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JANUARY 2012 VOL. 34, NO. 1

landscapetrades.com

How to control time and cost overruns

Destination garden centres Rethink your store — as a venue

Shot at survival for urban trees Bylands: Leader in conservation, HR and marketing

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51

Green industry outlook positive

Meet the industry at Congress 2012

28

Horticulture, tradition, values ‌Thailand

PM40013519

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contents JANUARY 2012 VOL. 34, NO. 1

PUBLISHER Lee Ann Knudsen CLP | lak@landscapeontario.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Sarah Willis | sarahw@landscapeontario.com EDITOR Allan Dennis | adennis@landscapeontario.com WEB EDITOR Robert Ellidge | rob@landscapeontario.com ART DIRECTOR Kim Burton | kburton@landscapeontario.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Mike Wasilewski | mikew@landscapeontario.com ACCOUNTANT Joe Sabatino | joesabatino@landscapeontario.com SALES MANAGER, PUBLICATIONS Steve Moyer | stevemoyer@landscapeontario.com COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT Shawna Barrett | sbarrett@landscapeontario.com ADVISORY COMMITTEE Gerald Boot CLP, Laura Catalano, Hank Gelderman CHTM, Tim Kearney CLP, Marty Lamers, Jan Laurin, Bob Tubby CLP

Landscape Trades is published by Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association 7856 Fifth Line South, Milton, ON L9T 2X8 Phone: (905)875-1805 Email: comments@landscapetrades.com Fax: (905)875-0183 Web site: www.landscapetrades.com

feaTuRes 6

36 Green is good

Destination marketing

Coalition looks at health benefits of green space

Cash in on garden tourism

BY COLLEEN CIRILLO

BY VERONICA SLIVA

38 Low-cost loans

12 Good news for the green industry Trades well positioned for growth in 2012 BY JUDITH GUIDO

16 IPM for growers Testing microbial-based pesticides

Not-for-profit offers financing for growers BY ASHLEIGH BENEDICT

40 Call to action: Come alive outside! New outdoor initiative helps build community connections

BY PETER ISA ACSON

BY JIM PALUCH

20 Lease on life for urban trees

49 Training executives for the green industry

Underground water collection cells promote survival

Management program is an investment in your future

BY LORRAINE FLANIGAN

BY LIZ KLOSE

LANDSCAPE ONTARIO STAFF Carla Bailey, Rachel Cerelli, Paul Day CDE, Lexi Dearborn, Tony DiGiovanni CHTR, Denis Flanagan CLD, Sally Harvey CLT CLP, Helen Hassard, Lorraine Ivanoff, Jane Leworthy, Kristen McIntyre CHTR, Kathy McLean, Linda Nodello, Kathleen Pugliese, Paul Ronan, Ian Service, Tom Somerville, Martha Walsh

24 Gold Rose for Bylands

columns

Landscape Trades is published nine times a year: January, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, October and November/December.

Social media allows targeted marketing

All rights are reserved. Material may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Landscape Trades assumes no responsibility for, and does not endorse the contents of, any advertisements herein. All representations or warranties made are those of the advertiser and not the publication. Views expressed do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the association or its members, but are those of the writer concerned.

ISSN 0225-6398 PUBLICATIONS MAIL SALES AGREEMENT 40013519 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO: CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT LANDSCAPE TRADES MAGAZINE 7856 FIFTH LINE SOUTH, MILTON, ON L9T 2X8, CANADA

26 Mine customer data online

ROAD TO SUCCESS

68 Math is not sexy BY ROD McDONALD

BY KYLE LACY

LEGAL MATTERS

28 Growing in a tropical paradise

70 Inspection vs. supervision: qualifying the designer’s responsibility

Horticulture in Thailand

BY ROBERT KENNALEY

BY MICHAEL PASCOE

MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS

72 Controlling cost overruns BY MARK BRADLEY

DEPARTMENTS GREEN PENCIL INDUSTRY NEWS CNLA NEWS PROVINCIAL NEWS NEW PRODUCTS CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS WHERE TO FIND IT

4 44 64 66 76 79 79 81

SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING

74 It IS easy being green BY SEAN JAMES

In this issue: CONGRESS

2012 PREVIEW GUIDE REGISTER TODAY!

Subscription rates: One year – $46.89, two years – $84.73; three years – $118.63, HST included. U.S. and international please add $20.00 per year for postage and handling. Please make cheque payable to Landscape Trades.

Canadian nursery recognized with international honour

Featuring Congress Conference and Special Events JANUARY 9, 2012 Human Resources and Leadership Modules — CLP Study Group IPM Symposium Landscape Designer Conference Ontario Parks Association’s 56th Annual Parks Educational Forum JANUARY 10 - 12, 2012 Congress Conference JANUARY 10, 2012 Canadian Fence Industry Association’s AGM JANUARY 11, 2012 Landscape Ontario’s AGM Irrigation Conference January 12, 2012 Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Workshops

locongress.com AN INITIATIVE OF:

FEATURING: FENCECRAFT

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURES

to check out t sure Be of Exhibi he

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CONGRESS 2012 show preview Pages 51-62

Canada’s 39th International Horticultural Lawn and Garden Trade Show and Conference January 10 - 12, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre South Building Toronto, Ontario, Canada

SPONSORED BY: Bobcat of Hamilton Ltd. Entripy Custom Clothing Vermeer Canada Inc.

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greenpencil Customer engagement builds local connections for small business

Getting back to basics with a digital twist A popular YouTube video making the rounds again highlights the exponential differences in communication made possible through the Internet. Called Shift Happens 4.0, it was produced in 2009, so the shocking facts and figures would be even more eye popping if updated to reflect the marketplace in 2012. The idea behind fast-paced presentations such as this one, is to remind us of the infinite nature of the digital universe. We all know the Internet is a game changer. What you were doing two years ago, even a year ago, isn’t necessarily relevant anymore, as new hardware and softBy Sarah Willis ware are released constantly, requiring us to be in a state of perpetual adaptation. The smart phone in my back pocket is much more powerful than the first few computers I owned. Consumers have become addicted to change and we are online and accessible all the time. Apart from the appalling fact that 2,000,000 Americans now have a television in their bathrooms, the light bulb moment for me in Shift Happens was that, “It’s easier than ever to reach a large audience, but harder than ever to really connect with it.” So true. Will the Internet ever reach its full potential for small business? Globalization may be the Holy Grail for multi-national corporations, but is it relevant for a local service company creating trust relationships with its customers?

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Digital marketers tell us we now need to become ‘community managers’ to get our message across. Advertising is no longer all about shipping information out, it’s about listening, conversing, reshaping conversations, and relating to your target audience. The number varies depending on the source, but consumers are exposed to between 7,000 and 8,000 advertising impressions per day. Show it, don’t tell it, is a popular ad mantra if you want to get your message across. This is the secret weapon owned by the professionals in the green industry. It is full of caring individuals who are in the “show me” business. A look at the award-winning projects across the country bears witness to the skill and creativity required for the jobs you do. Word-of-mouth has always been the best form of advertising, as neighbours attest to the integrity of crews, attention to detail and pleasure experienced in a job well done. We don’t need marketing experts to tell us that 80 per cent of consumers trust a recommendation from a peer over a salesman. Our industry was built on overthe-garden-fence recommendations. Today, we need to connect both over the fence and digitally. Like it or not, the generation of upand-coming gardeners spends more time online than making connections face to face. Customers will only engage with you online if they can appreciate the value in your product or service. Your personality will draw them in, and ongoing advice and inspirational photographs will keep them hooked. If you’ve had success creating an online community network, I’d love to hear from you. Contact me at sarahw@landscapeontario.com or 647-723-5424. LT

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garden centre destination By VeronIca slIVa

What do garden centres and tourism have in common? More than you might imagine. Gardening is the most popular hobby in north america, expected to increase as baby boomers retire. this interest in gardening, combined with travel, has created a specialized niche known as “garden tourism.” as a garden centre or nursery owner, you can benefit. Ireland’s Gardenworld and terrain, near Philadelphia, use two creative strategies to attract retail customers.

You may not think of a garden centre as a “destination,” but gardeners not only enjoy visiting gardens while on vacation, but they also like to check out where the locals go to buy plants and look for inspiration. Canadian tour operator Donna Dawson of www.icangarden.com and www.gardeningtours.com has been offering garden tours since 1998. She says, “When I take my tour groups to a garden that has a garden centre nearby, it is always a tossup, ‘What do we see first, the garden centre or the garden?’ Garden lovers enjoy browsing for that special goodie to bring back home, whether it’s an idea or a product or just to check out what the locals grow.” Though Donna’s tours take her clients to far-off places, the same mindset applies when keen gardeners visit a town or city closer to home. What then qualifies a garden centre as a destination? Is it one that offers superb plants and a knowledgeable, friendly staff? Not necessarily so! These are normal expectations. For a garden centre to qualify as a 6 | JANUARY 2012

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destination it must offer something unique, and stand apart from all the rest. On a recent trip to Ireland I found such a place. Gardenworld, located in Kilquade in County Wicklow in the south of Ireland, opened in 2007 on the site of the existing National Garden Exhibition Centre. It is a top notch garden centre with a fine selection of hard-to-find plants and a staff with over 100 years of combined gardening experience. It’s not surprising that in a few short years this place attracts a lot of gardeners. It has something special to attract visitors ... its outstanding display gardens. The display gardens were born out of desperate times. For many years Tim and Suzanne Wallis ran a successful retail and wholesale nursery on the property, combining the retail garden centre with a plant propagation operation. Eventually, unable to compete with much larger propagation operations, this part of the business floundered. And as the saying goes, necessity became the mother of invention. Tim decided to do for gardening

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In the inspirational Celtic Stone Garden, this lovely Gothic arch is completed with a finely carved keystone.

what department stores commonly have always done for kitchens and furniture; to display products in a realistic setting. Tim’s brain child was to create an outdoor exhibit featuring a variety of garden designs, both large and small, to suit various budgets. He hoped that customers would be able visualize how plants, garden accessories and landscaping options fit into real properties. He then invited Ireland’s top garden designers and landscapers to create gardens in the space left by the failed propagation business. It was a huge success. Now about to enter its third decade, the National Garden Exhibition Centre (www. gardenexhibition.ie/about.html) has since established itself as Ireland’s leader of new trends in garden design. With over 15,000 plants, trees and shrubs incorporated into the gardens, the displays provide an excellent way for Gardenworld customers to identify plants and assess how they grow. Many of the displays include water features,

pergolas, mirrors, unusual furniture, sculptures and stonework. Some of the gardens present a traditional approach to garden design, such as the 100 metre Harlequin Walk. This permanent garden reflects the Edwardian style and serves as the main axis of the exhibition with climbing roses rambling over the eight arches that cross the path. In spring and summer, 2,500 bedding plants fill the borders on each side of the walk. At the centre an octagonal rose garden with four exits leads visitors into the other show gardens. While the plants themselves star in the Harlequin Walk, other gardens highlight hardscaping and the use of garden accessories. In the Celtic Stone Garden shrubs and plants take a back seat to the hardscaping. The star of this garden is a stunning hand-cut stone wall inlaid with Celtic carvings. A Celtic-inspired water fountain emerges from a wooden deck to complete the picture.

The Gothic Garden is designed to inspire and get creative juices flowing. The dramatic cement gothic window overlooks a pool, creating an ethereal effect to illustrate how a theme can pull both plants and structures together. In the summer the surrounding garden is a haze of colour. As the seasons change, the garden evolves naturally until in the depths of winter, it is wild, shadowy and full of character. In all there are 20 themed display gardens, each one offering visitors lots of ideas to take home. Some are permanent while others are changed or replaced so there is always something fresh to see. Most of the plants used in the display gardens can be purchased at Gardenworld. There are also designated retail areas for specialty gardening needs. For example, those interested in water gardening will find everything imaginable needed to create and maintain ponds. A tea room for refreshments provides a reason to linger longer. Today Gardenworld is an JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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One of a kind garden accessories are displayed throughout the gardens, showing homeowners how to use garden art to its best advantage.

outstanding example of a garden centre that has become a destination. ouTdooR liVing Not all garden centres and nurseries have the space or resources to create show gardens like those at Gardenworld. But, there are other ways to get on the garden centre destination map. Terrain at Styers’ in Glen Mills, Pa., near Philadelphia, is one that comes to mind. Before Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie (yes, the fashion retailers) purchased the business, Styer’s was a traditional American garden centre, looking pretty much the same as all the others in North America ... a tad uninspiring. Terrain is different. It is a lifestyle store that cleverly blends the line between home and garden. It’s a garden centre, a housewares emporium, a gift shop all rolled into a magical place where even those who don’t know a daffodil from a daisy can feel empowered to grow anything. Founded in 2008, Terrain transforms the local garden center into a celebration of nature. You know you are not in an ordinary garden centre the moment you drive into the parking lot. One-of-a-kind structures, doors and other large pieces of garden ornamentation that look like they spent a century or so at a castle are set up just beyond the parking lot. Whether you have the space for such pieces or not, you are drawn to check them out. The unusual accessories set the tone for the indoor retail space. 8 | JANUARY 2012

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A path winds through the exhibition gardens at Gardenworld.

Once inside the store, it is clear is that the inspired merchandising fingers of Anthropologie and Urban Outfitters have been at work. Terrain’s style is perhaps best described as rustic-modern, where old and weathered is a repeating theme. Preowned and not-so-loved pieces of furniture, along with wooden crates, old benches, planks of wood and pallets, serve as benches and tables along with natural materials like tree branches. Antiquish-looking props are used as retail fixtures to display products. The plants and horticultural products are intermixed with books, giftware, housewares and personal products. Blackboards and chalk are used for signage. The whole atmosphere is trendy and organic. And of course, “the look “is for sale everywhere. Terrain is a master at creating themed displays. Every season is special. Winter features bulbs for forcing and everything to celebrate Christmas with home décor, trees and ornaments for sale. In spring the nursery comes alive with flowering branches and is fully stocked for the gardening season ahead. The nursery stock is top-notch and displayed with accessories that encourage the browser to become a buyer. Summer is greeted with a superb selection of hanging plants and succulents for terrariums to help shoppers think about moving the gardening season indoors after summer’s glory. And in

fall, it’s all about the harvest with pumpkins and gourds to attract the Thanksgiving and Halloween crowd. Workshops that are regularly offered on a variety of topics from creating terrariums to building birdhouses to growing succulents are more reasons customers keep coming back to the store. Located in an antique greenhouse, the café is smack dab in the retail sales area. Surrounded by plants, books and products, it is a place to enjoy a light lunch, have coffee and chat with friends. The food (and the coffee) is excellent. Executive chef Keith Rudolf creates his menus using seasonal produce, meat and dairy from local farmers. And, the café is available for special events such as weddings and parties…after 5:00 p.m., of course. A retailer like Terrain illustrates that it is

Reclaimed and antique architectural elements set the stage in Terrain’s onsite cafe.

