahoma canon

Joaquin Phoenix in “Her,” featuring production Deisg n by former Tulsan K.K. Bar ret t

CINEPUNK

Former Tulsan falls in with Hollywood’s hippest collective of talent

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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by JEFF MARTIN

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L

et’s start with the names you know; Spike Jonze, Sofia Coppola, David O. Russell, Michel Gondry. All contemporary filmmakers, all contributing vital works to the world of cinema. Keith “K. K.” Barrett has worked with them all. While mostly known as a production designer, Barrett’s other credits include art director, cinematographer, and even actor (“I Heart Huckabees,” 2004). But his path to the movie business was anything but conventional. Born in Omaha, the young Barrett and his family made several stops including the Ozarks (Missouri) and Oklahoma City before landing in Tulsa. With an interest in the visual arts, specifically painting, Barrett continued his exploration of Oklahoma towns and cities by moving to Stillwater in the 1970s and enrolling at Oklahoma State University. While not particularly known as a Mecca of cutting-edge culture, Barrett fell in with other creative types and eventually his interests shifted to music (drums). He and his cohorts began composing and recording at a breakneck pace. Punk was just about to take over the world.

In early 1977, Barrett moved to Los Angeles and soon joined the early punk pioneers, The Screamers, often referred to as one of the great “unrecorded” bands in rock history. The band never rose above cult status, but Barrett and his bandmates began to play with visual formats and videos prior to the MTV era. Throughout the 80s and 90s, Barrett worked in and out of the music video and commercial industries. It wasn’t until he met video impresario Spike Jonze, known mostly at the time for award-winning videos for Weezer, Beastie Boys, Bjork, and others, Barrett began forging a new path. Everything changed when he was offered the role of production designer for the film “Being John Malkovich,” an odd little indie that became a critical and commercial success and garnered multiple Academy Award nominations. From that once experience, Barrett met Gondry, Coppola (who was then married to Jonze), and David O. Russell. In the fifteen years since, Barrett has rarely worked outside of that original group, the lone exception being the 2011 adaptation of

Jonathan Safran Foer’s “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” with director Stephen Daldry (“The Hours”).

“It’s all life. I am just curious. Always learning. Music, painting, filmmaking, teasing friends, fixing the broken, playing devil’s advocate, it’s all the same adventure.” ­—K.K. Barrett Barrett’s latest collaboration with Jonez brings him full circle. “Her,” starring Joaquin Phoenix as a lonely writer who falls in love with his computer’s operating system (voiced by Scarlett Johansson), was recently named the best film of 2013 by the National Board of Review and nominated for several Golden Globes. The film comes to Tulsa in early 2014.

SETTING UP Barrett worked with Sofia Coppola numerous times. Coppola lived in Tulsa as a child in the early 80s when her father (Francis Ford Coppola) made the film adaptations of S.E. Hinton’s “The Outsiders” and “Rumble Fish” back-to-back. The logo for Barrett’s punk band The Screamers was created by fellow Oklahoman and legendary underground comics artist, Gary Panter (b. 1950, Durant). Panter is known most for his Emmy-winning set designs for “Pee-Wee’s Playhouse.” One of Barrett’s early collaborators was artist Al Hansen, famous in his own right, but also grandfather of musician Beck (Hansen). In 2006, Barrett worked as Production Designer on Coppola’s largescale period piece, Marie Antoinette. The Costume Designer for that film was Academy Award-winner, Milena Canonero (“Chariots of Fire,” “Barry Lyndon”). Canonero is married to renowned character actor and native Tulsan Marshall Bell. One of Jonze and Barrett’s earliest collaborations was the famous “It’s Wide Open” commercial for Levi’s. Doesn’t ring a bell? It’s the one with the guy on the stretcher where everyone breaks into song, singing Soft Cell’s “Tainted Love” to the beeps and bumps of the medical machinery. Yeah, you know it.


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Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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THE TULSA VOICE Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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artspotting

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Prints of Persia

Iranian-born Tulsan facilitates U.S. debut for artist cousins by BRITT GREENWOOD

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orn in Iran but raised in the U.S., Shirin Zakerion always knew she had a knack for creative pursuits. But it wasn’t until a trip to her homeland last year that she finally discovered the roots of her creativity. Zakerion, a hairstylist and owner of aes•thet•ic hair & beauty in Tulsa, met extended family in Iran she had only heard stories about— including artist brothers Farshad, Arash and Farzad Ashkar. Farshad is a graphic artist, Arash is a photographer and mosaic artist, and Farzad is a photographer and graphic artist. During her time in Iran, Zakerion got to know the brothers and marveled at their artistic talent — and she was often amazed at how wellknown they were in a country with such a rich artistic heritage. “Everywhere we went, people knew them,” she said. Despite their notoriety in Iran, it has long been the Ashkar brothers’ dream to have their art displayed in an American gallery, and cousin Zakerion has become a wish-granter, securing them an exhibition at Colour Gallery, 1532 S. Harvard Ave., which will debut “Iran: The Hidden Beauty,” on Jan. 11 from 6-9 p.m. and present the exhibit throughout January. “They just want people to see their art,” Zakerion said. “Iran itself is so beautiful and has so much to offer as a country.” In one of Arash’s photographs, the isolation pulsates — a man is sitting a chair, facing away from the camera wearing a white suit. The sulking figure, rendered in stark black and white, is holding a balloon in a gray field of haze. The image connotes loneliness,

Iran: The Hidden Beauty Colour Gallery, 1532 S. Harvard Ave. Opening: Jan. 11, 6-9 p.m. Runs through January

MORE ART HAPPENINGS SALON DES REFUSE`S // Submitting artists may not have been red stamped with the “R” for rejected like the initial Paris Salon did to impressionistic masters, but being denied a show still stings. All works shown have been refused at juried shows in Oklahoma in 2013 // 1/9 through 2/80. MEME Gallery; 2022 E. 11th St.; 918-906-7128 ART PARTY // Local and international Photo by Arash Ashkar

artist showcase will eventually transform into a dance party to celebrate

depression and despair but remains captivating. Farzad has a fascination with astronomy, Zakerion said, and specializes in combining night photography with graphical elements to create wondrous images of the night sky. Farshad specializes in poster art. The show has a quasi-political bent; it doesn’t outwardly speak out against the Iranian government, but evidence of political influence can be traced through themes of seclusion in the artwork. “Iran is a lonely, forgotten country,” she said. “People are still living their day to day lives, and they still have passions and aspirations. But because of what the government is doing, they

can’t get it out — they don’t have the same opportunities to have exposure like we do.” Perhaps unfortunately, the safest and most secure way to transport the artwork to Tulsa was by digital means. Although not illegal, the brothers had no assurance the work would make it to Tulsa if mailed, and they didn’t want to risk losing it. Zakerion will print and frame the art, and will represent her cousins at the show, where more than 20 works will be displayed and available for sale. The show really isn’t about appreciating the landscape of the country; the brothers reveal the beauty of the Iranian spirit beyond the veneer the government has created.

the one-year anniver sary of the video skate magazine, Skatersatlas.com // 1/3, 8 p.m. through 2 a.m. Rusty Crane; 109 N. Detroit; 918-974-5454 IN A GLORIOUS LIGHT // Romanticrealist paintings of the Taos Society of Artists (1915-1927) are exhibited, highlighting the landscape and early cultural subjects of the Taos Valley. // Through 3/16. Philbrook Downtown; 116 M.B. Brady St.; 918-749-7941 FORM AND LINE // Drawings and sculptures of Chiricahua Apache artist Allan Houser, known for his diverse use of media and styles. Houser’s sketchbook will also be on display // Through 6/29; Gilcrease Museum of Art; 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road. 918-596-2700


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TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS

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FEATURING

James Judd, Guest Conductor

FOR TICKETS CALL 918/596.7111 or WWW.MYTICKETOFFICE.COM

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W.A. MOZART - SYMPHONY NO. 40 IN G MINOR, K. 550 PROKOFIEV - SYMPHONY NO. 5 IN B-FLAT MAJOR, OP.100

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 2014 AT 7:30 PM CHAPMAN MUSIC HALL AT THE TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

arts & culture music film & tv etc. // Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

Chairpersons: Heather Richetto-Rumley and Scott Rumley Entertainment provided by ATC • Cuisine from Chef Keith Jimerson Individual Tickets are $200 • Sponsorships available: Call Fast Eddie at ATC (918) 747-9494 31


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by MATT CAUTHRON

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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From Western Doughty’s photo exhibition, “Route 66: Room #116”

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Photo exhibition examines iconic roadway’s gritty underbelly

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couple of years ago, photographer Western Doughty holed up in a seedy motel room along Route 66 for three weeks, hoping to catch a glimpse of a wholly unique and rarely explored corner of the world. Glimpse that world he did. Doughty came away from his self-imposed furlough with thousands of photographs — some featuring the motel’s colorful coterie of temporary residents, some inspired by their stories and personalities. “We always see the exterior of these seedy kinds of places,” Doughty said. “But we rarely see inside — see the stories, the people, the struggles. Race issues. Class issues. That’s what I was trying to get at with these photos.” Doughty drew from his early artistic influences in the conception and execution of the project.

