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January 2014 VOL. 36, NO.1

landscapetrades.com

Prevent spalling from spoiling your installations

Dream gardens: A Gavin portfolio Decoding financial statements New-found plant gems, from Newfoundland

GREENER FLEETS Progressive contractors boost margins — and marketing — with fuel efficiency

Scott Bryk of The Grounds Guys PM40013519

Inside: CONGRESS 2014 PREVIEW


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contents JANUARY 2014 VOL. 36, NO. 1

Greening your fleet 6 Environmental responsibility and profitability can go hand in hand

BY SUSAN HIRSHORN

FEATURES

COLUMNS

12 Proper paver installation techniques

46 LEGAL MATTERS Termination rights under construction contracts

Follow building codes when using paver overlays on concrete BY BERT MINOR

BY ROB KENNALEY

20 Financial management decoded

48 SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING Practice sustainable behaviour at your own office

P&L statements can tell a revealing story BY LEE ANN KNUDSEN

26 Plant Atlantic Gems from Newfoundland plant breeding and selection program BY TODD BOLAND

32 Readers react Highlights of Landscape Trades’ reader survey BY LEE ANN KNUDSEN

34 Certified Landscape Designer Certification gives confidence and builds business BY SARAH WILLIS

36 Design inspiration A different take on the designed landscape BY DIARMUID GAVIN

38 Business development and branding Approach marketing like you do a landscape project BY JASON BOUWMAN

BY SEAN JAMES

50 ROAD TO SUCCESS Fear of failure will always hold you back BY ROD McDONALD

68 LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT Employee incentives that work for everyone BY MARK BRADLEY

DEPARTMENTS Green Pencil Industry News Letter to the Editor New Products CNLA News Coming Events Classifieds Where to Find it

4 72 75 76 78 79 79 80

40 Results-oriented training Improve your ROI on staff training

ry st re tu ntre du uc Ce In n nce rastrngress e e re Inf to Co r G fe enToron ier Con Greding, em d and Buil Pr an craft South s ’ w e 14 da ho enc, 20 na e S g F 7-9 Ca rad rinnuary T tu Ja

INSIDE:

BY BILL ARMAN

Congress 2014 Show Preview Pages 55-67

44 Help with hiring A short skills test to pre-qualify job candidates BY OWEN DELL

iew v e pr

a Fe

14 20 Featuring

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greenpencil

Time-honoured approach to service sales is still tops

Referrals trump Google ads M

y daughter is currently immersed

in research studies at university, and I’ve been proofreading her work in my down time. Consequently, I’ve been paying more attention than usual to other academic studies that come across my desk. One study looked at the marketing claim that the highest-quality service firms make the highest bids to appear at the top of sponsored Google searches. In case you did not know, Google accepts money in exchange for high search rankings. A countering position that made me do a double-take recently was titled, “Beware the plumbing firm that advertises a lot.” Researcher Ryan McDevitt of Duke University found that the residential plumbing firms that advertised on platforms such as Google searches or in the By Sarah Willis Yellow Pages received more service complaints than those who market in other ways. More specifically, McDevitt determined that the Google advertisers received more than 13 times as many complaints, as those companies who didn’t spend money to get their name at the top of the search engine! McDevitt’s study also deduced that Google searches disproportionately attract uninformed customers, who are not willing to take the time to connect with a quality firm through references and testimonials. These tend to

4 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

be the homeowners with a short-term need for a service, rather than those looking for long term interaction. What I take from this study, is that old-fashioned relationship marketing is still king for sales success. Despite the constant interference of electronic media in our lives, no type of service-industry marketing is as effective as one person responding to the needs of another. Mad Men’s suave ad pitchman Don Draper says “Advertising is based on one thing — happiness.” Happy clients, customers or guests — however your company refers to them, will want to extend their relationship with you and your company. And, they in turn will tell their friends about the wonderful experience, product or service you provided. Relationship marketing is as old as commerce itself, but perhaps can be overlooked in the efforts to market via the internet, advertising low-cost deals and marketing through social media (although if done well, social media can be virtual relationship marketing). It is a practical undertaking, and every person in your company can participate. Every interaction with a customer can be used to enhance the relationship, and improve the happiness quotient. Academic market research aside, veteran salesmen tell me that nothing shortens the sales cycle like a good referral from a happy client. While the marketers survey and study to prove to themselves the best way to market your business, the only thing you can bank on is LT your own ability to sell yourself.


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Greening the Fleet By Susan Hirshorn

Contractors can reduce the carbon footprint of vehicles shuttling crews and materials to the jobsite — and save money. By any standard, The Grounds Guys is a successful firm. With 42 locations over five provinces, this Mono, Ont.-based grounds-keeping franchise recently opened its 135th location in the United States. Its president, Scott Bryk, is a biologist by education. He instituted an environmental policy for the firm that includes “greening” its fleets. Among their initiatives is the use of low-emission fuels and eco-friendly driving practices when servicing their clients, who are largely industrial and commercial. Given today’s pressing environmental concerns, high fuel costs and pressures on fossil fuel reserves, Bryk hopes more landscapers will follow suit. “What people need to understand is that environmental sustainability and business profitability are not mutually exclusive,” he says. “There’s a lot that landscapers of all sizes can do to reduce our carbon footprint while remaining efficient and profitable.”

Scott Bryk, The Grounds Guys, sets the example for his company by driving a hybrid vehicle.

6 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Consider propane and biodiesel Alternative fuels can reduce harmful emissions and in some cases, lower fuel costs. Propane, for example, is widely available and is almost half the price of gasoline. It burns more cleanly than gasoline and can reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with climate change by up to 25 per cent.


Typically, propane produces up to 90 per cent fewer air-polluting carbon monoxide emissions and 50 per cent fewer toxic emissions than gasoline. The majority of propane vehicles in North America are aftermarket conversions. Says Bryk, “Converting that gas-powered pickup truck is seamless and reliable. It costs several thousand dollars but considering the fuel savings compared to gasoline you can make that up pretty quickly.” The Canadian-based Propane Facts Alliance (www.propanefacts.ca) describes two types of conversion, one being a hybrid system that starts on gasoline and switches to propane without operator input. Advantages include extended range and no cold starting issues — an important consideration when doing winter work. Disadvantages include reduced space and payload in carrying of two fuels. There are also conversions where the vehicle operates solely on propane. This doesn’t reduce space and payload — and liquid propane injection systems do not experience cold starting issues. However vapour injection systems, if not properly designed, may experience difficulties at very cold temperatures. If your truck or tractor runs on diesel, it probably won’t need any special modifications to run on biodiesel. Although there may not be significant cost savings with biodiesel, this clean-burning, biodegradable and renewable fuel, made from plant and animal fats, reduces carbon dioxide (a principal emission in greenhouse gas) by up to 99 per cent compared with petroleum-based diesel. It also reduces other emissions associated with harm to human health. Biodiesel is sold as a blend, mixed with conventional diesel. For example, a B5 blend consists of 5 per cent biodiesel and 95 per cent conventional diesel. Most diesel engines are warranted to run on anywhere between B5 to B20 but check your vehicle warranty to be sure. Biodiesel’s reputation for gelling up in cold weather may be true for B10 blends and higher. The smaller the percentage of biodiesel in the blend, the better it performs in cold temperatures. The City of Montreal

Eco Grounds Care of Cedar Valley, Ont., uses lithium-ion powered bicycles that pull small trailers with their landscaping equipment.

fleet, for example, has operated successfully on B5 throughout the cold Montreal winters. At The Grounds Guys, franchisees don’t always have B5 available, Bryk says. “Those who use biodiesel in their trucks tend to use it in summer and go back to using conventional diesel in the winter.” The availability of biodiesel in general, as well as the availability of certain blends, still varies widely across the country. Investigate electric Put the words “electric” and “vehicle” together and the word “hybrid” usually comes to mind. Hybrids run on gasoline or other fuel, and an electric motor powered by a large rechargeable battery. The battery in a hybrid is recharged either from the engine or from energy captured while braking, or both. With fuel savings of 25 to 50 per cent over conventional gas-powered vehicles, hybrids have become increasingly attractive to fleet owners. Various industries now use hybrid cars, SUVs and light, medium and heavy duty vehicles. Although the cost of a hybrid vehicle can be about 20 per cent higher than its conventional counterpart, Bryk encourages organizations requiring several company vehicles to investigate hybrids when it’s time to replace their gas-guzzlers. Bryk’s hybrid Toyota Prius, for example, gets him around on 3.5 litres of gasoline per 100 km., or 80 miles to the gallon. Nowadays, purely electric vehicles (EVs) are gaining attention since they don’t require liquid fuels and have zero emissions. However, the energy storage constraints of today’s batteries still limit EVs to shorter trips that provide sufficient recharging time. One innovative landscaper using electrics is Eric Gordon, president of Eco Grounds Care

in Cedar Valley, Ont. This grounds-keeping franchise services urban area clients such as office buildings, commercial properties, condominium and townhome communities. They currently have 175 franchises in Canada and the United States. Instead of using pickup trucks, the company’s full time “zero-emissions team” get around some of their clients’ sites on lithium-ion powered bicycles pulling small trailers with their equipment. “Blowers, mowers and trimmers are also battery powered and everything is recharged via solar panels on the trailers and at our storage facilities. On cloudy days we recharge with a storage battery,” Gordon explains. “The bikes get about 18 miles on a single charge; the equipment about 45 minutes per battery. To extend run time to three hours, we have units with four-packs.” As intriguing as this sounds, not all of Eco Ground Care’s experiences with electrical equipment have been happy ones. For example, when their 52-in. battery powered zero turn mower stopped working, neither the dealer or the manufacturer could resolve the problem and the firm was out $5,500. “The lesson learned,” Gordon says, “is to insist contractually that if the equipment cannot be serviced within a reasonable amount of time you get the purchase price back.” They have since replaced the zero turn (at their cost) with a similar mower fuelled by propane. Put smart management into play Even when new technologies work just fine, they often have a high capital cost. Additionally, warns transportation analyst Charlotte Argue, “if a fleet has intrinsic inefficiencies the benefits of technology and/or alternative fuels might not be fully realized.” Argue works for E3 Fleet, a Canada-wide program,

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based in Vancouver, B.C., that helps public and private sector organizations green up their vehicle fleets. “Alternative fuels and fuelefficient technologies are just one component of a green fleet,” she adds. “The other component is green fleet management — and this is where we place the most emphasis. Rather than costing money, green fleet management allows owners and managers to find cost savings, as well as achieve improvements in reducing their environmental footprint.” Among the recommended practices: Eco Grounds Care’s utility vehicle lessens emissions and fuel consumption and is sized right for accessing sidewalks and narrow city areas.

FUEL-EFFICIENT DRIVING TIPS The same behaviours that reduce your carbon footprint also save money — and lives! Slow down Fuel consumption increases significantly over about 90 km/h; decreasing your highway speed from 120 km/h to 100 km/h can reduce your fuel consumption by up to 20 per cent. Drive calmly Rapid acceleration and braking (jack rabbit starts and stops) can use up to 30 per cent more fuel at highway speeds, causes increased wear and tear on the vehicle and is dangerous, particularly in urban areas. Reduce stopping and starting Every time you stop and start again in traffic, the engine uses more fuel and therefore produces more CO2. Proper route planning, including the use of fewer left-hand turns, can avoid much of this. For information on fuel-smart driving and other green fleet practices visit E3 Fleet, www.e3fleet.com; Natural Resource Canada, http://fleetsmart.nrcan.gc.ca; FleetChallenge Ontario, www.fleetchallenge.ca; and Clean Energy Nova Scotia, www.fleetwiser.ca. A useful handbook about developing fuel-smart driver training programs is available at the Environmental Defense Fund Innovation Exchange, http://business.edf.org/sites/business.edf. org/files/fuel-smart-driving-handbook.pdf

10 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Right-size your fleet Vehicles and equipment should be the right size for the tasks they perform most often. Those which are too large or over powered will burn more fuel, produce more emissions and increase your operating expenses. For example, Gordon’s small, biodiesel-powered Kubota utility vehicle gives his teams access to urban sidewalks, narrow passageways and small gardens without burning much fuel or racking up tickets for street parking. In summer, the teams use the diesel engine to power their watering equipment instead of relying on a conventional gas-powered motor on the back of the truck to pump water. In winter the Kubota serves as a salt spreader for sidewalks and walkways (and yes, he also reverts to conventional diesel in winter). Overall the vehicle’s fuel costs are about $20 a week, Gordon says. Implement fuel efficient driver training This alone can reduce fuel consumption and emissions by 20 per cent or more, Argue says — and it’s a major initiative at The Grounds Guys, where the use of gasoline powered trucks is still common. Driver and mentorship training sessions focus on what Bryk calls, “non-aggressive driving techniques” (see sidebar). “We try to get the message across that while it’s important to get through your list of properties, it can’t be at the expense of driving like a maniac. Because all of the money you think you’re saving by moving quickly from property to property you’re going to blow on fuel. All you’ve done is waste everybody’s time and done it in a dangerous fashion.” Practicing fuel-efficient driving is part of the firm’s career development, raise and promotion requirements. Bryk also emphasizes the importance of bonuses and other incentives to ensure the crew’s buy-in.

“Give them a gift card, an iTunes card, whatever they want. How is success measured? Team A drove 500 km this week. Team B drove 500 km this week. Team A used 150 litres. Team B used 180 litres. Obviously Team A was more efficient.” Have an idle-reduction policy According to Natural Resource Canada, gasoline engines consume between 2.5 and 4 litres of fuel per hour while idling, and diesel engines waste from one to four litres per hour. To avoid this, The Grounds Guys monitors its vehicles’ idle time with GPS. “We want to know when a vehicle is idling for more than 10 minutes,” Bryk says. Monitor and manage your data Today’s GPS technology offers a variety of features related to fuel efficiency and lowering your carbon footprint. For example, vehicle speed and idling can be monitored and logged — routes planned for optimal service and fuel efficiency – and vehicle maintenance alerts issued. Well-maintained vehicles stay in service longer, operate more efficiently, produce fewer greenhouse gases and provide service that is more reliable. Gordon, formerly a software developer, has designed proprietary software that also lets him monitor and calculate carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions from his service vehicles and equipment. “This assures our clients; some of whom are LEED- or BOMA Best-Certified, or working towards these goals, that we are meeting or exceeding expectations for environmental sustainability,” he says. Both Eco Grounds Care and The Grounds Guys extend their sustainable practices beyond the fleet to include recycling, the use of eco-friendly alternatives to landscape chemicals and responsible salting in winter. Their efforts are helping to change the public face of landscaping for the better. Bryk sums up his business philosophy as one that caters to a “triple bottom line of people, planet and profits. When we look at doing business and determining whether it’s profitable, we also take into account what the impact is on the LT planet and on people.” Susan Hirshorn is a Montreal-based freelance writer for business, professional and consumer audiences.


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Appalling BY BERT MINOR

revisited

Appalling Spalling, an article I wrote in the January 2013 issue of Landscape Trades, addressed the issue of spalling brick veneers on homes caused by improperly installed raised patios, garden walls, and paver overlays on concrete steps and porches. The article certainly drew some attention. I personally got several emails and calls from homeowners who read the article online, had been affected by the issue in one form or other, and were looking for answers. Calls and emails came from near and far. It certainly cemented in my mind the pervasiveness of the problem — it truly is widespread, and affects many homeowners. Before I get into how the industry is dealing with the matter, and for those of you who missed the original article, perhaps a quick review is in order.

Recap of the problem Who knows where it got started, but overlaying concrete porches and steps with pavers has been a growing trend over the last half-dozen years or so. It became so popular, in fact, that suppliers responded by manufacturing thinner pavers designed specifically for overlays. These thinner, lighter pavers were easier to work with and could even accommodate homes where the door soleplate or sill was too close to the concrete porch or step for an overlay with traditional pavers. Before long these overlay pavers were fea12 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

tured in supplier catalogues, and contractors everywhere were picking up on the trend. More and more homeowners were offered a perfect solution to the drab, industriallooking concrete steps and porches that all too often mar the front of beautiful homes. Unfortunately, the problem with overlays is, contractors are using the system on homes that really weren’t designed to accept paver overlays. Many homes are built where the bottom row of brick veneers start at grade with the poured concrete step or porch. When contractors overlay these

During the winter, moisture trapped in brick veneers will expand and contract with freeze and thaw cycles. This trapped moisture will eventually weaken the brick and cause the faces to break off — or spall.


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The practice of building against most other forms of cladding on homes, when done incorrectly, causes damage and violates building codes.

Raised garden beds above the brick veneer line are also culprits for causing efflorescence.

It is important that weep holes are not covered by raised garden beds to allow water to drain, and air to circulate behind the brick and dry the wall.

14 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Efflorescence is the white marking left behind when the summer sun dries the trapped moisture in the brick wall.

porches and steps, they are actually covering the bottom row of bricks, and weep holes, on the house. Not only is covering weep holes on brick veneers contravening building code, it actually traps moisture at the base and behind the brick-veneered wall when it rains. Trapped moisture wicks up the brick wall, sometimes several feet high, and on hot summer days when the sun beats down and dries the brick, efflorescence is left behind. Although efflorescence in and of itself can be benign, and is often present in newly-manufactured concrete products, constantly reoccurring efflorescence from trapped moisture is often a sign of something more serious — something that could eventually affect the structural integrity of a home. During winter months, moisture trapped in brick veneers will expand and contract when subjected to freeze/thaw cycles. Repeated expansion and contraction of this trapped moisture will, over time, weaken the brick and eventually cause the faces to break off — or spall. Trapped moisture also reaches the home’s wood framing and eventually causes the wood frame of the house to rot, inviting insects. The efflorescence caused by all these overlays really is what drew attention to the issue for me. I could drive down any new neighborhood where a lot of landscaping work was done and see many affected homes. The overlays also brought to light a few other secondary, but just as serious, side issues. I saw many homes where raised garden beds were installed at, or even above, the brick veneer line. Other homes have had raised steps and

raised patios built up directly against homes with little or no protection — usually a thin weatherproof adhesive membrane. Although efflorescence from trapped moisture in brick accentuates the problem, the fact is that the practice of building against most other forms of cladding on homes, when done incorrectly, can and will cause damage and also violate building codes. These practices most likely violate the National Building Code but at the very least clearly violate the following Ontario Building Codes: 9.15.4.3 Extension Above Ground Level (1) Exterior foundation walls shall extend not less than 150 mm (5 7/8”) above finished ground level. 9.27.2.2 Clearance from ground (1) Not less than 200 mm (7 7/8”) clearance shall be provided between the finished ground level and siding that is adversely affected by moisture such as wood, plywood, OSB, waferboard and hardboard. Aside from the building code requirements for grade clearances, code for installing brick veneer calls for weep holes to be placed no more than 24-in. on centre when open head joints are used, and no more than 16-in. on centre when wick materials or round tubes are used. These weep holes are there to allow for unobstructed air to circulate and dry the wall, but also to allow water to drain from behind the wall. It stands to reason that any project that obstructs these weep holes in any way, shape or form are contravening the codes that govern them.


Leave a paver out and open at end for air circulation

Door Sill

A thorough understanding of construction specifications for installing concrete products against homes is crucial before taking on any project. Covered weep holes, specifically, seem to have drawn the attention of many home inspectors. I’ve had a number of homeowners contact me, including a personal friend of mine, where the buyer’s home inspector called for remediation of building code violations of covered weep holes as a condition of sale. The stress relief solution

For raised patios, however, the solution is as simple as building a stress relief wall, illustrated and detailed in the Advanced Residential Paver Technician Student Manual. The stress relief wall calls for building a hidden wall that would leave a three- to four-inch gap between the raised patio and the home’s cladding. The stress relief wall does not reduce lateral pressure against foundation walls. Stability of the existing foundation wall should be taken into consideration when designing stress relief walls.