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Contains a growth stimulant (Glomus intraradices) developed exclusively for planting in flower beds, gardens and seedling containers, blended in a mixture of peat moss and humus and respectful of the environment.

Des bordures d’aluminium de qualité supérieure pour pavés, asphalte, plates-bandes ou jardins; offertes en plusieurs modèles, couleurs et dimensions. Permaloc est destiné aux paysagistes et est exclusif aux jardineries spécialisées.

Contient un supplément de croissance (Glomus intraradices) développé exclusivement pour les plantations de plates-bandes, jardins et contenants, incorporé à un mélange de tourbe de sphaigne et humus et respectant l’environnement.

A complete range of 20 high quality fertilizers for biodiversity of crops, designed for environmentally friendly consumers. OMRI certified. Une gamme complète de 20 engrais de qualité supérieure pour la biodiversité des cultures destinés aux consommateurs soucieux de l’environnement. Accrédités OMRI.

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The displays at Terrain (left) are a sensory experience. Here, terrarium growing media are simply but effectively displayed, highlighted with slate and chalk signage.

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Dramatic detail rules at Terrain. Guests are intrigued to enter the store where it appears an old tree is growing within the building. The ‘tree’ created from a trunk and vines, is a creative prop from which to sell lanterns, lamps and feeders.

possible to set yourself apart in the garden centre business. It takes outside-the-box thinking and creativity, and perhaps a little risk taking. When it comes down to it, what Terrain has to offer is really no different than most other garden centres. But, it is packaged uniquely, and that’s what sets this retailer apart. Standing out from the crowd has its advantages. Both Gardenworld and Styers have created destination garden centres in different ways, but are both benefiting in the same way‌by attracting a segment of the market that otherwise might have passed them by. You can LT do it too. Veronica Sliva is an Ontario-based garden writer with a lust for travel. Read about her adventures in both gardening and travel on her blog at www.gardenersworld.ca

Phone: 877-727-2100 17525 Jane St., RR #1 | Kettleby, Ontario | L0G 1J0

Terrain at Styers: Glen Mills, Pennsylvania www.shopterrain.com/for-garden Gardenworld: Kilquade, County Wicklow www.gardenworld.ie

www.zandersod.com

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| LANDSCAPE TRADES

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Innovation at work. For 85 years, STIHL has been a world-class innovator in outdoor power equipment. German engineered products featuring the latest pioneering technologies make STIHL the market leader. STIHL products are only available at independent STIHL Dealers who provide expert advice and on-site service. Thank you for supporting the leading team and for making STIHL the Number 1 Selling Brand in Canada.

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Industry outlook for 2012 Despite economic pressure, green industry businesses can tweak their models for success By JUdItH GUIdo

After a successful

presentation on market dynamics, trends, and growth opportunities held at the Landscape Ontario headquarters in September, I was asked to share my thoughts and outlook for 2012. The question is daunting for several reasons. First, the volume, rate and speed of change is faster and more furious than ever. Next, as the world gets smaller and communications systems advance, the effects of global political, economic and physical tidal waves can have a direct impact on our businesses within a matter of minutes. For example, current data shows that of 160 emerging countries around the world, we may see as many as 45 holding major revolutions, ousting their current political leadership in 2012. Depending on how these potential revolutions affect the stock markets and major economic indices, will determine whether they affect our businesses. Think back to this past summer and fall; did you ever think that the instability of Greece would cause such world-wide economic ripples? With those caveats covered, I will attempt to paint what I

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believe our industry will look like in 2012. Even though the world is getting smaller, our market dynamic periphery needs to expand. We can no longer focus entirely on our micro-markets and those of our nextdoor neighbours. We need to look at events happening around the world. Why? Because they have a direct impact on both consumer and commercial spending. When global volatility heats up and disrupts markets, this causes a wave of instability, which translates into buyer skepticism and conservatism. Buyers take a “hold� mentality, spending money only on items deemed necessities. Make certain you engage somebody who knows how to read and analyze markets, and then leverage the data into an intelligent and profitable business model. This means looking at local, national and international market dynamics, while listening to the voice of your customers, and analyzing their spending patterns. Utilize social media, the web and low-cost SFA (sales force automation) and CRM (customer relationship management) tools to stay

in constant contact with your customers, prospects, media and competition, in order to identify changes in the market, and emerging business trends. Once you’ve identified market changes and trends, act quickly, leveraging them before your competition. gReen sTill glows A market trend that will continue in 2012 is the GREEN movement. Revenues from green construction projects increased by 11.3 per cent in 2011, with projections of 19 per cent growth for 2012. There are several market dynamics that contribute to this growth, including regulatory compliance, but mostly contractors and retailers are listening to the voices of their customers, as 73 per cent percent are demanding GREEN. Green companies will be rewarded with higher revenues and profit margins, lower expenses, greater market share and increased customer and employee retention in 2012, along with significant brand equity growth. Many businesses now view GREEN as an

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Retailers need to ensure their customers an extraordinary experience to maintain their patronage.

important strategic business tool. Consumer conservatism and risk aversion will reign again in 2012. The renovation market will continue to see strong growth, as people reinvest in their homes, with 39 percent allocating money to outdoor living and landscaping. The commercial market will also benefit by the renovation trend. Position yourself as a landscape investment advisor instead of a landscaper or garden centre employee. Ask your customers how much they intend to invest (not budget or spend) in their landscape products or projects. The word invest implies that your customers will get a return, and it moves you away from being an adversary or expense centre, to an advocate with the customers’ best interest in mind. Promote products and services that will produce strong return on investment and environmental stewardship, such as low maintenance landscapes, smart irrigation, perennials, hardscapes and indigenous plantings. open — foR business A seismic trend is the increased demand for transparency. Customers expect you to be transparent in your pricing, contracts and information about your company. You need to open your “kimono” to them, as they don’t want any surprises. Buyers are risk averse. They’ve been badly burnt over the last three years. They want to know that you are a financially solid company with a professional team. Tout your education, credentials and expertise, as these communicate low risk. Buyers want to understand your guarantees and warranties easily. Fewer than 20 percent of guarantees are redeemed, so differentiate by making yours the lowest-risk in the industry. Promote the innovations, products and equipment that will save your customers time and money. Those providing dashboards 14 | JANUARY 2012

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and reports that customers can access easily will be big winners. Providing clearly documented site information, via mobile technology, will earn you business and provide a competitive advantage. Those who don’t use technology will be seen as suspect and outdated. Being transparent and proving how you are part of the solution is critical today. As customers become smarter and more connected in 2012, the need for quantifying and communicating your value will be paramount. Customers EXPECT that you’ve done your homework, and understand their needs, pains and goals. You’ll need to PROVE your value, how you’re part of their solution, AND how you’re really different from your competition. Make value a tangible and easyto-understand asset. Align your values with ease of doing business,extraordinary customer experiences, environmental stewardship and differentiation. For commercial companies, developing reporting systems with“before and after” scenarios will earn trust and customers. Learning how to read and translate the voice of the customer, ahead of your competitor, will be a critical skill in 2012. Those who can clearly articulate, communicate and PROVE their value proposition, as it relates to the voice of the customer, will win. Technology connecTs Social media will continue to be a great tool for you, and your key stakeholders, in communicating value to others. Social media really does matter, and will continue to play an even greater role in purchasing decisions in 2012. Customers will use social media to conduct research, identify trends, locate suppliers, find deals and talk about you in either a positive or negative manner. Recent research shows that 80 percent of buyers change their minds about buying from you if they read negative information, while 87 percent of buyers will buy from you after reading positive feedback. Clanning like-minded, successful customers, who continue to grow as a result of their relationship with you and your services, will create incredible sales-advocate channels for your organization. Using social media and managing your online presence is a must in 2012. Either control your brand and

communications, or your competitors will do it for you. Expanding smart partnerships with suppliers, customers and value chain partners will not only increase revenues and market share, but will significantly improve name awareness and reputation, your brand equity. Remember, we’re all judged by the company we keep, so choose these partners carefully. Identities of our philanthropic and community partners will play a role in the customer’s decision-making criteria. Customers, as long as there is product and price parity, will continue to favour local and smaller players. Farmer’s markets will continue to grow in 2012, a great place to partner with locals, promote business and align yourself with the community. Farmer’s markets are cost-effective sales and marketing channels. Embrace technology; it not only saves you time and money, but it increases efficiencies and company valuation, along with attracting and retaining excellent employees and partners. Embracing technology ahead of your competition can earn you significant market share. Customers want to be aligned with innovators, not dinosaurs. Affordable mobile field technology and software, smart irrigation and phones, downloadable apps, GPS, killer websites, sales force automation, hybrid equipment and social media are available to both big and small companies, at a very reasonable cost. The year 2012 is showing signs of overall growth in the seven to nine per cent range. Those who can read and leverage the markets, deploy technology, and have assembled an intelligent team will lead, earning more than 15 per cent. For those who don’t lead, approximately eight per cent will go out of business, 23 per cent will lose money and the remainder will make less than nine per cent. Listen, watch, learn and adapt to your customers and the markets, LT and make 2012 your best year ever! Judith Guido, of Guido & Associates, is a Californiabased business growth specialist. She has helped all green industry sectors with research and product development, training, mergers and acquisitions, branding and strategy, and profitable growth.

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Microbial-based pesticide testing in nurseries By Peter Isaacson, National IPM/Minor Use Coordinator, CNLA

Nursery growers have identified the lack of access to newer, environmentallyfriendly pesticide products as an impediment to adopting IPM strategies. While some reduced-risk and microbial products are becoming available in the Canadian marketplace (Table 1) pest management is still predominantly dealt with culturally and chemically. In 2006 the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada initiated a two-year research project to study the viability of microbial-based pesticides on ornamental nursery production. This research project was undertaken to start encouraging nursery growers to adopt these technologies and assist in reducing chemical pesticide use, and the risks associated with them. First year results were published in the March 2007 issue of Landscape Trades. This article will summarize the final year of testing.

Efficacy of biofungicides In this project the biological fungicides Rootshield* (Trichoderma harzianum), Rhapsody (Bacillus subtilis) and Pre-Stop (Gliocladium cacatenulatum) were evaluated for efficacy and crop tolerance of powdery mildew on outdoor- and greenhousegrown hybrid roses (2006-2007), Botrytis on geraniums (2006-2007) and Rhizoctonia aerial blight of maidenhair fern (2007). These results summarize the results from the 2007 growing season. Rose powdery mildew experiments All of the biological fungicides applied as a preventative spray every seven to 14 days reduced rose powdery mildew symptoms on one-gallon, container-grown outdoor hybrid roses compared to the untreated check, under moderate disease pressure. Pre-Stop (G. catenulatum) and Serenade

*Please note that early trials were conducted with Plantshield which is not registered for use in Canada. Rootshield is currently registered for both aerial and drench applications. Table 1: Registered Biofungicides for ornamentals in Canada

Product Manufacturer PCP no. Target pest Crops Actinovate SP Natural Industries Inc. 28672 Botrytis, powdery mildew Field and greenhouse Fungicide grown strawberry, pepper, gerbera daisy Bloomtime Biological Northwest Agricultural 28436 Fire blight Apple, pear, including FD Biopesticide Products non-bearing pome fruits Dygall AgBioResearch Ltd. 21106 Crown Gall Nursery grown plants Mycostop Biofungicide Verdera Oy 26265 Fusarium (damping off, root Greenhouse grown rot, stem rot and wilt) cucumber, tomato, pepper, ornamentals PreStop Verdera Oy 28820 Pythium sp., Greenhouse grown Rhizoctonia solani, vegetables, herbs Fusarium oxysporum, and ornamentals Phytophthora cryptogea, Botrytis cinerea, Didymella bryoniae Rhapsody ASO Agraquest Inc. 28627 Powdery mildew, Botrytis, Greenhouse and outdoor bacterial leafspot, anthracnose grown ornamentals RootShield Drench WP, BioWorks Inc. 27115 27116 Pythium, Rhizoctonia, Fusarium Greenhouse grown Rootshield Granular tomatoes, cucumbers, ornamentals Serenade Max Agraquest Inc. 28549 Botrytis, Sclerotinia, downy Various vegetable and fruit mildew, powdery mildew, crops fire blight

16 | JANUARY 2012

January 2012 final.indd 16

Max (Bacillus subtilis) applied every 14 days, and Rhapspdy (B. subtilis) applied every seven days, performed as well as, or better than, the standard fungicide, Nova 40W (myclobutanil). Serenade Max left a white residue on the leaves which persisted after overhead watering, which may not be desirable in a commercial hybrid rose; however, no residue or injury was observed on flower petals. Plantshield (Rootshield), Trichoderma harzianum, was somewhat less effective under higher disease pressure at the end of trial. Differences between treatments were not statistically significant due to a high degree of variability within each treatment, including in the check and standard fungicide treatments. No symptoms of phytotoxicity were observed on any of the three hybrid rose cultivars in the trial. Geranium botrytis blight experiments Under moderate to high disease pressure, zonal geraniums cv. ‘Bravo’ and cv. ‘Neon Violet’ treated preventively (prior to inoculation) and every 14 days postinoculation with pre-stop (Gliocladium catenulatum strain J1446) had significantly less Botrytis blight than the check plants or the plants treated with captan fungicide, and the highest plant quality rating. PRESTOP reduced Botrytis lesion size, number of lesions and number of diseased leaves and provided control comparable to captan. Serenade Max (Bacillus subtilis QST 713), with the second highest plant quality rating, reduced the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) significantly compared to the untreated checks and provided a level of disease control comparable to captan. All of the biologicals: Pre-Stop, Serenade Max (Bacillus subtilis QST 713), and Plantshield (Rootshield), Trichoderma harzianum strain T-22, reduced the area under the disease

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AUDPC (area under the disease progress curve) calculated on the percent leaf area affected. The lower the value the better the disease control. 2 Columns with the same letter are not significantly different in LSD at P < 0.1. 1

progress curve (AUDPC) significantly compared to the untreated checks. No phytotoxicity was observed in any treatment.

Rhizoctonia aerial blight of fern experiments Plantshield (Rootshield), Trichoderma harzianum Strain T-22, was the only biological fungicide that significantly reduced Rhizoctonia aerial blight of western maidenhair fern (Adiantum aleuticum) compared to the untreated check, under moderately high disease pressure. Disease control with Plantshield was not statistically different from that obtained with Senator 70 WP (thiophanate-methyl). Maidenhair fern is highly susceptible to Rhizoctonia aerial blight when grown in the greenhouse under high temperatures. All treatments were applied every 14 days in this trial. Serenade Max and Rhapsody (Bacillus subtilis MB 600) reduced disease to some extent also, and may have performed better on a 7-day schedule on this overhead-irrigated crop. Pre-Stop (Gliocladium catenulatum) was not effective on this disease.