“We always see the exterior of these seedy kinds of places. But we rarely see inside — see the stories, the people, the struggles. Race issues. Class issues. That’s what I was trying to get at with these photos.” “My dad was an artist,” Doughty said. “He kept some explicit books around the house — usually on the top shelf — that I would get into as a kid. One was (photographer) Larry Clark’s ‘Tulsa.’ I remember zoning in on the grain

of the photos. It had this realism — even violence — that I’d never seen portrayed before. Larry Clark made me want to be a photographer.” Enchanted by the gritty, visceral nature of Clark’s work, as well as influences from the world of film such as David Lynch, Sam Peckinpah and, especially, Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky, Doughty said the look and feel of the series had been fully-formed in his mind for some time. “I had the whole vision for the project before I ever even started shooting anything,” Doughty said. “When I saw this room, it just fit that vision perfectly.” A selection of Doughty’s photographs will be featured in a special exhibition, “Route 66: Room #116,” this month at Living Arts of Tulsa. An opening reception

will be held at 6 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 3, during the Brady Arts District’s First Friday Arts Crawl, and the exhibition will run until Jan. 23. Also opening at Living Arts on Jan. 3 is “Value,” an installation by Glenn Herbert Davis.

Route 66: Room #116 A photography exhibition by Western Doughty Living Arts of Tulsa, 307 M.B. Brady St. Opening 6 p.m., Jan. 3 Runs through Jan. 23 Note: Contains content that may not be suitable for children.


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1/6

PAC Gallery, Tulsa Performing Arts Center; 110 E 2nd St.; (918) 596-7122 // Opens 1/6 Lindsay Larremore Craige: The Quiet Side of the Peephole Photo by Evan Taylor

Salon des Refuse`s - Submitting artists may not have been red stamped with the “R” for rejected like the initial Paris Salon did to impressionistic masters, but being denied a show still stings.  All works shown have been refused at juried shows in Oklahoma in 2013 1/9 through 2/80 - MEME Gallery; 2022 E. 11th St.; (918) 906-7128

Matt Sadler - A winner of the HBO Talent Search, Matt Saddler comes to Tulsa for a Special Engagement at the Loony Bin after recently headlining both the Out of Bounds Comedy Festival and the Moontower Comedy Festival. Feature comic: David Beck, Opener: Ron Shively. 1/2, 9 p.m.: $2; 1/3-4, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $10 - The Loony Bin, 6808 S Memorial Dr. Ste. 234; (918) 392-5653

In a Glorious Light - Romantic- realist paintings of the Taos Society of Artists (1915-1927) are exhibited, highlighting the landscape and early cultural subjects of the Taos Valley. These artist are also the founders of Taos arts colony Through 3/16 - Philbrook Downtown; 116 M.B. Brady St.; (918) 749-7941

Raw Meat: Blind Harold - An improv show in which six players are given a theme with which they create three stories that ultimately lead to a single resolution. - 1/2 and 1/9, 9 p.m., $5 - Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

OLD TOWN

Free Soles: May I Pandora Your Show? - Two performers improvise scenes based on music playing through Pandora. No one knows what will play next or what will happen! - 1/10, 7:30 p.m., $10 - Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St. Show and Tell with Peter Bedgood - Bedgood hosts a variety show that includes comedy, special guests, and music. - 1/10, 9 p.m., $10 Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St. Tulsa Symphony: Mozart and Prokofiev For their fourth concert of the season, Tulsa Symphony presents two epic pieces of music conducted by James Judd: Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 and Prokiev’s Symphony No. 5. - 1/11, 7:30 p.m., $25-$70 - Tulsa Performing Arts Center; 110 E 2nd St.; (918) 596-7122

1/5 BOK Center - Monster Jam - 3 p.m. - $27-$37 1/9 Reynolds Center - TU Men’s Basketball vs. Tulane - 8 p.m. - $10-$39 1/10 BOK Center - Tulsa Oilers vs. Brampton Beast 7:35 p.m. - $15-$45 SpiritBank Event Center - Tulsa 66ers vs. Sioux Falls Skyforce - 7 p.m. - $14-$34 1/11 BOK Center - Tulsa Oilers vs. Brampton Beast 7:35 p.m. - $15-$45 Mabee Center - ORU Women’s Basketball vs. Central Arkansas - 3 p.m. - $7 Mabee Center - ORU Men’s Basketball vs. Central Arkansas - 6 p.m. - $7-$15 SpiritBank Event Center - Tulsa 66ers vs. Sioux Falls Skyforce - 7 p.m. - $14-$34 1/12 BOK Center - Tulsa Oilers vs. Allen Americans - 4:05 p.m. - $15-$45 Reynolds Center - TU Men’s Basketball vs. Southern Miss - Noon - $10-$39

VOICE T H E

T U L S A

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

OLDTOWN

Jason Russell - Russell brings his zany, energetic comedy to Tulsa. Known for his exuberant style and playful audience interaction, Russell will have his audience bouncing off the walls right along with him. 1/8, 8p.m., $7; 1/9, 8 p.m., $2; 1/10-11, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $10 - The Loony Bin, 6808 S Memorial Dr. Ste. 234; (918) 392-5653

1/4 BOK Center - Monster Jam - 7:30 p.m. - $27-$37 Mabee Center - ORU Women’s Basketball vs. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi - 3 p.m. - $7 Mabee Center - ORU Men’s Basketball vs. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi - 6 p.m. - $7-$15 Reynolds Center - TU Men’s Basketball vs. Cal State Fullerton - Noon - $10-$39 Reynolds Center - TU Women’s Basketball vs. Valparaiso - 2:30 p.m. - $5

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Opening Reception: 1/3 6-9 p.m. - TAC Gallery; 9 E W.B. Brady St.; (918) 592-0041

Comedy Night - Woody’s Corner Bar hosts their monthly showcase of Tulsa comedians. 1/5, 9 p.m. - 325 E 2nd St.

1/2 Mabee Center - ORU Women’s Basketball vs. Houston Baptist - 5 p.m. Mabee Center - ORU Men’s Basketball vs. Houston Baptist - 7:30 p.m.

etc.

A collaboration of artists Jeff Hogue, Mark Kuykendall, and Cheyenne Butcher examines Tulsa’s cultural past, resurrected through the retrieval of a short family movie of a holiday parade in the 1950s.

Snap! - The house team at the Comedy Parlor takes a simple suggestion from the audience and turns it into a long form improvised performance full of silly characters and situations. - 1/3-4 and 1/11, 7:30 p.m., $10 Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

Sports

film & tv

1/3

Rumble-ish: The Improv Competition - The audience are the judges as some of Tulsa’s best improv comedians compete for the coveted Golden Ponyboy. Pay what you can. - Every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. - Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

Hilton Price - The comedian performs. Featuring Billy Bazaar and hosted by Drew Welcher. - 1/11, 10:30 p.m., $10

music

reverence - Recent work by B. Dirks. - 1/3, 7 p.m. through 2/6 - Lot No. 6; 1323 E 6th St.

Erica Rasmussen: Body Language - 1/3-26 108 Contemporary; 108 E M.B. Brady St.; (918) 895-6302

Performing Arts

Kelly’s Treehouse - A show comprised of short form improv games, in a similar format as Whose Line Is It, Anyways? - 1/11, 9 p.m. $10 Comedy Parlor; 328 E 1st St.

arts & culture

Glenn Herbert Davis: VALUE - An immersive and subversive installation which will use the Living Arts gallery as a base and be fabricated on site to fit and connect specifically within the space. The large forms will be constructed of lightweight lumber frames skinned with translucent polyethylene. They will mimic the character of temporary enclosures and will be accessible for audiences to move through. Davis will give a performance in the environment at the end of the exhibit. Opening Reception: 1/3 6-9 p.m. - Living Arts; 307 M.B. Brady St.; (918) 585-1234

Unscripted Play - Over a two month residency, Tulsa artist Sarah McKemie and Dutch artist Ieke Trinks collaborate on a process-based performance project and exhibition that encourages us to transform our daily routines. - Hardesty Arts Center; 101 E Archer St.; (918) 584-3333

Form and Line- Drawings and sculptures of Chiricahua Apache artist, Allan Houser, who is known for diverse mediums and styles. Houser’s sketchbook will also be on display - Through 6/29 - Gilcrease Museum of Art; 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road. (918) 596-2700

featured

Western Doughty: Route 66: Room 116 - Doughty’s exhibition examines and deromanticizes the lore of Route 66 through a series of intimate portraits. Seeing the many motels along the famed highway as temporary homes and emotional waiting rooms, Doughty lived in a motel room on Route 66 for the duration of the project but also made the room available to anyone who wanted to come by, any time of night or day. Subjects were encouraged to pose themselves and the resulting images are full of texture, emotion, and personality. Viewers are advised that this exhibition contains strong content and may not be suitable for children. - Opening Reception: 1/3 6-9 p.m. - Living Arts; 307 M.B. Brady St.; (918) 585-1234

Art Party - Local and international artist showcase transforming into a dance party to celebrate the one-year anniversary of the video skate magazine, Skatersatlas.com - 1/3, 8 p.m. through 2 a.m - Rusty Crane; 109 N. Detroit; (918) 974-5454

food & drink

Visual Arts

news & commentary

Craige presents an exhibit of round oil paintings depicting private and mundane moments of domestic life seen as if through a peephole looking in to their subjects’ homes.

contents

Lindsay Larremore Craige: The Quiet Side of the Peephole

F R E E • I N D E P E N D E N T • A LT E R N AT I V E

NEXT ISSUE: JANUARY 15, 2014

33


THE TULSA VOICE

TOP

OF THE

LIST

//

{MUSIC}

From the source

We asked 10 Tulsa musicians from varying genres and musical backgrounds to name just one favorite album of 2013. From pop to country to jazz to hiphop and every sonic sidestreet in between, we present a sample of the music currently turning on Tulsa’s music makers

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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etc.

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music

arts & culture

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TULSANS’ TOP TUNES

JAMES BLAKE Overgrown

BEYONCÉ Beyoncé

WILLIE NELSON To All The Girls

VERSE The Cit y That Always Sleeps

“I love the production and sense of space that continue to define his work,” Combs said. “Great vocals, impeccable taste, and a guest spot from RZA make this one of my favorite albums of the year.”