Adhere paver to top of SRW unit 1 in. (25 mm) bedding sand 2% slope away from building

Wood framed exterior wall with siding

SRW installed near vertical as per manufacturer's guidelines 3 to 4 in. (75 to 100 mm) air gap Provide drainage at bottom of air gap Geogrid as required by design and height of SRW

Cement treated base or dense graded base well compacted Concrete foundation wall with basement

6 in. (150 mm) minimum dense graded base under raised patio

Cross section of a relief wall Confusion on the issue of building steps and raised patios against homes have been around as long as I can remember. Contractors are not the only ones that have been starving for answers and clarity. I’ve had highly respected and qualified members

of the design sector ask me how we dealt with building against homes. The topic also comes up at designer meetings and informally at industry gatherings. With the Advanced Residential Technician course we’re finally given a solution to at least deal ef-

ICPI committee recommends action The ICPI Construction Committee formed a task group to deal specifically with overlay and raised patio systems that effectively bury the exterior brick and siding on homes. Based on a casual survey of contractor members, the issue appears to be greatest in Ontario, Quebec and the northeastern U.S.; problematic installations were done by uncertified contractors and ICPI-certified contractors alike. The task group concluded that these practices are a clear violation of building code, and the problem is widespread enough to negatively affect the industry in many ways if not dealt with properly. The solution really boils down to education, but on many levels. For contractors, The Concrete Paver Installer Course should include information about basic code requirements. The Advanced Residential Technician course currently deals with basic building code requirements related to finished grade elevations next to buildings. That information should also be mirrored in section drawings. A further suggestion has been made to include content in the student manuals and ICPI course PowerPoint presentations warning that installing material against cladding is not an accepted practice. A quick survey of producer’s web sites, printed brochures and catalogues shows many projects where pavers are installed against brick and other types of cladding. Producers should review their marketing

literature to ensure they are not inadvertently promoting a practice that violates building code. Because of their market presence and reach, producers will be encouraged to provide simple details that identify building code requirements in their materials. Producers have a lot of control over information flow, and landscape centre sales staff and contractors rely on producer’s marketing material. They have the best points of contact with contractors and homeowners, and can easily pass on correct installation procedures. Homeowners need education as well. Information at distributor’s yard should help. Yard help and sales staff should also be educated on proper installation techniques to better inform homeowners and do-ityourselfers. Although not officially a recommendation of the ICPI task group, I would further encourage producers to include a section in their upcoming 2014 seminars that will clearly and decisively put this issue to rest. One thing is clear. The construction committee really defined the problem, and put to rest once and for all, that covering exterior cladding is a clear violation of building code.

JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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Raised garden beds are a popular choice with many home owners, so it’s important to communicate the best methods for installing pavers correctly while maintaining proper water drainage.

fectively with raised patios and steps — the relief wall. There seems to be no simple solution to concrete overlays. Although the construction committee task group recommends breaking up the concrete and pouring a new concrete form at the proper height, that solution simply isn’t practical in most situations. Unless

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someone comes up with an overlay system that doesn’t contravene building code, homeowners simply won’t have the option of covering their concrete porches and steps with concrete paver products. Summary Designers and contractors in the field are often looking to the industry for guidance and support. Front line field workers are often the first to realize when a product is causing issues or installation guidelines need clarity. They need to share their concerns. In order for organizations such as the ICPI to be effective at creating solutions, they need information to flow up from the front lines. Although organizations such as ICPI encourage direct communication from front line workers, most contractors and designers will look to producers for help and advice on both product and product uses — including installation best practices. Producers are close to contractors and designers and also respond directly to customer complaints. They respond to product quality issues, but often see examples of improper uses of their products. They can see if an issue is isolated or part of a greater trend. They should, in my view, take a greater role in bridging the current communication gap between designers, contractors and homeowners and the organizations developing best practices. Installation guidelines are developed by ICPI and other supporting organizations, but producers are exposed to day-to-day issues and should be one of the key vehicles for communicating that information. I can’t help but wonder, for example, if problems with overlays could have been dealt with sooner. If a protocol was in place to push the information from the front line to the organizations that can make a difference, the solution could have been communicated to contractors much earlier. A quicker response to this issue could have made a difference last season. Especially if information would have been shared at the spring contractor showcase events. Certainly the hundreds of homeowners who have been affected last season by improperly installed LT projects would agree.

Bert Minor is an Ottawa-based certified landscape designer.

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MANAGEMENT PROFILE:

Asking questions about finances Contractor Nathan Helder decodes two financial statements

BY LEE ANN KNUDSEN

Many in the green industry were born into the business; Nathan Helder was not. As a result, his seven-year history with Gelderman Landscape Services, based in Waterdown, Ont., has required a steep learning curve. Helder tackled the challenge of taking over the business by doubling down on finance, an area he sees as the weak spot in many landscape companies. His attitude was to ask questions about every aspect of Gelderman’s finances, and to take advantage of all the mentorship opportunities he could find. By being inquisitive, Helder has learned to identify some specifics in financial statements that can help guide companies toward enhanced profits. To illustrate, he crafted a sample Profit and Loss (P&L) statement for a strong company, as well as one for a company needing improvement. Then he agreed to be interviewed about what the numbers mean, as well as the questions and opportunities they suggest. Both fictional companies are design/build/snow contractors, with identical revenues. Company B has a strong bottom line, but Company A’s numbers show some weaknesses. Helder spent an afternoon explaining why. He first highlighted the direct costs area (Cost of Goods Sold, including direct labour, subcontractors and materials), used to determine gross margin. Company B is spending less on direct field labour, and more on specialized subcontractors. “I plugged in the numbers this way to suggest that using skilled subcontractors could result in lower direct labour and material costs. Sometimes we think we need to keep people busy, yet utilizing subcontractors with higher markups can produce higher profits. Higher spending on materials could also indicate poor purchasing processes and tracking or inaccurate estimates and takeoffs,” Helder says. He identified improved material controls (implementing a purchase order system, for example) and takeoff accuracy as productive ways to lower costs. 20 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Looking at equipment Equipment costs can be a financial drain on landscape companies — so significant, that Helder broke equipment out on the spreadsheet. “Company A has a full-time mechanic on staff, owns all its equipment, and most of the equipment is at least seven years old. It has to pay for a skilled employee’s salary to maintain, plus parts and shop supplies. Company B takes its equipment to a shop for repairs, leases most of its equipment and rotates equipment after five years. As a results it uses less fuel and has fewer breakdowns — less downtime,” Helder says. In his illustration, Company A is spending nearly $80k more on equipment, to service identical revenue — a huge drain on profitability. Depreciation and leasing costs are higher for Company B. This indicates that equipment overall is newer, and less likely to break down, with the resulting repair bills and wasted labour expense. While lower depreciation means lower expense on a P&L, it means a fleet is getting older and prone to more expensive repair. Helder says, “One of my own biggest mistakes was buying out the leases on three trucks. What we saved in monthly expense was wiped out by frame and transmission trouble, frustration and downtime. I look at the experience as a $60,000 mistake I will never make again.” There is no doubt Helder is convinced that equipment should serve only one function in a landscape company: to do a job. He says it’s easy to put emotions into equipment, but falling in love with a truck or skid steer can be a very expensive. Drill down to overheads Under overheads, Helder pointed out two relatively small line items he says can be very revealing about a company’s success. Company B spends more on uniforms, and a lot more on safety and training. According to Helder, investing in training indicates a company is investing in its employees;


that it considers employees a valued asset. He asserts that investing in training pays off over the long term with lower turnover, better efficiency and improved quality. Uniforms are an investment in success, he says, because they convey professionalism and marketing value. Helder stressed the critical importance of placing the owner on salary; he sees this expense item as one of the top indicators of a company’s financial success. Company B pays its owner an appropriate owner’s salary, while Company A does not. While this

practice is common, Helder believes it leaves companies with a distorted financial picture, and vulnerable. He says, “What happens if there is no profit? What happens if you ‘get hit by a bus,’ and must replace yourself with a general manager?” Overheads are slightly lower for Company A, but Helder says they are artificially lower, since the owner is not paying himself a salary. “If he thinks his overheads are low, he is fooling himself.” Travel and entertainment spending is higher in Company A, suggesting this fictional owner might be running more trip and dining

Profit and Loss

January 1 to December 31st Revenue Direct Field Labour Subcontractor Materials (includes delivery) Cost of Goods Sold Gross Margin Mechanic, anyone helping (tools,salaries/wage /bonus) Rental/leasing vehicle/equipment (includes auto and equipment taxes and interest) Fuel and oil (include mileage reimbursement here) Depreciation Vehicle/Equipment Insurance Vehicle/Equipment Repair parts, shop supplies, repairs done out of house Small Equipment (ie: backpack blowers, include tax) Tools and Supplies (eg. Wheelbarrows, pruner s) Equipment Total Uniforms Safety and Training Owner's Salary (and/or President, GM's salary and bonuses) Sales People/Estimators/Sales Managers/ Designers (salaries, bonuses, commissions) Office Staff (salaries/bonuses) Payroll Taxes for ALL employees AND owne rs (include unemployment and workers comp) Group Insurance for ALL employees AND owners (medical, hospital, life) Employee Benefits for ALL employees and owners Rent/mortgage (building depreciation, buildin g insurance, utilities, repairs, maintenance and upkeep) Communication Marketing/ads/web (contributions, photography, client events, direct mail, postage) Travel and entertainment Insurance ( liability, casualty, BUT NOT real estate & group) Office Supplies/Computers (include equipment depreciation) Bad Debt Professional (accounting, legal, consulting) Licenses, Dues, Training (including membership, subscriptions, seminars) All other (include misc. business tax.) Overhead Total Profit (before extraordinary income and expenses) Other income Interest Expense Net Profit

COMPANY A

COMPANY B

Dollars $2,500,000

100.0%

Dollars $2,500,000

100.0%

$600,000 $100,000 $630,000 $1,330,000

24.0% 4.0% 25.2% 53.2%

$500,000 $200,000 $500,000 $1,200,000

20.0% 8.0% 20.0% 48.0%

$1,170,000

46.8%

$1,300,000

52.0%

$75,000 $50,000 $100,000 $15,000 $22,500 $125,000 $18,500 $45,000 $451,000

3.0% 2.0% 4.0% 0.6% 0.9% 5.0% 0.7% 1.8% 18.0%

$0 $100,000 $75,000 $50,000 $22,500 $70,000 $18,500 $36,000 $372,000

0.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 0.9% 2.8% 0.7% 1.4% 14.9%

$0 $500 $30,000 $105,000 $95,000 $59,000 $5,500 $35,000 $68,000 $19,000 $36,000 $35,000 $36,460 $34,373 $15,000 $15,000 $3,545 $34,717 $627,095

0.0% 0.0% 1.2% 4.2% 3.8% 2.4% 0.2% 1.4% 2.7% 0.8% 1.4% 1.4% 1.5% 1.4% 0.6% 0.6% 0.1% 1.4% 25.1%

$91,905

$91,905

$7,500 $15,000 $100,000 $110,000 $95,000 $59,000 $5,500 $35,000 $68,000 $18,000 $36,000 $15,000 $36,460 $30,000 $2,500 $7,500 $3,545 $34,717 $678,722

0.3% 0.6% 4.0% 4.4% 3.8% 2.4% 0.2% 1.4% 2.7% 0.7% 1.4% 0.6% 1.5% 1.2% 0.1% 0.3% 0.1% 1.4% 27.1%

3.7%

$249,278

10.0%

3.7%

$249,278

10.0%

JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

21


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expense through his company to minimize taxes. Helder, like Company B, is very careful about expenses like this, as well as personal vehicle use: “Canada Revenue Agency is performing more audits than ever.” Helder believes paying up the first time around is far cheaper than being audited. Bad debt also shows higher for Company A, which Helder says should suggest a question: Is the company’s accounting being managed currently and efficiently? At Gelderman, “We have a payment policy in place: 30 per cent due on signing; 30 per cent at start of work; 30 per cent due midway, typically after hardscape installation; and 10 per

cent upon completion.” This payment policy can protect a contractor from large holdbacks — or worse — while correcting small details at the end of jobs. Why are professional fees higher at Company A? Helder says this could indicate a finance-averse owner, who procrastinates on accounting and promises himself to catch up during a rainy day. In this scenario, Helder says organization and efficiency suffer, accounting costs are higher, and the owner could be leaving money on the table. Nathan Helder participates in a business peer group. Members runs businesses of similar sizes in non-competing geographic

HEAR NATHAN HELDER AT CONGRESS Culture vs. Profit; Can Culture Be a Profit Centre? Jan. 7, 1:30 p.m. The Exploding Condo Market: Are you Ready to Grow Your Business? Jan. 8, 1:30 p.m. Take advantage of two targeted presentations on boosting your profitability, as well as the opportunity to meet Nathan Helder, at the Congress Conferences. Register at www.locongress.com.

areas, and meet to compare and discuss financial details in-depth. Over and over, he says even the owners of large companies say, “I need to learn my numbers better.” So Helder knows first-hand that landscape companies with this challenge need not feel alone. The bottom line Net profit, even with artificially low overhead cost, is only 3.7 per cent for Company A. Company B’s profit performance was well over twice as good — all on the same revenue. “Every company needs to make profit. Profits are needed for capital expenditures, return on assets, return on owner’s equity/ investment, cash flow, additional growth and investment in people.” Going over the statements revealed Helder’s huge respect for his fellow landscape contractors. He clearly hopes his curiosity about numbers might help others, just as mentors in the industry have helped him. In Helder’s mind, it’s all about goals. “No matter what your goals are — whether you want to expand your company or stay at the same size — you still have to manage LT numbers.”

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Newfoundland breeding program yields intriguing cultivars BY TODD BOLAND Philladelphus ‘Starbright’

Plant Atlantic Plant Atlantic is the plant breeding and selection program developed at the Memorial University of Newfoundland Botanical Garden (MUNBG). Started in 2004, this program mirrors a similar successful program developed at the University of British Colombia (UBC) Botanical Garden. This is not surprising since the director of MUNBG in 2004, Dr. Wilf Nichols, used to be one of the plant breeders at UBC. His main claim-tofame during his years at UBC was the development of ‘Mandarin’ honeysuckle. When Dr. Nichols moved to Newfoundland as director of MUNBG, he brought a mock orange hybrid (Philadelphus) he had developed at UBC. This mock Picea glauca ‘The Limey’ orange was to become the starting

26 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

point for our Plant Atlantic program. Through an Atlantic Innovation Fund (AIF) grant, I was hired as the research horticulturist for this project, and I have been carrying out plant breeding and selecting ever since. Plant Atlantic utilizes both active breeding for new plants as well as selections of unique native plants that have horticultural merit. These plants include both herbaceous and woody material. The goal is to patent these plants, set up license agreements with propagators across Canada and beyond, with royalties returning to MUNBG to continue the breeding program. International market break-out The mock orange was the first release from Plant Atlantic to enter the national and international market. It was created by crossing the very hardy Philadelphus lewisii to the more tender P. delayavi var. melanocalyx. The latter species has a deep purple calyx which contrasts with the snowy-white flowers. The hybrid selected from the cross had the prairie hardiness of P. lewisii but the wonderful purple calyx of P. delavayi. The selection was named ‘Starbright’ and received a U.S. Plant Patent in 2008 and European CVPO in 2013. ‘Starbright’ has been a hit with propagators and


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New selection of Juniperus communis

growers in Europe, and through the help of Plants for Europe is now being propagated across Europe for mass release in 2014. It helps that the U.K. magazine WHICH? gave ‘Starbright’ a five-star rating in 2013! There are two coniferous selections which have caught the attention of other plant propagators, namely a Picea and a Larix. The Picea glauca ‘The Limey’, is a white spruce that arose as a spontaneous seedling. The new foliage is brilliant yellow, becoming more chartreuse as the season progresses. In winter, the plant returns to its vibrant golden hue. This selection is now being propagated and sold through Iseli Nursery in Oregon. The eastern larch, Larix laricina, is a prostrate selection with blue-tinted foliage. It may be grown on its own roots as a creeping plant or top-grafted as a weeping standard. It is being trialed at Mosterman Plants in Chilliwack, B.C.

Iris sibtosa Bristol’s Hope

effect is quite stunning, and both are real show stoppers in the garden. Among the herbaceous plants from our breeding program, has been a number of intersection iris crosses between Iris versicolor, I. hookeri, I. siberica and I. ensata. Three have been recently registered with the American Iris Society under the names of ‘Bristol’s Hope’, ‘Plum Point’ and ‘Belle Royale’. These selections have the look of I. siberica with the branching flowering habit of I. versicolor. As an added bonus, the spring foliage is brilliant yellow! Our native Newfoundland beach-head iris, Iris hookeri (aka Iris setosa var. canadensis) is already a popular perennial offered across Canada as Arctic iris.It is a dwarf plant,under 30 cm,with porcelain-blue flowers. Through additional select breeding, we now have a lavender-pink selection. Crosses of this selection to white Iris setosa has resulted in semi-dwarf plants with pale lavender to blue-violet flowers. However, these hybrids produce up to 18 sequential flowers, resulting in a blooming season of three weeks, a rare phenomenon for irises! Most gardeners are familiar with marsh marigold, Caltha palustris. In most of the plant’s native range, the flowers have five yellow petals. However, in the Himalayas a white-flowered selection can be found in the wild. In the Plant Atlantic program we have bred and selected a Himalayan form that has flowers which are 50 per cent larger than the norm, with up to nine petals per flower and with the added bonus of buds that are pink before they open.

Proudfoot legacy Two plants from our program came to us from an avid Friend of the Garden member, Ken Proudfoot. Ken, who is now deceased, was a potato breeder at Agriculture Canada’s Atlantic Cool Crop Research Centre in St. John’s. Besides breeding potatoes, Ken also dabbled in breeding other plants. Ken developed a Potentilla fruticosa hybrid he called ‘Helene’, after his late wife. This potentilla has light lemon-yellow flowers and interesting golden-stems. This selection is currently only being An Atlantic orchid Recently, there has been a surge in the culsold locally through Newfoundland nurseries. Ken also introduced to tivation of hardy terrestrial orchids, yes orchids, Caltha palustris us a beautiful selection of Juniperus communis in the garden! These exotic plants can fetch high prices as the supply cannot meet current demands. Plant Atthat has bright green spring growth, copperlantic is fortunate to have a hardy orchid in our repertoire purple winter foliage and a high proportion of twisted needles that expose their blue-white undersides. The overall of new plants. Our plant is called Dactylorhiza ‘Inkspots’. 28 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES


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Sorbus

This orchid produces a dense spike of magenta-pink flowers with darker markings. However, just as spectacular are the heavily spotted leaves which are a show-stopper. Unfortunately, this orchid needs evenly moist soil and will go dormant by late summer. Despite this drawback, gardeners who understand the habits of orchids will want this easy and relatively hardy plant for their collections. This orchid is currently being mass-produced at Murray’s Horticultural, Landscape and Garden Centre in Portugal Cove, Nfld. The most recent plant that has garnered great interest from landscape designers, growers and landscapers, is a semidwarf silver-leaved willow selected from our native Salix candida. This selection is a male, producing five-cm catkins in spring just as the leaves begin to unfurl. The stamens are red, opening to yellow, contrasting with the otherwise silver-white catkins. The summer leaves are silver-white above and felted-white below, a great contrasting plant in any landscape. Plants can ultimately reach two m, but through careful pruning, can be maintained at one m, and makes an admirable informal hedge or stand-alone specimen. This willow is currently being trialed at Mosterman Plants as well as Jeffries Nurseries, Portage la Prairie, Man. So what else do we have in the pipeline? How about a Ligu-

30 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Salix candida

laria ‘The Rocket’ look-alike that is only 60 cm? Such a plant has arisen in a flat of mixed Ligularia hybrids we have grown. This past summer was its first-time blooming and this plant has us, and many others, quite excited. If it continues to stay this small, we could have a real winner. And then there is our semi-dwarf mountain ash (Sorbus) whose unripe fruits are dark burgundy, ripening to pale pink! This is quite a departure from our standard orange-fruited mountain ash. Another semi-dwarf mountain ash look-alike is our X Sorbaronia (Sorbus X Aronia), whose pale pink flowers develop into large, wine-red berries. This is just a sampling of the key plants in the Plant Atlantic program. Many others are in the process of crossbreeding, trialing and selecting. MUNBG is in the process of securing additional funding to help support ongoing work in this regard. Qualified plant propagators interested in trialing Plant Atlantic selections can reach me LT at jtboland@mun.ca.

Todd Boland is research horticulturist at the Memorial University of Newfoundland Botanical Garden.