18 | JANUARY 2012

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2

Conclusions In this project the biological fungicides Rootshield (Trichoderma harzianum), Rhapsody (Bacillus subtilis) and Pre-Stop (Gliocladium cacatenulatum) were evaluated for efficacy and crop tolerance of powdery mildew on outdoor and greenhouse grown hybrid roses (2006-2007), Botrytis on geraniums (2006-2007) and Rhizoctonia aerial blight of maidenhair fern (2007). On roses preventative sprays every 7-14 days with any of the three biological fungicides reduced powdery mildew symptoms when compared to the untreated checks. Each performed the same or better than the chemical standard Nova 40W (myclobutanil). Botrytis suppression on geranium was most successful using PreStop when treated preventatively, and every 14 days. Pre-Stop reduced the number of Botrytis lesions and the number of diseased leaves and provided a level of disease control comparable to Captan. Plantshield (= Rootshield) was the only biological that significantly reduced Rhizoctonia aerial blight on western maidenhair fern and

Columns headed by the same letter are not significantly different in Duncanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MRT at P<0.05.

1

AUDPC calculated on the % lesion area as a function of plant leaf area. The lower the value the better the disease control. Columns headed by the same letter are not significantly different in Duncanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MRT P<0.05.

1

control was equivalent to Senator 70WP. None of the products showed phytotoxicity symptoms on the test plants. We would encourage growers to try these products at least on a limited scale to better understand how they will be incorporated into production practices. It is important to note that most of these products act preventatively and will not compensate for poor growing practices. Growers must establish the environment that will allow healthy plant growth and reduce the need for fungicide sprays. Ensure you follow label directions carefully when using any pest control product. Overall we have been very pleased with the research work conducted as a blend of efficacy data generation, demonstration trials and extension work. When informing growers of the trials the response has been generally positive, and the research data generated will help promote use of these biologicals among ornamental growers. Data generated through the course of this study has been sent to registrants to support registration efforts. We would very much like to thank the growers who donated plant material and participated in these studies including NATS Nursery, Langley, B.C. and Bylands Nursery, Kelowna, B.C. Research trials were conducted by Dr. Zamir Punja, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C. and Dr. Janice Elmhirst, Elmhirst Diagnostics and Research, Abbotsford, B.C. LT This work was supported by the Pest Management Centre of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Pesticide Risk Reduction Program. Additional funding was provided by the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association.

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Urban trees get a chance BY LORRAINE FLANIGAN

New technology nurtures roots, beneath the pavement Gazing at the trees planted along the north side of a commercial block on the Queensway in the Etobicoke area of Toronto, you’d hardly be aware of what’s been going on underground since Toronto Water installed a system called Silva Cells in 2008. That is, unless you glance directly across to the south side of the street and compare the size of the trees there, which were planted in a conventional manner, to the larger ones growing above the Silva Cells system. That’s when you realize that something extraordinary is going on right under your feet. “It’s an underground rain garden and a tree soil delivery system, too,” says Michael James of Deep Root Canada, the company that worked with tree and soil consultant James Urban to develop Silva Cells. Introduced in 2007, there are now 200 Silva Cell installations around the world, including plans for the 2015 Pan Am Games in Toronto. The modular system is designed to deliver a high volume of un-compacted soil to the root zone of trees planted in paved areas, such as parking lots, roads and sidewalks. Based on research Urban has conducted, 20 | JANUARY 2012

January 2012 final.indd 20

Consultant James Urban talks about how the Silva Cell system affects the trees planted at the Queensway site.

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trees need two cubic feet of soil volume for every square foot of canopy area. Most urban trees, according to Investment vs. Returns for Healthy Urban Trees, a report prepared by the Kestrel Design Group, get less than one-tenth of that amount. “The handwriting is on the wall,” says Urban. “There are only five or six species that are typically planted in cities — ash, linden, honey locust — these are the ones that have a ghost of a chance of survival. And with [threats like] the Asian long-horned beetle [and other pests], we need to move into the next tier of trees, ones like beech, the whole range of oaks and the maple genus. Soil is the main thing that limits the plant palette,” he explains. Conventional planting practices, threats from infestations and the stresses of an urban environment are factors that adversely affect the life span of city trees. The Kestrel report maintains that urban trees live for an average of only 13 years. “Cities don’t get the values from their trees until they reach maturity,” explains James. It’s not until trees reach trunk diameters between eight and 12 inches, he says, that they contribute significantly to the reduction of heat island effects and air pollution levels, and start to improve residential resale values. The purpose of the Silva Cells system is to give the tree what it needs to grow to maturity in an urban environment. 22 | JANUARY 2012

January 2012 final.indd 22

A model at the Queensway site shows how the perforated pipes deliver stormwater to the soil-filled trenches of the Silva Cells where it’s filtered by microbial action.

Comprised of 2x4-ft. fiberglass reinforced polypropylene frames that meet American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials H-20 loading requirements, each Silva Cell has a soil capacity of 10 cubic feet. At the Queensway site, two trenches dug under the sidewalk accommodate 260 frames, which supply 688 cubic ft. of soil to each of four trees: two American Liberty elms (Ulmus americana ‘Libertas’) and two Freeman hybrid maples (Acer x fremanii). Rainwater captured from the storm sewers is carried through the cells via perforated distribution pipes. As the water flows through the system, it’s filtered and cleaned of pollutants such as the chemicals and metals typically found in urban environments. “The soil is doing the work,” says James, “The carbon-based elements are eaten by microbial matter in the soil.” Although enhancing tree health through a system that provides adequate amounts of good soil was the impetus for designing the Silva Cells system, an increased interest in stormwater management has led DeepRoot to develop an add-on that has become attractive to city planners. As in the Queensway project, the Silva Cells system is designed to cycle stormwater through the soil, helping to slow the rate of runoff. At the Queensway site, the runoff that flows into the sewers is captured and filtered through the bioretention soil held in the Silva Cells

– a mix of 80 percent sand and 20 percent soil. The system is designed to manage the runoff from a two-inch rainfall in 24 hours. “This works just like a swale, but it’s happening underground. We just put a roof on it,” James explains. With the additional benefits of stormwater control, Silva Cells has placed the care of urban trees within the sphere of utilities management. “Trees are part of the municipal infrastructure, just as lightposts are. But where light poles depreciate in value, trees appreciate over time,” says James. The truth of the matter is that budgets for utilities infrastructure are greater than those for urban trees. Compared to a conventional stormwater management system, Silva Cells are not only more cost-effective, but they come with a bonus. As James Urban puts it, “We sell the idea as a stormwater system — LT and the tree is free!” Lorraine Flanigan is a Toronto-based garden and horticulture industry writer.

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

11/23/2011 1:33:54 PM


January 2012 final revisions to printer proof.indd 23

11/24/2011 11:35:36 AM


Bylands Nurseries After winning the inaugural CNLA RBC grower of the year award, Bylands Nurseries of Kelowna, B.C., was honoured with the prestigious Gold Rose award by the International Association of Horticultural Producers (AIPH) in Xi’an, China in September, 2011. Nominees for this international program are all winners of their own national awards of excellence competitions. The Silver Rose was awarded to Majestic Trees of the United Kingdom, and The Green Innovator of The Netherlands received the Bronze Rose. Judging criteria for the AIPH Grower of the Year award goes far beyond the production of top quality plants. Judges consider economic performance and marketplace position, innovation in production and growing techniques, market orientation and company image, environmental standards and human resource policies. In a comprehensive application, the company provided key benchmark indicators to prove its financial strength, demonstrating fiscal prudence. Letters of reference from bankers and accountants attested to the strength of Bylands’ management team. CANADIAN LEADER Primarily a container operation, Bylands produces over 3 million plants on 400 acres in Kelowna and Chilliwack. The inventory lists over 3,000 plant varieties and sizes. The company was one of the first Canadian nurseries to become DCPC certified and to implement the new Clean Plants Certification program, recognizing the importance of documentation and traceability. In 2008, Bylands revamped its marketing and focused on promoting itself as a brand, targeting the end user. The goal is to have customers asking for Bylands’ product when they visit a garden centre. Plant labels underwent a complete redesign, with the logo prominently displayed, a great photo and relevant plant information. POP bench signs and tree wraps were distributed to act as silent salespeople at independent garden centres.

Bylands Nurseries of Kelowna, B.C. was awarded the International Grower of the Year Gold Rose award in Xi’an, China. On hand to accept the award were John and Maria Byland, and their two children, Mike and Melanie.

24 | JANUARY 2012

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Innovations such as this palletizing system for shipping plants, helped Bylands win the international award.

ENVIRONMENTAL OWNERSHIP Bylands has been an industry leader with its environmental practices for decades. Growing in the dry conditions of the British Columbia interior, water conservation is taken very seriously. In 1993, Bylands was the first nursery in B.C. to construct a water reclamation pond. Since then, two more have been built, allowing the nursery to reuse up to a third of water consumed. The community composting program offered at Bylands was featured in May 2011 Landscape Trades. This program diverts green waste from local landfills, and creates valuable organic matter that is reused at the nursery. As testament to its commitment to environmental initiatives, the nursery was the first recipient of BCLNA’s Environmental Stewardship Award. The final judging criteria for International Grower of the Year, is the human resource element. Bylands Safety Committee is active at the nursery, which is committed to offer its employees a safe, clean, well-maintained workplace. The company offers a top-notch benefits package to full-time and continuing season employees, and brings a physiotherapist on site every two weeks to provide employee assessments and treatment, at company cost. As a result, the nursery’s worker compensation insurance rates were adjusted down by 30 per cent. Bylands supports apprenticeship, and its company policy is to have one or two employees in the program at any given time. Social events throughout the year express the company’s appreciation for staff’s hard work and dedication. “It was a great honour to receive this award, especially as this is the first year for Canada’s participation,” said John Byland. “I wish to acknowledge the foresight of Owen Vanstone in bringing this program to Canada, and the support of the CNLA in making the LT national Grower of the Year Award possible.”

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

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Using Data and Social Media

to drive Revenue BY KYLE LACY

I would like to assume we all understand that social media is here to stay in the world of business. The conversations and arguments over the relevance of digital marketing become unavoidable in the mid-1990s and continue into the new millennium. Now the conversation has moved from using Facebook to the integration of social media, direct mail, and email in order to create a streamlined direct-response platform for customers. We should be having this conversation! It is extremely important to create a system to reach consumers in the way they want to be reached. Normally, we look at data like transactional and demographic information in order to make marketing decisions. For example, where the person is from, how old, income data, and what they spent in the store or business. However, in the new world of digital marketing, that is not enough. People aren’t just households in a segment, they are individuals with unique needs, motivations, interests and passions. They only become committed, loyal advocates when they perceive your company as a partner in their life. Are you allowing your best customers to tell the story for you? It is extremely important that YOU, the business owner, start focusing on different types of data in order to fully sell your customers. This is important to shift

marketing towards understanding that personalization and technology is kind. There are five different data sets to focus on when capturing and building a database for your business.

people. We also need to understand that different age groups may use the same type of media. My 64-year-old father uses and communicates through an iPhone. My 24-year-old brother does not.

PSYCHOLOGICAL People view the world differently. A lawyer, auto mechanic, homemaker, artist, student or pilot all have different constructs of their needs, as well as those of their family, friends or community. Is the prospect a driver, intuitive, practical, calculative, creative, sympathetic? How do we know and how does that instruct content creation? Psychological parameters are important because you can draft/write content that directly speaks to the specific psychological makeup of an individual. For example, if someone is passive they are not going to buy landscaping to make their yard better than the neighbors. They do not care! However, they may be interested in products that help them grow their backyard garden.

ASPIRATIONAL Start with the end in mind. What do you want your product or company to do and how will you know it is a success? What do you know about the goals, values and objectives of the people you want to compel, and how can you use this information to drive more revenue? Most people ignore this extremely important data point. Are you going to send a direct mail piece for a fullservice landscaping product to an individual who bought a tomato plant? No.

GENERATIONAL People of different ages interact and communicate differently. The media which is used to compel a response in 2011 is much different than 1980. We need to be sure we aren’t trying to further perfect media that was designed for another time, for other

Digital goes live Kyle Lacy is author of Twitter Marketing for Dummies and Branding Yourself. He will be presenting two sessions on online communication and using social media at Congress 2012 in Toronto. Evolve or die – The future of online communications Landscape Designers Conference - Mon., Jan. 9, 9-10:15a.m. Lacy will discuss the changing world of communication and customer interaction through websites such as Facebook and mobile applications. This session will help you reach customers more effectively through online marketing. Using Social Media to enhance your business. Congress conference - Tues., Jan. 10, 9-10:30 Features detailed examples on how to be successful using social media and digital technologies. You will take away at least three strategies to build a social media plan for your business. For more information, or to register for one of these sessions, visit www.locongress.com. 26 | JANUARY 2012

January 2012 final.indd 26

TRANSACTIONAL What did the person spend, and why? This piece of information is usually the most recognized in the database. The more people spend, the more likely they will be back in the store. Transactional data can also be used to predict customer trends, and they are your best advocates through social media. GEOGRAPHICAL Most of you are regional businesses, where location is extremely important. Geographic information should be included in your database marketing campaign and is just as important as the other four segments. It should be the data driving most of your direct mail or couponing strategies. Other than the data, it is important to know that your best social media marketers are your customers. Your customers are the individuals who truly understand why your company is important. They truly understand what makes your brand and sells your product. You must speak to them as individuals, not a massive group. Social media allows you to individualize your marketing and build a cleaner, faster, and more productive LT marketing revenue stream.

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

11/23/2011 1:34:00 PM


January 2012 final.indd 27

11/23/2011 1:34:05 PM


Orchids grow in Thailand like dandelions grow in North America, making Thailand a major exporter.

gives gardeners a reason to smile Thailand, as the tourist posters proclaimed in the late 1980s, is the land of smiles, and this still holds true today. A visit to the country in February of 2011 was a homecoming; I once lived here and worked for the Royal Thai Government for three years. Now I was back again, visiting friends as a tourist. It still is the land of smiles, and a country where our version of ‘take it easy’ is translated into ‘never mind’ when things go awry. Thailand is, and always has been, a popular tourist Mecca because of this laid-back attitude and friendly people. Today however, it is also a booming central economy for the region because business here is easy. On a downtown Bangkok street you can hear German, French, English, Italian and Japanese spoken as frequently as Thai; the locals expect foreigners to act, well, foreign. Everyone is accepted and of course, everything must be ‘sonook’ or fun. 28 | JANUARY 2012

January 2012 final.indd 28

BY MICHAEL PASCOE

Thailand, once known as Siam, has always been a stable anchor in an area of constant disruption and conflict. Bordered by Myanmar (Burma) to the west, China to the north and Laos to the east, it is a country whose people have learned to tread lightly and always smile in the face of adversity. Thailand has the longest-serving world leader in its monarch, King Rama IX, and is a constitutional democracy. It is a country that has never been occupied by foreign interests. Though stable, it erupts with minor internal political power shifts, usually quelled by its benevolent leader-king. Thailand’s stable political history, coupled with its people’s positive attitude, has enabled the country, based in a poor region of the world, to develop rapidly. Today, it is a newly-industrialized country and has one of the most progressive attitudes towards foreign investment and

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

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Brightly decorated spirit houses are found at entrance ways and in gardens.