“Hats off to Beyoncé for her self titled surprise album,” Jackson said. “With dynamic, rhythmic material, she jumped from genre to genre while allowing her listeners into her world by enticing them with poetic lyrics and street lingo reminiscent of her roots in Houston.”

“That’s easy!” Rose said with a wink, immediately naming the album on which she performs a duet with the country legend. “With different vocal styles and genres ranging from classic country to jazz to gospel, this album truly has something for everyone.”

“Critics spent 2013 justifying A$AP ROCKY and Kanye West’s output, but Verse spent it smashing their albums with any given song on ‘The City That Always Sleeps,’” Gilliam said of the Tulsa M.C.’s debut. “Local, or international: Verse wins.”

CHRIS COMBS Guitarist, producer // Booomclap 34

BRANJAE JACKSON Singer // Branjae and the All Stars

TINA ROSE Singer // Daughter of Tulsa legend Leon Russell

MITCH GILLIAM Singer, guitarist // Lizard Police


THE TULSA VOICE // contents

“The album has great beat selection, front to back,” Verse said. “Quality lyricism, flows and deliveries that changed from song to song without feeling corny or over the top. It was cohesive without being repetitive, and has high replay value.”

“It’s an exciting example of what happens when masters get together to improvise with complete trust, joy and curiosity,” Welch said. “I love the constant surprises and effortless conversations these four get into.”

VERSE M.C., producer, DJ

CLAY WELCH Guitarist // And There Stand Empires

arts & culture

LUKE CHRONISTER Guitarist // All About a Bubble

featured

“It was refreshing for me to hear a good balance of pop and catchy vocals with the upbeat feel they have — but not too cheesy,” Chronister said. “They are one of the first ‘upcoming new’ bands that have put an album out in a while that I can really get into.”

food & drink

WAYNE SHORTER Without a Net

news & commentary

JOEY BADA$$ Summer Knights

BRETT BIRDSONG

THE 1975 The 1975

music

JANUARY

SAT. 4 Dj Pez

“It is significant to me because I’ve worked with both of these artists,” Epperly said. “Also because it was recorded at the White House, and I served as conductor of the U.S. Army Chamber Orchestra in Washington for three administrations.”

REBECCA UNGERMAN Vocalist // The Rebecca Ungerman Combo

BARRY EPPERLY Artistic director // Signature Symphony

“I’ve admired Bobby McFerrin’s music ever since getting his and Yo-Yo Ma’s ‘Hush’ album on cassette some twenty years ago,” Ryan said. “So I wasn’t surprised that this release features the same musical spontaneity, creativity, and excellence that he not only produces but seems to be made of.” BARRON RYAN Classical and jazz pianist

FRI. 17 Swan Lake Gentleman’s Society SAT. 18 Melvin Seals w/ Mark Karan & Terrapin Flyer THURS. 23 Mountain Sprout

18

23 26

SUN. 26 Forgotten Space

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

“I was at the Primo Room at Ciao the night it was recorded, and all the magic is there for the listening,” said Ungerman. “It’s simply the best players playing their best on the best music, all led by the wondrous Crosby.”

The White House Sessions, Live 1962

BOBBY MCFERRIN spirit youall

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BENNETT/BRUBECK

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etc.

PAM VAN DYKE CROSBY Jazz on a Summer’s Night

THURS. 16 Wayne “The Train” Hancock

film & tv

FRI. 3 Green Corn Rebellion Cd Release Party

FEBRUARY WED. 26 Rehab Farewell Tour

18TH & BOSTON • TULSA, OK TULSASHRINE.COM 35


THE TULSA VOICE //

musiclistings Brandon Clark

news & commentary

contents

There are plenty of opportunities in the next couple of weeks to catch one of the area’s best examples of Red Dirt Music, or as he calls it, “Oklahoma Beer Joint Music.” The Brandon Clark Trio plays a pair of shows at the Undercurrent on 1/3, and on 1/8 with Framing the Red. Clark also plays weekly solo acoustic sets on Sundays at Mercury Lounge, and on Thursdays at The Office Pub in Sand Springs.

food & drink

Brandon Clark Photo by Kelly Kerr

Wed. // Jan. 1

The Hunt Club – IBC Benefit, James Groves and Scalehouse

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – Mark Bruner & Shelby Eicher – 6:30 p.m.

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge - Wild N Out

Hey Mambo – 7 Blue

Cellar Dweller – Jazz w/ Michael Cameron – 9 p.m.

Hibiscus – Friday Jam – 10 p.m.

Full Moon Café (Broken Arrow) – Mark Gibson & Ryan Magnani – 8 p.m.

The Colony – Tom Skinner Science Project Dirty Knuckle Tavern – Military Jam Elephant Run – Old School

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

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etc.

film & tv

music

arts & culture

featured

Just 1 More – Steve McCabe & Sheldon Clark Main Street Tavern – Live Jazz – 6–9 p.m. On the Rocks – Don White – 7 p.m.

Waka Winter Classic

Five Oklahoma bands compete for the chance to play for an audience of over 20,000 at the 2014 Wakarusa music festival June 5-8. Competing this year are, from Tulsa, The Dirty Creek Bandits, The Loaded Dice, and We The Ghost, and from OKC, Jumpship Astronaut and The Younglings. All five bands will play at Cain’s Ballroom on Thursday, 1/9, and the audience will vote to decide the winner. If you want to catch a sneak preview of Wakarusa, or a showcase of up and coming Oklahoma bands, this show is for you. Tickets are just $5 at the door, and the show starts at 8 p.m.

Magoo’s – Kinsey Sadler Mercury Lounge – Parker Milsap, Cary Morin – 8 p.m.

Pickle’s Pub – Billy Snow – 8 p.m. – 12 a.m. Riffs, Hard Rock Casino – Travis Kidd – 7 p.m.

Rooster’s – Matt Breitzke

Silver Flame – Bobby Cantrell – 7–11 p.m.

The Shrine – Green Corn Rebellion, The Calamities

Thurs. // Jan. 2 Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge - Writers Round Cimarron Bar – Harry Williams & Friends Jam w/ Mike “SaxMan” Winebrenner & more CJ Moloney’s – DJ Spinning Club 209 – Open Mic

Mercury Lounge – Lusitania – 7 p.m. Slo Ride – American Hero Jam – 5 p.m.

Infuzion – Brian Lee – 4 p.m.

Mystic River Lounge – The Real Band – 9 p.m.–1 a.m.

Mon. // Jan. 6 Celebrity Restaurant – Mark Bruner – 6–8:30 p.m. The Colony – Open Mic w/ Cody Clinton The Creative Room – Open Mic for poets, MCs & musicians Elephant Run – Old School

Silver Flame – Bob Clear – 7–11 p.m.

Infuzion – Tom Basler – 5 p.m.

Undercurrent – Brandon Clark Band

Soundpony – Colleens

Utopia Bar & Lounge – Jon Ide

Undercurrent – The Sellout’s Jacob Dement

Yeti – Carnegie

Sat. // Jan. 4

Dusty Dog – Chuck Dunlap & Friends Acoustic Jam – 7–10 p.m.

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge – DJ Spinning

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – The Fabulous Two Man Band – 8 p.m.

The Colony – Whiskey Shivers

CJ Moloney’s – DJ Mikey B

Tues. // Jan. 7 Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – Charlie Redd & the Scissortails – 10 p.m. Gringo’s – Open Mic – 7 p.m. Gypsy Coffee House – Open Mic Night Infuzion – Tom Basler – 5 p.m.

The Hunt Club – Herotone

Ed’s Hurricane Lounge – Open Jam w/ The Salty Dogs – 3–7 p.m.

Mercury Lounge – Wink & Friends

Infuzion – Brian Lee 5 p.m. – Dueling Pianos 8 p.m.

Fishbonz Owasso – T3 Trio

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame – Depot Jam – 5:30 p.m.

Kenosha Station – Danny Baker Band - 6–11 p.m. Magoo’s – DJ TIMM–A – 8 p.m. Mercury Lounge – Parker Milsap, Cary Morin – 8 p.m. Mystic River Lounge – Jenny Labow – 8 p.m. On the Rocks – Thayer, Pendergrass & Armstrong – 8 p.m. – 12 a.m. Pickle’s Pub – Jim Sweney & Chris Campbell Silver Flame – Bob Clear – 7–11 p.m. Soundpony – Neiv Utopia Bar & Lounge – Andrew Cooke & Friends Yeti – Move Trio

Full Moon Café (Both Locations) – Dueling Pianos – 9 p.m. Gypsy Coffee House – Josh Caudle The Hunt Club – All About a Bubble Magoo’s – Under the Gun Mercury Lounge – Shawn James, Old Salt Union – 8 p.m. Mystic River Lounge – The Real Band – 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Rooster’s – Steve & Sheldon

Scotty’s – Billy Snow – 7–11 p.m. Silver Flame – David Armstrong & Lauran Simpson – 7–11 p.m. Utopia Bar & Lounge – Ben Mosier Vanguard – Rye Rye, Eryn Woods, Lakeview Drive, D. Woods from Danity Kane Yeti – Blue Spot, Manarchist

Shades of Brown – Gwen’s Kids - 7–9 p.m.

Wed. // Jan. 8

The Shrine – DJ Pez – $5

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge - Wild N Out

Silver Flame – Bob Clear – 7–11 p.m.

Cellar Dweller – Jazz w/ Michael Cameron – 9 p.m.