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Reader survey 2014:

Market research is GOLD By Lee Ann Knudsen

five grand as I remember — only within our reach because of a special research grant from Heritage Canada. Move ahead ten years, and the only practical survey method is known by a brand name, Survey Monkey. Our 2013 survey emailed to Landscape Trades readers and garnered a response rate of four percent. Times certainly change; a four per cent response rate is highly respected these days. Quantified value Even though survey methods have changed, results show Landscape Trades readers appreciating and caring about their magazine in both 2003 and today. In 2003, 53.7 per cent of respondents kept and filed their issues, in 2013 over 59 per cent file and keep them. Nearly two thirds pick up issues to read two or more times, and well over half

A TOUCH OF GREEN

Just like the landscape industry, the communication industry is facing pressure and uncertainty from all sides. Often, the buzz and chatter masks the real goal of publishing: reader service. Landscape Trades strives to never lose sight of its mission — to help Canada’s green industry prosper — and toward that end we ask for reader input once a year. Surveys are the most efficient way to get that input. It is interesting to consider changes in survey methods over recent years. Back in 2003 we commissioned a third-party reader survey, that was actually delivered by mail. We randomly selected 400 readers, and sent three mailings: an introduction, a questionnaire and a follow-up to non-respondents. In 2003, 150 of those readers mailed their answers back, for a very respectable 37.6 per cent response rate. The data certainly came at a cost, about

spend more than 20 minutes with each issue. Over 92 per cent think the editorial content of Landscape Trades is credible. We asked readers how they receive industry information. Choices included networking, association membership, direct sales contact, e-letters, social media, trade magazines, search engines, trade shows and conferences, blogs, and webinars. Trade magazines came in as the resounding top choice, at 87 per cent. The second most popular medium for receiving industry information, at 74 per cent, was trade shows. Who are you? The survey also helped paint a more detailed picture of our readers; for example, 73 per cent are age 46 or older. The 56-65 age group comes in at 33 per cent, and we send a special salute to the five per cent of our readers

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aged over 66. Only four per cent have been in business less than five years, while over 59 per cent have been in business over 20. Businesses tend to be small; 78 per cent have 25 employees or fewer, and 39 per cent employ one to five. Nearly 53 per cent consider their companies to be family businesses. We asked only one marketing question, about the supposedly free media on everybody’s mind: social. Just under half of readers allocate resources to promoting their companies through social media. Of those, 23 per cent feel they get a return on their investments, 32 per cent have not seen a return, and 46 per cent are not sure. When we asked the same question in 2012, 17 per cent felt they were getting R.O.I. from social. One reader commented on social media candidly, “I am not interested in communicating with customers more than I do now.” A good year ahead Survey responses indicated a significant good news story: A full 62 per cent of re-

spondents expect stronger business performance in 2014. Another 36 per cent expect 2014 to bring no growth. Only three respondents, 1.76 per cent, expect weaker outlooks for the new year. On another positive note, nearly 57 per cent of readers intend to spend money on capital improvements in 2014. We asked about factors limiting potential growth. According to respondents, the most significant barriers are availability of skilled labour, lower-priced competition, management skills/time constraints and that old favourite, weather. Implementing change Your guidance in the 2012 survey gave the Landscape Trades editorial team some insights, which resulted in action. Responding to survey input plus other data, the Landscape Trades editorial calendar will shift in 2014; publication of the annual Source Book product directory issue will move to May, and the Snow and Ice Management focus issue will now be published in September,

closer to gear-up time for that sector. And our Retail and Garden Expo preview issue moves to October. In the comment fields, readers strongly appreciated the legal guidance shared by our columnist Rob Kennaley. Columnists Rod McDonald, Sean James and Mark Bradley also have a strong fan following. Business management was a consistent theme in the comments; to the reader suggesting a story on P&L analysis, we already had the story on page 20 of this issue in the works. Hopefully it will help the respondent asking for stories on, “Running a business issues, things that you only learn painfully ... As a company only five years in, I am just getting killed on things other companies already know.” Sincere thanks go to the Landscape Trades readers that took their scarce time to respond. Those efforts will truly guide editorial decisions toward a more useful magazine, and they reinforce my conviction that the horticulture industry is a generous industry. LT

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CERTIFIED LANDSCAPE DESIGNER:

DESIGN CREDENTIAL

boosts confidence and builds business It’s been a 20-year journey, but the Certified Landscape Designer (CLD) designation is gradually gaining momentum. The process to become certified has recently been updated, but the requirements have stayed the same. To become a Certified Landscape Designer, the candidate must have a minimum of seven years of combined education and practice, write an exam and submit three projects for a portfolio review. Haig Seferian CLD, OALA, of the Seferian Design Group in Burlington, Ont., is credited with being the driving force in developing this unique certification vehicle. Seferian recognized there was a cohort of qualified landscape designers graduating from college, and proposed creating the CLD designation to give recognition and a vehicle for networking and communication. Don Chase CLD of Hamilton, Ont., explains that this designation has its roots in Landscape Ontario’s Landscape Design Sector Group committee, but was taken under the CNLA umbrella in 2005 and made available to designers across Canada. Two years ago, the National Landscape Design committee undertook a three-step strategy to update the CLD process. Chase is quick to note that the requirements have remained unchanged; the committee worked to make the certification navigation process easier. “The lack of a design manual was always seen as a stumbling block,” he says. “Candidates were offered a reading list of references, but that didn’t work.” So, the committee created a comprehensive design manual with an accompanying CD, to help candidates prepare for the exam and portfolio review. Step two was to revise the exam, which was completed by the committee this summer, and step three was to tighten up the portfolio review process. “The original portfolio review was too broad, so we made it more specific, and made it easier for the judges to comment on each portfolio, so candidates understand where they need to focus more effort. In addition, the checklist candidates follow to prepare for the portfolio review has been rewritten to give clear expectations for the review.” Requirements specify three projects must be submitted for portfolio reviews. Chase advises CLD candidates to submit one project first, before attempting to put together the other two. “One of the benefits of becoming a CLD is the informal mentoring process that occurs through the process. CLD candidates get matched up with an already Certified Landscape Designer in their area, who is available to help answer questions.” Veteran designers deem it a privilege to share their experience with their younger colleagues.

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BY SARAH WILLIS

Jen Cuddie, of Oriole Landscaping in Toronto, is working on her CLD designation, and her portfolio review was the first one completed under the new marking matrix. “I didn’t come to the process from the traditional direction of post-secondary education,” she says, explaining she initially worked in construction and took landscape design courses at night school. “Going to school and working in the industry was so valuable. I was able to experience in real life the examples we went over in class.” Cuddie says the new portfolio review checklist was invaluable in preparing her three projects for review by the judges. She recommends certification for the boost in confidence that the credentials provide. “Confidence is such an important element in being able to sell projects. You need to get someone to trust your work, and if you can’t sell the work, you can’t build the project.” Audrie VanderWerf CLD, of GardenWorks Landscape Design, Greater Vancouver, B.C., says “I often get asked by potential clients if I am certified. This is more and more important to people as they continue to be educated about hiring tradespeople. The first time that I was able to say “Yes” made the process worth it. “In order to retain my certification, I must prove annually that I am keeping abreast of landscaping news, views and how-tos by way of teaching or learning at seminars and courses. So I love this ‘benefit’ of educating myself and having that experience contribute to my recertification. As a CLD I also often participate in certification decisions and meetings.” Ron Koudys CLD, OALA, of Ron Koudys Landscape Architects, London, Ont., says the CLD designation offers benefits on many different levels, first echoing Cuddie’s note about confidence. “Being a Certified Landscape Designer means the industry has reviewed your work and you’ve met a standard. This accreditation sets you apart from hobbyists or poorly qualified persons, and builds credibility in the client’s mind. It’s early days, but we are starting to see clients asking for CLD credentials.” VanderWerf advises that designers take the test and do the portfolio for at least their own self analysis. “The trophy is the CLD designation! You will attain esteem, confidence and a greater client base. You will help with public awareness of the industry. And you will have a great portfolio to show prospective clients. It’s a natural next step in your career.” Landscape designers interested in pursuing certification can find more information at www.canadanursery.com, or contact Laura LT Brinton at laura@cnla-acpp.ca.  


Landscape Congress Booth #116

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DESIGN

Inspiration Irish garden designer shakes up ‘stuffy’ world of gardening

People have said his gardens are not ‘normal,’ but Diarmuid Gavin of Diarmuid Gavin Designs of Wicklow, Ire., is on a mission to bring contemporary garden design to the masses. Gavin has said he wants to show how you can have fun with design, and that it’s OK for gardens to be a bit different. Gavin admits it took him a few years to figure out what his life work was going to be, but once he decided to go into gardening, he knew it was right for him. He could see that he wanted to change things up and make gardening relevant to himself. He has put his unique touch on gardens around the world, is a popular television presenter in the U.K. and author of 11 books. Gavin is making two keynote presentations at Landscape Ontario’s Congress 2014, and provided Landscape Trades with a teasing glimpse at some of the contemporary and playful garden designs he will discuss.

THE WESTLAND TOWER GARDEN

THE IRISH SKY GARDEN

At the Chelsea Garden Show in 2012, seven gardens, all of individual style, were created in a multi-storey arrangement. The objective: to explore whether we can garden on top of each other in an increasingly urbanised society. An elevator brought visitors up, and a tubular slide hastened them down at the speed of sound! This garden was awarded a special honour at Chelsea – the Most Creative Show Garden prize, which is awarded only at the judge’s discretion, and was the first time in five years a garden has received this award.

Taking inspiration from the Emerald Isle, this Chelsea Flower Show exhibit had more than 40 shades of green, using clipped mounds of yew and box, along with steams of dwarf pine and an assortment of ornamental grasses to bring a touch of Ireland to London.

36 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES


ON GOLDEN POND A ‘his and hers’ glass and wood studio dominates this small plot, planned for a retired couple who loved to write and paint. Clouds of Pittosporum tobrira, clumps of ferns and beautiful blue iris flowers frame a dark watery pool.

A COASTAL RETREAT The tide is high....and the ripples of an undulating lawn reflect the rhythm of the waves. Two acrylic bubble seats hang from an open pavilion, allowing garden users to sit and gaze at tidal waters, while sunken stone rustic rooms create a haven from sometimes brisk winds.

CITY PENTHOUSE TERRACE TIME TUNNEL  A contemporary covered walkway crosses a shady damp garden, framed by clumps of Tasmanian tree ferns.

A million-pound flat, designed for a Manchester United team mate of David Beckham, contains wooden canopies  to stave off the north of England rain, while framing views of the city beyond. Standard olive trees are planted in sculptural pots and LED spotlights help to set the evening mood.

GET INSPIRATION FROM DIARMUID GAVIN AT CONGRESS 2014 Mon. Jan. 6., 2:15 -4:00 p.m. Rebel without a garden: A personal journey through garden design A pre-trade show event at the Landscape Designer Conference, International Plaza Hotel, Toronto Wed., Jan. 8, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. The evolution of garden style: A romp through history and a peek at the future of our gardens Purchase tickets for both at www.locongress.com

JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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Design, build and  maintain...your brand BY JASON BOUWMAN

Landscapers tend to be a bit squeamish when it comes to marketing and brand development. For some, the default strategy is simply head down, work harder. Others use the wait-and-see approach. Still others dabble with various marketing schemes hoping to find  a silver bullet for all their business development challenges. These approaches are partially responsible for low profit margins, flat-lining and high staff turnover rates – all of which can be resolved through solid brand building. It’s easy enough to put it all on familiar ground if you simply approach your brand the same way you approach your clients’ backyards: Design. Build. Maintain. Design a competitive brand, build demand for your brand and maintain the course for real growth. DESIGN Every landscaping project begins with a vision — a clear picture of the desired final product. When it comes to developing a brand, having a defined image of the company you want to be, and the results you hope to achieve, is essential. Don’t have the vision clearly mapped so much as roughed out? Start by thinking in broad strokes. Write down several definitive statements about who you want to be, what you will do, who you will do it for, and why it will be compelling. Just like the initial sketch of your client’s yard, the main components of

your vision will begin to materialize. Now refine. Articulate how that’s unique and how it benefits. This will be key in driving demand for your services and establishing trust among prospects. Without adequate demand, it’s hard to position yourself for profit. Without differentiation from your competitors, it quickly becomes a race for the bottom. Most landscapers know not to put a shovel in the ground without having a solid plan and detailed blueprints. Regardless of project size, the landscaper first specifies components, estimates time and materials, and schedules work. In marketing, this is called a marketing plan. It outlines the strategy, lists the goals and objectives, identifies the audience(s), spells out the key message(s) and specifies the channels and the frequency of communication. BUILD Building something of quality takes craftsmanship. Whether taking meticulous care at every step, knowing what’s right for a particular client, or finishing the job as promised, both the landscaper and marketing professional need to be committed to excellence; to serving the client in the best way possible. And there’s no quality product without quality materials. Whether it’s a natural stone patio or your brand awareness. If

HEAR JASON BOUWMAN AT CONGRESS 2014 Jason Bouwman’s Congress Conference presentation, From Purpose to Profit, will cover marketing mistakes he’s seen owners of landscaping firms make, and outline a powerful approach to marketing success. His session takes place at 10:45 a.m., Wed., Jan. 8 at Congress 2014. Go to www.locongress.com for details or to register.

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you’re looking to improve your brand’s exposure or generate better leads, you won’t get far with one-off, disjointed marketing efforts based on where the latest buzz seems to be. I’ve attended many presentations on marketing. There’s usually a lot of talk about tactics like social media and digital marketing, and presenters are quick to encourage landscapers to get tweeting, pinning, liking, following and writing. But I suggest the challenges in the landscape industry are not a result of a lack of tactics or channels, but rather a lack of creativity, innovation and personality. Encouraging more chatter without refining our thinking is going to flood media channels with more useless info (which is already happening) and drive up skepticism, NOT demand. Before worrying about getting heard on the latest social media outlet, concern yourself with things like positioning, differentiation, unique value propositions, strategic planning, product innovation, marketing plans, identity, message, story and content. Developed well, these are the quality ingredients of powerful brands. Approach your marketing like any other building project and you’ll see how much more effective marketing can really be.   MAINTAIN

Maintain your efforts and your developing brand through observation, measurement and analysis. Regularly prune out the dead stuff and be sure to keep things neat and trim. You may need to move the odd thing around every now and then to get it working just right. And don’t forget to enjoy watching it grow. LT

Jason Bouwman is principal and creative director of Compass Creative in Stoney Creek, Ont., a marketing agency that specializes in serving contractors in the landscaping and home renovation industry.


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See us at Congress Booth #760


Key to effective training: Train with a purpose!

BY BILL ARMAN

I had just conducted a year-long training series for all of our field people and something just wasn’t right. When I was hired by a new company, I reviewed our jobs, and found they were in poor condition, crews were working unsafely and customers were furious about unkept promises and inconsistent delivery. Adding insult to all of this, we weren’t making any money! So, I launched a full-scale assault with a hands-on weekly training program. All field employees had to attend a paid twohour training session every Saturday for 52 weeks in a row. That should do it, right? WRONG!! So what went wrong? I hadn’t trained with a PURPOSE. I had just trained our entire field operations without any linkage or accountability to what was important to our organization. DANG! This took a while to sink in, and one night while I was laying awake worrying about all of the things a leader worries about, the training epiphany hit me. Training must have direct linkage to the company’s desired results, which must be measureable. Training has to have a purpose. I finally figured out that there were four key goals that all truly successful organizations must be able to achieve to truly enjoy sustainable success. Training plays a foundational role in achieving to what I call The Big Four of organizational success. The Big Four are so critical, they must be consistently applied and executed for a company to achieve sustainable success.

So now I understand: with no training, there is no way to arrive at The Big Four! They are: 1. Find, attract, get on board, keep and grow the right people 2. Deliver your services consistently 3. Find, attract get on board, keep and grow the right customers 4. Make money, as in profit

delivers your services efficiently, effectively and safely. This will then play a major role in attracting the right customers! Sales and marketing Having great training programs in place should be part of your sales and marketing program. You need to answer the question asked by your existing and potential customers, “How will your training program make my job easier?”

Or in simple terms, People + Performance + People = Profit

ROI through training Training increases the capabilities of both you and your team, which in turn increases your organization’s capacity. You can confidently take on that big job and know you will perform and deliver a good Return On Invested Training — as in, make money! See how training weaves its way through The Big Four? Delivering consistently on your service promise is by far and away more profitable than the alternative, believe me. Now, take a good look at training within your organization and ask yourself: l What role does training play in recruiting, on-boarding and retention of employees, with safety, culture, work quality and making a profit at your company? l How do you measure the successes achieved by your training program? l Which people at your company currently receive training? Who are you missing? l Are you, the leader, getting the training you need? l How should you go about building a more effective training program?

To convince you to invest in purposeful staff training, here are just a few examples of the positive effects that training has had on “Best in Class” companies: Culture When people feel safe and know there is an emphasis on training, development and continual learning, it creates a culture that people want to be part of, and want to stick around and be productive, positive, safe and happy! Recruiting When recruiting the right people to your organization, the mere fact that you have an active and vibrant training program makes you more attractive than your competitors. Retention People learn, develop, grow and in turn become more valuable to your organization when they are well trained. When the right people enjoy success and they can link their success to the training that is available at their organization, they stay around. Consistent quality A well-trained workforce

HEAR BILL ARMAN ON TRAINING AT CONGRESS Harvester Bill will be delivering two talks at Congress 2014, held at the Toronto Congress Centre. How to Build On-Purpose Training Programs Wed., Jan. 8, 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Quality Counts! How to Build a Quality Control Program Thurs., Jan. 9: 10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Find more information, or to register, visit www.locongress.com. 40 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Remember that people are being “trained” everyday at your organization whether you have a formal training program or not. Make certain that the training they are receiving is the right training and serves a purpose. LT Head Harvester Bill Arman is co-founder of The Harvest Group, an international landscape consulting /coaching training firm. To learn more on how to build your organization into a Best in Class organization, visit the Harvesters at harvestlandscapeconsulting.com.


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A sample skills test Short test for applicants helps weed out unskilled labour

Irrigation 1. Above-ground pressure lines may be PVC or galvanized. (true false) 2. Modern drip emitters don’t require filtration. (true false) 3. Most digital controllers have a battery backup. (true false) 4. The distance of throw of a Toro 570 is (a) 10–15 feet, (b) 30–40 feet, (c) 18 inches. 5. The flow rate of a drip emitter might be (a) 600 gpm, (b) 1 gph, (c) 21.2 PVC. Plants and planting 6. Horticultural vinegar is effective on weeds on parios and driveways. (true false) 7. Malathion is a popular flowering shrub. (true false) 8. Ground covers should be watered (a) one week after planting, (b) after they have died back to the ground, (c) immediately after planting. Hardscape 9. Nails used in outdoor construction must be galvanized. (true false) 10. A joist is the same thing as a pier block. (true false) 11. Dry-laid brick is usually installed on a sand base. (true false) 12. Which of these is a brick pattern? (a) double runner, (b) basket-weave, (c) salt-finish 13. A swale is (a) a rock-moving tool, (b) a type of cinder block, (c) a shallow gully for draining water. 44 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

Equipment use and care 14. A trenching machine may be operated for up to one hour without any attention. (true false) 15. Chainsaws run best on straight gasoline. (true false) 16. Rototilling compacted soil should be done at slow speed. (true false) 17. A mattock is similar to (a) a pick, (b) a push broom, (c) a tree stake. 18. Oil levels in gasoline-powered equipment should be checked (a) monthly, (b) hourly, (c) before each use. Safety 19. Power equipment should be adjusted while it is operating. (true false) 20. Valve solenoids may be tested by applying 110 volts to the coil. (true false) 21. Lifting and carrying railroad ties requires two people. (true false) 22. Injuries should be reported (a) at the end of the week, (b) immediately, (c) only if a doctor’s care is required. 23. Heavy lifting should be done by (a) bending at the knees, (b) bending at the back, (c) both.

Job management and cost control 24. On a crew of three or more, one person is for standby. (true false) 25. A crew leader is responsible for directing the work of subordinates. (true false) 26. Actual hours spent on the job are not important to job cost. (true false) 27. A change order is (a) a refund slip for overpayments, (b) used to add or delete work, (c) just like a purchase order. In addition to the above questions, I strongly suggest a few short essay questions. Checking for basic writing skills and the ability to describe a procedure are an important part of the test. Sample essay questions the flushing procedure on a new sprinkler system. l List the steps in planting a two-gallon plant. l List some of the major responsibilities of a foreman or crew leader. l Describe

HEAR MORE OF OWEN DELL’S WISDOM AT CONGRESS Sustainable Landscaping: The Future is Now! Tues., Jan. 7 at 12-noon Owen joins this panel discussion on how being conscious of the environment can be good for business. Right Plant, Right Place Wed., Jan. 8 at 10:45 a.m. Join Owen for a discussion on the impact of poor plant choices, and learn how to choose the right plant for every condition. Tickets to both events can be purchased at www.locongress.com. ANSWER KEY: 1. (False), 2. (False), 3. (True), 4. (A), 5. (B), 6. (True), 7. (False), 8. (C), 9. (True), 10. (False), 11. (True), 12. (B), 13. (C), 14. (False), 15. (False), 16. (True), 17. (A), 18. (B), 19. (False), 20. (False), 21. (True), 22. (B), 23. (A), 24. (False), 25. (True), 26. (False), 27. (B)

Hiring new staff is a time-consuming activity — and can be costly if you don’t get it right the first time. Over the years, I’ve learned to give my top applicants a short test to gauge the basic skills I’m hiring for. Here is a simple multiple-choice and true/false skills test that you can edit and adapt as you wish.