Vivid colours reflect the happy nature of the Thai people.

culture. It is the ‘mai pen rai’ or ‘never mind’ attitude, where everything has to be sonook, that makes the people so accepting. ROOTED IN TRADITION Agriculture coupled with tourism are the pillars of the economy. (There is no word in the Thai language for horticulture.) Thailand is the world’s largest rice exporter, farming 25 per cent of its arable land, the most of any country in the Mekong

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Delta. This agrarian-based society has a strong connection with the land through centuries of farming, but also through its religion, Buddhism. Over 85 per cent of the population are practicing Buddhists. Thai people have an intense link with plants through their own gardens and religion; gaily decorated spirit houses are found in almost every garden and at the entrance to most industrial parks and factories. Spirit houses are often placed in a tropical oasis

and adorned with offerings of fruit, jasmine and orchid flowers, and of course the staple, rice. Horticulture in Thailand is everywhere; in this tropical climate everything grows. In the 1980s when I worked in Thailand, I was amazed at how easily woody cuttings rooted. At the time we were producing over one million Morus alba trees for the country’s sericulture industry. We rooted hardwood stem cuttings over 12 cm in diameter; we

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with horticulture that has enabled Thailand to become one of the world’s major exporters of cut orchid flowers. It is a place where Dendrobiums are as common as dandelions, with most homes having at least one orchid, grown in a coconut husk tied to the trunk of a banyan tree. (Buddha sat under a banyan

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The Thai love for colour is reflected in all that surround their daily lives.

Masses of coloured annuals found in gardens symbolize prosperity.

tree) Thais, like the Laotians (see article on page 24 in the November/December issue of Landscape Trades), have been gardening in containers for centuries, and most garden centres support this culture by producing all of their inventory in heavy, decorative clay pots which act as instant adornment to a sometimes dry, dusty landscape. Thais love colour, reflected in their temples, and silk and cotton fabrics, but

also in their gardens — where masses of brightly coloured annuals are often a sign of prosperity and welcome. Annual plantings are frequently combined with shrubs which often include Ixora hedges (a substitute for Buxus), resulting in a very static, controlled display. The Thai people are very easygoing, however when it comes to gardens, the landscape is often very controlled, with most elements clipped or pruned.

PLANTS ARE PERSONAL Professional landscaping in Thailand is very limited; most homeowners design and plant their own gardens. While the affluent might hire someone to do it, they will almost always have direct input with regard to plant choice and placement. Labour is quite cheap and a gardener who would maintain the landscape would make about ten dollars a day, so even the middle class can have someone come in and do the heavy work of mowing or removing the spent fronds from palms. Every home in Thailand has plants in pots and herbs in the garden. Fruit trees are common, and it is a tradition that plants are given freely from home to home as a sign of benevolence and graciousness. When I left the country all those years ago I gave away with great ceremony several Ficus and guava trees that I had air layered. They were accepted by my friends with both hands, palms facing up, as this is the Buddhist way to accept a honoured gift. When I visited those friends this past February it was with great ceremony that we ate a meal in their shade; a tree that family members, who were not yet born those many years ago, know was grown and given to their parents by the ‘soon farang nakasaaid,’ the tall, foreign agriculturist. LT Michael Pascoe is the tall professor and academic program co-ordinator for the Horticulture Technician and Apprenticeship Horticulture Programs at Fanshawe College in London Ont., and director of The Gardens of Fanshawe College and the A.M. Cuddy Garden.

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is good for our health BY COLLEEN CIRILLO

Photo: Torrie Gervais/LEAF

The Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition is building a strong case for green infrastructure investment and legislative protection. One of the coalition’s strongest arguments is that green infrastructure is proactive, and provides preventative health care. Most people recognize that natural areas, gardens and parks improve our quality of life, but few are able to articulate the why and how of this phenomenon. The coalition is attempting to do just that by amassing evidence that demonstrates the direct and indirect human health benefits — both physical and psychological — of green infrastructure. Related studies and programs are detailed below. Many more can be found in the resources section on our website, www.greeninfrastructureontario.org. In 2003, Lawrence St Leger, editor of Health Promotion International, the official journal of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education, wrote a piece titled Health and nature—new challenges for health promotion. In this essay, St Leger challenges health promoters worldwide to examine the growing evidence of personal and community health benefits incurred by nature. He presents a summary of the key theories and research findings from the 1970s onward, and makes the argument that natural areas address many health issues, thereby making their protection and enhancement a more cost-effective option than some traditional health programs that focus on specific health issues. He writes, “As groups of professionals, we may need to be more proactive in making sure abundant open areas, where citizens can easily experience contact with plants and animals, service the communities in which we live.” The Canadian Public Health Association is working to improve public awareness of the health effects of climate change and air pollution. As part of this mandate, the association recently published a study in the Canadian Journal of Public Health demonstrating that eight per cent of non-traumatic mortality in Canadian cities can be linked to fossil fuel combustion. A related study published in the same journal demonstrates that the increase in hospital admissions for asthmatic children is directly attributable to increased air pollution. In addition, the Ontario Medical Association has completed many reports on the health effects of air pollution in Ontario. One such report states that approximately 60,000 Ontarians are admitted 36 | JANUARY 2012

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to emergency rooms annually due to air pollution exposure. And 17,000 are admitted to hospitals for chronic health problems stemming from exposure to air pollution. The association estimates that these rates will increase to 88,000 and 24,000 by 2026. These findings build the coalition’s case for investment in, and legislative protection of, green infrastructure that offsets air pollution. In 2002 a group of Toronto organizations, agencies and community members committed to cancer prevention initiated the Toronto Cancer Prevention Coalition. The coalition immediately went to work on an action plan which provides direction for awareness and change to stop cancer before it starts. The plan received endorsement by Toronto City Council later that year. Since then, the coalition and its working groups continue to implement the strategies embodied in the plan. The Ultraviolet Radiation Working Group has produced a comprehensive policy and related guidelines to help the city provide and maintain adequate shade, using structures and trees. This document acknowledges that shade trees provide excellent sun protection, while also serving many other environmental and aesthetic functions. It includes helpful tree-selection criteria to maximize shade. The Clean Air Partnership released a report in April of this year examining how municipal public health departments in Ontario promote healthy and sustainable communities through land use and transportation planning. All 10 departments featured in this study are promoting development patterns, population densities and land-use designs that support active transportation. Most departments are also promoting policies to establish trails, parks and other greenspaces. Some of the recommended actions presented in this report involve green infrastructure. For example, cities should use permeable pavement and bioswales to recharge groundwater tables and reduce storm water run-off. In addition, green roofs, street trees and parks are required to reduce the urban heat island effect. Public Health and Land Use Planning is available on our website, LT www.greeninfrastructureontario.org/resources. Colleen Cirillo is coordinator of Green Infrastructure Ontario.

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Opportunity for growers LOW-COST FINANCING OFFERED THROUGH AG COALITION BY ASHLEIGH BENEDICT

In today’s economy, as operating costs continue to increase it is becoming more of a challenge to manage finances and capital budgets. Growers continue to look at ways to reduce costs and try to spread savings further to ensure their business is a success. ACC Farmers’ Financial recognizes that the availability of low cost and accessible financing is essential to remain competitive in the industry. ACC administers loans for several thousand agricultural products across different sectors of agriculture, and is a nationally appointed administrator of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Advance Payments Program. Loans are available up to $400,000, with the first $100,000 interest-free and up to $300,000 at the prime rate. Since 2008, ACC has helped tailor the Advance Payments Program (APP) to accommodate the needs of the greenhouse

and nursery landscape industries. The loan programs that exist today were designed to help growers with both production and marketing and to give easier access to cash advances for commodities being grown and sold within the program timeline. In 2009 when the program was introduced to the nursery sector, a limited line of inventory was included and only a small number of items were available for financing in a few provinces. The 2011 program is now available in all provinces for thousands of nursery products grown across Canada. ACC is currently offering the fall cycle of this program, where growers that do not participate in Agristability are given the opportunity to access the same low-cost financing available to others in the spring. The 2012 program for greenhouse vegetables, cut flowers, and potted plants has undergone major improvements to better

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accommodate the needs of the growers. The program will now run from November 2011 through to April 2013 and includes both higher advance rates and a more accommodating repayment schedule, allowing growers greater flexibility with their cash flow. Aside from the fall cycle of the program for nursery products, growers applying for financing under the Advance Payments Program are required to be enrolled in Agristability. Calculations are based on the number of products to be harvested and sold within the program timeframe, and the eligible loan limit is the lesser of the government portion of a growers’ Agristability reference margin, or the specific amount based on production and advance rates. For example, if the production eligibility totaled $400,000 and your Agristability reference margin was $610,000, you would be eligible to receive the full $400,000 because the government portion would not limit your eligibility (610,000 x 66.5% = $405,650). However, if your Agristability reference margin were $430,000, you would only be eligible to receive $285,950 because you would be capped by the reference margin ($430,000 x 66.5% = $285,950). ACC Farmers’ Financial understands how important it is for producers to fully assess their financial situation each year and plan how to improve cash flow as they move forward. With affordable financing solutions that are almost never offered by traditional lenders, the services provided by ACC are a great complement to other financing programs within the agricultural industry. If you are interested in the services available through ACC Farmers’ Financial and would like additional program information, please contact a lending officer at 1-888-278-8807 LT or visit www.accfarmersfinancial.ca.

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Come Alive Outside Helping unglue Canadians from video screens

BY JIM PALUCH There is a movement afoot to entice people outdoors. I believe everybody wins when somebody goes outside, and I know for the green industry to survive and thrive in coming years, we must share the value of outdoor living with children and their parents, with property managers and their tenants and every other place that outdoor living can make a difference.

Over the past year, as my company JP Horizons has passionately shared our vision to get people outside again, every individual or group I have spoken with has understood the dangers of our coach-potato society, spending way too much time inside absorbed in technology. In general, we have forgotten the simple pleasures of Coming Alive Outside. I ask them to raise their hands if they have more scars on their knees than their children or grandchildren.  After a moment’s hesitation the hands begin to go up and a light goes on in their eyes. Grown men get tears in their eyes as we discuss the childhood obesity and diabetes epidemics, and everyone agrees that we all spend too much time engaged in technology every day. When we initially started sharing this message I struggled with how to efficiently explain why we need to Come Alive Outside. The following is from Linda Coors, our director of the Working Smarter Training Challenge, who captured the emotional essence on what it means to come alive outside. “Why is it important to come alive outside? Reach back into your memories, and what stands out to you? I learned to enjoy hard work from my dad because he made it a game. Getting wood for the winter was fun because carrying it to the wood pile was a competition to see who could carry the most and get back with another pile the fastest. Then we’d get

CAO message builds connections in Picton, Ont. The Come Alive Outside message resonated with Scott Wentworth OALA, of the Scott Wentworth Landscape Group in Picton, Ont. “We’ve all heard the statistics that have resulted from our sedentary lifestyle — that childhood obesity has risen 350 per cent since 1976 and the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s report that 59 per cent of Canadians are now overweight or obese. Yet we don’t question these facts; no one is doing anything about the problem,” says Wentworth. The Scott Wentworth Landscape Group has been designing outdoor spaces and actively involved in the local community for years. The company’s 20th anniversary seemed like the right time to embrace

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Come Alive Outside and energize the community. Picton is the county seat of Prince Edward County, a close-knit community on the northeastern shore of Lake Ontario which, thanks to the leadership and urging of the Scott Wentworth Landscape Group, has officially declared itself the first Come Alive Outside Community in North America. As part of his commitment to this movement, Wentworth hired a Come Alive Outside program coordinator last summer to arrange and publicize events that encouraged people to get outside and be active. In June 2011, Wentworth formed a Come Alive Outside committee with representatives from the municipal community, services department, board of education, the business community, service clubs,

the family health services team, sports associations and the media specialist for the chamber of commerce and tourism. “By July 1, we were able to celebrate our first Come Alive Outside event. Picton’s B.I.A. offered us the use of a parking lot, on which we laid 6,400 ft. sq. of sod.” Wentworth says the event was a great success, with families coming out to experience the lost art of unstructured play in the temporary green space. “We’ve had wonderful support from the green industry, as well as other leaders in the community,” says Wentworth. “Our committee presented an outdoor activity event plan to the community that takes us through December 2012.”

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CAO encourages individuals and families to learn the art of unstructured play.

to have a huge brushfire when night came, and we’d gather around to eat hot dogs and watch the fire reach to the sky. “How about finding a grapevine to swing out over the creek? Did you ever have a favourite tree? Mine was a weeping willow in the backyard and it belonged to me. I’d climb up there and sit for hours, just thinking. What about the feeling of picking the first mess of beans and digging new potatoes from the garden and having them with fresh tomatoes, green onions and peppers all because you had the privilege of putting seed into the ground and nurturing it to produce? “What would it be like to never roll down a hill and come up covered in freshly cut grass? What can compare to the learning experiences of nature? Take a child on a walk and you will be amazed to see things through his eyes, and you’ll remember why we truly do come alive outside.” Doesn’t that evoke a great emotion? Why wouldn’t we want to encourage individuals and families to run and jump and play, and even just sit and relax in the wonderful outdoor spaces we create? Why not sell memories rather than plantings and pavers

and well trimmed grass? A few months after introducing these ideas, dozens of landscape companies around North America have heightened their awareness and have gained the Come Alive Outside Edge, energizing their company culture, defining their marketing message and growing sales. Just imagine what we will do as an industry when we become committed to helping customers, employees, families and

communities Come Alive Outside! What better marketing message for your company or battle cry for you and your family than to remember   Everybody Wins When Somebody Goes Outside! LT Jim Paluch of JP Horizons has been training and inspiring the green industry for 22 years. To get the Come Alive Outside edge visit to www.comealiveoutside.com.