Soundpony – Soul Night! w/ DJ Soul Fingaz and DJ Sweet Baby Jayzus

The Colony – Tom Skinner Science Project

Undercurrent – Artifas, Sovereign Dame, The Joint Effect

Dirty Knuckle Tavern – Military Jam

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge – DJ Spinning

Utopia Bar & Lounge – Rachel Bachman – 8–11 p.m.

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – Annie Ellicot w/ Mark Bruner & Shelby Eicher – 7 p.m.

Club Majestic – DJ Scandal

The Yeti – J Brown

The Hunt Club – Greg Klyma with Sweethearts of the Radio

Fri. // Jan. 3 Electric Circus – House Party ft. Darku J, Zack Fast, Krewx Enso – Purple Pop w/ Steve Cluck Fishbonz Owasso – Steve & Sheldon Full Moon Café (Both Locations) – Dueling Pianos – 9 p.m. Guthrie Green – Mark Gibson – 6 p.m.

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Hillman’s Garage – Growl, Who & The Fucks, Cucumber and the Suntans, The Daddyos – 10 p.m.

Sun. // Jan. 5

Elephant Run – Old School

Infuzion – Tom Basler – 5 p.m. Just 1 More – Steve McCabe & Sheldon Clark

Cimarron Bar – Open Jam w/ The Kevin Phariss Blues Band– 4–9 p.m.

Main Street Tavern – Live Jazz – 6–9 p.m.

The Creative Room – Fail to Decay, The Opportunist, Deadalive, Sun Sought

Undercurrent – Framing the Red, Brandon Clark Band

Silver Flame – Bobby Cantrell – 7–11 p.m.


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DAILY FEATURES Mon. Karaoke Night Tue. Two for One Wed. Whiskey Wednesday Thur. Guys Night

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WEDNESDAY Baker St. Pub The Max – Retro Trivia

Long Island Teas

etc.

TUESDAY Marley’s Chicago Style Pizza Soundpony The Warehouse Bar & Grill Woody’s Corner Bar The Colony

4

$

film & tv

MONDAY Utopia Bar and Lounge

Shot & Beer

music

*

Trivia

5

$

$

FRIDAY Casual Cocktail Dirty Knuckle Tavern Dixie Tavern Double RR Saloon Elote Kenosha Station Market Pub Martinis Mi Tierra Mr. Lucky’s Pub and Grille No Place Lounge Remington’s Sports Bar The Bar Western Horseman SATURDAY 71st Street Depot Buffalo Wild Wings Casual Cocktail Dirty Knuckle Tavern Double RR Saloon Market Pub No Place Lounge Remington’s Sports Bar The Depot

Rolling Rock Buckets

arts & culture

Certainly among the most interesting new places to see live music, Hillman’s Garage (1016 E 4th St.) is home to a future food truck, a screen-printing workshop, a room full of antiques and curiosities for sale, and practice/ performance space for a few local bands. On Friday, the 3rd, the garage is hosting a night of surf rock and good vibes, with performances by Austin, TX’s Growl, and Tulsa’s own Who and the Fucks, Cucumber and the Suntans, and The Daddy-Os, who will be offering their debut CD for free.

8

$

featured

Hillman’s Garage

THURSDAY 71st Street Depot Buckaneer Bar Club Renegade Dirty Knuckle Tavern Dixie Tavern Double RR Saloon Elephant Run Enso Four Aces Lounge Gold Mine Lounge Hall of Fame Lennie’s Club No Place Lounge Rooster’s Cocktails Twisted Lizard Westbound

with small bar prices!

food & drink

TUESDAY 727 Club Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge Baker Street Pub Bounty Lounge Buffalo Wild Wings Cronies Double RR Saloon Elephant Run Joe Momma’s Lennie’s Club

going on at

TULSA'S HOTTEST NEW CLUB

news & commentary

MONDAY Dirty Knuckle Tavern Double RR Saloon Jameson’s Pub Just One More Lot No. 6 Roadside Pub Utopia Bar

WEDNESDAY Double RR Saloon Ed’s Hurricane Lounge Fishbonz Fox and Hound Hall of Fame Kenosha Station Magoo’s Market Pub Roadside Pub Utopia Bar Westbound Woody’s Corner Bar The Yeti

Check out our Facebook page to find out what's

contents

SUNDAY Carousel Lounge Club Majestic Club Renegade Double RR Saloon Dusty Dog No Place Lounge Undercurrent

TUESDAY (continued) Mr. Lucky’s Pub and Grille Osage Casino Red Dirt Dance Hall TGI Fridays (61st & Memorial) Tulsa Eagle

//

*

Karaoke

THE TULSA VOICE

musiclistings

w e N y p Hap ar! Ye

BRADY ARTS DISTRICT 918.585.9353 ARCHER & CHEYENNE DOWNTOWNLOUNGETULSA.COM 37


THE TULSA VOICE // contents news & commentary food & drink

musiclistings Thurs. // Jan. 9

featured arts & culture

Tues. // Jan. 14

Fishbonz Owasso – Lost on Utica

The Hunt Club – RPM

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge - Writers Round

Full Moon Café (Both Locations) – Dueling Pianos – 9 p.m.

Magoo’s – Octane Blue

Cain’s Ballroom – Waka Winter Classic w/ We The Ghost, The Loaded Dice, The Dirty Creek Bandits, Jumpship Astronaut, The Younglings

Gypsy Coffee House – Earth to Troy

Mercury Lounge – The Whistle Pigs, The Whiskey Misters

The Hunt Club – Christine Jude Trio

Shades of Brown – Gwen’s Kids - 7–9 p.m.

Infuzion – Tom Basler – 4 p.m.

Silver Flame – Bob Clear – 7–11 p.m.

Jade Bar & Nightclub – Lil Wil & T–Balla w/ Young DV, BIG LAC, Ma Cuzz, DismondDJ, Shanks, C–Nile G

Soundpony – DJ Heady P

Cimarron Bar – Harry Williams & Friends Jam w/ Mike “SaxMan” Winebrenner & more CJ Moloney’s – DJ Spinning Club 209 – Open Mic

Hey Mambo – 7 Blue Hibiscus – Friday Jam – 10 p.m.

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – The Fabulous Two Man Band – 8 p.m.

Living Arts – Nathaniel Bartlett

Vanguard – Scattered Hamlett, Kingshifter

Magoo’s – Johnny Duke

Yeti – Convert, Heemeyer

The Hunt Club – Luke Campbell

Mercury Lounge – Thunderosa, Leopold and his Fiction – 8 p.m.

Infuzion – Tom Basler – 5 p.m. Magoo’s – DJ TIMM–A – 8 p.m. Mercury Lounge – All In Gents – 8 p.m. On the Rocks – Thayer, Pendergrass & Armstrong – 8 p.m. – 12 a.m.

Sun. // Jan. 12

Silver Flame – Bob Clear – 7–11 p.m.

Cimarron Bar – Open Jam w/ The Kevin Phariss Blues Band– 4–9 p.m.

Pickle’s Pub – Jim Sweney & Chris Campbell

Undercurrent – Stevie Stone

Soundpony – DJ Nutter

Utopia Bar & Lounge – Jon Ide

Silver Flame – Bob Clear – 7–11 p.m.

Woody’s Corner Bar – DJ Spin

Undercurrent – British Invasion of Tulsa – $3 – 8 p.m.

Vanguard – Spence, Dear You, Sick of the Day

Utopia Bar & Lounge – Andrew Cooke & Friends

Sat. // Jan. 11

Woody’s Corner Bar – Aaron Woods Acoustic – 9 p.m.

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge – DJ Spinning

Yeti – Bass Tribe

All Soul Acoustic Coffeehouse – Maxwell Hughes

Fri. // Jan. 10

Fishbonz Owasso – Infinity Ed’s Hurricane Lounge – Open Jam w/ The Salty Dogs – 3–7 p.m.

Area 18 Bar & Ultra Lounge – DJ Spinning Cain’s Ballroom – Tulsa Playboys – $7–$10 CJ Moloney’s – Jumpsuit Love

Full Moon Café (Both Locations) – Dueling Pianos – 9 p.m.

Club Majestic – DJ Scandal

Gypsy Coffee House – Super Darren 65

Gringo’s – Open Mic – 7 p.m. Gypsy Coffee House – Open Mic Infuzion – Jon Glazer – 5 p.m. Mercury Lounge – Wink & Friends Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame – Depot Jam – 5:30 p.m. Scotty’s – Billy Snow – 7–11 p.m. Silver Flame – David Armstrong & Lauran Simpson – 7–11 p.m. Utopia Bar & Lounge – Ben Mosier

Mystic River Lounge – The Sellouts – 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Soundpony – Midnight Reruns, Dead Shakes

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – Charlie Redd & the Scissortails – 10 p.m.

Undercurrent – Searching for Sanity, Dirty Crush, Dryver, No Void Utopia Bar & Lounge – Rachel Bachman – 8–11 p.m.

Dusty Dog – Chuck Dunlap & Friends Acoustic Jam – 7–10 p.m.

CJ Moloney’s – DJ Mikey B

Full Moon Café (Cherry Street) – Mark Bruner & Shelby Eicher – 6:30 p.m. Full Moon Café (Broken Arrow) – Mark Gibson & Ryan Magnani – 8 p.m. Mercury Lounge – Carter Sampson – 4 p.m. Slo Ride – American Hero Jam – 5 p.m. Yeti – Outsiders

Mon. // Jan. 13 Celebrity Restaurant – Mark Bruner – 6–8:30 p.m. The Colony – Open Mic w/ Cody Clinton The Creative Room – Open Mic for poets, MCs & musicians

Tulsa’s independent and non-profit art-house theatre, showing independent, foreign, and documentary films.