BY OWEN DELL


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Check out these programs that reduce the cost of ownership for durable, economical Isuzu trucks: ü Free Oil Changes* – every 16,000 kilometers for 2 years you are eligible to receive a free oil change from an authorized Isuzu Dealer! ü Free Health Reports** – for 2 years, every 16,000 kilometers, you’ll receive this report that provides you with vital operational information that helps keep your truck on the road… not in the shop! ü Free Extended Warranty PLUS Program – in addition to the engine and transmission powertrain warranty, Extended Warranty Plus covers mechanical breakdown of fuel injectors, turbocharger, alternator, starter, water pump, rear drive axle, front I-beam axle and cross-members (N-Series diesel models), for 5 years or 280,000 km. Isuzu’s proven long-term reliability and class-leading fuel economy deliver best-in-class maneuverability for a true Isuzu advantage. And with these fantastic programs, you can control maintenance and repair costs, lowering your overall cost of ownership and making Isuzu trucks an even better value. Visit your local Isuzu dealer to learn more about lowering the costs of commercial truck ownership. Vehicles shown with optional equipment; some equipment is dealer installed. These vehicles are assembled from component parts manufactured by Isuzu Motors Limited and by independent suppliers who manufacture such components to Isuzu’s exacting standards for quality, performance and safety. N-Series is a trademark of Isuzu Motors Limited. * On new 2011–2014 N-Series diesel trucks delivered between January 1st and December 31, 2013; available to all retail and fleet buyers. **The Health Report highlights the vehicle’s general health and operation, engine condition, fuel consumption, brake wear and driving habits. It also can help owners and drivers maximize their fuel economy and minimize their cost of operation.

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legalmatters

Termination rights under construction contracts BY ROBERT KENNALEY

Sometimes, in construction, contractors and subcontractors will be faced with an owner or contractor who wants to terminate, or cancel, the contract or subcontract. In other circumstances, a contractor or subcontractor may not want to continue working for various reasons, including nonpayment. In this article, we will explore these issues. For ease of writing, we will focus on the owner/contractor relationship. The principles we discuss, however, will be equally applicable to the relationships between contractors and subcontractors, and to subcontractors and sub-subcontractors, further down in the pyramid. The first question we will address is, “Can a party simply terminate or cancel the contract because he is not happy?” We see, for example, many cases, particularly in the residential construction context, where the owner believes he or she can cancel the contract because of “lost confidence” in the contractor. Generally speaking, and without a contractual term to the contrary, however, a party has no right to terminate a contract for this reason. Breach not enough to quit By analogy, for example, no one would think the purchaser of a brand-new vehicle would be allowed to return to the dealership three months after the purchase and announce that, because he had “lost confidence” in the vehicle, he would be cancelling the contract and making no further payments. The same holds true in construction: unless the contract provides otherwise, the owner will have to have sufficient grounds to terminate the contract. Further, what is and isn’t, “sufficient grounds” will vary in the circumstances. In this regard, not every breach of contract will generally entitle the other side to terminate. The car purchaser, for example, is 46 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

required to call on the warranty given with the car and will not be entitled to treat the car purchase agreement as at an end except in very limited and extreme circumstances. Similarly, where a contractor defaults in construction, an owner will generally be required to call on the contractor’s warranty and/or backcharge the contractor unless the breach of contract is so serious that it would entitle the owner to terminate. When deciding whether or not an aggrieved party can treat the contract as at an end, the Court will look at the intention of the parties (as expressed in the contract between them, and by implication if necessary) to determine whether or not they intended the offended party to remain bound by the contract in the event of the breach in question. The terms and conditions of the contract, then, are very significant in determining whether or not, when, and how a party might be able to terminate a contract. In this regard, it is important to realize that the expressed and implied terms and conditions of the contract will generally prevail. The only exception is where it can be argued that the enforcement of the contract terms would be unconscionable either due to the inequality of bargaining power between the parties or for public policy reasons. The contract can set out conditions upon which a party might be able to terminate on notice. The contract can also set out the instances of default which would, upon specified terms and conditions, allow one party or the other to terminate the agreement. Commonly, in this situation the contract will also include provisions requiring the aggrieved party to give notice of the default, along with a window of opportunity for the other party to correct the breach, failing which, the right to terminate will arise. The moral of the story is that a party will

only be entitled to terminate if that party can point to an enforceable contractual term between the parties that would allow for the termination – based on either expressed or implied terms of contract. Non-payment justifies termination It is worth noting that, unless the contract expressly provides otherwise, the contractor will generally have the right to either terminate or withdraw services for non-payment. Said another way, the courts will generally read into the construction contract, a term which provides that if the owner is substantially in default of his or her payment obligations, the contractor will not be required to continue. The non-payment, of course, would have to be material, for the implied right to arise. (In other words, it is unlikely a court would allow the contractor to terminate or drop tools if only $1 is owing, or where the payment is only a day late.) What degree of non-payment would be necessary to justify termination would vary in LT the circumstances.

Robert Kennaley has a background in construction and now practices construction law in Toronto and Simcoe, Ont. He speaks and writes regularly on construction law issues and can be reached for comment at 416-368-2522 (Toronto), 519-426-2577 (Simcoe) or at kennaley@mclauchlin.ca. This material is for information purposes and is not intended to provide legal advice in relation to any particular fact situation. Readers who have concerns about any particular circumstance are encouraged to seek independent legal advice in that regard.


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See us at Landscape Ontario’s Congress, booth #417


sustainablelandscaping

Little things make a big difference

BY SEAN JAMES

There are many actions

we can take as business owners to help the environment. We ponder how to cut fuel and water use and how to use plant species that are better for the environment, and how to design earth-friendly landscapes. But, have you ever thought about your purchasing habits? The supplies we use for our offices, the tools we buy and use, and especially the products we install in landscapes can have an enormous effect. Little items like buying toilet paper made from recycled paper, and fair trade, organic coffee are options often overlooked. Every little bit helps. Think about signing up with Bullfrog Power — a clean power generation company. See if you can find biodiesel. Each of these things costs only a little more but it’s worth it (and the coffee’s delicious!). Look into e-billing to save paper and transportation costs. The longevity of what we buy is important as well. Buy tools that last! Think about how long an item is going to last. Quality pays for itself over time. As far as sales go, selling a longer-lasting product may cost a bit more, but if you educate your customer about the value over the long and even the medium term, most people will understand and be willing to pay. Market what you do for the environment and how you do it. Markets are changing. If you want to engage clients and stand out from the crowd, appeal to their ethics. Landscape stone is an interesting topic for greening. Do you have a local quarry producing beautiful, quality stone? It may not be perfect but they’re eco-friendly, compared to some of the competition. Also, there’s a smaller carbon footprint when it comes from close to the jobsite. Companies such as Atlas Stone are now

48 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

using unusual recycled materials such as glass to reduce the amount of limestone used in manufacturing its products. Look to who’s leading the curve, and stay up on the latest materials and techniques. Think about revolutionary materials as well: have you heard of the Envirolok system? Bags which can be filled with material excavated onsite and stacked into a retaining wall. They can also be used to stabilize a stream bank or protect a river bed. Being constructed of landscape fabric means they can be vegetated, either planted with plugs or seeded. The process means less At the Fern Ridge office, downspouts run into this pond and bog to clean the water. If fuel is used moving ma- it overflows during a large rain event, the water is captured by a nearby berm terials to the jobsite and and infiltrates. Don’t feel guilty — it doesn’t help. Most no materials quarried from natural areas. Are you using permeable paving around of us can’t do everything and we certainly your own office? Are you implementing can’t do it all at once. Just consider baby rain gardening techniques at your yard? steps. Get creative. Lead by example and What about your home? Have you looked show folks what can be done. You’ll feel LT into installing a pollinator garden or edible better doing it. planting? Our design staff often takes a stroll through the gardens for inspiration, grazing Sean James is owner of on veggies and fruits as they go, and return an Ontario-based environrejuvenated and re-inspired. It’s worth it in mentally-conscious landscape many ways and can inspire potential cusdesign/build/maintenance tomers as well. company. In addition, he is Do you have any other ideas? Pass them on an eco-consultant and a and I may include them in a future column. popular speaker.


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roadtosuccess

Overcoming fear

BY ROD McDONALD

Fear, concern, worry, consternation — regardless of the word we use, each affects our emotions and sense of well being. If we take the time to look at the emotion of fear on a rational basis, it can have its advantages. Fear keeps us driving on the right side of the road, as the consequences of the opposite behaviour are quite severe. As with all emotions, fear is a double-edged sword. This column is about overcoming fear and finding your way through the elaborate maze towards success. I am not immune to fear. I have gone through all sorts of emotions while building my business and rest assured, fear was a part of my life, especially in the early days. I had worked out of my back yard and then on some rented land for the first eight years of my operation. Wade Hartwell from Golden Acres in Calgary had warned me of the pitfalls of renting land, and I had hoped against hope, that the horror stories he told me would never become a part of my personal, historical narrative. My hope held out for a few years until the landlord sold the property that my garden centre occupied, and tried to evict me with two weeks’ notice. To turn this into a bona fide horror story, this eviction notice was supposed to occur in the month of May! Looking back on risk I survived that experience, barely, and I was determined never to allow it to happen again. I found two acres of scrub land on the edge of the city and bought it. Over the next winter, I worked diligently to open my garden centre in its new location. All I had to do was grade the land, pave the parking area, put in culverts for drainage, erect a fence and gates, build a few greenhouses, install the pathways and get enough stock to accommodate my customers’ needs. Did I mention that this project used up all of my money? I even assigned my house to the credit union in order to get a loan. I was maxed out. 50 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

It was April and things were coming together. One night, I closed my eyes and fell into a deep sleep. Around four a.m., I woke up screaming. I had had a really bad dream. What if I built this brand new garden centre and no one came? I had no reserves left. I was tapped out and by the middle of May, the bills would be coming due. I was sweating profusely, unable to return to sleep. That was fear, at its worst. Thirty years later, I can still recall how it shook me to my core. What if I built a garden centre and no one came? The first Saturday in May, I planned a grand opening. A big ad in the local paper (purchased on credit), radio spots, free coffee and donuts, balloons for the kids. We put on a brave face and there were lots of staff ready to serve the hoped for swarm. The gates opened at nine a.m. No one was there to crash the gate. By noon, only a handful of browsers had popped in and sales were perhaps a couple of hundred dollars. After lunch, I grabbed four of the staff and we headed out to a nearby planting job that I had booked earlier in April. I thought we might as well keep busy landscaping, if not waiting on customers. We were gone around an hour and then the mobile radio went off. The instructions were hurried, “Bring back every one, right now! We are swamped.” Back we went and glory of all glories, the parking lot was full and there were customers all over the place, buying everything we had on display. Don’t you love a happy ending? I never looked back after that day, as we always had a loyal contingent of people wanting to shop in my place. I never woke up filled with fear, ever again. Control what you can control Here is what I have learned over the years: You can always plan the event, but never the outcome. The outcome will vary, but you can skew things in your favour by paying attention to details. Customers who shop at independent garden centres appreciate

that attention to detail. They also appreciate good service, clean surroundings, quality signage and inspiring displays. You should never max out your credit, leaving nothing in reserve. I did it, once, but never a second time. The consequences are too severe if you have nothing left to bail yourself out of a rainy spring or any slow start. Always do the math first, before finalizing any decision. If the math doesn’t work, then don’t do it. It is as simple as that. You can never eliminate risk but you can minimize risk by ensuring that if you do succeed, at least there is an upside. To rephrase, for every risk there must be a corresponding reward of greater value. When ordering new products or product lines, I always like to ask the basic question: If this does not move, then how much will it cost me to reverse the situation? If the cost of bailing out is affordable, then I do it. A good example of this was selling concrete statuary. My staff and I took in a trade show in 1986 and I fell in love with some wonderful, good quality statuary. Not the rough stuff made in a back yard, but well finished material. No one was selling this line in Regina. I was ready to pounce. My staff said “No, no one else is selling it, and there has to be a reason.” I went ahead with the order because I did the math. The first order was for only ten birdbaths, three fountains and a few statues. We could afford that minimum order and if none of it sold, it would become a part of our display feature. I just didn’t see a downside and if it did sell, I could see some decent profits. The stock sold, and it sold quickly. Customers who would have never thought of purchasing a fountain or a birdbath were drawn to the excellent quality. The reorders were sent and sent yet again. After a few years, our sales were around $60,000 a year, just in statuary. The upside was quite lovely. Over the years, I learned to live with the fear of potential problems. My friend Jan Pederson, who ran Shelmerdine’s in Winni-


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roadtosuccess peg, told me that due to a rainy, cold spring, his June had been bigger than his May. I had never heard of that occurring before but in this business, the unusual has a way of happening. When it came my turn to have that killer spring, I didn’t fret as much, as it was my 24th year. It was 2002, and as had happened in Winnipeg, the May shoppers showed up in June. With strong summer sales, we actually finished slightly up for the year. Now, I am the first to admit, given a choice, I would much rather have my money up-front rather than have to wait. The point is that the customers came. They had a gardening itch to scratch and we were there to scratch it. Faith kills fear Did you know that faith and fear are mutually incompatible? If you have a lot of fear in your life, faith is often lacking and if you are strong in faith, then fear is usually reduced. I am not talking about religious faith. I am talking about faith that things will work out,

Since 1962

not always as planned, but they do work out. As I developed experience, my faith that things would work out increased. I had a friend who was a bank manager (not mine). He would drive by my garden centre and fret because there would be 2,000 bales of peat moss in my back compound. “Who are you going to sell all that peat moss to?” he would demand to know. “Someone will buy it,” I responded, “and if they don’t buy it right away, it will keep, and they will buy it later in the season.” I took great delight in phoning him in July and saying, “Corky, I just phoned for another truck load of peat moss, as I am running low on inventory.” He worried, I didn’t. You cannot live your life in fear, as that is not living, at least in my books. You have to develop confidence and trust that things will work out. If you cannot find your way to develop that faith, that sense of optimism, then you are probably in the wrong business and need to find employment with a higher level of security. Many years ago, my wife was a student

nurse, working on the veteran’s ward at her training hospital. It was a quiet night and the ‘old boys’ were settled in. She took the time to go from elder to elder, asking, “If you had your life to live over again, what would you do differently?” Good question. Great question! The aging soldiers, to a man, answered the same, using different words of course, “I would worry less, and it always works out in the end.” Overcoming fear is a mandatory part of LT staying on the road to success.

Rod McDonald owned and operated Lakeview Gardens, a successful garden centre/ landscape firm in Regina, Sask., for 28 years. He now works full-time in the world of fine arts, writing, acting and producing in film, television and stage.

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Congress Conference and Special Events January 6 Pre-trade show IPM Symposium Landscape Designer Conference Effective Management Short Course January 7 - 9, 2014 Congress Conference January 7 Canadian Fence Industry AGM Awards of Excellence Ceremony January 8 Landscape Ontario AGM Tailgate Party NEW EVENT: The Feminine Factor in Horticulture January 9 Irrigation Conference

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Welcome to

Congress 2014

What trends will drive your success in the spring season? At Congress 2014, Canada’s Premier Green Industry Trade Show and Conference, you’ll discover how to stay ahead of the curve, find cutting-edge resources, contemporary concepts, and delve into the products, plants and ideas that will drive your spring sales.

CONGRESS is your once-a-year opportunity to tap into the growing demand for more sustainable landscapes that make efficient use of water, native plants, natural stone, xeriscape concepts and storm water management. Close to 600 multinational vendors, spread over eight acres, will provide you with the resources to stay ahead of a constantly changing business environment. New concepts and practical advice from leading industry experts will inspire you to create distinctive landscapes. By connecting with other professionals — all in one place, under one roof, over three days, you might just become a trend setter — the first in your market to satisfy customer demands. Plan to join us January 7 - 9, 2014 in the south building of the Toronto Congress Centre. PARTNER INFORMATION Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association is one of the most vibrant associations of its kind, comprised of over 2,000 members, ten sector groups and nine local chapters. Its trade mission is to promote the horticulture industry in Ontario, and its public mission is to promote the joys and benefits of green spaces.

GREEN Industry conference The Canadian Fence Industry Association is a

non-profit organization representing contractors, retailers, agents, wholesalers and manufacturers y trence of fence products and services. It is dedicated to representing uosnfer d c in high construction standards and levels of ethicalnbusiness ee r behaviour in a competitive market place. g Produced by

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Dates and Times PRE-TRADE SHOW MONDAY, JANUARY 6 l IPM Symposium 7:30 a.m. in the Cohen Ballroom, Toronto Congress Centre l Landscape Designer Conference 8:00 a.m. in the International Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel l Effective Management Short Course 8:30 a.m. in the New York Room, International Plaza Hotel l GPGB’S Living Walls and Green Roofs Train-the-Trainer Workshop 1:00 p.m. York Room, International Plaza Hotel CONFERENCE TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 TO THURSDAY, JANUARY 9 TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE Opening Keynote: 9:30 a.m. Morning Sessions: 10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Life Lesson at Lunch: 12 noon – 1:15 p.m. Owners Only Workshops: 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Afternoon Sessions: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. and 2:45 – 3:45 p.m.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 Awards of Excellence Ceremony 4:45 p.m. Plaza Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel l Canadian Fence Industry Association Annual General Meeting and Gala 4:00 p.m. Crowne Plaza Toronto Airport Hotel l

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8 Landscape Ontario AGM 7:30 a.m. International Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel l Tailgate Party (New location in hotel) 5:00 p.m. – 11:30 p.m. Plaza Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel l NEW EVENT: The Feminine Factor in Horticulture 4:00 – 5:15 p.m. International Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel Ticketed Event l

THURSDAY JANUARY 9 Irrigation Conference 9:00 – 11:45 a.m. Sutherland Room, Toronto Congress Centre Ticketed Event

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CONGRESS TRADE SHOW Tuesday, January 7, 2014 Wednesday, January 8, 2014 Thursday, January 9, 2014

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

SHOW LOCATION Toronto Congress Centre, South Building 650 Dixon Road, Toronto, Ont. M9W 1J1 Canada Located minutes from the Toronto Pearson Airport and 15 minutes from downtown Toronto.


DISCOUNT ELIGIBILITY Members of Canadian Fence Industry Association, Canadian Nursery Landscape Association, Landscape Ontario, Ontario Association of Landscape Architects and the Ontario Parks Association are entitled to member pricing. REFUND POLICY: No refunds will be issued unless Congress 2014 is cancelled by Show Management. NOTE: Early morning registration lines can be long. Leave extra time to register if you are attending an early morning session.

THREE WAYS TO REGISTER ONLINE: LOcongress.com CHEQUE: Please make cheques payable to Landscape Ontario – Congress 2014 and mail to: CONEXSYS Registration, 7050B Bramalea Rd, Unit 34, Mississauga, ON L5S 1S9 or FAX: 905-405-9870 or 800-628-8838 ONLINE REGISTRATION STAYS OPEN UNTIL 2 p.m. ON JANUARY 9, 2014

ACCOMMODATION The official hotels for Congress are listed below and are the only hotels in contractual arrangement with Landscape Ontario. Receive special rates by quoting Landscape Ontario Group Codes as indicated. Special rates are in effect until December 3, 2013. Reservations cancelled after 6 p.m. on the scheduled day of arrival and/or no shows will be billed one night’s room charge plus applicable taxes. IMPORTANT NOTICE: Take care when dealing with travel agencies. From time to time, Congress delegates are subjected to improper solicitation from unaffiliated hotels or third-party housing agencies. You are advised to exercise due diligence with these unauthorized housing bureaus. It is strongly recommended that you make reservations directly with the host hotels.

REGISTRATION INFORMATION Register online at LOcongress.com

INTERNATIONAL PLAZA HOTEL Reservations 416-244-1711 655 Dixon Road, Toronto, ON M9W 1J4 $130 Single or Double, Group Code: GXP

Conference delegates: Register a group for full or one-day Conference passes, and save even more! Every fifth delegate from the same company receives a FREE full or one-day conference pass.

CROWNE PLAZA TORONTO AIRPORT Reservations 416-675-1234 33 Carlson Court, Toronto, ON M9W 6H5 $112 Single or Double, Group Code: LZN

Email conference@landscapeontario.com to obtain the group discount after registration is completed. Your transaction will be refunded. All conference passes include admission to the trade show. Badges will be mailed to those registered by December 6.

RADISSON SUITE HOTEL TORONTO AIRPORT Reservations 416-242-7400 640 Dixon Road, Toronto, ON M9W 1J1 $125 Deluxe Suite/$145 Executive Deluxe Suite, Group Code: CONG for telephone and online reservations

EXHIBITOR CONFERENCE PASSES Each exhibiting company is entitled to ONE FREE full conference pass. Session admission is limited to one person per exhibiting company. Exhibiting company employees may share the badge to attend different sessions. Additional passes may be purchased.

SHUTTLE SERVICE Shuttle service, courtesy of Banas Stones, is provided daily from all host hotels to the Toronto Congress Centre. Shuttle times are posted in the lobby of the hotels.