A big focus for this year is the creation of a two-km fitness trail that touches schools, childcare centres and a community centre. Interestingly enough, Wentworth notes that a year ago, the Parks and Recreation Department completed a survey of activity levels in the County. “We’re hoping that another survey in a year’s time will show an increase in outdoor activity.” Wentworth is proud to report all his employees have been energized by the Come Alive Outside message, and as a bonus, spearheading this worthy program has enhanced the company’s image as a leader in the community. — Sarah Willis

JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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industrynews Sharpen your professional edge at Congress 2012 Industry professionals can get an edge on their competition at the conferences at Congress 2012. Prominent experts and industry leaders will present seminars and workshops to help green industry businesses grow and prosper. The 39th installment of Congress, Canada’s International Horticultural Lawn and Garden Trade

The seminars and workshops at Congress are designed to help your company prosper.

Show and Conference, takes place Jan. 10-12 at the Toronto Congress Centre. It attracts more than 600 vendors and 11,000 industry professionals from around the world, to share their secrets of success in an ever-challenging industry. Over its nearly four decades in operation, Congress has clearly established itself as the place to see what is new to the industry and learn best practices to run a profitable business. This year, the Congress conference features an all-new format that maximizes opportunities to connect with other industry professionals and share successes that will benefit green industry businesses. Owners-only workshops will promote leadership skills, such as leading a customerfocused team, succeeding as a landscape contractor, the ultimate business management calendar for contractors and the 10 best business practices you need to know. Daily lunch events feature round-table sessions on human resources, sales and marketing and an Ask the Experts town hall panel discussion. All professional development programs at Congress qualify for Landscape Industry

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Certified Continuing Education Credits. Visit www.canadanursery.com for more certification credential details. A series of events will kick-off the conference on Monday, January 9, 2012. Day-long events include the Certified Landscape Professional Study Group: Human Resources and Leadership Modules, a study group led by Paul Doornbos CLT CLP. IPM Symposium 2012: Managing Turf, Trees and Expectations features a full roster of speakers in the turf and tree industry, including lunch and a networking reception. The IPM symposia have been uniquely respected event since 1965. Attendees receive eight CECs from the IPM Council of Canada. The Landscape Designer Conference features a series of topics and discussions to build a better landscape design business. And Ontario Parks Association’s 56th Annual Parks Educational Forum will feature seminars on building the brands of parks and making our municipal green spaces affordable and sustainable. The Irrigation Conference, hosted by Landscape Ontario’s Irrigation Sector Group, has changed to

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See What’s Hot in Red Iron GET THE FULL PICTURE IN BOOTH 116. Space won’t allow us to show you all our new 2012 products here, but we can tell you what they have in common. Site after site, year after year, Toro® equipment works as hard as you do. And now there are even more ways to get that legendary reliability and durability. Come see the latest innovations in landscape contractor and residential equipment at the Toro booth 116. Nothing performs quite like Toro equipment. HARD WORKING … LONG LASTING.

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Growing today for a greener tomorrow

industrynews a new date and time, Wed., Jan. 11, at noon. This new half day program includes lunch and is presented by Todd Magatagan, CAIS, CGIA, CIC, CID, CLIA, CLWM, a seasoned expert from Around the Grounds, Woodland, Texas, providing a candid look at licensing. For more details, see the special Congress Preview Section on pages 51-62 of this issue. Online registration is open at www.locongress.com.

Communities invest in beautification On Oct. 29, the National Battlefields Commission hosted the 17th annual Communities in Bloom National Awards Ceremony in Québec City, honouring municipalities from Canada, England, Scotland, Ireland, the United States and Japan.  Communities in Bloom is a Canadian non-profit organization committed to fostering civic pride, environmental responsibility and beautification through community involvement. Its national program focuses on the promotion of green spaces in community settings. Congratulations to the national award winners: Densil, Sask., Stettler, Alta., New Glasgow, N.S., Summerside, P.E.I., Killarney-Turtle Mountain, Man., Campbell River, B.C., London, Ont., and the Canadian Forces Bases in Petawawa, Ont. The City of Stratford, Ont., in the large population category, and The Town of Goderich, Ont., in the small population category, were the winners in the Circle of Champions, a category where past winners compete amongst themselves.  The City of Charlottetown, PE.I., in the large pop-ulation category, and The Village of Tallanstown, Ireland, in the small population category, were the winners in the International Challenge, a competition between winners of various national programs.  

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The annual Atlantic Green Forum took place on Nov. 7 and 8 in St. John’s, Nfld. The theme for 2011 was The Green City, which addressed the issues of the value of urban parks, challenges in design, maintenance of industrial commercial green spaces, and the value of green space and park development for social and health benefits. The conference included a combination of local, provincial, national and international speakers from as far away as Japan. On hand was Newfoundland’s Minister of Environment and Conservation, Terry French. Other notable speakers included Nancy Rottle, founder of the Green Futures Lab in Washington, Paul Ronan, executive director of Ontario Parks Association and past parks director for the City of Toronto, and special guest Tetsu Nomura, general manager in the Technical and Research Department for the Japan Landscape Contractors Association. The two-day event wrapped up with a lunch with the Speaker of the House of Assembly Ross Wiseman.

Exmark partners with Echo Canada Exmark has announced a strategic partnership with Echo Canada, opening the door for Exmark to distribute products to more than 800 Canadian dealers. “The partnership with Echo was a no-brainer,” said Rick Olson, president of Exmark. “There are many similarities between our companies, our approach to service and our relentless commitment to quality. We couldn’t be happier about this partnership.” 46 | JANUARY 2012

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industrynews Echo Canada began to service Exmark dealers in November, 2011, with the full fleet in place by January, 2012. “We are excited to be associated with Exmark,” commented Echo Canada’s president, Ed Zynomirski. “They are a first rate organization that shares many of the same corporate values as our company. With their industry leading products and our strength of distribution across Canada, we look forward to gaining a greater share of the commercial landscape market.”

Free green industry software JPL Consulting is offering all members of CNLA free light versions of its proprietary software programs for the green industry. JPL Budgeting for Success 3000 Lite Version is designed for service trades, retailers, growers and wholesalers at every level. Landscape and maintenance companies are offered the JPL Estimating Lite Version, and all green industry companies can benefit greatly from the free JPL Fleet Cost Management Lite Version. This is a limited-time offer; download these program for free from www.jplbiz.ca.

hagen was a pillar in the pet products industry Rolf C. Hagen, founder and chairman of Rolf C. Hagen Inc., passed away suddenly yet peacefully in October at his home in Montreal, surrounded by his loving wife Marianne and grandson Justin. Rolf C. Hagen Hagen started in business by acquiring bird seed from the Canadian prairies and exporting it to Germany. His small export business eventually flourished and branched out into a solid, well-respected pet supply business, that today spans many continents. His brothers Dieter and Horst subsequently joined the company, both of whom brought new energy and innovation, taking it to new heights of success. The trio formed the first generation of an internationally successful familybased company that is now managed by Rolf C. Hagen’s three sons, Mark, Tom, and Rolf Jr. Hagen was a tireless force who was actively

involved as chairman of the company, up to the day preceding his sudden passing.

new holland road show events benefit red Cross New Holland Construction announces that Trevor Wehage, Saskatoon, Sask., has earned the title of North American Skid Steer Champion. Wehage, who works for Don Wehage and Sons Trucking and Excavating in Saskatoon, defeated more than 30 of the most talented compact equipment operators in the United States and Canada in a series of skill-testing challenges using a New Holland 200 Series skid steer loader. The championship event took place in October, during the 2011 GIE+EXPO show in Louisville, Ky. The field consisted of more than 2,000 participants who competed in New Holland Construction Super Boom Road Show events across the United States and Canada this year. Wehage, who has operated equipment similar to skid steer loaders for 14 years, came in first place with a winning time of 00:21.10. Along with the crown, owner/operator Wehage earned the grand

A

s the lawn care season winds to a close, Neudorff would like to take this opportunity to thank the lawn and landscape industry of Canada, particularly in Ontario, for supporting Fiesta® in 2011. The patented technology in Fiesta® represents the best broadleaf weed control available to lawn care companies where pesticide bans are in place. We are grateful for your support. In 2009, 2010, and 2011, Neudorff carried out several field trials at Guelph Turfgrass Institute (GTI) to further determine best practices for Fiesta®. Several additional trials were performed in the US to look at new weeds and warm season turf. The results clearly indicate the high performance of Fiesta® and its safety on turf. In addition, Neudorff has undertaken studies in the US with a leading university testing different rates and timing in order to maximize weed control and value. Neudorff will continue to invest in Fiesta® to improve the formulation, lower application rates, and broaden the label. Our goal is to create an environment where both the industry and use of Fiesta can grow. In exchange for your support, Neudorff will commit a portion of its Fiesta® sales to advertising, to grow the lawn care industry across Canada. This is our commitment to you. We look forward to your continued support, which will allow us to innovate and develop further products that fit today’s changing environmental requirements. We wish everyone in the industry the best of the season as well as a happy and prosperous new year. Sincerely,

Cam Wilson, Vice President Neudorff North America

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prize of a New Holland Construction 200 Series skid steer loader, valued at $35,000 U.S., plus a leather jacket and a commemorative scale model of a New Holland 200 Series skid steer loader. The North American Skid Steer Championship event completes the year-long celebration of the launch of the New Holland Construction 200 Series skid steer loaders. The road show events also provided fundraising and volunteer opportunities with local chapters of the American

Red Cross and the Canadian Red Cross. At each event, local Red Cross chapter representatives were on site to generate awareness of local activities and recruit volunteers. New Holland Construction contributed $500 to each Red Cross chapter that participated in the events. During the championship award ceremony last week, New Holland Construction donated an additional $2,500 to the American Red Cross Louisville Area chapter. To date, New Holland

cs od spe s k c e Ch site: on web dIt.com

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to perfectly “Fit” hundreds of jobs We grow Premium Bluegrass with a high density, dark green colour, or choose a Dwarf, Low-Mow Bluegrass for fairways and sports fields, or check out our newest exclusive blends including Eco-Turf MixtureTM a self-fertilizing sod for environment-sensitive areas.

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Construction and its dealers have donated more than $29,000 to the Red Cross through its road show events.

dekok new marketing manager for Agrium Agrium Advanced Technologies announces the addition of Ron Dekok as North America marketing manager for the company’s Turf and Ornamental Wholesale division. In his new role, Dekok will have responsibility for each of the Polyon and Duration controlled-release fertilizer and Precise controlled-release protection product lines in North America. Based out of Agrium Advanced Technologies headquarters in Loveland, Colo., Dekok will report to Jeff Novak, vice president of marketing. Prior to joining the turf and ornamental wholesale division, Dekok served as marketing manager for the direct-to-market sales division of Agrium. Dekok had also worked as sales and marketing manager for the Canadian ProHort division, prior to and following its acquisition by Agrium in 2008.

sexton to direct siMA education outreach The Snow and Ice Management Association (SIMA) has hired Phillip Sexton for the newly created position of director of education and outreach. Sexton has over 20 years Phillip Sexton of experience in the snow, landscape, and arborist industries, both as an employee and business owner. He most recently worked for The Brickman Group, as corporate director of national snow operations. For SIMA, he will be responsible for leading the association’s educational programs, particularly operational and technical training, and for outreach and relationship building with end-users of snow and ice management services. Sexton has a B.S. degree from Empire State College. He will work out of his home office based LT in the Albany, N.Y. area.

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Hamilton Sod Compact Sod (905) 389-1315 (519) 653-7494 Mount Hope Cambridge 48 | JANUARY 2012

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Invest

in your

future

Executive training for the green industry

BY LIZ KLOSE

LIEP is the Landscape Industry Executive Program, a professional business management program developed specifically for executives, managers and owner-operators in the landscape, nursery, and retail garden centre sectors. In June 2010, an industry steering committee comprised of members of all three commodity groups began discussions regarding LIEP. The end result: a collaborative effort between the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association and the George Morris Centre, an agricultural think tank based in Guelph, Ont., to advance professional development to benefit our industry. LIEP was launched in August 2011 and incorporates the following key learning features: - Strategic planning Do you spend too much time putting out fires and running the day-to-day activities in your business to take the time to work on your strategic business plan? Are you taking over a business or creating a new sideline in your existing business and need help creating a business plan? - Succession planning Have you been thinking about your succession plan but are not sure where to start? Are you positioning your business to sell, or looking at a business to buy? - Operations Planning Do you have challenges in recruiting and retaining good people? Do you face challenges with competition from big box stores? Is your competition pricecutting on landscape installation jobs? - Information systems management Does your business need to develop methods to increase profitability, improve organization and promote communication?

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LIEP for 2011 was postponed, as the number of registrations received was not sufficient to warrant running the program. A survey was sent through association communication bulletins requesting member input on a few brief questions. Most of those who completed the survey agreed with the curriculum content, need and merit of this type of management program. The amount of time away from the business

and cost were identified as issues for some respondents. The key highlights follow: Survey question

Response

Does the content cover what you expect in an executive development program?

88 per cent strongly agree or agree

12 per cent disagree or strongly disagree

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I don’t need this kind 28 per cent strongly agree of management training or agree 71 per cent disagree or strongly disagree I can’t devote this much 44 per cent strongly agree time to management or agree training 55 per cent disagree or strongly disagree It’s too expensive for 56 per cent strongly agree the value I’d receive or agree ($5,900 +HST) 45 per cent disagree or strongly disagree

Many thanks to those who responded, providing additional perspective, constructive feedback and support to continue to develop the program. All input will be taken into consideration in the coming weeks as we investigate ways of improving delivery. Why partner with the Morris Centre? The George Morris Centre, www. georgemorris.org, is a leader in the agriculture sector for executive professional development, and has championed several

G&L Group, Partners in Your Performance. The G&L Group was built on family principles of loyalty, hard work and trust. As we innovate and grow into the future, we are passionate about providing the very best soil, salt, aggregates, concrete and waste bin services in the industry. Our mission is continued quality customer service and a commitment to getting the job done right.

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Concrete

Aggregates

Soil

Salt Waste

research projects for our industry, including a stakeholder survey on labour issues and a literature review of the benefits of green spaces. In January 2010, the Centre prepared a report, Labour Issues in the Horticulture Sector, prepared for the Horticulture Value Chain Roundtable Labour Working Group, to provide an assessment of the effectiveness of the current infrastructure in addressing key labour issues, and to categorize the challenges and gaps that will affect a new long-term strategy. The George Morris Centre knows the foundation of our industry. Combined with its 20 years of executive management training expertise and the collaboration with CNLA on industry stats and trends, the partnership remains focused to deliver a stellar experiential program to fill a gap in our human resources development training options. Tuition funding available LIEP is an investment in you and your business. Based on other successful programs delivered by the George Morris Centre, such as EDP and CTEAM, most program registrants recoup their training investment within one year. In addition, most financial institutions provide reduced lending rates for business owners showing due diligence in this type of training. Funding research revealed that some cost-sharing grants were available, however, each province has different eligibility requirements for the Growing Forward program, which seems to be the best aligned funding source for members with a Farm Business Registration Number (FBRN). There are funding opportunities for other commodity groups as well. Check with your provincial association for information on this and other potential funding sources. In Alberta, landscapers qualify for the Growing Forward Leadership Development Program. Watch www.canadanursery.com for LIEP details and updates as they become available, or contact Karen Bilton, education coordinator, George Morris Centre, phone 519-822-3929 ext. 205, email karen@ LT georgemorris.org. Liz Klose is landscape priorities manager with the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association. She can be reached at liz@canadanursery.com.