Elephant Run – Old School Infuzion – Jon Glazer – 5 p.m. Undercurrent – The Sellout’s Jacob Dement

HAPPY NEW YEAR

REDEFINING DOWNTOWN Join us for First Friday Art Crawl on January 3rd « Happy Hour 4-7 daily « « Over 80 beers « « Barrel aged cocktails «

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

//

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List ings compiled in collaborat ion with Cur tsList.com. For the most up-to-date list ings, visit Cur tsList.com.

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Fur Ball

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9th

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West

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W , d l i W

THE TULSA VOICE

o f s l i a T ild the

featured arts & culture

Hyatt Regency – Downtown Tulsa

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6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

music

March 8, 2014

etc. // Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

For tickets or sponsorship contact jamee@animalallianceok.org OR info@animalallianceok.org.

Tulsa’s favorite animal event! 39


August: Osage County In theaters: Jan. 10

//

THE TULSA VOICE

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SoundBite:

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contents

“It’s as though [director John] Wells saw that he had a great script (penned by Letts himself) and a band of top actors and just let them do all the work.”

Voice rating: 6.5/10 Premiere:

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

//

etc.

film & tv

music

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featured

food & drink

The Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., will host a special screening on Jan. 10 for the opening of “August: Osage County” featuring displays of memorabilia from the career of screenwriter and native Tulsan Tracy Letts, who adapted his Pulitzer Prize-winning play.

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Meryl Streep, Julianne Nicholson and Juliette Lewis in “August: Osage County”

Oklahoma writ large Brilliantly written and acted, “August: Osage County” suffers from a lack of vision behind the camera by JOE O’SHANSKY

“A

ugust: Osage County,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning play from Tulsa native Tracy Letts is an amazing piece of work. They don’t hand out those Pulitzers like peanuts in coach class, after all. Even if you haven’t seen the stage show, just kicking back on a Sunday night reading Letts’ sublime story and vibrant characters is a contenting, rich experience to be savored. Its blackly comedic tone and rancorous familial dysfunction form a uniquely entertaining whole. Barbara, Karen and Ivy Weston (Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis and Julianne Nicholson, respectively), are three sisters who reunite at their ancestral home after their father, Beverly Weston (Sam Shepard) goes missing. Their mother, Violet (Meryl Streep), battles cancer by whole-heartedly

embracing her pill addiction, and by honing her capacity for cutting observations, or “truth telling,” to a razor’s edge. When things take a turn for the worse and Bev winds up dead, the coming together of the family reveals resentments, rivalries and secrets that threaten to tear them apart. It’s a dark story, though not so much as the other two films based on Letts’ work, “Bug” and “Killer Joe.” Infidelity, incest, drug addiction, suicide and molestation ensue, but the tone strikes a precarious balance between Tennessee Williams-esque drama and barbed, black-as-a-mineshaft laughs that seem to arrive during the narrative’s most awkward moments. It’s a balance that director John Wells doesn’t quite pull off — mainly because it feels like he has such a light touch. In the

hands of Robert Altman, who was a master at blending those kinds of atonalities, “August” would likely have felt more organically executed. It’s as though Wells saw that he had a great script (penned by Letts himself) and a band of top actors and just let them do all the work. Ideally, that’s what you’d want to do (a strong foundation never hurt a film) but it helps to have a stylistic signature, or even a hand for nuance. Luckily, the assemblage of titanic acting talent rescues the film somewhat — though a few scenery-chewing moments sometimes threaten to cross into caricature. Meryl Streep seems primed to take yet another trip to the Academy stage. Her Ivy Weston is an iconic, Southern Gothic matriarch who seems like she’s going off the rails when

in fact none of the wool really gets pulled over her eyes. Julia Roberts oozes the cold regality of a woman struggling to maintain control as her marriage to Bill (Ewan McGregor in a fine, charming turn) goes south. Juliette Lewis is in a revelatory zone as Karen Weston, whose relationship choices also leave something to be desired. Margo Martindale, Chris Cooper and Benedict Cumberbatch are outstanding in supporting roles. The idyllic countryside and cloistered interiors of the Weston home are tangibly captured by Adriano Goldman’s warm cinematography, making for a pretty film. But it’s one with a fair amount of artifice. Really, all of the interlocking parts of Letts’ story work. Here, they just need a shot of WD-40.


THE TULSA VOICE // contents

E E V SA DAT e h t March 1-2, 2014

news & commentary

Art Show & Sale

featured

Tulsa Renaissance Hotel & Convention Center

food & drink

32nd Annual

• More than 1,000 pieces of amazing nature and western art

music

• Proceeds benefiting regional wildlife conservation projects

arts & culture

• Over 50 nationally-renowned artists

film & tv etc. //

Encore Artist Matthew Higginbotham

Guest Artist Harold T. Holden

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

Featured Artist Paul Rhymer

w w w. N a t u r e Wo r k s . o r g

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THE TULSA VOICE

TOP

OF THE

LIST

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

//

etc.

film & tv

music

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Leonardo DiCaprio in “The Wolf of Wall Street”

Screen grabs 10 reasons why 2013 was an embarrassment of cinematic riches by JOE O’SHANSKY

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hile I doubt you’ll see a better movie than “The Wolf of Wall Street” this year, the idea of numerical ratings, or even a thumbs up, is reductive, not really saying shit about the nuances of what makes a film worth loving, loathing or being on the fence about. But really, I just hate making lists. There’s always the movie you didn’t see, or worse, one you forgot. So, with that in mind, here are my favorite movies of 2013. I’ll let you decide if they are in the right order, but you must see them. Promise? 1 // The Wolf of Wall Street People seem to be missing the point of “The Wolf of Wall Street.” It isn’t a glorification of the excesses of misogynistic, white-collar criminals. It’s a satirical skewering of the mentality that has been ruining this country for much of the past 30 years. It just happens to be wrapped up in the funniest, lewdest, most electric film of Martin Scorsese’s late career. At 71 years-old, the venerable

director has made a movie with the energy and momentum of a filmmaker a third his age, capturing Jordan Belfort’s gilded, manic life story with the skill of a master. Leonardo DiCaprio turns in the performance of his career alongside a scene-stealing Jonah Hill, and the results are nothing short of astounding. It’s a three-hour long film that feels like it takes up half of that runtime, and still leaves you wanting more. 2 // Dallas Buyers Club Matthew McConaughey turns in yet another Oscar-worthy performance as Ron Woodroof, a lecherous rodeo cowboy whose heterosexual adventures in the ‘80s earn him an AIDS diagnosis at a time when that news amounted to a death sentence. Refusing to take inevitability sitting down, Woodroof circumvented the FDA to bring experimental therapies to the desperately ill — with the help of Jared Leto’s Rayon, a dying pre-operative transsexual whose world-weary pragmatism changes the homophobic Ron in ways he never would have believed. Heart-

breaking, funny, and beautifully directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, “Dallas Buyers Club” miraculously subverts schmaltz to craft a unique, unshakeable story of true humanity. 3 // The Act of Killing I’d never seen a movie like “The Act of Killing.” Neither have you. Director Joshua Oppenheimer delves into the lives of a band of executioners responsible for the murder and torture of thousands during the communist purges in Indonesia during the mid-1960s. That would be morbid enough, but the unrepentant men involved (who still inspire fear today) are offered the opportunity to re-enact their bloody exploits with shocking and deeply weird results. Surreal, creepy and at points utterly avant-garde, “The Act of Killing” will leave you mesmerized, appalled and quite possibly a little ill. 4 // 12 Years a Slave It feels odd to call “12 Years a Slave” director Steve McQueen’s most hopeful film. The story —

of a free Northern black man, Solomon Northup, who is kidnapped from his family and sold into bondage in the South — certainly isn’t light-hearted. In fact, McQueen exhibits his usual unflinching style down to every last dehumanizing detail. But the full picture he paints, with wonderful performances from Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ashley Dyke and Chiwetel Ejiofor as Northup, is one that rewards the audience with just enough light at the end of the tunnel to feel some slight contentment. 5 // Fruitvale Station The most moving film I saw all year. The true-life tale of Oscar Grant, as portrayed in a stunning performance by Michael B. Jordan, “Fruitvale Station” lets us walk by Grant’s side during a fateful day in 2008 that culminates with a confrontation with a Bay Area transit cop. The beautiful, grainy 16-mm film stock and lucid direction from first-time feature director Ryan Coogler bring Oscar Grant back


THE TULSA VOICE featured arts & culture music Michael Fassbender and Chiwetel Ejiofor in “12 Years a Slave”

film & tv etc. // Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

Honorable Mention // Still Mine This simple story — that of a landowner fighting City Hall to build a house on his bucolic property — on its own wouldn’t normally propel “Still Mine” onto this list. But the performances by James Cromwell and Geneviève Bujold as an aging married couple seals the deal. They are simply perfect. Funny, sexy, sweet and utterly charming, the transparency they bring to their roles is nothing short of miraculous.

Matthew McConaughey in “Dallas Buyer’s Club”

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8 // The Spectacular Now Coming of age films rarely get it this right. With “The Spectacular Now,” director James Ponsoldt nails all the frustration, excitement and loss of waning adolescence with novelistic panache. Miles Teller, as Sutter Keely, a hard-drinking, funny, charismatic teenager pining to know his estranged father, is a

10 // Spring Breakers Harmony Korine’s trashy, funny and provocative assault provides so much more than just the opportunity to ogle Mouseketeers in bikinis. A thematic sibling to his 1997 cult-classic, “Gummo,” Korine paints the screen with a hedonistic satire of American cultural entitlement, when a gaggle of college girls who love sex and money go on spring break and meet Alien (James Franco, in the role of his career), a nouveau riche drug dealer who turns out to be a lot deeper than he seems.