Congress 2014 Preview 3


CONGRESS 2014 SHOW TEAM SUPPORT COORDINATOR Shawna Barrett ART DIRECTOR Kim Burton EXHIBIT SALES Darryl Bond LANDSCAPE ONTARIO PRESIDENT Phil Charal SHOW COMMITTEE CHAIR Terry Childs SHOW COMMITTEE VICE CHAIR Brian Cocks, CLTT, CLTS, CLTO SPONSORSHIP SALES Paul Day, CDE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF LANDSCAPE ONTARIO Tony DiGiovanni, CHT SHOW COMMITTEE PAST CHAIR Beth Edney, CLD WEB EDITOR Robert Ellidge DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND LABOUR DEVELOPMENT Sally Harvey, CLTI, CLP SHOW COMMITTEE VICE CHAIR Nathan Helder FENCECRAFT SHOW MANAGER Evie Isenberg SHOW COMMITTEE VICE CHAIR Michael LaPorte DIRECTOR OF EVENTS AND TRADE SHOWS Heather MacRae CONFERENCE AND EVENTS MANAGER Kristen McIntyre, CHT TRADE SHOW COORDINATOR Linda Nodello

SPONSORS Landscape Ontario thanks the following sponsors for their generous support of Congress PLATINUM SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS H A R D S C A P E CO M M I T T E E

BRONZE SPONSORS BEAVER VALLEY STONE LTD BOBCAT COMPANY MEDALLION FENCE VERMEER CANADA

FAST FACTS - WHY YOU NEED TO ATTEND l Explore three shows in one — spread over eight acres l Discover 600 multinational vendors l Engage with close to 13,000 industry professionals l Test hundreds of innovative products l Sharpen your skills l Express your opinions at the Landscape Ontario Annual General Meeting l Increase knowledge with advice from industry experts l Celebrate at the Awards of Excellence ceremony NEW PRODUCTS SHOWCASE Find game-changing products to satisfy your customers and keep you on the cutting edge.

OPEN INVITATION TO ALL MEMBERS OF LANDSCAPE ONTARIO

The Ontario Horticultural Trades Foundation of Landscape Ontario is hosting the Legacy Room at the Toronto Congress Centre on Tuesday, January 7, from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Drop in and network with other members of Landscape Ontario, including the pioneers, while enjoying light refreshments. Open invitation to all members of Landscape Ontario. For more information contact Kathleen: kpugliese@landscapeontario.com or 1-800-265-5656 ext.309 www.horttrades.com 4 Congress 2014 Preview

FEATURE GARDENS Visit the gardens, designed and constructed by students from Durham, Fanshawe, Humber, Niagara and St. Clair colleges and the Ridgetown Campus of the University of Guelph to see future trends and new talent.


PRE TRADE SHOW EVENTS MONDAY, JANUARY 6, 2014

Full-Day Workshop, Lunch Included International Plaza Hotel, New York Room 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Ticketed Event: Members $119, Non-members $139 LED BY Jacki Hart (left), CLP, Clarity for the Boss and Tim Kearney (right), CLP, Garden Creations of Ottawa

PRESENTED BY Ron Koudys, BLA, Med, OALA, CSLA, ASLA, RLI (MI), CLD, Ron Koudys Landscape Architects Christene LeVatte, CLP, Highland Landscapes For Lifestyle Ron McCarthy, BLA, The McCarthy Group Rob Kennaley, McLaughlin and Associates KEYNOTE Diarmuid Gavin, Diarmuid Gavin Designs PLATINUM SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

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49th Annual Integrated Pest Management Symposium Toronto Congress Centre, Cohen Ballroom Full-Day Event: Tabletop Displays, Lunch, Networking Reception, Door Prize, MOE and OMAF updates included. Plus IPM Leadership Award presentation. 7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Ticketed Event, $119 for Members and Non-members. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Net proceeds are donated to lawn care research or a suitable alternative. Congress Conference is a separate fee. PRESENTERS Scott Olan, B.Sc., Ministry of Environment Jim Chatfield, M.S., Ohio State University David C. Smith, P.Ag. C.G.C.A., DCS Agronomic Services Pam Charbonneau, OMAF Dr. Karen L. Bailey, Ph.D., B.Sc., M.Sc., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Dr. Michael Brownbridge, Ph.D.; M.Sc., B.Sc., Vineland Research and Innovation Centre

International Plaza Hotel, York Room 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. Ticketed Event. Member rate is $495. Registration includes Living Walls and Green Roofs powerpoints, speakers scripts and White Papers, all the forms for your CEU presentations, public speaking tips and ongoing support. FREE Congress trade show badge also included. Congress Conference is a separate fee. Register at www.greenplantsfor greenbuildings.org/ttt/ INSTRUCTOR Karin Senneff, GPGB Trainer

KEYNOTE Peter Van Stralen, CFE, Sunshine Brands SYMPOSIUM SPONSOR

RECEPTION SPONSOR

KEYNOTE SPONSOR

TABLETOP SPONSORS G.C. DUKE EQUIPMENT, KOPPERT CANADA, PLANT PRODUCTS, TURF REVOLUTION

An initiative of the Landscape Ontario Designer Sector Group Full Day Event, Lunch and Reception included International Plaza Hotel, International Ballroom 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Ticketed Event. Member rate is $185, $265 for Non-members. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Congress Conference is a separate fee.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2014 INDUSTRY SPECIFIC EVENT

Hosted by the Landscape Ontario Irrigation Sector Group Toronto Congress Centre, Sutherland Room Keynote plus Meet-and-Greet Sponsors 9:00 – 11:45 a.m. Ticketed Event. Members and Non-members rate is $55. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. KEYNOTE Brent Mecham, CID, CLWM, CIC, CAIS, CLIA, CGIA, SPONSOR

Congress 2014 Preview 5


green industry conference

Register today at LOcongress.com MONDAY, JANUARY 6 Pre-Trade Show Events on Warm-Up Monday EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT SHORT COURSE 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Held at International Plaza Hotel, New York Room (Ticketed Event) IPM SYMPOSIUM 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Cohen Ballroom, Toronto Congress Centre ONLY LOCATION FOR THIS EVENT IN 2014 (Ticketed Event) LANDSCAPE DESIGNER CONFERENCE 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Held at International Plaza Hotel, International Ballroom (Ticketed Event) GPGB’S LIVING WALLS AND GREEN ROOFS, TRAIN THE TRAINER WORKSHOP 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Held at International Plaza Hotel, York Room (Ticketed Event)

TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 Registration opens TRADE SHOW OPEN

7:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

OPENING KEYNOTE DRUM CAFÉ

9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

MORNING SESSIONS 10:45 to 11:45 a.m. - GROWING TREES IN THE URBAN JUNGLE - PLANTS ARE NOT OPTIONAL! - THE INFLUENCERS LIFE LESSONS AT LUNCH 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING: THE FUTURE IS NOW! OWNERS ONLY WORKSHOP 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. new TAKING YOUR LITTLE BUSINESS AND MAKING IT BIG: WHEN TO GROW, AND HOW AFTERNOON SESSIONS 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. - HOW DO YOU GET ON THE FIRST PAGE OF GOOGLE? - CULTURE VS. PROFIT; CAN CULTURE BE A PROFIT CENTRE? AFTERNOON SESSIONS 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - REINVENTION MADE EASY: CHANGE YOUR STRATEGY! - TRANSITIONING TO ORGANICS

TUESDAY SPECIAL EVENTS LANDSCAPE ONTARIO LEGACY CELEBRATION 11:00 to 3:00 p.m. Sutherland Room, Toronto Congress Centre AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE 4:45 to 7:45 p.m. 4:45 p.m. President’s Reception 5:15 p.m. Awards Ceremony Plaza Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel TM (Ticketed Event) Lexa Pavers Sponsored by:

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TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE 650 Dixon Road, Toronto, Ontario Full Conference Pass $295. members, $370 non-members One-day Conference pass $165 members, $205 non-members

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9

Registration opens TRADE SHOW OPEN

Registration opens TRADE SHOW OPEN

7:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

OPENING KEYNOTE 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. THE EVOLUTION OF GARDEN STYLE MORNING SESSIONS 10:45 to 11:45 a.m. - RIGHT PLANT, RIGHT PLACE - FROM PURPOSE TO PROFIT - CHANGE YOUR OUTCOMES! A ROUNDTABLE WORKSHOP LIFE LESSONS AT LUNCH 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. PROTECT YOURSELF – GET THE FACTS! OWNERS ONLY WORKSHOP GET THE RIGHT RESULTS WITH THE RIGHT TRAINING

1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

AFTERNOON SESSIONS 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. - THE EXPLODING CONDOMINIUM MARKET IN ONTARIO: ARE YOU READY TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS? - ESSENTIAL SOCIAL MARKETING PRACTICES FOR EVERY SMALL BUSINESS AFTERNOON SESSIONS 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - GENIUS OF THE GENERA: REVEALING THE UNIQUE ATTRIBUTES OF COMMON TREE GENERA - IT’S NOT THE SIZE OF THE JOB, ITS HOW YOU SWING IT! A 12-STEP PROGRAM FOR LEAN + MEAN JOBSITES

WEDNESDAY SPECIAL EVENTS LANDSCAPE ONTARIO AGM 7:30 to 9:00 a.m. International Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel THE FEMININE FACTOR IN HORTICULTURE 4:00 to 5:15 p.m. International Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel (Ticketed Event) TAILGATE THANK YOU EVENT 5:00 to 11:30 p.m. Plaza Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel (Open to all trade show badge holders)

7:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

OPENING KEYNOTE 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. HIGHS ARE GOOD; LOWS ARE BAD BUT WE ARE ALL UNDER PRESSURE MORNING SESSIONS 10:45 to 11:45 a.m. - THE WEALTHY CLIENT: HOW TO LAND BIG FISH AND HOW TO DEAL WITH THEM ONCE THE HOOK IS IN - QUALITY COUNTS - IT COUNTS MORE THAN EVER! - THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF MAINTENANCE LIFE LESSONS AT LUNCH 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. THE LIGHTER SIDE OF LANDSCAPE OWNERS ONLY WORKSHOP 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. HOW TO BE EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE: THE ART OF MANAGING A GROWING COMPANY AFTERNOON SESSIONS 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. - EXTERIOR HOME STAGING FOR REAL ESTATE – COOL! - COMMUNICATION, INTERPRETATION... COMPLICATION! AFTERNOON SESSIONS 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO BETTER UNDERSTAND AND SERVE YOUR CUSTOMERS - HOW TO TURN MORE OF YOUR WEBSITE VISITORS INTO CUSTOMERS

THURSDAY SPECIAL EVENTS IRRIGATION CONFERENCE 9:00 to 11:45 a.m. Sutherland Room (Ticketed Event)


8 Congress 2014 Preview


BOOTH NUMBERING LEGEND “E” booths for Educational and Association, Not for Profit companies “GI” booths for Environmentally Conscious & Ontario Parks Assoc. Members “F” booths for Canadian Fence Industry Association Members Congress 2014 Preview 9


CONGRESS 2014 conferences CONFERENCE 2014 MAP Conference sessions held at the Toronto Congress Centre are in the Meeting Rooms in the south end of the building.

TO TRADE SHOW FLOOR

PINSENT ROOM

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

DANBY ROOM

COURTYARD CAFE AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE WINNERS DISPLAY

DOOR 4 SECURITY/ RECEIVING

CONGRESS CONFERENCES BERTON ROOM

ETROG ROOM CONFERENCE/ MEDIA OFFICE

CONFERENCE ENTRANCE

COHEN BALLROOM KEYNOTE, COFFEE AND LUNCH

A COLVILLE LOBBY

SUTHERLAND ROOMS #1-3

SUTHERLAND ROOM #4

SUTHERLAND ROOM #5

N JEWISON LOBBY

CFIA SHOW OFFICE

BAILEY ROOM

WAXMAN ROOM

PACHTER ROOM CONFERENCE ENTRANCE

DIXON ROAD

Success comes from a vision of the future and the skill and business resources to transform the natural environment into something extraordinary. The 41st Congress Conference is bursting with original concepts, contemporary thinking and easily implemented tips to apply in your business. Be inspired by a host of new and popular speakers and industry experts. Motivating opening keynotes kick off power-packed days. Engage with green industry experts to gain a competitive edge that will ensure your business grows and prospers.

Our IPM Symposium qualifies attendees for six CECs from the IPM Council of Canada. Please check your program recertification criteria for qualifying information to determine if Congress Conference sessions, special symposiums and events qualify.

Dynamic morning and afternoon sessions, Owners Only Workshops and Life Lessons at Lunch sessions are conveniently scheduled to deliver maximum value and networking at its best!

LO’s COACH’s CORNER Bring your burning question to a one-on-one meeting with industry consultants who will provide inspired solutions. Open to Conference Pass holders only.

All sessions qualify for landscape industry certified CEUs. Please visit www.canadanursery.com for details.

Conference sessions are held in the meeting rooms at the south end of the Toronto Congress Centre.

Tailgate Party XVIII

NETWORKING AT ITS BEST – LANDSCAPE ONTARIO STYLE NEW LOCATION IN THE HOTEL! Upstairs in the Plaza Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel 5:00 to 11:30 p.m. NEW FORMAT! Join your fellow Congress delegates for dinner and early-evening entertainment.

Landscape Ontario

Annual General Meeting Join your fellow Landscape Ontario members on January 8, 2014, 7:30 to 9:00 a.m. Held in the International Ballroom at the International Plaza Hotel, 655 Dixon Road, Toronto Breakfast served at 7:30 a.m., and the meeting will begin at 8:00 a.m. sharp. Meeting open to all members. Please RSVP by January 3, 2014 to Kathleen Pugliese, (800) 265-5656 ext. 309 or kpugliese@landscapeontario.com.

Your trade show badge is your free admission ticket. Hosted by the Landscape Ontario Show Committee.

10 Congress 2014 Preview

SPONSORED BY

H A R D S C A P E CO M M I T T E E


CONGRESS 2014 conferences OPENING KEYNOTES Daily 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Cohen Ballroom

OWNERS ONLY WORKSHOPS Daily 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Waxman Room

TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 Drum Café

TUESDAY, JANUARY 7 Taking Your Little Business and Making it Big George Urvari, BA Oriole Landscaping, Toronto, Ont. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8 Get the Right Results with the Right Training Bill Arman The Harvest Group, Calabasas, Calif. THURSDAY, JANUARY 9 How to be Everywhere, All at Once: The Art of Managing a Growing Company Mark Bradley The Beach Gardener, Toronto, Ont.

LIFE LESSONS AT LUNCH

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8 The Evolution Of Garden Style: A Romp Through History And A Peek At The Future Of Our Gardens Diarmuid Gavin, Diarmuid Gavin Designs Wicklow, Ireland

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9 Highs Are Good; Lows Are Bad But We Are All Under Pressure! Anwar Knight, CTV News Toronto, Ont.

GAIN INSIDER INFORMATION WHEN YOU CONNECT AT #LOCONGRESS OR FOLLOW @LOevents @LOphotoguy @LOexpo @LOgnome

– – – –

Kristen for info on conference and events Robert for publication news Heather for exhibitor and trade show Grout for originality!

Daily between 12 noon to 1:15 p.m., Cohen Ballroom, Lunch is provided. TUESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2014 Sustainable Landscaping: The Future is Now! Moderator: Owen Dell; Panelists: David Alba, Scott Bryk, Anna van Maris

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2014 Protect Yourself! Get the Facts! Moderator: Gerald Boot, Panelists: Richard Burton, Bernie Marcoux, Andrew Selluski

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2014 The Lighter Side of Landscape Host: Haig Seferian, CLD, OALA, CSLA, FASLA

NEW EVENT!

The Feminine Factor in Horticulture

Are you

? Yes, I am!

Stop by the Landscape Ontario Booth #40 and pick-up a ribbon for each certification credential you hold – attach it to your show badge with pride.

PLUS: Get info on how certification can benefit you and your company.

Inaugural Networking Event for Women in Horticulture 4:00 to 5:15 p.m. (Pre-Tailgate Party)

Inspiring Evolving Empowering Join your peers for the thought-provoking keynote presentation by Beth Edney, CLD.

Held at the International Plaza Hotel, International Ballroom. Ticketed event.

Congress 2014 Preview 11


AS OF NOVEMBER 15, 2013 A&R GEOSYNTHETICS INC ...................310 A.M.A. PLASTICS LTD .......................... 1417 ABBOTSFORD CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD ..........................................................537 ACO SYSTEMS LTD ............................. 1302 ACTI-SOL INC .........................................G38 ACTION TRAILERS ............................... 1758 ADVANCED EQUIPMENT SALES / TREBRO .............................................. 1467 AKR CONSULTING CANADA INC ..........278 ALGONQUIN NATURAL STONE LTD.. 1672 ALL ONTARIO HYDROSEEDING AND ICE CONTROL ..............................723 ALL TREAT FARMS LTD ..........................460 ALLIANCE AGRI-TURF INC .................. 1118 AL-MAR VINYL PRODUCTS ................... F30 ALPINE PLANT FOODS CORPORATION .................................. 1725 ALTURNAMATS, INC ...............................133 AMAZING GATES OF CANADA..............266 AMERISTAR FENCE PRODUCTS .......... F11 ANGA’S FARM & NURSERY ................ 1629 AQUA TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES ..721 AQUASCAPE, INC ................................ 1206 ARBORVALLEY URBAN FORESTRY .. 1250 ARCTIC EQUIPMENT MFG CORP ...........642 ARMTEC/BROOKLIN ............................ 1512 ASB GREENWORLD LTD..................... 1303 ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO ROAD SUPERVISORS.......................... E29 ATLAS POLAR COMPANY LTD............ 1729 ATLAS ROLLING ENTRY SYSTEMS ..... F33 AUDIO MARKETING CONCEPTS ............438 AVK NURSERY HOLDINGS INC.......... 2101 AZEK BUILDING PRODUCTS .................635 BAG-O-SAND INC................................. 1560 BAHCO ................................................1137A BALSAM PROMOTIONS ...........................90 BANAS STONES PRIVATE LTD ...... 750,862 BANNERMAN LTD ...................................236 BARKMAN CONCRETE LTD ................ 1570 BARRACUDA INC ................................. 1243 BARRETO ............................................1442A BATTLEFIELD EQUIPMENT RENTALS ...766 BAUMALIGHT BY: MTB MFG INC ......... 1761 BAYER ADVANTAGE ........................... G39A BAY-LYNX MANUFACTURING INC ...........364 BEAVER VALLEY STONE LTD ................260 BEC EQUIPMENT ....................................167 BEST WAY STONE LTD...........................672 BIG BEAR TOOLS INC ............................148 BISON TILES ......................................... 137A BLUE SKY NURSERY LTD.................... 1217 BOBCAT - SCHILLER .........................1442B BOBCAT COMPANY..................................99 BOBS TRAILER PARTS INC....................637 BOREAL AGROMINERALS INC........... 1527 BOSMAN HOME FRONT INC.................129 BOSS INDUSTRIAL, INC .........................276 BOT AGGREGATES LIMITED .................428 BOULDERS STONE SUPPLY INC ......... 1846 BRANDT TRACTOR LTD .........................373 BRAUN NURSERY LTD ........................ 1235 BRICKSTOP CORP ..................................446 BRITESPAN BUILDING SYSTEMS .........655 BROWN - TRENCHMASTER..............1546A BROWN’S CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD ....................................465 BROWN’S FUELS ................................. 1102 BUDGET ENVIRONMENTAL DISPOSAL...155 C PINE ASSOCIATES INC ................... 1124 CALCO SOILS ..........................................338 CALIN STONE LTD ..................................412 CAMBRIDGE AGGREGATE SERVICES .........................................1155C CAMPANIA INTERNATIONAL ............1155A CAN AM PRECAST PRODUCTS LTD... 1343 CANADA BLOOMS ....................................70 CANADA POWER TECHNOLOGY - CPT....548 CANADALE NURSERIES LTD .............. 1212 CANADIAN DIAMOND TECHNOLOGIES ................................ 1763 CANADIAN EQUIPMENT OUTFITTERS ....546 CANADIAN FENCE INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (CFIA)........................... F44 CANADIAN NURSERY LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION ............... 40A CANADIAN RESTORATIONS GTA INC ...149 CANADIAN SALT COMPANY LTD (THE) ...............................................173 CANADIAN SCALE COMPANY LIMITED ....................................................78 CANADIAN SHIELD PAVEMENT PRESERVATION PRODUCTS..............G40 CAN-CLEAN PRESSURE WASHERS... 1567 CANNOR NURSERIES LTD.................. 1149