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CONGRESS REGISTER TODAY!

2012 PREVIEW GUIDE Featuring Congress Conference and Special Events JANUARY 9, 2012 Human Resources and Leadership Modules — CLP Study Group IPM Symposium Landscape Designer Conference Ontario Parks Association’s 56th Annual Parks Educational Forum JANUARY 10 - 12, 2012 Congress Conference JANUARY 10, 2012 Canadian Fence Industry Association’s AGM JANUARY 11, 2012 Landscape Ontario’s AGM Irrigation Conference January 12, 2012 Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Workshops

locongress.com AN INITIATIVE OF:

FEATURING: FENCECRAFT

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURES

re to check out th u s Be list of Exhibi e

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Canada’s 39th International Horticultural Lawn and Garden Trade Show and Conference January 10 - 12, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre South Building Toronto, Ontario, Canada

SPONSORED BY: Bobcat of Hamilton Ltd. Entripy Custom Clothing Vermeer Canada Inc.

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You’re invited to locongress.com It’s here! Your once-a-year chance to meet 600 vendors, learn from leading industry experts, be entertained and connect with other professionals — all in one place, under one roof, over four days. Mark your calendars today to join us at Congress, January 10-12, 2012 in the south building of the Toronto Congress Centre. Take this time to set your game plan, pick up the latest tools of the trade and practical business tips to guarantee your success in 2012. Update yourself on the latest products, technologies and best practices for the design, construction and maintenance of public and private green spaces. PARTNER INFORMATION: Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association is one of the most vibrant associations of its kind, comprised of over 2,000 member companies, ten sector groups and nine local chapters. Its trade mission is to promote the horticulture industry in Ontario, and its public mission is to promote the joys and benefits of green spaces. The Canadian Fence Industry Association is a non-profit organization representing contractors, retailers, agents, wholesalers and manufacturers of fence products and services. It is dedicated to representing high construction standards and levels of ethical business behaviour in a competitive market place. The Ontario Parks Association is a registered charity organization that is devoted to bringing together those people who are interested in the development and protection of parks and green spaces. The OPA is committed to educate park professionals and enable them to meet or exceed industry standards while actively advocating for the protection and enhancement of parks and open spaces. Our motto “Protecting Tomorrow Today” is a commitment to civic beautification and the advancement, protection and conservation of parks, open space and the environment in the province of Ontario. 2

Canada’s 39th International Horticultural Lawn and Garden Trade Show and Conference

AN INITIATIVE OF:

January 10-12, 2012

FEATURING: FENCECRAFT

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURES

SPONSORS: Landscape Ontario thanks the following sponsors for their generous support of Congress: PLATINUM SPONSORS Banas Stone Inc. StoneArch/Global Arch GOLD SPONSOR Chrysler Canada Inc

SILVER SPONSORS Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel Landscape Trades BRONZE SPONSORS Bobcat of Hamilton Ltd Entripy Custom Clothing Vermeer Canada Inc

SHOW MANAGEMENT: Paul J. Day, CDE, Show Manager Lorraine Ivanoff, Assistant Show Manager Kristen McIntyre, CHT Conference & Events Coordinator Tony DiGiovanni, CHT, Executive Director of Landscape Ontario Sally Harvey, CLT, CLP, Manager of Education & Labour Relations Linda Nodello, Trade Show Coordinator Beth Edney, CLD, Show Committee Chair Brian Cocks, CHT, Show Committee Vice Chair Tom Intven, Landscape Ontario President Evie Isenberg, President, Canadian Fence Industry Association Paul Ronan, Executive Dir., Ontario Parks Association Shelley May, Office Mgr., Ontario Parks Association TRADE SHOW FACT LIST s#ONGRESSISTHREESHOWSINONEˆSPREADOVEREIGHTACRES s3EEOVERVENDORSFROMAROUNDTHEGLOBE s%XCHANGEIDEASWITHOVER INDUSTRYPROFESSIONALS s0ARTICIPATEINHUNDREDSOFPRODUCTDEMONSTRATIONS s'ETBUSINESSADVICEFROMINDUSTRYEXPERTS s$ISCOVERNEWEQUIPMENT PLANTSANDPRODUCTS

Congress 2012 Preview

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Three Ways to Register:

ONLINE locongress.com CHEQUE Please make cheques payable to Landscape Ontario and mail to: Congress 2012 c/o CONEXSYS, 7050B Bramalea Rd, Unit 34, Mississauga, ON L5S 1S9 FAX 905-405-9870 or 800-628-8838 ONLINE REGISTRATION STAYS OPEN UNTIL 2 PM ON JAN. 12, 2012

REGISTRATION INFORMATION: Register online at locongress.com. Pre-register by December 16, 2011 to save money. After that date, fees increase. Conference delegates will save even more when they register a group for a full or one day conference pass. Every 5th delegate from the same company, registered at the same time will receive a FREE conference pass. All conference passes include admission to the trade show. Badges will be mailed to those registered by December 16th.

MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2012

EXHIBITOR CONFERENCE PASSES: Each exhibiting company is entitled to ONE FREE full conference pass. Session admission is limited to one person per exhibiting company. Exhibiting company employees may share the pass to attend different sessions. Additional passes may be purchased.

Both held at the Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel

DISCOUNT ELIGIBILITY: Members of: Canadian Fence Industry Association, Canadian Nursery Landscape Association, Landscape Ontario, Ontario Landscape Architects Association, Master Gardeners and the Ontario Parks Association are entitled to member pricing.

Events

/0!th Annual Parks Educational Forum 7:00 a.m. Landscape Designer Conference 8:00 a.m CLP Study Group 8:00 a.m. TH!NNUAL)0-3YMPOSIUM7:55 a.m.

EARLY BIRD DEADLINE POLICY: No extensions to the deadline of December 16, 2011 will be granted. Registration fees after this date and on-site are more expensive.

Both held at the Toronto Congress Centre

Conference

REFUND POLICY: No refunds will be issued unless Congress 2012 is cancelled by Show Management.

Toronto Congress Centre Morning Sessions: 9:00 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Lunch Sessions: 12:15 p.m. Info Sessions: 2:00 p.m.

NOTE: Early morning registration lines can be long. Leave extra time to register if you are attending an early morning session.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10 TO THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

ACCOMODATION: The official hotels for Congress 2012 are listed below and are the only hotels in contractual arrangement with Landscape Ontario. Receive special rates by quoting Landscape Ontario Group Codes as indicated. Special rates are in effect until December 12, 2011. Reservations cancelled after 6 p.m. on the scheduled day of arrival and/or no shows will be billed one night’s room charge plus applicable taxes.

Irrigation Conference and Luncheon WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre: 12:00 noon

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities Workshops THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre: 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Workshop Option #1 Advanced Green Roof Maintenance Workshop Option #2 Green Walls 101: Systems Overview and Design Workshop Option #3 Green Infrastructure: Policies, Performance and Projects

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Take care when dealing with travel agencies. From time to time, Congress 2012 delegates are subjected to improper solicitation from unaffiliated hotels or third-party housing agencies. You are advised to exercise due diligence with these unauthorized housing bureaus. It is strongly recommended that you make reservations directly with the host hotels. Pickup a free bag courtesy of StoneArch/Global Arch

Details and registration at www.greenroofs.org

TRADE SHOW

TUES. JANUARY 10, 2012: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.

DOUBLETREE BY HILTON, TORONTO AIRPORT HOTEL Reservations -    655 Dixon Road, Toronto, ON M9W 1J4 $128 Single or Double – Group Code: LDF CROWNE PLAZA TORONTO AIRPORT Reservations -    33 Carlson Court, Toronto, ON M9W 6H5 $110 Single or Double – Group Code: LSO RADISSON SUITE HOTEL TORONTO AIRPORT Reservations -    640 Dixon Road, Toronto, ON M9W 1J1 $121 Deluxe Suite/$141 Executive Deluxe Suite – Group Code: CONG for telephone & online reservations SHUTTLE SERVICE: Shuttle service, courtesy of Banas Stones Inc., is provided daily from all host hotels to the Toronto Congress Centre. Shuttle times are posted in the lobby of the hotels.

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WED. JANUARY 11, 2012: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.

THURS. JANUARY 12, 2012: 9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. SHOW LOCATION: Toronto Congress Centre 650 Dixon Road Toronto, ON M9W 1J1 Located minutes from the Toronto International Airport & 15 minutes from downtown Toronto.

Congress 2012 Preview

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

2EGISTRATIONOPENSATAM 4ORONTO#ONGRESS#ENTRE Trade show open, Tuesday and Wednesday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Thursday 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. MONDAY, JANUARY 9TH PRE-TRADE SHOW EVENTS

CLP STUDY GROUP 8:00 A.M. To 3:00 P.M.

IPM SYMPOSIUM 7:55 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Networking Reception to follow

Registration opens 7:30 a.m., Toronto Congress Centre (Ticketed event)

Registration opens 7:30 a.m., Toronto Congress Centre (Ticketed Event)

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[OWNERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ONLY WORKSHOPS]

9:00 - 10:30 a.m. TUESDAY, JANUARY 10TH

Using Social Media to Enhance Your Business

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Leading a Customer Focused Team

10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Indulge in Excellence

Why Trees Matter: The Many Benefits of Trees For You and Your Customers

How to Prepare a Government Bid: Doing Business with the Municipal and Ontario Governments

The Way of Decay

The 5Ds of Successful Sales

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Is Your Business Safe? Find Out! WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11TH

The Kitchen Table Presentation

How to Succeed and Prosper as a Landscape Contractor

Small Words, Big Problems: How to Spot Common Problems Before They Happen Weather Tools for Maintenance Operation: Low Tech to High Tech

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12TH

Dream BIG Green Roofs and Walls

Recruiting Programs that Work: How to Attract and Get the Right People on Board

Trials and Tribulations: A Look at New Plant Introductions Do What, When? The Ultimate Business Management Calendar for Landscape Contractors

Is Your Business Safe? Find Out!

The 10 Best Practices that All Businesses Need to Know

Interpreting Local Area and Road Weather Forecast Products

What Does the Future Hold for Our Industry?

Conservation Arboriculture

4

Congress 2012 Preview

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What You Don`t Know Can Hurt You

Seeing Red: Rules, Regulations and Red Tape How to Get the Job at Your Price

Extraordinary Design Details

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Most events are at the Toronto Congress Centre, unless otherwise noted. Separate fees apply to pre-trade show sessions and most special events. After December 16, 2011: Full Conference Pass $295 for members, $370 for non-members One Day Conference Pass $165 for members, $205 for non-members

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER CONFERENCE 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Networking Reception to follow Registration opens 8:00 a.m. International Ballroom, Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Toronto Airport Hotel (Ticketed Event)

/0!34(!..5!, PARKS EDUCATIONAL FORUM 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Registration opens 6:30 a.m., Mississauga Room, Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Toronto Airport Hotel (Ticketed Event)

[LUNCH EVENTS]

12:15 p.m. Life Lessons at Lunch: Human Resources (Lunch included with conference registration)

Town Hall: Ask The Experts (Lunch included with conference registration)

Life Lessons at Lunch: Sales and Marketing (Lunch included with conference registration)

2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

SPECIAL EVENTS

The Prosperity Journey (FREE with trade show registration)

Landscape Ontario Legacy Celebration 11:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 p.m.

Human Resources for the Future: Making the Specialist High Skills Major Program Work for You! (FREE with trade show registration)

Landscape Ontario Annual General Meeting 7:15 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. International Ballroom, Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel (Open to all members)

Landscape Industry Executive Program - Taking the LIEP to Business Excellence. (FREE with trade show registration)

Tailgate Party, 5:00 p.m. to Midnight International Ballroom, Doubletree Hotel by Hilton Toronto Hotel (Free with trade show registration)

On the Job Training Primer Session (FREE with trade show registration)

Awards of Excellence and Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reception 4:45 p.m. Reception, 5:15 p.m. Ceremony Plaza Ballroom, Doubletree Hotel by Hilton Toronto Airport (Ticketed Event)

Irrigation Conference and Luncheon. 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., Toronto Congress Centre (Ticketed Event)

Green Roofs For Healthy Cities Workshops Workshop 1: 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Advanced Green Roof Maintenance (Ticketed Event) Workshop 2: 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Green Walls 101: Systems Overview and Design (Ticketed Event) Workshop 3: 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Green Infrastructure (Ticketed Event)

Congress 2012 Preview

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MONDAY, JANUARY 9, 2012

Pre-Trade Show Events

CLP STUDY GROUP Certified Landscape Professional: Human Resources and Leadership Module Toronto Congress Centre FULL DAY SEMINAR - LUNCH INCLUDED 8:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 p.m. Session 3:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00 p.m. Opportunity to write any of the CLP Module Examinations Ticketed Event. Pricing after December 16, 2011 for Members: $200 and Non-members: $220. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Congress Conference is a separate fee. Presented by: Paul Doornbos CLT, CLP, Thornbusch Landscaping Company Note: Participants must purchase the study manual at least 30 days in advance. Visit www.clp.canadanursery.com or contact Julia Ricottone at (888) 446-3499.

IPM SYMPOSIUM 2012 Managing Turf, Trees and Expectations Toronto Congress Centre, Cohen Ballroom FULL DAY SEMINAR - tabletop displays, lunch, networking reception, door prize, MTO and OMAFRA updates included. 7:55 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. New! IPM Person of the Year Award. For details visit loawards.com and click on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Special Awards.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ticketed Event. Pricing after December 16, 2011 for Members and Non-members is $110. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Net proceeds are donated to lawn care research or a suitable alternative. Congress Conference is a separate fee. Presenters: Dr. Parwinder Grewal, Ohio State University Crystal Lafrance, Ministry of the Environment Jim Chatfield, Ohio State University William Bryant Logan, Urban Arborists Pam Charbonneau, OMAFRA KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

The Art of Customer Service: Influence With Ease

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER CONFERENCE Hosted by the Landscape Ontario Landscape Designer Sector Group Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel, International Ballroom FULL DAY EVENT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LUNCH and RECEPTION INCLUDED 8:00 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. Ticketed Event. Pricing after December 16, 2011 for Member is $185 and $265 for Non-member. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Congress Conference is a separate fee. Keynotes presented by: Kyle Lacy, Mindframe Ron Koudys, BLA, MEd, OALA, CSLA, ASLA, RLI (MI), CLD, Ron Koudys Landscape Architects Phillip Van Wassenaer, Urban Forest Innovations Paul Zammit, Toronto Botanical Gardens Panel Discussion moderated by Haig Seferian, OALA, CSLA, FASLA, CLD, HHHBA Seferian Design Group, Panelists: Ron Koudys, BLA, MEd, OALA , CSLA, ASLA, RLI (MI), CLD, Ron Koudys Landscape Architects Tony Lombardi, BA, CLD, CLP, Dr Landscape Christine Gracey, OALA, CSLA, DA Gracey and Associates PLATINUM SPONSOR:

GOLD SPONSOR:

SILVER SPONSORS:

BRONZE SPONSOR:

ONTARIO PARKS ASSOCIATIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 4(!..5!,0!2+3%$5#!4)/.!,&/25-

Turning Grey to Green, 75 Years of Protecting Tomorrow Today

SYMPOSIUM SPONSOR:

Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel, Mississauga Room FULL DAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; networking breakfast, door prize, tabletop displays and OPA Past Presidentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; luncheon and awards included. 7:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 p.m.