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7 // Blue Jasmine Much like Scorsese, a reinvigorated Woody Allen is turning in his best work in decades. “Blue Jasmine” marks his return to darker character drama as we follow Jasmine (Cate Blanchett), a formerly rich Manhattanite whose fortune is lost when her corrupt husband is imprisoned for fraud. Forced to move to San Francisco and get back on her feet with the help of her lower-middle class sister, Jasmine spirals into mental downfall as she begins to realize her life was never what it seemed, and that she might never be able to adapt. Blanchett is a wonder and, shockingly, so is Andrew Dice Clay as Auggie, Jasmine’s estranged brother-in-law.

9 // Inside Llewyn Davis The Coen brothers strike again with this gorgeous, pathos-driven tale of a couch-surfing folk singer in the 1960s and his fugue-like adventures across the country after losing his benefactor’s cat. Striking a satisfying balance between the tone of “A Serious Man” and the musical joys of “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” the Coens weave an enigmatic tale with the feel of near improvisation (though that’s just effortlessness), giving us yet another classic. Oscar Isaac is prickly and sympathetic as Davis, while a slew of great actors fill the periphery. The narrative might not satisfy everyone, but the ride is more than enough to keep us interested.

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6 // Her Spike Jonze has a Christopher Nolan-like, watchmaker’s approach to his narratives — except his work is warmer, more organic and emotionally genuine than Nolan’s. With “Her,” Jonze grafts a quirky, human love story onto a dystopian sci-fi bauble of oddness, crafting a melancholy and genuine rumination on love’s frailty. Joaquin Phoenix is Theodore, a divorced nerd who falls in love with his computer’s operating system (voiced by Scarlett Johansson). While the core of the plot might remind some of the cheesy ‘80s romance “Electric Dreams” (a computer falls in love with Virginia Madsen), “Her” a is a far more nuanced, deeply written and skillfully executed tale. Phoenix and Scar-Jo turn in engrossing performances and Jonze has never been more assured behind the camera.

natural. The chemistry he shares with Shailene Woodley during the film’s most intimate scenes make for some of the most genuine character moments of the year.

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to life, returning the humanity that was stolen from him. Simply amazing.

Ashley Benson and Vanessa Hudgens in “Spring Breakers”

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Bryan Cranston in “Breaking Bad”

Tube tops New viewing models take hold as television’s Golden Age rolls along by JOSHUA KLINE

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or television junkies, 2013 will go down as the Year of Netflix. The digital streaming platform came into its own and bested cable’s old guard by producing and distributing outstanding original content in a manner that catered to the new binge-watching norm. Water cooler conversation became about the lost weekends spent mainlining “House of Cards” and “Orange is the New Black,” whose entire first seasons were made available for viewing upon premiere. Meanwhile, HBO made its own contribution to this shift (and put another nail in the coffin of DVDs) by providing a deep well of catalogue titles through its on-demand web service HBO GO. The following is not meant to be a complete representation of the year’s best television — I missed more than a few shows that might have competed for inclusion. Some blind spots in need of forgiveness: I’m woefully behind on “Boardwalk Empire,” which I hear has blossomed into something great. I haven’t seen a

frame of “Getting On,” HBO’s comedy about aging, or Christopher Guest’s mockumentary series “Family Tree,” or FX’s cop drama “Justified.” Same goes for “The Good Wife” and “Sons of Anarchy” and “Modern Family.” I’m currently working my way through Jane Campion’s impressive “Top of the Lake” miniseries, but was unable to complete it before writing this column. Also missed were HBO’s two big movies — Steven Soderbergh’s Liberace biopic “Behind the Candelabra” and David Mamet’s “Spector.” On the failing end of the spectrum, there were some especially disappointing misfires: Showtime’s “Masters of Sex” was a promising concept that turned out to be a stodgy, passionless slog. AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” which I’ve watched sporadically throughout its run, continues to be a deathly serious, boring rehash of Romero’s zombie apocalypse narrative. Fox’s Kevin Bacon/Kevin Williamson serial killer thriller “The Following” played like a parody of bad crime shows. The revival of

“Arrested Development” (another Netflix move) proved incapable of living up to the nostalgic hype and expectations of its fanbase. The worst thing I witnessed this year was the disastrous final season of Showtime’s serial-killer-as-superhero drama “Dexter,” a show I’ve loved and defended for years even as its slow decline became impossible to ignore or justify. The series finale — the ridiculousness of which I won’t spoil for you, even though you should never watch it — will surely go down as one of the worst in history. But TV in 2013 certainly wasn’t all bad. These ten series proved yet again that the small screen is no longer the cinema’s silly stepchild, but a narrative force to be reckoned with. 1 // Breaking Bad Closure, thy name is Vince Gilligan. The final season of the best show on television managed to be everything to all viewers. From the explosive climax of antepenultimate “Ozymandias,” the pulpy

meth drama takes a hard left turn and goes quiet with the last two episodes, leaving Walter White and the audience ample time to contemplate just how far down the rabbit hole we’ve gone. Its concluding moments found the perfect balance between consequence and redemption, leaving most fans feeling a bittersweet mixture of mourning, exhilaration and perfect satisfaction. 2 // Mad Men Anyone who says Mad Men has gone downhill or “gotten boring” is not to be trusted. Matthew Weiner has distilled what was at first a soapy parade of un-PC retro-porn into a model of literary elegance and restraint. As layered and complex as a classic novel, the show now demands a level of focus at odds with today’s short attention spans. There is no plot, only happenings. It’s all rich, complementary metaphor and razor-sharp subtext. The evolutions of Don Draper, Peggy Olsen and the supporting staffs of SCDP and CGC are as messy, confusing and (often) infuriating as the seismic


THE TULSA VOICE // music Adam Driver and Lena Dunham in “Girls”

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10 // Eastbound and Down The profane comedy of red state values and prejudices rebounded from its lackluster second and third seasons with a gut-busting fourth and final run. Danny McBride’s Kenny Powers is an American antihero for the new millennium — xenophobic, deluded and self-sabotaging at every turn, but somehow still lovable.

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

Honorable mentions // The Killing, American Horror Story, Master Chef, Hello Ladies, Portlandia

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9 // Orange is the New Black Netflix’s other big success story of the year featured some of the most complex, richly drawn female characters to appear on the small screen. Jenji Kohan (Weeds) took Piper Kerman’s memoir and used it as a springboard to explore race, class and gender couched in a comedy of prison manners.

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6 // Homeland After a promising but uneven inaugural season followed by a

8 // New Girl Yes, it’s a vehicle for Zooey Deschanel’s manic pixie cuteness, with a worn Friends-like premise and relationship contrivances aplenty. But the thing about “New Girl” is that, despite its broad sitcom trappings, it frequently finds the sweet spot between honesty and optimism in its portrayal of 30-something relationships.

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5 // Game of Thrones Anyone looking to understand the abusive stranglehold Game of Thrones’ third season had on its viewers needs only to Google the video “Viewers React to Red Wedding.” The anguished, moaning cries of dozens of fans, secretly recorded by friends who knew what was coming, as they watch several of the show’s most noble characters slaughtered in a single scene is disturbing and hilarious, and a testament to the medieval fantasy’s storytelling power.

Jon Hamm in “Mad Men”

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4 // Girls Lena Dunham is a force of nature, and people love to hate her. If she were a man, she’d be heralded as the heir apparent to Woody Allen. But she’s a woman who comes from money and artistic affluence, and has achieved an extraordinary level of success at just 26. She’s also not afraid to expose her imperfect body to the camera. So, the Internet calls her spoiled and coddled and fat and exhibitionist. But Girls is just too incisive, vivid and honest in its portrayal of millennial narcissism and sexual confusion for any of the ad hominem attacks to hold water. Love or hate the characters, it’s an exquisitely realized show by a writer who knows what she’s doing.

7 // Veep A funny, glib satire of American political ineptness, made by the same Brits responsible for “In the Loop” and “The Thick of It,” starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus as an eternally put-upon vice president who just wants a little respect from POTUS. Call it the comic flipside of “House of Cards.”

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3 // House of Cards Netflix redefined the parameters of television with this pedigreed mammoth: a pitch-black drama from director David Fincher, playwright Beau Willimon and actor Kevin Spacey about an Iago-like corrupt congressman who endlessly manipulates his way through the backrooms of Washington in his quest to end up in the White House.

disappointing second run, Showtime’s CIA thriller finally got it near perfect the third time around with a finale that upended everything we’d come to expect from the show. The only question is how it can possibly continue from here.

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cultural shifts occurring around them. The show demands discipline and patience from the viewer, but it’s immensely rewarding.

Emilia Clarke in “Game of Thrones”

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Scrooge to Santa

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A change of holiday heart in one hour flat

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by ANDY WHEELER

“H

ello. My name is Andy and I was a Rent-aSanta.”