12 Congress 2014 Preview

CONGRESS 2014 exhibitor listings

CARMIX CANADA ................................. 1607 CASE IH DEALERS..................................282 CAST LIGHTING LLC............................ 1132 CENTRAL INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CORP...577 CENTRAL IRRIGATION SUPPLY OF CANADA INC ................................ 1106 CHEROKEE MFG ................................. 1316 CHRYSLER CANADA INC .........................39 CI FABRICS ............................................. F24 CIRCLE GRAPHICS ................................ F27 CJ BLOWER TRUCK SERVICES ............171 CLEARVIEW NURSERY LTD ................ 1326 CLOTURES OASIS INC .......................... F23 COASTAL SOURCE CANADA ................508 COLONIAL BRICK & STONE .............1155B COLVOY EQUIPMENT......................... 91,93 COMMANDER ATTACHMENTS .............378 COMMANDER INDUSTRIES ..................744 COMMUNITIES IN BLOOM ....................G46 COMPASS CREATIVE STUDIO INC ...... 1621 COMPOST COUNCIL OF CANADA (THE)... E1 CON X EQUIPMENT CANADA INC ........468 CONCORD ALUMINUM RAILINGS ....... F46 CONNECT EQUIPMENT .............................2 CONNON NURSERIES/ CBV HOLDINGS LTD .............................560 CONNON NURSERIES/ NVK HOLDINGS INC .......................... 1456 COOPER EQUIPMENT RENTALS ..........147 CREATIVE LANDSCAPE DEPOT............252 CREDIT VALLEY CONSERVATION ....... E30 CREIGHTON ROCK DRILL LTD ..............567 CRESCENT OIL/FUELS INC .....................74 CROWN VERITY ................................... 1317 CRS CONTRACTORS RENTAL SUPPLY ................................ 1724 CUB CADET .............................................628 CURV-RITE INC ....................................... S16 D&R ELECTRONICS CO LTD .............. 1642 DA-LEE PROFESSIONAL DUST & ICE MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS ...............111 DECLOET STRUCTURES LTD............. 1130 DEER FENCE CANADA INC ..................G87 DEER SHIELD .....................................1137B DEL EQUIPMENT LTD .............................102 DELAWARE PUMP AND PARTS LTD ....... 177 DEVTRA INC.............................................820 DEWEZE MFG .........................................169 DFK EQUIPMENT SALES INC ................872 DIRECT SOLUTIONS FORMERLY AGRIUM ADVANCE TECHNOLOGIES ...533 DIVERSITREE PLANTS INC ................. 1202 DNM SYSTEMS LTD ................................534 DOLPHIN FIBERGLASS POOLS ......... 1828 DOMAX CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT...........................................247 DON MARJAMA NURSERY CO, INC ... 1259 DRIVE PRODUCTS ..................................172 DRIVETEC ...............................................G30 DUKE (GC) EQUIPMENT LTD .....................................1546,1643,1442 DURHAM COLLEGE GARDEN ........ HALL F DURA-TOOL ........................................1137C DUTCHMASTER NURSERIES LTD ..... 1566 DYNA ........................................................439 DYNABLAST: DIV OF JOHN BROOKS CO LTD .......................179 DYNASCAPE SOFTWARE ................... 1218 EARTH SAFE........................................ G39B EARTHBIN BY PROGESSIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS ............................G62 EASTERN FARM MACHINERY LTD .........382 EASY-FLO ................................................G47 ECHO POWER EQUIPMENT (CANADA)......................................... 45,708 ECO WOOD PRODUCTS LTD ................543 ECO-FLEX ................................................409 ECO-POOLS INC .....................................141 ED’S CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD ........451 ELIET USA INC.........................................408 ELOQUIP LTD........................................ 1272 EMPLOYERS FIRST.................................. E4 ENCORE LANDSCAPE LIGHTING ....... 1351 ENTERPRISE COMMERCIAL TRUCK... 1331 ENVIREM ORGANICS INC................... 2106 ENVIROBOND PRODUCTS CORP ....... 1113 ENVIRONS WHOLESALE NURSERY... 1528 EQUIPMENT JOURNAL ..........................333 EUROPA LANDSCAPING PRODUCTS .1155E EV EVOLUTION POLYMERIC SAND ... 552A EVERPLAY INSTALLATION INC.............G31 EXCEL INDUSTRIES, INC .......................572 EZ-GRASS, INC..................................... 1252 FAIRFIELD TREE NURSERIES INC ..... 1142 FAIRGREEN SOD FARMS LTD ............ 1433

FANSHAWE COLLEGE & GARDEN ....................................E5, HALL F FBC - CANADA’S SMALL BUSINESS TAX SPECIALISTS .............................. 2110 FEDERATED INSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA .......................................... F19 FELCOTRONIC ...................................1137D FENCE PEOPLE LIMITED (THE) ........... F22 FERRIS INDUSTRIES INC .......................416 FERTILEC LTEE/MASTER TURF ..............20 FIBRAMULCH ............................................16 FLEXI-TIE .............................................1137E FOCUS INDUSTRIES .............................G71 FORTRESS FENCE PRODUCTS .......... F16 FOUNDATION SUPPORTWORKS OF ONTARIO....................................... 1660 FOX HOLLOW FARMS ......................... 1324 FRENSCH (C) LTD ................................ 1137 FS PARTNERS, A DIV OF GROWMARK, INC............................... 1203 FTT ............................................................613 FX LUMINAIRE .........................................436 FYFE (ALLAN) EQUIPMENT LTD............361 G&D EQUIPMENT INC/MORBARK ........184 G&L GROUP OF COMPANIES ............ 1507 GARDEN MAKING MAGAZINE............ 2108 GARDEN STAR ....................................G39C GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA ...........17 GENERAL SEED COMPANY ............... 1204 GEORGIAN SPRINKLERS INC ............ 1468 GERRICK CARPENTRY...........................512 GLENDYNE CANADIAN BLACK SLATE ...................................2112A GLOBAL ARCH INC .................................518 GRACE UNIQUE BAG .............................477 GRAVELY, AN ARIENS CO BRAND ..........46 GREAT LAKES WOOD PRODUCTS INC ................................. 1634 GREAT NORTH LANDSCAPE PRODUCTS ............................................552 GREEN ROOFS FOR HEALTHY CITIES....G4 GREEN TRACTORS ................................334 GREENHORIZONS GROUP OF FARMS LTD (THE) ........................ 1260 GREENSTAR PLANT PRODUCTS.........G39 GREENVILLE - A PART OF WRIAN MARKETING..............................553 GRO4 ORGANICS INC ......................... 2111 GRO-BARK (ONTARIO) LTD ...................328 GROSS FILLEX ....................................G39D GROTEK ............................................... G39E GROUNDS GUYS (THE) ...................... 1327 GROWER’S CHOICE............................ 1226 H2ZEN INC .................................................13 HANES GEO COMPONENTS.................860 HARKNESS EQUIPMENT LTD............. 1470 HARVEST POWER................................ 473A HAYES TIMBER...................................1155G HEALTH CANADA - PEST MANAGEMENT REGULATORY AGENCY ...................... E27 HEFFCO ELASTROMER INC.................G66 HIGHPOINT DECK LIGHTS .................137B HILLTOP STONE & SUPPLY ................ 1251 HONDA CANADA INC .......................... 1612 HORST WELDING / AMI ATTACHMENTS ............................ S12 HORTICULTURAL MARKETING INC............................................... 1155,1156 HORTPROTECT - THE INVESTMENT GUILD & MARSH CANADA ...................238 HUB - SINCLAIR COCKBURN INSURANCE BROKERS ........................818 HUMBER COLLEGE GARDEN .............................Entrance Hall F HUMBER NURSERIES LTD.....................369 HUNTER INDUSTRIES INC.....................434 HUSQVARNA CANADA CORPORATE.. 1652 HUSQVARNA CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS CANADA ........................ 1249 HUTCHESON SAND & MIXES................432 II SOLUTIONS - INNOVATIVE INDUSTRIAL SOLUTIONS ........................................ 1513 INFRASTRUCTURE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASSOCIATION ....................... E18 INFRASTRUCTURES.................................27 IN-LITE DESIGN CORPORATION........ 1524 INNOVATION INITIATIVE COOPERATIVE INC .............................. E17 INNOVATIVE SURFACE SOLUTIONS ...G69 INTEGRATED APPLIANCES LTD - LYNX GRILLS..................................... 1361 INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF ARBORICULTURE ONTARIO INC (ISAO) .................................................... E11 IOWAT .......................................................476 ISLINGTON NURSERIES LTD .................308

ISUZU COMMERCIAL TRUCK CANADA ....1 JACOBSEN TURF PRODUCTS .........1546B JB&D COMPANY LTD........................... 1266 JC BAKKER & SONS LTD .................... 1542 JC ROCK LTD...........................................347 JCB INC ....................................................678 JIM PATTISON LEASE.............................479 JOHN DEERE CANADA ULC........728B,728 JOHN DEERE LANDSCAPES LTD .........232 JOHN FUMERTON SERVICES ...............337 JRT NURSERIES INC ........................... 1403 KAGE INNOVATION LLC .........................774 KATO’S NURSERY (2007) LTD ............ 1224 KAWARTHA ROCK QUARRY INC........ 1145 KEN BEGG NURSERY SALES INC ....... 1135 KERR LIGHTING ...................................552B KESMAC BROUWER TURF ....................561 KILLALOE WOOD PRODUCTS............ 1346 KINGSPOINT SMALL ENGINE INC ..........76 KIOTI TRACTOR - DIV OF DAEDONG USA, INC ..................................................51 KOBES NURSERIES INC ..................... 1313 KOPPERT CANADA LTD ...................... 1425 KROWN RUST CONTROL SYSTEMS ....854 KUBOTA CANADA LTD............................686 KWIK LOAD A DIVISION OF DRIVE PRODUCTS ................................115 L&R SHELTERS INC ............................. 1230 LAC BALSAM ...................................... 1137F LACKMOND DIAMOND PRODUCTS ......................................... 1518 LAFARGE CANADA INC ........................... 1248 LAHMAN PRECAST CONCRETE INC... 1209 LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT NETWORK ........................................... 1506 LANDSCAPE ONTARIO RESOURCE CENTRE .....................................................40 LANDSCAPE ONTARIO’S HARDSCAPE COMMITTEE ......................................... 40B LANDSCAPE STYLE BV ....................... 1256 LANDSOURCE ORGANIX LTD ...............547 LANING (ROBERT H) & SONS LTD.........866 LAWN LIFE ............................................ 1348 LAWYER NURSERY INC .......................... 1626 LEISURE POOLS USA TRADING, INC .......83 LEONE FENCE CO LTD ......................... F37 LIGHTHOUSE SALES GROUP ...............665 LIGHTNING EQUIPMENT SALES INC .. 1167 LIMBERLOST STONE INC ................... 1743 LIMESTONE TRAIL CO INC ................... S18 LINNAEA NURSERIES LTD .................. 1421 LINZEL DISTRIBUTING ................... 138,142 LIPANI TURF GROUP ..............................312 LOCKEY USA .......................................... F20 LS TRAINING SYSTEM..............................72 LYON & BUTLER INSURANCE BROKERS LTD .................................... 1329 MACCAFERRI CANADA LTD ..................415 MACLEAN ENGINEERING........................14 MAGUIRE SUPER-SHIELD / MAGUIRE CROSS-FIRE ........................166 MAHINDRA USA INC ............................ 1646 MAKITA CANADA INC .............................267 MANITOU AMERICAS INC FORMERLY GEHL................................... 2B MANKAR ULTRA-LOW VOLUME SPRAYERS .......................................... 1328 MANULIFT EMI ............................................7 MAPLE LEAF NURSERIES LTD ........... 1734 MAR-CO CLAY & STONE ........................132 MARTEK SUPPLY ................................. 1414 MASONAL STONE INC ........................ 1519 MASON’S MASONRY SUPPLY LTD .........464 MASTER HALCO CORP ........................... F5 MAXTECH VINYL PRODUCTS ..........2112B MAXWELL STONE ................................ 2112 MAYNE INC ........................................... 1405 MAYNOOTH NATURAL GRANITE ....... 1426 MCCLOSKEY INTERNATIONAL .......... 1766 MEDALLION FENCE LTD ........................513 MEGADOME/HARNOIS INDUSTRIES ... 1428 METAL PLESS INC ..................................538 MILLER COMPOST THE MILLER GROUP ............................346 MILLGROVE GARDEN SUPPLIES LADY BUG BAG .....................................551 MILLGROVE PERENNIALS INC........... 1432 MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT........ E26 MIRAFI GEOTEXTILES & GRIDS .........552C MISKA TRAILERS.......................................11 MITSUBISHI FUSO TRUCK OF AMERICA, INC ...................................10 MODERN FENCE TECHNOLOGIES CANADA .................................................. F7 MOLNAR METAL ART - DIV OF IMPAX MFG ......................................... 1352


Ceremony

AND

MONSTER POWER EQUIPMENT .......1546C MOON VISION LIGHTING .......................264 MORI NURSERIES LTD ........................ 1170 MS GREGSON; DIV OF RAD TECHNOLOGIES INC ................ 1255 MUNGER LAWNSCAPE DISTRIBUTION......................................G45 MUSKOKA ROCK COMPANY LTD .......................... 1101,1105 MYKE .......................................................G60 NAPOLEON APPLIANCE CORPORATION .....................................272 NATIONAL BUILDING GROUP ..........1428A NATIONAL CONCRETE ACCESSORIES ......................................568 NATIONWIDE INDUSTRIES ..................... F2 NATURAL INSECT CONTROL ................653 NATURAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN MAGAZINE .......................................... 1370 NEW ENGLAND ARBORS CANADA ... 1409 NEWROADS NATIONAL LEASING ..........30 NIAGARA COLLEGE & GARDEN ..................................E16, HALL F NILEX INC.................................................450 NISCO NATIONAL LEASING ............... 1337 NLS PRODUCTS........................................31 NORLEANS TECHNOLOGIES INC ........189 NORTH SHORE IMPORTS................... 2107 NORTHERN PERFORMANCE ................649 NORTHLAND QUARRY SUPPLY LTD... 1325 NORTHSTAR INDUSTRIES .....................143 NORTON ABRASIVES O/A SAINT GOBAIN ABRASIVES CANADA INC ........1628 NURSERY SOD GROWERS ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO........................................... E2 NUTRITE ................................................ 2012 NUVO IRON............................................... F8 OAKS CONCRETE BRAMPTON BRICK LTD ........................318 OCEANIE INTERNATIONAL 2000 ........... F9 OMEGA II FENCE SYSTEMS................. F17 OMNI ENVIRO CANADA ...................... 1150 ONTARIO ONE CALL............................ 1116 ONTARIO PARKS ASSOCIATION..........G33 ONTARIO REGIONAL COMMON GROUND ALLIANCE (ORCGA) ......... 1214 ONTARIO SAWDUST SUPPLIES LTD ...... 341 ONTARIO SEED CO LTD...................... 1134 ONTARIO TREE SEED PLANT - MINISTRY OF NATURAL RESOURCES .................343 ONTARIO TRUCK TRAINING ACADEMY ............................................. E25 ON-TRUX LTD.............................................42 ORACLE RMS INSURANCE RISK MANAGEMENT SERVICES ..................113 OREGON DISTRIBUTION LTD............. 1502 ORGANIC EXPRESS INC........................246 ORGANIC OUTDOORS SUPPLY CANADA LTD.........................................G74 OUTDOOR LUXURY LTD ........................449 OUTDOOR SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT INC ................................ 2004 OUTFRONT PORTABLE SOLUTIONS - A DIV OF ALL COVER PORTABLE SYSTEMS ...............................................528 OXFORD PALLET & RECYCLERS LTD ..................................G51 PALFINGER NORTH AMERICA ........... 1824 PAVER RESOURCES, INC ................... 2104 PEBBLEMAN NATURAL STONE (THE)....615 PEETERS (JM) NURSERIES LTD ........ 1353 PEFFERLAW PEAT PRODUCTS INC ... 1404 PERMACON GROUP...............................648

PERMALOC CORPORATION..................413 PES CANADA ...........................................175 PESTICIDE INDUSTRY COUNCIL - PIC ... E10 PHOENIX MEASUREMENT SOLUTIONS INC....................................153 PICKSEED CANADA INC ..................... 1520 PINEMEADOWS TREE FARMS LTD...1202A PINENEEDLE FARMS........................... 1133 PLAYCARE AND DESIGN INC ................549 PLS INSOLES INC ................................ 1408 POTTERS ROAD NURSERY INC......... 1529 POWER BOND ADHESIVE ..................552D POWER SOURCE CANADA ....... 1856,1848 PREMIER EQUIPMENT ........................ 1447 PRICELESS PRODUCTS LANDSCAPE DEPOT ............................719 PRIMEMAX ENERGY INC ......................G26 PRO FLEET CARE ...................................822 PRO LANDSCAPE BY DRAFIX SOFTWARE..............................417 PRO TECH ENGINEERING INC .......... 1858 PROFESSIONAL LAWN CARE ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO................... E9 PROLINE EQUIPMENT: DIVISION OF HERITAGE OAK FARM, INC............... 1429 PROMO SHAN CORP .......................... 1258 PRO-POWER CANADA INC....................478 PUTZER (M) HORNBY NURSERY LTD ..1424 PYGAR SALES CANADA LTD .................365 Q & Z NURSERY INC............................ 1562 QUALITY FERTILIZERS INC............ 268,473 QUALITY SEEDS LTD ........................... 1435 QUEST AUTOMOTIVE LEASING SERVICES ..............................................228 QU-UP CORPORATION ..........................481 RAMROD (DIV OF LEON MFG COMPANY INC) .................377 RAYCO .................................................1546D REDMAX (MTI CANADA)...................... 1661 REGION OF PEEL....................................474 REGIONAL TRACTOR SALES ..................32 REIST INDUSTRIES INC .........................372 RIDGEVIEW LANDSCAPE SUPPLY....1155D RITTENHOUSE SINCE 1914 ............... 1535 RIZMI STONE AND AGGREGATES INC ....................................................... 1127 ROCK VALLEY NATURAL STONE....... 1516 ROMA FENCE GROUP OF COMPANIES ............................ 564,F26 ROYAL BOTANICAL GARDENS .............. E3 ROYNAT LEASE FINANCE.....................G42 RUBAROC ...............................................G56 RYAN BY SCHILLER ...........................1442C RYMAR SYNTHETIC GRASS LTD ............95 SABLE MARCO INC ............................. 1128 SANTERRA STONECRAFT .................. 1312 SCAG ...................................................1643E SEAL KING INC..................................... 1160 SEAL TECH INC......................................G41 SEDUM MASTER INC ............................G64 SELECT STONE SUPPLY........................609 SENECA COLLEGE.................................. E8 SESTER FARMS INC ............................ 1246 SGI LIGHTING .........................................G22 SHAW BROS LIMITED.......................... 1427 SHERIDAN NURSERIES ...................... 1342 SHIN BIO CANADA INC ....................... 1402 SHOWA BEST GLOVE MANUFACTURING LTD...................... 1533 SIVACO WIRE GROUP ...........................G73 SLOAN’S NURSERY AND new CHRISTMAS TREES ........................... 1221 SMALE (WR) CO (1979) LTD ..................128

President’s Reception

4:45 p.m. PRESIDENT’S RECEPTION 5:15 p.m. AWARDS CEREMONY

Plaza Ballroom, International Plaza Hotel (Ticketed Event, $65 includes President’s Reception) For more information AN INITIATIVE OF

www.loawards.com Lexa PRESENTING Pavers SPONSORS TM

DownLoaD oUr Free 2013 eLecTronic caTaLoGUeS.