RECEPTION SPONSOR:

Ticketed Event. Pricing after December 16, 2011 for Member is $235 and $270 for Non-member. Lunch tickets are $55. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Congress Conference is a separate fee.

Jeff Mowatt, JC Mowatt Seminars, Calgary, AB

Presenters: Chris Ziemski, Community Operations Services Manager, City of Cambridge Carlo Balistrieri, Head of Horticulture, Royal Botanical Gardens KEYNOTE SPONSOR: TABLETOP SPONSORS :

Agrium Advanced Technologies '#$UKE%QUIPMENT Koppert Canada Plant Products Turf Revolution



Stop by the Landscape Ontario Booth #41 to pickup your certification ribbons. Attach to your Congress 2012 show Preview badge and wear with pride!

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KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

How Chicago Went Green and Learned on the Way Brendan Daley, LEED AP, CPRP, Director of Green Initiatives, City of Chicago Drop in and network with other LO members, while enjoying light refreshments. Open to all members of Landscape Ontario. Hosted by the Ontario Horticultural Trades Foundation. Pachter-Karsh Room, Toronto Congress Centre Tuesday January 12, 2012 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. For more information contact Kathleen at 1-800-265-5656 ext. 309 kathleen@landscapeontario.com

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The 2012 Conference has been re-formatted to give attendees the most value for their dollar. Sessions run in the morning and include lunch and networking at its best. All sessions qualify for Landscape Industry Certified Continuing Education Credits (CECs). Please visit www.canadanursery.com for details.

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Daily 9:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:00 p.m. TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2012

Leading a Customer Focused Team

Lead a customer oriented team and get to your underlying service and sales culture. Jeff Mowatt, JC Mowatt Seminars, Calgary, AB

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2012

How to Succeed and Prosper as a Landscape Contractor

Learn how to structure your business for maximum profitability and lead more effectively. Monroe Porter, Proof Management Consultants, Richmond, Va. THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

Option 1: Do What, When? The Ultimate Business Management Calendar for Landscape Contractors

Achieve improved time management and business growth when using a business management calendar designed specifically for landscape contractors. Mark Bradley, Landscape Management Network, Whitby, Ont.

Option 2: The 10 Best Practices that All Businesses Need to Know

Recruit and retain the right employees and customers, consistently and profitably. Bill Arman, The Harvest Group, Calabasas, Calif. Rescheduled so that you can attend the IPM Symposium on Monday, January 9, 2012

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2012 IRRIGATION CONFERENCE AND LUNCHEON 2012

The Good, the Bad, the Ugly ... and the Future of Texas Irrigation Licensing HALF DAY CONFERENCE - NETWORKING

12:00 Noon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 P.M. lunch included

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CONGRESS CONFERENCES

All Landscape Ontario professional development programs emphasize the Prosperity Partnership, five pillars of business excellence: Sales Success, Financial Health, Developing Customers for Life, Professional Operations and Leadership Excellence that will help you achieve your personal and professional goals, as you build a profitable business.

BAILEY ROOM

Our IPM Symposium qualifies attendees for 8 CECs from the IPM Council of Canada.

Ticketed Event. Pricing after December 16, 2011 is $75 for Member and Non-members. Includes FREE Congress trade show badge. Congress Conference is a separate fee. Register online at www.locongress.com Todd Magatagan, CAIS, CGIA, CIC, CID, CLIA, CLWM, Around the Grounds, Woodlands, Texas Sponsored by:

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LUNCH EVENTS Daily between 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.

Join us for roundtable discussions over lunch as industry leaders host group discussions on a variety of issues. We all experience challenges, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share some solutions. Bring your burning questions! Discussions will take place in conference rooms, each with a Room Moderator and several Discussion Leaders. LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2012

Life Lessons at Lunch: Human Resources

Hiring, engaging, motivating and retaining good employees is a challenge faced by all businesses with 5 or 500 employees. Explore what it takes to keep people happy and engaged so that your business benefits from jobs well done. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2012

Town Hall: Ask the Experts

Based on experience gained from the school of hard knocks, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn to avoid mistakes and discover valuable lessons from panels moderated by Michael Pascoe, Fanshawe College and Sally Harvey, Landscape Ontario. THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

Life Lessons at Lunch: Sales and Marketing

Getting customers and keeping customers is your key to success. Join the interactive discussion on issues related to sales and marketing that will keep customers knocking at your door.

LANDSCAPE ONTARIO

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 7EDNESDAY *ANUARY  AM All Landscape Ontario members are invited to attend your AGM and review activities from the previous year, elect your 2 members-at-large and discuss plans for the upcoming year. Your vote counts! "REAKFASTAM-EETINGAM International Ballroom, Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel RSVP to Kathleen Pugliese, 1(800)265-5656 ext. 309 kpugliese@landscapeontario.com by January 5, 2012. Registration opens at 7:00 a.m.

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BOOTH NUMBERING LEGEND “E” booths for Educational and Association, Not for Profit companies “GI” booths for Environmentally Conscious & Ontario Parks Assoc. Members “F” booths for Canadian Fence Industry Association Members

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January 10-12, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre

Canada’s 39th International Horticultural Lawn and Garden Trade Show and Conference

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GO TO OUR WEBSITE TO REGISTER NOW!

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EXHIBITOR LISTINGS AS OF NOVEMBER 7, 2011

A M A PLASTICS LTD .....1417 A&R GEOSYNTHETICS INC .....314 ACO SYSTEMS LTD ...........335 ACTION CAR & TRUCK ACCESSORIES ...... 90 ACTI-SOL INC .............. GI36 ADVANCED EQUIPMENT SALES/TREBRO ..........1465 AGRIUM ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES ............533 ALFA PRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL ......... GI55 ALGONQUIN COLLEGE....1226 ALL TREAT FARMS LTD .....460 ALLIANCE AGRI-TURF INC ..........1118 AL-MAR VINYL PRODUCTS...................F26 ALPINE PLANT FOODS CORPORATION............1727 ALTURNAMATS, INC ........133 ALUMI-GUARD ...............F41 AMAIZEINGLY GREEN VALUE PRODUCTS ULC .......... GI50 AMERICAN EXPRESS ......1146 AMERISTAR FENCE PRODUCTS...................F10 APPLIED POLYMER SYSTEMS ...................1149 APPRENTICESEARCH.COM -H.I.E.C. ...................... E1 AQUA INNOVATION .......1870 AQUA MIX ...................1326 AQUASCAPE, INC ............304 ARBORVALLEY URBAN FORESTRY .................1250 ARCTIC EQUIPMENT MFG CORP..........................642 ARIENS CO ..................172A ARMTEC/BROOKLIN ......1512 ASB GREENWORLD LTD ..1317 ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO ROAD SUPERVISORS......E14 ATLAS BLOCK CO LIMITED .....................538 ATLAS POLAR COMPANY LTD ............1737 ATLAS ROLLING ENTRY SYSTEMS ...........F28 ATPONDS - DIV OF A&T INDUSTRIES INC ........1206 AUTOVISION WIRELESS INC ............................. 29 AVALANCHE/LEDEX INDUSTRIES ................508 BAG-O-SAND INC..........1560 BAHCO ..................... 1139B BAKKER (JC) & SONS LTD ..................1542 BALSAM PROMOTIONS ...... 82

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BANAS STONES INC ........750 BANNERMAN LTD............109 BARKMAN CONCRETE LTD ..........................1634 BARRACUDA INC ..........1243 BARRETT MARKETING GROUP .......................570 BATTLEFIELD EQUIPMENT RENTALS .....................766 BAY-LYNX MANUFACTURING INC ............................266 BEC EQUIPMENT.............163 BENDALE BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL INSTITUTE ... 84 BEST WAY STONE LTD ......670 BESTWAY FABRIC BUILDINGS .................157 BIG BEAR TOOLS INC ......247 BIG ISLAND QUARRIES INC ..........................1247 BLUE SKY NURSERY LTD ..........................1217 BOBBEX INC ................1406 BOBCAT COMPANY ........... 99 BOSMAN HOME FRONT INC ............................129 BOT AGGREGATES LIMITED .....................436 BOUNDARY FENCE + RAILING SYSTEMS INC ...............F32 BRADSTONE/ STONEROX .................1121 BRAUN NURSERY LTD ....1235 BRICKSTOP CORP ............537 BRI-MAR ....................744B BRITESPAN BUILDING SYSTEMS .....................655 BROOKDALE TREELAND NURSERIES LTD............453 BROWN’S CONCRETE ........364 BROWN’S FUELS ...........1102 BURLINGTON LINE-X ADRIAN STEEL .............566 C PINE ASSOCIATES INC ..........................1124 CALCO SOILS .................340 CALHOUN SUPER STRUCTURE .................449 CAN AM PRECAST PRODUCTS LTD ...........1343 CANADA BLOOMS ............ 70 CANADA GREEN FARM .....365 CANADA POWER TECHNOLOGY - CPT .......548 CANADALE NURSERIES LTD ..........................1212 CANADIAN BOULDER SUPPLY.....................1621 CANADIAN EQUIPMENT OUTFITTERS ................546

CANADIAN FENCE INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (CFIA) .....F30 CANADIAN NURSERY LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION ............. 41A CANADIAN RECYCLED GLASS ......................2106 CANADIAN RESTORATIONS GTA INC ......................151 CANADIAN SALT COMPANY LTD (THE) .....169 CANADIAN SCALE COMPANY LIMITED ...................... 74 CANNOR NURSERIES LTD ..........................1516 CARMIX CANADA ..........1607 CARRIER CENTERS ..........772 CASE IH DEALERS...........282 CAST LIGHTING LLC ......1132 CENTRAL IRRIGATION SUPPLY OF CANADA INC .........1106 CHEROKEE MFG ............1316 CHRYSLER CANADA INC .... 39 CJ BLOWERS ..................167 CLE LEASING ENTERPRISE LTD ..........477 CLOTURES DIRECTES INC....F9 CLOTURES OASIS INC ......F21 COMMANDER INDUSTRIES ................250 CONCORD ALUMINUM RAILINGS ...................F44 CONNECT EQUIPMENT....... 11 CONNON NURSERIES/ AVK HOLDINGS INC ....2101 CONNON NURSERIES/ CBV HOLDINGS LTD.......560 CONNON NURSERIES/ NVK HOLDINGS INC ....1456 CREDIT VALLEY CONSERVATION ............E25 CUB CADET....................632 CUBEX LIMITED .............212 CURV-RITE INC ............... S9 CYCLE PODS ONTARIO INC ............................413 DAKOTA TREE TRANSPLANTER ............667 DA-LEE PROFESSIONAL DUST & ICE MANAGEMENT SOLUTION ...................111 DAY & CAMPBELL LIMITED ...................2109 DCS APPLIANCES BY FISHER & PAYKEL APPLIANCES CANADA INC..............1513 DECK MASTERS OF CANADA .....................412 DEER FENCE CANADA INC .......................... GI83 DEERBUSTERS ..............1426

DEL EQUIPMENT LTD .................... 102, 202 DELAWARE PUMP AND PARTS LTD...................165 DEVTRA INC ..................820 DFK EQUIPMENT SALES INC ............................872 DIAMOND SYSTEMS INC ..........................1660 DITEQ CORPORATION ......551 DNM SYSTEMS INC ..........115 DOMAX CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT.................367 DOWNHAM NURSERIES INC ............................146 DRIVE PRODUCTS ...........744 DRIVETEC......................260 DUKE (GC) EQUIPMENT LTD .... 1447, 1543, 1546, 1642 DURA-TOOL ............... 1139E DUTCHMASTER NURSERIES LTD ..........................1566 DYNA METRO INC DYNAMATRIX ...............439 DYNASCAPE SOFTWARE ..1218 EASTERN FARM MACHINERY LTD ............................382 EASY PRO POND PRODUCTS...................141 EASY-FLO .................... GI45 ECHO BEAR CAT .............. 45 ECHO POWER EQUIPMENT (CANADA) ...................712 ECO SOLUTIONS (MILTON) INC .......................... GI18 ECO SYSTEMS INC .........1259 ECO WATER INNOVATIONS ............1207 ECO WOOD PRODUCTS LTD ............................543 ED’S CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD ..........................1136 ELIET USA INC ...............408 ELOQUIP LTD ...... 1272, 1366 ENGAGE AGRO..............1352 ENTRIPY CUSTOM CLOTHING .................1567 ENVIROBOND PRODUCTS CORP........................1113 ENVIRONMENTAL FACTOR INC/EFI .................... GI41 ENVIRONS WHOLESALE NURSERY ..................1526 EQUIPMENT JOURNAL .....333 ESF EQUIPEMENTS INC ..... 79 EVERPLAY INSTALLATION INC ............................432 E-Z-GO ..................... 1447A EZ-GRASS, INC .............1252 FAIRFIELD TREE NURSERIES INC ..........................1142

FAIRGREEN SOD FARMS LTD ..........................1431 FANSHAWE COLLEGE .....3, E5 FEDERATED INSURANCE ...F42 FELCO ...................... 1139A FENCAST INDUSTRIES LTD ............................F11 FERRIS INDUSTRIES INC ..518 FIBRAMULCH .................. 30 FIELDWORKS CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT.................... 9 FIRST CONCRETE LTD .......468 FLIPPAD INTERNATIONAL STABILIZER PADS .......173B FORTRESS IRON FENCE SYSTEMS .......................F2 FORTRESS IRON RAILINGS ...................F14 FOX HOLLOW FARMS .....1324 FRENSCH (C) LTD..........1139 FS PARTNERS, A DIV OF GROWMARK, INC ........1203 FSI LANDSCAPE SUPPLY.1725 FUTURE ROADS SOLUTIONS ............... GI25 FYFE (ALLAN) EQUIPMENT LTD ...........361 G R DISTRIBUTORS INC ...553 G&D EQUIPMENT INC/ MORBARK ...................316 G&L GROUP OF COMPANIES ...............1507 GALAXY ILLUMINATIONS INC ..........................1350 GARDENLINK INC ...........464 GARDENS CENTRAL MAGAZINE (CORNWALL PUBLISHING CO) ..........................1232 GEHL CO ...................... 11A GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA .................. 23 GENERAL SEED COMPANY ..................1204 GLOBAL ARCH INC ..........418 GODRICH TREES PROJECT .....................E13 GRAVELY, AN ARIENS CO BRAND...................172 GREAT NORTH OUTDOOR PRODUCTS...................552 GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE ONTARIO COALITION ...GI60A GREEN ROOFS FOR HEALTHY CITIES......... GI60 GREEN TRACTORS ...........334 GREENHORIZONS GROUP OF FARMS LTD (THE) ...1260 GREENVILLE - A PART OF WRIAN MARKETING ....1129 GRO4 ORGANICS INC .....1150