Hi Andy. “It has been one week since I was Santa.” A friend had double booked his Santa gigs over Christmas. He asked for help. I was hesitant. I had never been Santa before. A Viking? A referee? The Situation from “Jersey Shore”? Sure. But never Mr. Kringle. All those kids and their parents and the costume and … “$125? One hour?” Sold! I am not a fan of the holidays. Christmas, Kwanza, Hanukah, Solstice, Festivus — no thanks. Stress increases. Traffic seemingly doubles. People lose their minds. All I want to do is take a relaxing Calgon bath but it always feels like a Silkwood shower. My friend needed a favor and I wanted to go to New York City for Christmas. I figured the $125 could go toward a down payment on a bagel. He handed off the costume and I arrived at the event. I stuck my pillow-padded belly out as far as my sciatic nerve would allow and did my best waddle to my seat — although it took me a minute, as I was immediately set upon by children eager to get some one-on-one time with the big guy. I sat down. It was go time. It was Santa Hour. Some kids ran at me. Some

River Parks spokesperson Tanja Carrigg with reluctant “Rent-a-Santa” Andy Wheeler

were handed to me. Others were forcibly shoved in my lap, screaming bloody murder, while their parents took pictures yelling, “Smile, Mordecai!” But each visit generally broke one of two ways. The first was best summarized by Abby, a cute but skeptical 8-year-old: “You’re not real,” she said with the glare of a prosecuting attorney, while tugging off my poorly-attached, polyester beard. “Ho! Ho! Ho! Yes I am little girl! I’m Santa,” said I. “No you’re not. You’re a fraud.” “Abby, I am making a nice list and a naughty list. Which one do you want to be on?” This gave my accuser pause. It

All those Rent-aSanta stories prepare you for the shrieking and the terror. They don’t tell you about the beauty and the wide-eyed innocence of a child at Christmas. I wasn’t ready for that — or it has been so long that I had forgotten. shut down the verbal assault, but her sour gaze remained. She didn’t believe. Nor did many others.

But some of the kids had a total and reverential belief — a look of utter devotion as they approached, like Ewoks toward C3PO. “Hi Santa!” They were all in. And they knew the procedure. “I want an X-Box! I want a Nerf guided missile launcher! I WANT I WANT I WANT …” In a surprisingly touching twist, some didn’t want anything for themselves at all. “I want my cousins to be able to come see me for Christmas,” whispered one child, afraid that if anyone heard, it would not come true. “I want my daddy to feel better,” pleaded another while looking at her dad, who was in obvious physical pain. All those Rent-a-Santa stories prepare you for the shrieking and the terror. They don’t tell you about the beauty and the wide-eyed innocence of a child at Christmas. I wasn’t ready for that — or it has been so long that I had forgotten. So I decided to embrace Christmas this year. Not for the doofus doing 37 in the left lane or the dullard at the mall yelling at the seasonal clerk for not honoring a dusty coupon from the Eisenhower administration. But because somewhere, in our fair city, there is a kid who believes I’m Santa Claus. Who am I to ruin that? Ho! Ho! Ho!


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free will astrology by ROB BREZSNY

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “In games there are rules,” writes science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, “but in life the rules keep changing.” This is always true, of course, but I think it will be an especially poignant truth for you between now and your next birthday. During the coming months, you may sometimes feel as if every last law and formula and corollary is mutating. In some cases, the new rules coming into play will be so different from the old rules you’ve been used to, they may at first be hard to figure out. But now here’s the happy ending: It may take a while, but you will eventually see that these new rules have an unexpected logic and beauty that will serve your future well.

Jan. 1 – Jan. 15, 2014

This we ek’s homework: To he ar Par t One of my thre ep ar t audio fore casts ab out your dest iny in 2014, go to ht tp://bit.ly/BigPic t ure2014.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The citizens of Iceland love literature, but many are not content to simply read. One out of every ten Icelanders writes and publishes a book at sometime in his or her life. I know it’s unrealistic, but I would love to see at least one in ten of all my Libra readers do the same in 2014. I think you’re ready to make a big statement -- to express yourself in a more complete and dramatic way than ever

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 2014, it’s possible you will be given a cabbage farm or a petting zoo or some bequest that’s not exactly in close alignment with your life’s purpose. But it’s more likely that the legacies and dispensations you receive will be quite useful. The general trend is that allies will make available to you a steady flow of useful things. Your ability to attract what you need will be high. In the coming months, I may even have good reason to name you an honorary Scorpio. You might match those Great Manipulators’ proficiency at extracting the essence of what you want from every situation.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): Big rivers don’t travel in straight lines. Their paths are curvy and complicated, with periodic turns and bends. In some places they flow faster and in others they’re slower. Their depth and width may vary along the way, too. Your own destiny is like one of those big rivers, Cancerian. In some years, it meanders for long stretches, slowing down as it wanders along a crooked course. It may even get shallower and narrower for a while. But I expect that in 2014, you

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I predict that you will commit no major acts of self-sabotage in 2014. Congrats! I also foresee that you will be exceptionally careful not to hurt or damage yourself. Hooray! More good news: You won’t be as critical of yourself as you have sometimes been in the past. The judgmental little voice in the back of your head won’t be nearly as active. Yay! Even your negative emotions will diminish in frequency and intensity. Hallelujah! Whoopee! Abracadabra!

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): St. Peter’s Basilica is a very old church in Vatican City. It contains a lifesize bronze statue of St. Peter that is at least 700 years old. Over the centuries, countless visitors have paid their respects by kissing and touching the feet of the idol. The metal composing the right foot has been so thoroughly worn down by these gestures that the individual toes have disappeared, leaving a smooth surface. You will have a similar kind of power in 2014, Gemini. Little by little, with your steady affection and relentless devotion, you can transform what’s rigid and hard.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I’m hoping you will find a new teacher or two in 2014, maybe even a mentor. Not a guru who tells you what to do. Not an exploitative “expert” who claims to know what’s right for you or a charismatic narcissist who collects adoration. What I wish for you, Scorpio, is that you will connect with wise and humble sources of inspiration . . . with life-long learners who listen well and stimulate you to ask good questions . . . with curious guides who open your eyes to resources you don’t realize you need. In the coming months, you are primed to launch a quest that will keep you busy and excited for years; I’d love to see you get excellent help in framing that quest.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For years, French painter Édouard Manet and French poet Stéphane Mallarmé hung out with each other every day. Mallarmé referred to their relationship as “the most complete friendship.” They influenced each other to become better artists and human beings. I’m guessing that in the coming months, Taurus, you’ll thrive on that kind of stimulating companionship. Having such regular contact with a like-minded ally might even be an important factor in ripening your intelligence. At the very least, I predict that soulful friendship will be a crucial theme in 2014. You will attract blessings and generate luck for yourself by deepening your ability to cultivate synergistic bonds.

before. If you’re not ready to write a book, I hope you will attempt an equivalent accomplishment.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Deep bronzes and smoky cinnamons and dark chocolates will be your lucky colors in 2014. Mellow mahoganies and resonant russets will work well for you, too. They will all be part of life’s conspiracy to get you to slow down, deepen your perspective, and slip into the sweetest groove ever. In this spirit, I urge you to nestle and cuddle and caress more than usual in the coming months. If you aren’t totally clear on where home is, either in the external world or inside your heart, devote yourself to finding it. Hone your emotional intelligence.

will be moving more rapidly than usual. You will be traveling a more direct route, and you will be both wide and deep.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I think we humans need some new emotions. It’s true that old standards like sadness, anger, jealousy, and fear are as popular as ever. But I would personally love to be able to choose from a greater variety, especially if at least 51 percent of the new crop of emotions were positive or inspiring. Now it so happens that in 2014 you Pisceans will be primed to be pioneers. Your emotional intelligence should be operating at peak levels. Your imagination will be even more fertile than usual. So how about it? Are you ready to generate revolutionary innovations in the art of feeling unique and interesting feelings? To get started, consider these: 1. amused reverence; 2. poignant excitement; 3. tricky sincerity; 4. boisterous empathy.

Explore your roots. On a regular basis, remember your reasons for loving life. Stay in close touch with the sources that feed your wild soul.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The coming months will be a good time to meditate on the concepts of happy accidents and benevolent trouble. Go ahead and throw constructive mischief into the mix, too, and maybe even a dose of graceful chaos. Are you game for playing around with so much paradox? Are you willing to entertain the possibility that fate has generous plans for you that are too unexpected to anticipate? There’s only one requirement that you have to meet in order to receive your odd gifts in the spirit in which they’ll be offered: You’ve got to be open-minded, eager to learn, and flexible.

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Would you be interested in a motto that will help set the tone for you in 2014? I’ve got a suggestion that’s in alignment with the astrological omens. It’s from a poem by Margaret Atwood. Try saying this and see if it works for you: “Last year I abstained / this year I devour / without guilt / which is also an art.” If you choose to make this affirmation your own, be sure you don’t forget about the fact that devouring without guilt is an art -- a skill that requires craft and sensitivity. You can’t afford to get blindly instinctual and greedy in 2014; you shouldn’t compulsively overcompensate for 2013’s deprivations. Be cagey and discerning as you satisfy your voracious hunger.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Testify at Fre ewillastrology.com. 47


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rock and roll crossword The Puzzle Will Come to You by Todd Santos

Across 1 Van Morrison “Like a full force ___, I was lifted up again” 5 Stone Gossard’s band, when not with Pearl Jam 9 Zep “Whole ___ Love” 14 Old school crooner Jackie 15 Stevie Wonder’s mother and sometimes co-writer Mae Hardaway 16 What your body does after mosh pit show 17 Donovan song about beverages? 18 Fire a member 19 Springsteen song he planted? 20 Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr. “You Don’t ___” 23 Led Zep “We come from the land of the ___ and snow” 24 Famous talent agcy. 25 Barbershop quartet members 28 R&B singer Khan 30 Betty of clinic fame 32 Bobby that filled in for Buddy Holly 33 “Closer” artists Tegan ___ 36 How you find your friend at loud show 37 “Love Travels” popster 39 Mark Lanegan cover about a coffee shop? 41 Cheap Trick guitarist Rick 42 Led Zep “Said there ain’t no ___ in crying” 43 Techniques 44 Guitarist Peterson of The Bangles 48 “There She Goes” band 50 Maggie’s last name, to The Beatles 52 Place to stay on the road 53 Killers “Smile ___” 57 “Friends ___” Bowling for Soup 59 ’70s soul band inspired by a labyrinth? 60 “How Far ___ Come” Matchbox Twenty 61 Often last movement of sonata 62 Bassist Kirkwood of Meat Puppets 63 Prodigy song that foreshadows? 64 Replacements “When It ___” 65 Joseph Arthur “Love Never ___ You to Lie” 66 Aerosmith “___ Child” Down 1 Bauhaus genre 2 Prince “The kinda girl you wanna teach She’s ___” 3 Billy Joel “___ Tender Moment Alone” 4 Led Zep’s Eddie Cochran cover “Somethin’ ___” 5 Thin Lizzy “Little Girl in ___” 6 Cuban dance 7 Simple Plan “Your Love Is ___”