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

PerMaconPro.ca

SMART ABOUT SALT COUNCIL ........... E28 SNAPEDGE CANADA........................... 552E SNOW & ICE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION INC ................................541 SNO-WAY INTERNATIONAL ..............1442D SOLANA ................................................137C SOMERVILLE NURSERIES INC .......... 1136 SOUTHLAND INSURANCE BROKERS INC .................................... 1418 SPEARE SEEDS ......................................454 SPEELMAN’S GARDEN CENTRE ..........569 SPIDER - DVORAK.............................. 1643F SPORT COURT ..................................... 1357 ST CLAIR COLLEGE GARDEN ........ HALL F ST WILLIAMS NURSERY & ECOLOGY CENTRE ........................... 1231 STABILA INC ......................................... 1503 STAM NURSERIES (2009) INC ............ 1412 STEWART’S EQUIPMENT LTD ...............103 STIHL LIMITED .............................................5 STONE ARCH ....................................... 518A STONE-LINK CORP .................................608 STONEMEN’S VALLEY INC ................. 1332 STONESAVER (KORZITE COATINGS).....647 STRONGCO EQUIPMENT ......................660 SUNLIFE FINANCIAL ...............................339 SUNNYWEI (STONE) INTERNATIONAL INC ....................................................... 1242 SUPER GREEN .................................... G39F SUPER SUCKER HYDRO VAC SERVICE INC ...................................... 1216 SUPPLY POST NEWSPAPER (THE).......566 SUREBOND SEALERS & ADHESIVES ..................................... 552F SUREFOOT HARDSCAPE PRODUCTS ......................................... 1229 SURE-LOC ALUMINUM EDGING / WOLVERINE TOOLS .......................... 1333 SYNLAWN ............................................. 1207 T.S.S.A...................................................... E19 TALLMAN TRUCK CENTRE LIMITED.. 2001 TANDESKI ASSOCIATES INC.............. 1125 TD RETAIL CARD SERVICES..................514 TEAM EAGLE ........................................ 1247 TECHNISEAL ........................................ 1532 TECHNO METAL POST DISTRIBUTION (ONTARIO) INC ......................................242 TECHO-BLOC INC................................ 1742 TEREX CONSTRUCTION AMERICAS......12 TERRAFIX GEOSYNTHETICS INC .........529 THAMES VALLEY BRICK & TILE/ BUILDING PRODUCTS ...................... 1466 THAT FRANCHISE GROUP ....................565 THE DECK CLIP ICE CLIP....................137D THE DECK STORE INC ...........................137 THE FOUNDRY/COOKSTOVES CANADA ...................................................47 THOMAS EQUIPMENT LTD ....................810 THRESHOLD INC ....................................864 TILLSON BRANDS INC (FUTURE ROAD SOLUTIONS) .............212 TIRECRAFT ................................................82 TOP LIFT ENTERPRISES INC...................22 TORO COMPANY (THE)..........................112 TORO COMPANY (THE)..........................116 TORONTO SALT & CHEMICALS LTD ....1219 TOTAL EQUIPMENT RENTALS ..... 91,93,94 TRACKEM..................................................G2 TRACKLESS VEHICLES LTD ..................160 TRADEWINDS INTERNATIONAL SALES CO INC.................................... 1319 TREE ISLAND STEEL LTD...................... F18

TRIPLE H CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD ....................................................... 1166 TRIPLE M SERVICES..............................G77 TRI-VERSA-GLOBAL INC ..................... 1517 TRUCK CRAFT INC .................................161 TRYNEX INTERNATIONAL ........................45 TRYSTAN ................................................. S11 TS BENEFIT SOLUTIONS .................... 2011 TSC - COUNTRY PRO SERVICES....... 1666 TSURUMI CANADA .............................. 1335 TUFX-FORT INC .......................................472 TURF CARE IRRIGATION & LIGHTING ........................................ 1117 TURF CARE PRODUCTS CANADA........218 TURF REVOLUTION ................................618 TURFMAKER CORP ................................335 TWIN EQUIPMENT LTD........................ 1750 TYEDEE BIN ............................................G68 TYMETAL CORP ..................................... F25 TYNE MOULDS AND MACHINERY CO LTD ................................................ 1151 UNILOCK LTD............................... 1121,1356 UNIQUIP CANADA LTD ...............................6 UNIVERSAL FIELD SUPPLIES INC ........146 UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH - RIDGETOWN CAMPUS................ HALL F UPPER CANADA STONE CO LTD....... 1434 URE-TECH SURFACES INC....................611 UXBRIDGE NURSERIES LTD............... 1234 VALLEYVIEW GARDENS...................... 1154 VAN NOORT BULB CO LTD................. 1525 VANDEN BUSSCHE IRRIGATION ..........350 VANDEN BUSSCHE IRRIGATION (DELHI) ...................................................351 VANHOF AND BLOKKER LTD ............. 1146 VENTRAC BY VENTURE PRODUCTS INC ...........................................................2C VERADEK INC ....................................... 2014 VERBINNEN’S NURSERY LTD ............ 1318 VERMEER CANADA INC .........................442 VERTI-CRETE OF TORONTO ...................86 VIKING POOLS ..................................... 2015 VINYL-FENCING.CA ............................... F13 VISSERS NURSERY & SOD FARM ..... 1228 VORTEXX.............................................1643G VOTH SALES & SERVICES INC .............884 VRE GREENHOUSE SYSTEMS .............360 WACKER NEUSON LTD ............................49 WAI PRODUCTS LTD/HYDRO-RAIN ......243 WALLENSTEIN BY: EMB MFG INC ........573 WATER ARTS INC................................. 1347 WATERLOO BIOFILTER SYSTEMS INC........................................452 WEBER MT (WEBER MACHINE, INC) ...181 WHITEOAK FORD LINCOLN SALES LTD .......................................... 1112 WILCO CONTRACTORS NORTHWEST INC ................................G70 WILLOWBROOK NURSERIES INC.........760 WINDSOR RUBBER ........................... 1155F WINKELMOLEN NURSERY LTD .......... 1306 WOLF DECKING ................................... 137E WOODBRIDGE EQUIPMENT PARTS INC .............................................447 WORKPLACE SAFETY & PREVENTION SERVICES .................. 1131 WRIGHT COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS ....150 WSI - WE SIMPLIFY THE INTERNET......248 YBRAVO...............................................1442E YOUNG’S AGGREGATES .................... 1205 ZANDER SOD CO LTD ......................... 1336 ZINCO CANADA INC ............................ 1232 ZIP UP UNDER DECK .......................... 137F

Instructors from an accredited educational institution – Specialist High Skills Major (S.H.S.M.), post-secondary, apprenticeship and horticulture/landscape related programs – are invited to register students until December 6, 2013.

Students Welcome Note: Student pricing applies to instructors accompanying a group. The Student Registration Package can be accessed at LOcongress.com (under Teachers and Students).

PerMacon_LeXa_LanDScaPe_TraDe_vF _LeFT_PaGe

Congress 2014 Preview 13


managementsolutions

Employee incentives: Not just how, but why

BY MARK BRADLEY

The hiring turnstile. That feeling in your stomach as you leave a jobsite bracing yourself for all the things that might go wrong when you take your eyes off the job. That overwhelming frustration of pouring most of your waking hours and energy into a business that doesn’t deliver anything close to the potential you know exists. Sound familiar? Let’s try to take 2014 in a different direction. Years ago, we realized that training was a priority if we were going to keep growing. I had too much on my plate, our jobs had too many mistakes, we burned through too many new hires — yet the solution to these problems kept coming back to the same thing: I needed to train my staff more and better if I was going to make

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this business bigger than myself. And so we did. We implemented on-the-job training to build new skills in our crews. We sought out and employed the best subcontractors we could find so we could watch and re-create the systems they used for efficient work or craftsmanship. We implemented, and still use today, an online training program for every staff member that comes aboard to cover the basics of safety, construction orientation, and PPE as well as courses that taught the language and culture of problem solving and waste elimination. We saw a difference almost immediately. We quickly grew stronger. I could delegate more. I could take on more work and bigger jobs without the fear I used to have when I left the jobsite. We were getting better, but we were still lacking something. My business was my life. It was how I provided for my family. It’s my future, it may be my children’s future, and I spent most of my waking life thinking about, living and breathing our company. But for my staff, it was not the same. Understandably, for them, this was just a job. Just a way to a paycheque. And all our talk of getting bigger, better, more profitable… it just wasn’t delivering the results I knew it should. The problem though, was obvious. We were teaching our crews how to do their jobs better, but we were failing to show them why to do their jobs better. Proper training will solve problems, but it can’t solve the underlying problem that robs companies of their true potential: motivation. If we were going to build a successful business, stop the hiring turnstile, and improve profits on productivity, then there was no other option. We had to show our staff why all this talk about productivity was important to them, not just to our business. Over the years, we’ve been developing and refining a multi-tiered approach to employee incentives. Some rewards are financial. Others are not. Combined, they work together to create a culture that rewards high achievers and frustrates (and drives out) poor performers. Going into this season, ask yourself one simple question: If you worked for your company, why would you work harder, faster and better? What’s in it for you? Many company owners I’ve met spend more time and energy worrying how to stop breaking a $50 shovel than how to motivate their staff. But with a just 10 per cent improvement in productivity, you could afford to buy your crews new shovels every day. You wouldn’t… but you could. 68 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES


I don’t believe there is one right answer to this question, but I will share just some of the tools that help us: l Attract superior talent l Produce industry-leading revenue per man hour l Retain and develop long-term employees Financial motivators l Standardize your wages Get

rid of annual reviews and arbitrary raises and create defined roles in your company. Show the paths to advancement (e.g. Labourer C, $15/hr.; Labourer B, $17/hr.; Labourer A, $18/hr. etc.). Define your expectations for what it takes to move up the ladder: certification, education, field-proven skills, clean driving record, perfect safety record, etc. Show your staff the opportunities within your company and define for them how they can progress towards their goal. l Go to salary for better stability Consider moving key field staff to an annual salary. Seasonal layoffs or reduced income force good staff to look to other trades for more predictable employment compensation. If you’re an upstanding, responsible person trying to build a future and raise a family, you’re going to need job with a predictable, stable income. Talk it over with key staff and agree on a salary based on a conservative estimate of hours worked multiplied by their hourly rate and make up the difference if you’ve overworked or underworked them at the end of the year. l Bonuses and incentives Have a bonus/ incentive program linked to company success. Keep it simple. I can’t stress that enough. Our program is based more or less on two simple metrics that are easy to measure, and easy for staff to control: sales and field wages. We have a clear sales goal and we have a clear percentage of sales that we can afford in field wages. If crews beat their production (produced revenue) goal without overspending on wages (as a percentage, not a flat number), it’s bonus time. It’s not a perfect system, but it is perfectly simple. At almost JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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Visit us at Booth 708 at Landscape Ontario Congress ECHO Power Equipment (Canada) www.echo.ca

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managementsolutions any time of the year, I can pull a very accurate sales and field wage spending to date. That’s all we need to know whether we’re tracking to meet, beat, or fall short of our goals. l Give them a future Offer a pension contribution plan. Most banks and major investment houses will help you setup a company pension plan where your employees can contribute pre-tax income directly off their paycheques. Match their contributions up to a maximum that grows each year. Have your investment agent Create a flowchart showing how employees can advance within your company. It inspires your employees along a path toward career growth, show your staff what it and helps you plan to profit from investing in human talent. takes to retire a millionstaff who want opportunities to advance reward your best performers with a pair aire. It’s not as much as you and your staff in rank and pay. Stagnant companies of flights anywhere in North America might think. You’ll attract/motivate people can’t offer promotions and raises. Emduring your down season. who see their future tied to our industry ployees see nothing but a dead-end, the and improve your retention rates. l Paid vacations Pay your vendors with same job every morning with no hope Other motivators l Share your goals for company growth credit cards (but pay your cards promptfor anything greater. l A scoreboard Put 12 guys out on a pond Growth and profitability are not just ly!). Collect travel points. Attract new, to play hockey and they’ll have a blast. important to you, they are critical to key staff with a paid vacation benefit, or

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managementsolutions Put 12 guys in an arena with some fans in the stands and a working scoreboard, and they’re ready to kill each other just so their number can be bigger than the other guys’ number at the end of the game. We use our mobile timekeeping system to show our staff real-time, upto-the-minute estimated vs. actual hours on every job. When everyone knows “the score,” everyone starts playing to win. It’s simple. l Training and education Through onthe-job training, industry training events, and online training, we want to offer

our staff opportunities to build their skills. It gives them a chance to move ahead in this industry and in my company. It gives our company the opportunity to promote from within. Key roles are assumed by current staff who already know our systems, know our procedures, and know our expectations, rather than trying to fill these roles with other companies’ castoffs. l Company events BBQs, a company team in a beer hockey league, pro hockey tickets, Christmas parties, a company golf tournament, foreman dinners…

Joe Graul 1-866-767-2958 Cell: 519-274-9698

Once a quarter, try to host some kind of special event for some/all of your staff to reward and reinforce your direction, your progress, and opportunities available in LT your company.

Mark Bradley, based in Ontario, is president of TBG Landscape and the Landscape Management Network.

Bryan Macpherson 1-888-631-5280 Cell: 519-494-2544

Visit us at CONGRESS

Booth #12

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industrynews Congress 2014: Tools for prosperity Entering its 41st year, Landscape Ontario’s Congress has grown to become Canada’s premier green industry trade exhibition and conference. It’s the perfect place to find the new products, ideas, equipment, tools, services and connections to build a better business. The tradition continues January 7-9, 2014, when Landscape Ontario’s trade show and conference returns to the Toronto Congress Centre, bringing together more than 600 leading manu-

Congress 2014 will provide you with the resources to be successful in a constantly changing business environment.

facturers and suppliers, along with 12,000 industry professionals from around the world, on more than eight acres of show floor to share their expertise and secrets to success. “With a full schedule of guest speakers, seminars, networking events and a show floor crammed with new and exciting products, Congress is the ideal platform for discovering innovative ways to expand your business,” says Heather

See us at Congress Booth #1218 72 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

MacRae, director of events and trade shows for Landscape Ontario. Congress provides the ideal mix of products and professional development where owners, managers and buyers from the green trades and horticultural industries gather together once a year to shop for new products, meet vendors, attend inspirational educational sessions and exchange ideas with thousands of fellow professionals from all industry sectors. The always-popular New Product Showcase at Congress is Canada’s largest collection of new products and services, featuring the latest tools, plants and products that industry professionals seek to meet the demands of their clientele. The Congress Green Industry Conference offers a dynamic speaker lineup composed of industry leaders and successful entrepreneurs with an interesting variety of practical sessions, owners-only workshops and popular Lunch ’n’ Learns. Conference sessions will cover topics from how to get your business on the front page of Google, to ways that you can reinvent your business and respond positively to a cyclical recession model. Special owners-only workshops will focus on how to expand your business, how to understand the threats of growth and how to avoid the pitfalls. After taking in the trade show and attending conference sessions during the day, there is plenty to do at night during Congress as well. Be inspired by the talent and creativity of the winners of LO’s landscape construction, maintenance and design awards at the Awards of Excellence Ceremony on

Tues., Jan. 7. This ticketed event begins at 4:45, and includes dinner and drinks at the President’s Reception. A new event at Congress is a networking event for women, Feminine Factor in Horticulture. Beth Edney will give a thought-provoking keynote presentation followed by an unprecedented opportunity to network with peers, on Wed., Jan. 7, 4-5:15 p.m. All congress attendees are invited to attend Tailgate Party XVIII on Wednesday evening. Come and enjoy the new format and enjoy dinner and earlyevening entertainment. The Tailgate Party is free to all badge holders. See the entire schedule of conferences and events for the show, and register to attend at www.locongress.com.

Toronto hosts 2014 Skills Canada competition Skills/Compétences Canada, a not-for-profit organization that actively promotes careers in skilled trades and technologies, has announced that Canada’s top skilled trade and technology students, along with government representatives, industry leaders, trainers and educators, will gather in Toronto at the International Centre from June 4-7, 2014 for the 20th annual Skills Canada National Competition. The event attracts hundreds of students from all provinces and territories, and features at least 40 unique skilled-trade competitions in the categories of Construction, Employment, Information and Technology, Manufacturing, Service, and


Transportation. It is the only event of its kind where young Canadians studying a skilled trade or technology can be tested against exacting industry standards, and vie for the honor of being named the best in their chosen discipline. Competitors will also be aiming for a coveted spot on WorldSkills Team Canada 2015, heading next to WorldSkills São Paolo 2015, in Brazil. For more information visit www.skillscanada.com.

considered as pests (i.e., weeds). It explains the invasive plants policy, lists the plants considered to be regulated pests, and indicates that these plants are prohibited from entry to Canada. As new invasive plants are assessed, they will also be added to this Directive. D-12-01 is available on the CFIA web site at the following address: www.inspection.gc.ca/ eng/1380720513797/1380721302921

CFIA pubishes invasive policy directive

New test for permeable paving infiltration

This timed test assesses the surface infiltration rate of new and in-service permeable pavements.

The Invasive Plants Directive (D-12-01), “Phytosanitary requirements to prevent the introduction and establishment of plants regulated as pests in Canada” is now posted on the CFIA website. D-12-01 clarifies the policy to prevent or limit the importation and the domestic spread of plants

The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM International) recently released C1781 Standard Test Method for Surface Infiltration Rate of Permeable Unit Pavement Systems. This test method is specifically designed for assessing the surface infiltration rate of new and

in-service permeable interlocking concrete pavements and permeable clay brick pavements. The test method involves timing a slow pour of a known weight of water into a 12-in. diameter pipe fastened to the permeable pavement surface with plumber’s putty. The infiltration rate is eas-

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industrynews ily calculated using a formula in the test method. The test method also provides guidance on how to locate the pipe on the paving surface to measure infiltration that represents the pattern on the larger pavement area. The test uses similar equipment and methods in ASTM C1701 Standard Test Method for Infiltration Rate of in Place Pervious Concrete. The similarities between C1701 and C1781 make the test results comparable. “We are seeing more provincial, state and local permeable pavement specifications require surface infiltration tests to accept new permeable pavements and to evaluate their in-service infiltration for determining surface cleaning,” says Craig Walloch, chair of ASTM Subcommittee C15.04 on Research, who helped develop the standard. “Now they have a method with specific guidance for testing unit paving with results that can be compared to that from pervious concrete and porous asphalt.” Walloch further noted that existing guidelines published by stormwater agencies have used C1701 to test surface infiltration of permeable unit paving. While the results from that test method applied to permeable unit pavement are

useful, C1781 provides clear guidance on executing the test on these pavements. To purchase and download C1781 from ASTM, visit www.astm.org/Standards/C1781.htm. For further information on permeable interlocking concrete pavement design, construction and maintenance visit the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute at www.icpi.org.

Canadian honoured at Hardscape Project Awards The Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute (ICPI) with the Brick Industry Association and National Concrete Masonry Association recognized the winners of the 6th Annual HNA Hardscape Project Awards at a breakfast ceremony held last October in Louisville, Ky. The awards recognize outstanding contractor projects including residential walkways, patios, driveways, and commercial plazas, parking lots, and streets.  Omniscape of Cambridge, Ont., won an award in the Segmental Retaining Walls - Residential Less than 1,000 Square Feet category, for its project Madiera - Enjoying Natural Beauty.

Asian long-horned beetle find The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) recently confirmed the presence of Asian longhorned beetle (ALHB) in an industrial area near Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, Ont. Between 2003 and 2007, ALHB was known to exist in the cities of Toronto and Vaughan. A quarantine area was established and control efforts were undertaken. Based on international standards, the pest was considered eradicated from this area in 2013 after not being detected for five years. This new find is outside of the eradicated area. Based on the CFIA’s national plant pest surveillance program, the ALHB has never been detected elsewhere in Canada. The CFIA is working with other federal departments and provincial and municipal governments to survey the area and determine next steps. Additional information is available on the CFIA  website at www.inspection.gc.ca/pests.

Hosta ‘Drinking Gourd’ named hosta of the year T​ ​he hosta cultivar ​‘Abiqua Drinking Gourd​‘​has been named the 2014 Hosta of the Year by the American Hosta Growers Association.​ This cultivar’s huge, heavily-textured, bluegreen leaves cup and twist into a unique display. It boasts white flowers in early summer and good WALTERS GARDENS, INC.

​​

18598 Advent Road Pitt Meadows, BC Canada, V3Y 2G8 Toll Free 1-800-471-4448 Phone: 604-465-7122 Fax: 604-465-8100 inquiry@specimentrees.com

slug resistance. It reaches ​45 cm (​18-​in.) tall,​​55 cm (​22-​in.)​ when flowering. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. They have an ability to excel in deep shade. ​‘​Abiqua Drinking Gourd’​ is hardy to Zone 3. ​ The AHGA’s members have voted to select a hosta of the year since 1996. Award winners are hostas that are good garden plants in all regions, are widely available and in sufficient supply. LT​

www.specimentrees.com 74 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

74 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES


lettertotheeditor The nursery industry doesn’t really ‘get it’ yet, as a recent mailing proved so nicely. The catalog that rolled across my desk was gorgeous, well designed and illustrated. There was even a URL for downloading images. Excellent, this could save me some time humping cameras around to trial gardens. I went to the website and was presented with a license. It was a standard thou-shallnot-own these images text except for one section, “If an image is used on a website, its use must be restricted, meaning that it not be posted in a downloadable format.” Well, I have to say I snorted out loud. There is absolutely no format or software that will stop a determined picture-nabber. None. But here’s the issue. Nurseries are still thinking scarcity, and the public is firmly into abundance. This attitude of protecting images is based on scarcity, and not the Net reality. Before the Net, nurseries invested large amounts of money to take professional slides, and guarded them jealously. Pictures were scarce. After the Net, there’s a decent camera in every cell phone, and photo-editing software to correct most mistakes. No, they’re not pro-level shots but frankly, it doesn’t matter as much as when the resources were scarce. The only thing you have left that’s scarce is your customer’s attention. Nurseries are only one small voice in the crowd. A very small voice at that to a limited market. By restricting photographs (which are no longer scarce) nurseries are shooting themselves in the foot. Photographs are the new medium of attention. You pay for your customer’s attention with gorgeous pictures. And restricting their use in any way is simply scarcity thinking. The only scarce resource the nursery industry has to sell are the plants. Everything else you used to protect is now freely available online. So will I promote this nursery’s plants? Probably not. I only have so many hours in a day and my readers want pictures. Given the option of working with nurseries who work with me and save me time or those who want to protect a no-longer-scarce resource, you can see what I’m going to do. Doug Green SGF Communications Stella, Ont. JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

More Nursery. Less Nursing. All season weed control. One application. Protect your nursery stock with one easy-to-use granular herbicide. Casoron® G-4 provides residual season-long control of more than 30 different weeds and grasses. It is easy to measure and apply, and requires no in-season re-application, so you will have more time for all your other important tasks.