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Biography info What geriatric rockers did Led Zep song “The ___” Led Zep song about a traveler? Pharmacists leader Leo Beck song “Jack-___” Sound of plucked string Some cats in the ’80s? Pantera bassist Brown “___ Adrift On Memory Bliss” P.M. Dawn Old school rapper Big Daddy ___ Progressive metal band ___ Warning Agreement band shouldn’t make Pop star Ho from Hong Kong Something to give security, when sneaking into a show R&Bers Tony! ___! Tone! Beatles “I’ve Got ___” Zep “Mean old ___ taught me to weep and moan” Led Zep “When you ___ it, mama, save me a slice” Wishbone ___ A-ha “___ Me” Where some concert films get shown Fuel song about silverware? Napalm Death “Malicious ___” McCartney of Wings M “Pop ___” Murmurs single “I’m ___” Village People “It’s fun to stay at the ___” They’re “Guilded” to Suidakra Nation that says it’s “Not Your Fault”? Alex Paterson & Thomas Fehlmann ambient house band Buffalo jam band

29 30 31 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 43 45 46 47 49 50 51 54 55 56 57 58

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

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The Puzzle Will Come to You

THE ADVIC E

goddess by AMY ALKON

A woman wrote you about flirting relentlessly with a male classmate who seemed interested in her but may have been too timid to ask her out. You asked her, “If a man can’t endure a possible 10 seconds of rejection, is he the man you want with you when danger rears its head?” Absent a link between shyness and an inability to defend a woman in danger, I think you’re being unfair to shy guys. —IRKED

If timidity were useful in defending people in danger, police sergeants would announce to their beat cops, “Okay, everybody, go out there and hide in the back seat of your patrol car!”

You’re right that physical courage -- willingness to risk physical pain -- is different from emotional courage: willingness to risk rejection or other social pain. But they’re more related than you think. Brain imaging research by UCLA’s Naomi Eisenberger and Matthew Lieberman finds that the same regions of the brain that are activated by physical pain are activated by social pain, and Eisenberger reports that “individuals who are more sensitive to one kind of pain are also more sensitive to the other.” Further pointing to a connection, what’s good for a sprained ankle seems good for a sprained ego. In research Eisenberger collaborated on, 500 milligrams of acetaminophen (think Tylenol) taken twice daily was actually found to diminish emotional pain. So, no, it isn’t a stretch to suspect that a guy who shrinks from social ouchies might respond to physical danger as if his spirit animal were the breadcrumb. There’s this notion that the shy guy approaches “the chase” like it’s the “lie there like cold salmon,” simply because he isn’t a people person. That actually describes an introvert -- somebody energized by being alone and easily overstimulated in a crowd but who isn’t necessarily afraid to hit on a girl he’s interested in. But a shy person, instead of having self-esteem, has “what other people think of me”-esteem. This means a woman’s rejection isn’t just a bummer; it’s a crushing confirmation of his worthlessness as anything more than a container of salable plasma. When a guy’s male role model appears to be grape jelly, it isn’t a woman’s cue to do all the work to make a relationship happen. This is dating, not a pet adoption. Besides, you get what you settle for. A guy desperate for approval is a guy a woman can never count on -- to show her who he really is, to stand up for what he believes in, or, maybe, to even know what he believes (without sticking a wet finger in the air). A guy like this isn’t someone a woman can respect and admire. That’s essential, because real love involves having a crush on a person as a human being, not taking pity on him for his shortcomings. The shy guy to have is the one who’s worked on himself and come out the other side -- who maybe still fears asking a woman out but manages to do it anyway. This tells her something about her -- that he wants her more than he wants to avoid rejection -- and something about him: that he has the qualities women look for in a man -- courage and character and not just the really basic stuff like a Y chromosome and an ability for point-andshoot urination. I went on a first date to a Japanese restaurant. My date kept licking his fingers clean. All his fingers. One by one. He’s otherwise a truly great guy, but I don’t know whether I can date someone with such weird table manners. —SHOCKED

Coyotes lick their paws for good reason -- because there’s no waiter to bring them a warm washcloth in a little dish. When an adult human does this on the first date -- the date we all know is scored by a team of invisible judges in the mind of the person we’re with -- you really have to wonder. As for whether this guy’s dining behavior will be a deal breaker, when you don’t have an answer, the best answer is usually waiting and collecting information until you do. So go on a few more dates. See whether he sticks his snout in the gravy boat. How you ultimately respond will probably depend on both the strength of your gag reflex and how old you are. Women in their early 20s will ditch a guy if his cowlick grows in the wrong direction. Women in their 50s and beyond understand that “truly great guys” are in short supply, and they come to appreciate the little things in a man, such as a pulse, bladder control, and the ability to remain awake throughout sex. Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com). Alkon is the author of "I See Rude People: One Woman's Battle To Beat Some Manners Into Impolite Society." COPYRIGHT 2013 AMY ALKON | DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

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ACROSS 1 Ballyhoo 5 Hard to approach 10 Popinjay 13 Andean wool sources 19 Prayer finale 20 Bahraini buck 21 Rocks, in a bar 22 Oxygenconsuming organism 23 1978 Oscarwinning prison documentary 26 Abdominal protrusion 27 City near San Francisco 28 Dressing dispenser 29 Analyze 30 “It has 1,001 ___!” 31 Like a clear night 32 Binding order 33 Like some peanuts 36 Bit of chinaware 37 Make restitution for 40 Attempted 41 Acted the banshee 42 Knock silly 43 Density symbol, in mechanics 44 “The best is ___ to come!” 45 In ___ (working in harmony) 46 Big galoot 47 Checkbook record 48 Cause of an actor’s nervousness 52 Golf score 53 Distances traveled by arrows 57 Art supporter? 58 Complete ranges 61 Bleep, as bad words 62 Fence straddler 63 Eyewear for Col. Klink 64 Excessive or unreasonable

65 Synonym for 32-Across 66 Illinois city 67 Op. ___ (bibliography abbr.) 68 Halloween door opener? 70 Turkish honorific 72 Use an axe 73 Evil smile 74 Crow call 77 Hilo souvenir 78 Dynamic pairs 80 Walk unsteadily 83 School, in Sorbonne 85 Freckle 87 Was less than perfect 88 North Pole-like 89 “Golly!” 90 Ten dimes 92 Actor Arkin 93 ___ suey 94 It can nail a case shut 95 After-dinner drink 99 Find, as in a dictionary 101 Painful remembrance 103 Eagle eye’s asset 104 First word uttered after a birth 105 ___ Park, Colo. 106 Away from the gale 107 It covers the pupil 108 Creator of Boo Radley 109 Manicuring material 110 Flower starter DOWN 1 Clasp for a door 2 Song title spelled using pantomime 3 Ring, like bells 4 Destination bound 5 Mentally mixed up 6 Much of Santa’s mail 7 Catch ___ (start to get)

8 Boat paddle 9 Geometric figure with a repeating pattern 10 Calculated 11 Brownish yellow color 12 Small-minded 13 “___-di-dah!” 14 Current flowing in the direction of the wind 15 Overdue debt 16 Vehicle that may crush cars 17 “Isn’t that ___ much?” 18 Ocean 24 Lightened (up) 25 Very angry 31 Pie piece 32 Casablanca cap 33 Home for a hog 34 “You ___ My Sunshine” 35 Set fire to 36 Hunger can cause them 37 Huge amount 38 Moo ___ pork 39 React to a tearjerker 41 Earp of the Wild West 42 Creator of Willy Wonka 45 Font for holy water 46 S-shaped molding 47 “Coming of Age in ___” (Mead book) 48 Roll the cameras 49 Like a baby’s position in the womb 50 Do more than call 51 Archipelago part 52 Hanky attachment? 53 Where some sleeping dogs lie 54 Written tribute 55 Midnight, in some horror stories

56 Narrow groove 58 One not long for this world 59 Rat tail? 60 Take notice of 62 Throw out of kilter 63 Creator 65 Some fourstringed instruments 66 Attacked jointly? 68 “Go away!” 69 More elderly 70 “That’s ___ folks!” 71 “___ whiz, Wally!” (“Leave it to Beaver” line) 74 Meshing is its job 75 Muhammad of the ring 76 Become the spouse of 78 Call into question 79 “Disgusting!” 80 Do some nit picking? 81 Acrylic fiber brand 82 Military recruit 83 Clear the slate 84 Multiplex components 86 Provided lodging for 88 Lame, as an excuse 90 Oxford doctorate, briefly 91 Address Congress, e.g. 92 Boiling-blood feeling 93 Fashion designer Chanel 95 Start the pot 96 Enameled metal 97 Apple source 98 Leered at 99 Switzerland’s ___ Leman 100 Monetary unit of Myanmar 102 Suffix with “real” or “patriot”

Universal sUnday Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker

sPooKed By rob lee

© 2014 Universal Uclick

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