Casoron G-4 ®

Gain more time next spring

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www.uap.ca/casoron West: 1-800-561-5444

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Ontario & Maritimes: 1-800-265-5444

BC: 1-604-534-8815

Quebec: 1-800-361-9369

® Casoron G-4 is a registered trademark of Chemtura Co./Cie. Always read and follow label directions. Member of CropLife Canada. 13013 09.13

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newproducts String trimmer Commercial landscapers now have a new 21.2 cc professional-grade trimmer option from Shindaiwa, the T235. Equipped with a solid drive shaft, comfortable and ergonomically correct grips, premium two-stage air filtration, and a fullwrap tank stand, this trimmer has been designed to perform. Add to these a 50 cm cutting swath, easy re-loading higher capacity speed feed head, and a hightorque gear box, and the T235 becomes a powerhouse trimmer. Shindaiwa

www.shindaiwa.ca

Retractable hose Great Stuff introduces its innovative new RoboReel water hose reel. RoboReel winds the hose automatically, at the touch of a button on the unit or on the remote at the end of the hose. It automatically rewinds the hose utilizing a backand-forth motion, preventing kinks. One-Touch starts the flow of water as the RoboReel’s valve and remote can manage all on/off water functions. Available in 100 ft. of 5/8-in. hose or 150 ft. of ½-in. hose.

Retail display system for trees The TreePlex multifunctional retail tree display has an interlocking grid system that can be reconfigured in a matter of seconds to hold five different pot sizes. Trees can be moved around the garden centre safely, quickly and easily using a pallet jack. Feature displays can now be done without the fear of wind and heat damage. Each TreePlex unit comes with six interlocking, injection molded, 3/8-in.-thick glass-filled polyethelene slats for strength and durability, and a 1-1/4-in. drain plug. Prairie Wind Garden Fixtures

www.prairiewindgardenfixtures.com

Great Stuff

www.roboreel.com

Customer service training manual This 200-page book shows you and your managers how to fully train your staff in a fashion that is customized to your store, your locale and your clientele. Your best advertising and promotion is to take advantage of the customer who is already in the store. With tips from this book, raise your benchmark sales per employee hour. JPL Consulting

www.jplbiz.ca

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newproducts Zero-chloride ice melter Global Biochem announces Snowmelt, a zero-chloride, corrosion inhibitor anti-/de-icing fluid. Snowmelt is a patented, all-natural liquid product. Its unique molecular makeup gives it excellent deicing efficiency, up to double that of sodium chloride. It is non-toxic to plants, fish and animals. Snow Melt is an engineered anti-ice liquid reducing corrosion of concrete, steel and asphalt translating to savings on material, labour and maintenance. Drivetec

www.drivetec.ca

Fertilizer Ball announces the addition of Nature’s Source Plant Probiotic to its line of plant nutrition products. Nature’s Source Plant Probiotic is a unique complex of beneficial microorganisms that promote the establishment and enhance the growth of all plants in all types of soils and growing media. Nature’s Source Plant Probiotic contains beneficial Bacillus (bacteria), Trichoderma (fungi), and Streptomyces (actinomycetes) on a 100 per cent soluble powder that can be sprayed on plants and foliage or injected through an irrigation system, or liquid concentrate for retail sales. Ball

www.naturessourceplantfood.com

Utility vehicle cab Curtis Industries has introduced a new commercial grade Cab System for John Deere Gator XUV and HPX models. This all-steel cab enclosure fits 2013 and prior-year models, and provides all-season protection. Curtis Cabs mount directly to the vehicles’ factory OPS in about three hours. The Curtis Cab has proven, tight-seal doors that won’t shatter like an all-glass door, and can be removed in under a minute. Wide, dual sliding windows in both the doors and rear panel provide maximum airflow from all angles. Curtis Industries 

www.curtiscab.com

ROCKWOOD FOREST NURSERIES "Growing is our Business" Since 1986

"Come see the difference" 437 Mark Road, R.R. #1, Cameron, Ontario K0M 1G0

P: 888-833-0473 | F: 705-374-4730 E: info@rockwoodforest.com

WWW.ROCKWOODFOREST.COM JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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cnlanews IPM consultation in B.C. In B.C., the Ministry of Environment is planning to amend the Integrated Pest Management Regulation (IPMR) to ensure that most pesticides used in landscaped areas are applied by trained people. More information is available on the BC government website (www2.gov.bc.ca). According to Peter Isaacson, CNLA’s IPM and minor use coordinator, the proposed changes will be positive overall for the industry. “Essentially, the idea is to take pesticides out of the hands of the public and into the hands of trained professionals. This is a good change, and likely will provide business opportunities to professional landscape firms. From a garden centre perspective the changes may be a bit different, as there will be more rules and regulations around selling to the public and a loss of some more dangerous pesticides.” The amendment will also stipulate that untrained operators will not be able to apply pesticides, even under supervision from a license holder; training is mandatory. Notes Isaacson, “We can see this as a positive change towards the safer use of pesticides, even though it will require additional training for some landscape companies.”

Trend insights and opportunities Significant trends are at work shaping the future of the ornamental horticulture industry, and businesses that grow and retail plants or sell related products and services. With nearly three decades of experience in the Canadian ornamental horticulture market, Marcon+ZRB research and marketing firm has examined these trends and reports on what they mean to you and your business. The following is an excerpt from its latest trend report. Read the full report at www.cnla-acpp. ca/research. “Prior to the 2008 economic crisis, experts predicted a trillion dollar (CDN) transfer of wealth over the next twenty years and, as Boomers received inheritances from their parents, this windfall would automatically translate into strong purchase levels for ornamental horticulture products and services during retirement. Five years later, many Boomers carry heavy debt loads and are ill prepared for retirement and longer life spans. While inheritances may help to alleviate their debt, evolving circumstances, changing interests and new spending habits should be expected as this generation ages. These will have a significant impact on the way you sell your plants, products or services. 78 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

“According to the Conference Board of Canada, the demand for condominiums and town homes will continue to be on the rise thanks to changing demographics. From the 2011 Census, the number of people living in single-detached homes starts to drop around age 55. Two thirds of the population aged 50 to 54 occupied a singledetached home in 2011. Over the next few years, a significant number of Boomers will downsize to a home with a predictably smaller outdoor space. Depending on the age and location of the house, condo or townhouse, the landscape may be mature and in need of upgrading, requiring a complete design and installation, or a compact balcony or rooftop calling for a creative solution. Consider the implications and sales opportunities for the types of plants, landscape materials and design required for such spaces. Is your business positioned for a sizable downturn in Boomer sales volume for traditional lawn and garden plants, supplies and landscapes, but ready to provide the value-added solutions they will be looking for? How will you market that you sell what they want?”

New germplasm for Canadian growers Landscape Ontario Horticulture Trades Association, in partnership with CNLA and Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, has used an investment of $43,200 from the Canadian Agriculture Adaptation Program (CAAP) to initiate the establishment of a gene pool of promising woody plant germplasm. The genetics are selected for simultaneous suitability as edible and ornamental plants in home gardens, patio arrangements and urban balconies. At the moment, the gene pool consists of 54 accessions from 17 taxa, and is rapidly growing. The goal of Vineland breeders and business analysts is to develop a focus on several taxa of strategic interest, and to utilize the germplasm in breeding. The further release of new cultivars with improved floral display, fall colour, and edible characteristics would provide a competitive edge to Canadian growers.

Garden centre assessment program Garden Centres Canada has created a new program for garden centres not quite ready to take part in the inspection program. This program will bring a local reviewer to your store who will look at specific aspects of your garden centre, such

as store layout, merchandising, and plant health. This new program will provide you with an outside opinion of your store and help you focus on where to make improvements. Information and registration forms can be found at www.cnla-acpp.ca/ retailers.

Eve Tigwell is back for 2014 For those garden centres that want a leg up on the competition, the garden centre inspection program with Eve Tigwell is a fantastic opportunity. Eve is a great resource, with over 25 years of experience in the garden centre industry. Have her visit your garden centre and give you tips on where to improve. Inspections will be taking place in March and June. Book your space early to take advantage of early-bird pricing.

Last chance to win a trip! HortProtect Insurance is offering you a chance to win a $5,000 travel voucher with Air Canada. Simply visit www.cnla-acpp.ca/contest to request a quote from HortProtect Insurance, and you will be entered into the draw. If you sign up with HortProtect, you will automatically receive ten bonus entries. Contest closes Feb. 28, at 11:59 p.m.

Plum pox virus update The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) recently informed CNLA and other stakeholders that a single positive of plum pox virus (PPV) was found this past summer as a part of CFIA’s regular monitoring activities. The positive plant was found in a homeowner’s backyard near the west border of the PPV quarantine area, and will necessitate expansion of the quarantine area. The expansion will not affect any wholesale nursery growers, but several retail garden centres will no longer be able to sell ornamental Prunus to homeowners outside the quarantine area. It is not yet known when this new restriction will come into effect as it will require Ministerial approval. Further details will be posted on the CFIA website: www.inspection.gc.ca. LT

The Canadian Nursery Landscape Association is the federation of Canada’s provincial horticultural trade associations. Visit www.cnla-acpp.ca for more information.


comingevents January 6-8, Great Lakes Trade Exposition (GLTE), DeVos Place, Grand Rapids, Mich. www.glte.org January 7-9, Congress 2014, Toronto Congress Centre, Toronto, Ont. www.locongress.com January 8-10, The Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show, Baltimore Convention Center, Md. www.mants.com

January 22-24, The Tropical Plant Industry Exhibition (TPIE), Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. www.fngla.org/tpie January 26-30, Toronto Spring Gift Show, International Centre and Congress Centre, Toronto, Ont. www.cgta.org January 28-31, International Plant Fair, Essen, Germany, www.ipm-messe.de

January 8-10, Northern Green Expo, Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis, Minn. www.northerngreenexpo.org

January 29-31, Your Next Level, New Orleans, La. www.yournextlevel.org

January 9-10, Indiana Green Expo, Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Ind. www.indianagreenexpo.com

February 5-7, New England Grows, Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Boston, Mass. www.newenglandgrows.org

January 13-15, CENTS 2013, Greater Columbus Convention Center, Columbus, Ohio www.centsmarketplace.com

February 5-7, iLandscape: The Illinois Landscape Show, Rennaisance Schaumberg Conference Centre, Schaumburg, Ill. www.ilandscapeshow.com

February 11-12, Manitoba Green Show, Victoria Inn, Winnipeg, Man. www.landscapemb.com February 12-14, ISA Ontario Conference, Deerhurst Resort, Huntsville, Ont. www.isaontario.com February 17-21, CGSA/WCTA Canadian International Turfgrass Conference and Trade Show, Fairmont Waterfront Hotel, Vancouver, B.C. www.golfsupers.com February 17-22, Association of Outdoor Lighting Professionals annual conference, Catamaran Resort Hotel and Spa, San Diego, Calif. www.aolponline.org February 18-20, Salon du Vegetal, Angers, LT France. www.salon-du-vegetal.com

classifieds BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

EQUIPMENT

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

ESTABLISHED MUSKOKA LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE COMPANY FOR SALE Successful, respected company, locally owned and operated, is looking for a professional and dedicated purchaser. Well-maintained fleet of trucks and equipment. Dependable staff, loyal customer base. Year-round operation. For serious inquiries only, please reply in confidence by email to: MuskokaOpportunity@gmail.com

SNOWBLOWERS FOR SALE Sicard Airport Snow Blowers for sale. Ready to use. $18,000 each. Call Mark at 647-830-5348

Macuto Nurseries Experienced farm workers required to perform manual work. Hand cultivating, digging and tree planting. Hourly rate $10.25. Also required: Driver - Class A licence, Z Certificate and Mobile Crane Operator 0-8. Driver hourly rate $17.50. Seasonal employment starting April 1, 2014 to Nov 30, 2014. Job site Keswick, Ontario. Fax resume 905-898-0360 or call 905-898-6856

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING INFORMATION

All classified ads must be pre-paid by credit card. Rates: $62.15 (includes HST) per column inch (approx. 25 words). Deadline: 10th day of the month prior to issue date. Space is limited to a first-come, firstserved basis. To advertise: E-mail your name, phone number and ad to Robert at classifieds@landscapeontario.com. Online classified rates are $67.80 HST included for Landscape association members and $90.40 (HST included) for non-members. Online ads are posted for 31 days. View ads online at www.landscapetrades.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PAO Horticultural We are looking for experienced farm workers required to perform manual work. Hand cultivating, digging and tree planting. Hourly rate $10.25 per hour. Seasonal employment starts April 1 to November 30, 2014. Based out of Hornby Ontario. We thank all applicants for their interest, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Please no phone calls, fax or email resumes: info@paohorticultural.com Fax: 905-875-1511

View these ads and more on our website at

landscapetrades.com

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79


where to find it COMPANY

PAGE

AMA Plastics Ltd 30

PHONE

EMAIL

WEBSITE

800-338-1136

ama@amaplas.com

www.amaplas.com

Beaver Valley Stone 70

416-222-2424

info@beavervalleystone.com

www.beavervalleystone.com

Best Way Stone Ltd 29

800-BESTWAY

info@bestwaystone.com

www.bestwaystone.com

Bobcat 19

infocenter@bobcat.com

www.bobcat.com

Cut Above Natural Stone 53

888-557-7625

cutabovestone@live.ca

www.cutabovenaturalstone.com

Dynascape Software 72

800-710-1900

sales@gardengraphics.com

www.dynascape.com

Echo Power Equipment Canada 69

877-324-6660

info@echo.ca

www.echo.ca

Exmark Manufacturing Co Inc 54

402-223-6351

www.exmark.com

G & L Group 31

888-907-7258

seany@gandlgroup.com

www.gandlgroup.com

Gravely 83

800-472-8359

info@ariens.com

www.gravely.com

Great Lakes Wood Products 71

877-266-0636

bbraun@glwp.ca

Gro-Bark (Ontario) Ltd 33

888-GRO-BARK

keith@gro-bark.com

www.gro-bark.com

Hino Motors Canada 41

905-670-3352

info@hinocanada.com

www.hinocanada.com

Hustler Turf Equipment 75

800-395-4757

sales@hustlerturf.com

www.hustlerturf.com

Isuzu Commercial Trucks 45

905-612-0100

tony.parravano@isuzutruck.ca

www.isuzutruck.ca

J. Lockwood Chrysler Ltd. 76

289-644-2250

fmackenzie@lockwoodchrysler.com

www.lockwoodchrysler.com

Kubota Canada Ltd 13

905-294-7477

info@kubota.ca

www.kubota.ca

Landscape Management Network 42, 43 888-347-9864 info@landscapemanagementnetwork.com

www.landscapemanagement network.com

M Putzer Hornby Nursery Ltd 24

905-878-7226

putzernursery@primus.ca

www.putzernursery.com

Miller Compost - The Miller Group 51

866-887-6457

compost@millergroup.ca

www.millergroup.ca

National Leasing 68

866-586-5501

sales@nationalleasing.com

www.nationalleasing.com

Navascape by Permacon 5

PUBLISHER Lee Ann Knudsen CLP | lak@landscapeontario.com Editorial Director Sarah Willis | sarahw@landscapeontario.com Art Director Kim Burton | kburton@landscapeontario.com Editor Allan Dennis | adennis@landscapeontario.com Web editor Robert Ellidge | rob@landscapeontario.com Graphic Designer Mike Wasilewski | mikew@landscapeontario.com Accountant Joe Sabatino | joesabatino@landscapeontario.com Sales Manager, PUBLICATIONS Steve Moyer | stevemoyer@landscapeontario.com INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS REPRESENTATIVE Greg Sumsion | gsumsion@landscapeontario.com COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR Angela Lindsay | alindsay@landscapeontario.com Advisory Committee Gerald Boot CLP, Laura Catalano, Hank Gelderman CHT, Marty Lamers, Jan Laurin, Warren Patterson, Gregg Salivan, Bob Tubby CLP

80 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES

www.navascape.ca

Subscription rates: One year – $46.90, two years – $84.74; three years – $118.64, HST included. U.S. and international please add $20.00 per year for postage and handling. Subscribe at www.landscapetrades.com

Landscape Trades is published by Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association 7856 Fifth Line South, Milton, ON L9T 2X8 Phone: (905)875-1805 Email: comments@landscapetrades.com Fax: (905)875-0183 Web site: www.landscapetrades.com LANDSCAPE ONTARIO STAFF Shawna Barrett, Darryl Bond, Rachel Cerelli, Tony DiGiovanni CHT, Denis Flanagan CLD, Sally Harvey CLT CLP, Jane Leworthy, Heather MacRae, Kristen McIntyre CHT, Kathy McLean, Linda Nodello, Kathleen Pugliese, Paul Ronan, Ian Service, Tom Somerville, Martha Walsh

Landscape Trades is published nine times a year: January, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, October and November/December.

Copyright 2013. All rights are reserved. Material may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Landscape Trades assumes no responsibility for, and does not endorse the contents of, any advertisements herein. All representations or warranties made are those of the advertiser and not the publication. Views expressed do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the association or its members, but are those of the writer concerned.

ISSN 0225-6398 PUBLICATIONS MAIL SALES AGREEMENT 40013519 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO: CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT LANDSCAPE TRADES MAGAZINE 7856 FIFTH LINE SOUTH, MILTON, ON L9T 2X8, CANADA


Key

Connections Our events provide the tools for your business to grow and prosper

• Increase brand recognition • Discover new customers • Capitalize on new markets • Source new suppliers

Canada’s Premier Green Industry Trade Show and Conference January 7-9, 2014 Toronto Congress Centre Toronto, Ontario locongress.com

Canada’s Garden Festival March 14-23, 2014 Direct Energy Centre Toronto, Ontario canadablooms.com

GreenTrade Expo Eastern Ontario’s Green Trade Show February 12, 2014 Capital Exhibition Centre Ottawa, Ontario 2013 greentrade.ca

For exhibitor or visitor information please call: 1-800-265-5656 x353

Canada’s fall show for the floral and garden industry October 22-23, 2014 Toronto Congress Centre North Building, Toronto, Ontario loexpo.ca

SNOWPOSIUM LANDSCAPE ONTARIO

SNOW AND ICE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE AND EXPO

Conference and Expo September 2014 Milton, Ontario


where to find it COMPANY

PAGE

PHONE

EMAIL

WEBSITE

Neudorff North America 82

250-652-5888

cam@neudorff.ca

www.neudorff.ca

Oaks Concrete Products by Brampton Brick 2

800-709-OAKS

info@oakspavers.com

www.oakspavers.com

Permacon Group Inc 84

800-463-9278

www.permacon.ca

Pro Landscape by Drafix Software 47

800-231-8574

sales@prolandscape.com

www.prolandscape.com

Pro-Power Canada Inc 16, 17

800-361-0907

propower@on.aibn.com

www.propowercanada.ca

Proven Winners 22, 23

800-633-8859

www.colorchoiceplants.com

Rockwood Forest Nurseries 77

888-833-0473

www.rockwoodforest.com

info@rockwoodforest.com

Specimen Trees Wholesale Nurseries Ltd 74

604-465-7122

inquiry@specimentrees.com

www.specimentrees.com

Stihl Limited 11

519-681-3000

info.canada@stihl.ca

www.stihl.ca

Suite Plants 32

855-275-8111

info@suiteplants.com

www.suiteplants.com

Tallman Truck Centre Limited 73

613-546-0567

www.ttctruck.ca

Techo-Bloc 25

800-463-0450

info@techo-bloc.com

www.techo-bloc.com

The Toro Company 35

800-544-5364

wendy.peskar@toro.com

www.toro.ca

TIMM Enterprises Ltd 52

905-878-4244

sales@timmenterprises.com

www.timmenterprises.com

Unilock Ltd 8, 9

800-UNILOCK

georgetown@unilock.com

www.unilock.com

United Agri Products (UAP) 75

800-265-5444

www.uap.ca

Willowbrook Nurseries Inc 39

905-892-5350

info@willowbrooknurseries.com

www.willowbrooknurseries.com

Winkelmolen Nursery Ltd 49

519-647-3912

winkelmolen@sympatico.ca

www.winkelmolen.com

Wright Manufacturing 27

888-337-2199

sales@wrightmfg.com

www.wrightmfg.com

Zander Sod Co Ltd 18

877-727-2100

info@zandersod.com

www.zandersod.com

82 | JANUARY 2014 | LANDSCAPE TRADES


LANDSCAPE DOM I NATOR When you work hard all day taming the tough terrain, you need a machine that works just as hard. You need a Gravely Commercial Mower. With a full product offering from zero-turn mowers to 21-inch walk behinds, Gravely is built to take on the toughest jobs. And when your livelihood depends on getting the work done – downtime is not an option. That is why Gravely Commercial mowers are built to dominate the landscape.

www.gravely.com


GEt tOGEthER

COME visit us at bOOth 648 DuRiNG LO CONGREss Permacon is pleased to invite you to our annual industry night. An evening of fun, food and networking for designers, contractors and distributors.

WhEN:

January 7th, 5:00pm - 1:00am

WhERE: International Plaza Hotel (across from the Congress Center) Rsvp:

customerservicegta@permacon.ca or 1-800-668-4805

PERMACON.CA


January 2014 Landscape Trades