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EXHIBITOR LISTINGS AS OF NOVEMBER 7, 2011

GRO-BARK (ONTARIO) LTD ............................328 GROUNDS GUYS (THE)...1329 GROWER’S CHOICE ..........577 G-TRAX WEAR PARTS INC .173 HAMILTON BUILDERS SUPPLY INC ...............1527 HANES GEO COMPONENTS...............860 HANSON HARDSCAPE PRODUCTS...................648 HARKNESS EQUIPMENT LTD ..........................2018 HARPER TRUCK CENTRES INC ..........................1724 HARSHA STONE INC ........246 HAYWARD POOL PRODUCTS CANADA, INC............. GI79 HILLTOP STONE & SUPPLY.....................1251 HISTREE.NET ............... GI62 HONDA CANADA INC .......... 8 HORST WELDING/ AMI ATTACHMENTS ........ S7 HORTA-CRAFT LTD.........1333 HORTICULTURAL MARKETING INC ................. 1158, 1159 HORTISIGN................ 1139C HORTPROTECT - THE INVESTMENT GUILD & MARSH CANADA LTD .....234 HUB - SINCLAIR COCKBURN INSURANCE BROKERS....818 HUNTER INDUSTRIES INC ............................434 HUSQVARNA CANADA CORPORATE ...............1652 HUTCHESON SAND & MIXES ................... GI68 HYDRO-RAIN .................243 INCRETE SYSTEMS; DIV OF EUCLID CHEMICAL ........339 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY TRAINERS INC .............862 INFRASTRUCTURES .......... 48 IN-LITE DESIGN CORPORATION............1625 INNOVATIVE SURFACE SOLUTIONS ............... GI63 INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF ARBORICULTURE ONTARIO INC (ISAO) ..................E11 INVADING SPECIES .......... E4 IRON EAGLE INDUSTRIES INC ............................F19 ISUZU COMMERCIAL TRUCK CANADA ............... 1

J LIPANI AND SON SOD FARM LTD ...........1302 JAMBETTE PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT............... GI22 JB&D COMPANY LTD......1266 JC ROCK LTD..................347 JCB INC ........................676 JOE JOHNSON EQUIPMENT INC ............................166 JOHN DEERE LANDSCAPES LTD ............................132 JOHN DEERE LTD .728A, 728B JOHN FUMERTON SERVICES ....................481 JOHNSTON RESEARCH & PERFORMANCE .............. 28 JPL VEHICLE LEASING SERVICES ..................1116 JRT NURSERIES INC ......1403 KAGE INNOVATION LLC ..1502 KAM’S GROWERS SUPPLY.....................1337 KATO’S NURSERY (2007) LTD ..........................1224 KAWARTHA ROCK QUARRY INC ..............1145 KEN BEGG NURSERY SALES INC.................1133 KESMAC BROUWER TURF EQUIPMENT .........561 KING PACKAGED MATERIALS CO .............635 KIOTI TRACTOR - DIV OF DAEDONG USA, INC ....1750 KOBES NURSERIES INC ..1313 KOPPERT CANADA LTD ...1423 KRAUS (V) NURSERIES LTD ..........................1556 KROWN RUST CONTROL SYSTEMS .....................854 KUBOTA CANADA LTD ......686 KWIK LOAD PRODUCTS LTD ............................117 L&R SHELTERS INC .......1230 LAC BALSAM.............. 1139D LAHMAN PRECAST CONCRETE INC ...........1209 LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT NETWORK....................373 LANDSCAPE ONTARIO GEORGIAN-LAKELANDS CHAPTER ....................E28 LANDSCAPE ONTARIO RESOURCE CENTRE......... 41 LANDSOURCE ORGANIX LTD...............547

LANING (ROBERT H) & SONS LTD.................866 LAWN LIFE ..................1346 LAWNSHARK USA ...........181 LAYFIELD GEOSYNTHETICS & INDUSTRIAL FABRICS LTD ............................609 LEMAR TREE SPADES .....1248 LIGHTHOUSE SALES GROUP .......................663 LIGHTNING EQUIPMENT SALES INC.................... N1 LIMBERLOST STONE INC ..........................1525 LIMESTONE TRAIL COMPANY LTD ..............S11 LINNAEA NURSERIES LTD ..........................1419 LINZEL DISTRIBUTING ..1231 LS TRACTOR USA LLC........ 15 LS TRAINING SYSTEM ....... 72 MACCAFERRI CANADA LTD ............................415 MACHER EQUIPMENT LTD .. 47 MAKITA CANADA INC ......563 MANKAR ULTRA LOW VOLUME SPRAYING SYSTEMS ....1624 MAPLE LEAF NURSERIES LTD ..........................1451 MAR-CO CLAY PRODUCTS INC ............................138 MARTEK SUPPLY ...........1414 MASONAL STONE INC ....1519 MASSARELLI’S .............1154 MASTER HALCO CORP ........F5 MAYNE INC..................1405 MCCLOSKEY INTERNATIONAL .........1766 MEDALLION FENCE LTD ....F31 MEGADOME/HARNOIS INDUSTRIES ..............1130 MERV’S PATIOS & SHEWANS ORNAMENTS ..............1202 MESHWEAR TECHNOLOGIES INC ............................228 MILLER COMPOST - THE MILLER GROUP ............346 MILLGROVE PERENNIALS..............1432 MILLROAD MANUFACTURING .........768 MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT ........... GI61 MISKA TRAILERS ............. 19 MITSUBISHI FUSO TRUCK OF AMERICA, INC .......... 17 MODERN FENCE TECHNOLOGIES ..............F7 MORI NURSERIES LTD .....428 MS GREGSON; DIV OF RAD TECHNOLOGIES INC ....1255

MTO TRUCK INSPECTION STATION .....................E15 MULCHIT INC ..............1412 MULLIGAN MARKETING GROUP ........................ 77 MULTI SHELTER SOLUTIONS ...............1420 MUNCIE POWER PRODUCTS.................744A MUNGER LAWNSCAPE DISTRIBUTION ........... GI43 MYKE PRODUCTS .......... GI35 NATIONAL BUILDING GROUP .....................1428 NATIONAL CONCRETE ACCESSORIES...............568 NATIONWIDE INDUSTRIES ..F4 NATURAL INSECT CONTROL .................. GI58 NEBS PAYWEB.CA ...........312 NEWROADS NATIONAL LEASING ...................... 46 NEWTONBROOK BLOCK & SUPPLY CO LTD .........446 NIAGARA COLLEGE.. E16, GI82 NISCO NATIONAL LEASING ...................1339 NLS PRODUCTS ............ GI21 NORLEANS TECHNOLOGIES INC ............................187 NORTHLAND QUARRY SUPPLY LTD ...............1327 NORTON ABRASIVES O/A SAINT GOBAIN ABRASIVES CANADA INC..............1628 NOVA - J THOMAS CANADA .....................637 NURSERY SOD GROWERS ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO...................... E2 NUTRITE .....................2008 NUVO IRON - LOCINOX ......F8 OAKS CONCRETE - BRAMPTON BRICK LTD...................320 OMEGA II FENCE SYSTEMS .....................F16 ONTARIO PARKS ASSOCIATION ............... 51 ONTARIO REGIONAL COMMON GROUND ALLIANCE (ORCGA) ...................1214 ONTARIO SAWDUST SUPPLIES LTD ..............341 ONTARIO SEED CO LTD ...1134 ONTARIO TIRE STEWARDSHIP ........... GI57 ONTARIO TREE SEED PLANT MINISTRY OF NATURAL RESOURCES .................343

ONTARIO TURFGRASS RESEARCH FOUNDATION - GUELPH TURFGRASS INSTITUTE ................... E3 OREGON DISTRIBUTION LTD ..........................1506 ORGANIC EXPRESS INC ....451 OUTDOOR SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT INC .........2004 OUTFRONT PORTABLE SOLUTIONS - A DIV OF ALL COVER PORTABLE SYSTEMS .....................528 PALMAC TRUCK BODIES ...... 7 PEBBLEMAN NATURAL STONE (THE) .........................615 PEETERS (JM) NURSERIES LTD ..........................1353 PERMACON GROUP INC ..1532 PERMALOC CORPORATION..............613 PESTICIDE INDUSTRY COUNCIL - PIC .............E10 PETERBILT OF CANADA ....308 PHOENIX MEASUREMENT SOLUTIONS INC............153 PICKSEED CANADA INC ..1520 PINENEEDLE FARMS ......1131 PLANT PRODUCTS CO LTD ...................... 1216 PLAYCARE AND DESIGN INC.................549 PLEASURE-WAY POOLS ....649 PLS INSOLES ...............1303 POPE (EDWARD H) LTD ....232 PORTABLE WINCH CO ....1228 POTTERS ROAD NURSERY INC ............1529 POWER SOURCE CANADA ...................1612 PRICELESS PRODUCTS LANDSCAPE DEPOT .......719 PRO FLEET CARE.............822 PRO LANDSCAPE BY DRAFIX SOFTWARE........417 PRO TECH ENGINEERING INC ..........................1858 PROFESSIONAL LAWN CARE ASSOCIATION OF ONTARIO...................... E9 PROLINE EQUIPMENT: DIVISION OF HERITAGE OAK FARM, INC ................1427 PRO-POWER CANADA INC ............................482 PUTZER (M) HORNBY NURSERY LTD ............1424 Q & Z NURSERY INC ......1562 QUALITY FERTILIZERS INC ............................476 QUALITY SEEDS LTD ......1433

TAILGATE PARTY XVI 5:00 p.m. to Midnight | International Ballroom, Doubletree by Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel A networking event for all Congress 2012 Trade Show Delegates. Dinner will be provided as well as some GREAT entertainment. Your trade show badge is all that is required for admission.

Check out three of the hottest emerging musical artists!

HOSTED BY:

Landscape Ontario’s Show Committee SPONSORED BY: BROOKE NICHOLLS

MILES EVANS

BIANCA BERNARDI

Congress 2012 Preview

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EXHIBITOR LISTINGS AS OF NOVEMBER 7, 2011

QUEST AUTOMOTIVE LEASING SERVICES .......224 RAMROD .....................1761 REDMOND WILLIAMS DISTRIBUTING .............142 REGION OF PEEL ............474 REIST INDUSTRIES INC....372 RIGBE’S QUARRY ............653 RITTENHOUSE SINCE 1914 ........................1533 RIZMI STONE AND AGGREGATES INC ........1127 ROB-ENS EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT INC ...........179 INC ............................179 ROMA FENCE LTD ............564 ROYAL BOTANICAL GARDENS ..................... E8 RTF TURF PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION ............1436 RTF WATER SAVER GRASS SEED/GRANVIEW FARMS FARMS LTD ................ GI49 LTD .......................... RUBAROC .................... GI46 SABLE MARCO INC ........1128 SANDLER TRAINING ........475 SANTERRA STONECRAFT ..............1312 SCHILLER GROUNDS CARE ...................... 1546A SCP DISTRIBUTORS INC .... 66 SEAL KING INC ............1160 SECUREQUIP SYSTEMS SYSTEMS LTD ...............S10 LTD ............................S10 SESTER FARMS INC .......1246 SHERIDAN NURSERIES ..1342 SHIN BIO CANADA INC..1402 SLOAN’S NURSERY AND CHRISTMAS TREES ......1221

SMALE (WR) CO (1979) LTD ............................128 SMART ABOUT SALT COUNCIL.....................E27 SNOW & ICE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION INC.........541 SNO-WAY INTERNATIONAL ....... 1642A SOD SOLUTIONS, INC ....1434 SOMERVILLE NURSERIES INC ..........................1643 SOMERVILLE SEEDLINGS ................1645 SOUTHLAND INSURANCE BROKERS INC ............1418 SPAARGAREN (WJ) ..... 1142A SPECIMEN TREES WHOLESALE NURSERIES LTD..........2104 SPEELMAN’S GARDEN CENTRE.......................569 ST CLAIR COLLEGE LANDSCAPE HORTICULTURE PROGRAM .................... 33 STAM NURSERIES .........1328 STEWART’S EQUIPMENT LTD ................ N3, N5, 101 STIHL LIMITED ... 1825, 1826 STONE-LINK CORP ..........608 STONEMEN’S VALLEY INC ..........................1332 STONESAVER (KORZITE COATINGS) ....647 STRONGCO EQUIPMENT....660 STRUCTURE STUDIOS ....1351 SUNNYWEI (STONE) INTERNATIONAL INC ...1242 SUREFOOT HARDSCAPE PRODUCTS.................1229

SURE-LOC ALUMINUM EDGING/ WOLVERINE TOOLS......1425 SWP INDUSTRIES INC......F18 SYLVITE AGRI-SERVICES LTD ............................276 SYNLAWN CANADA........1117 SYNTHETIK SURFACES CANADA/ECO-FLEX ..... GI77 TALK WIRELESS INC (ORGANETRICS.COM).....171 TALLMAN TRUCK CENTRE LIMITED ...................117A TANDESKI ASSOCIATES INC ..........................1125 TD RETAIL CARD SERVICES ....................514 TECHNISEAL ..................708 TECHNO METAL POST ENGINEERING ..............236 TECHO-BLOC INC ..........1742 TEREX CORPORATE AMERICAS .................... 35 TERRAFIX GEOSYNTHETICS INC ............................529 THAMES VALLEY BRICK & TILE/ BUILDING PRODUCTS ..1466 THE DECK STORE INC ......137 THERMA GREEN INC ........534 THRESHOLD INC .............864 TIANJIN BOTEDA INTERNATIONAL TRADE CO, LTD ............................F20 TORO COMPANY (THE) .....112 TORO COMPANY (THE) .....116 TORONTO SALT & CHEMICALS LTD ......1219 TOTAL EQUIPMENT RENTALS ...................... 86 TRACKLESS VEHICLES LTD ............................160 TRADEWINDS INTERNATIONAL SALES CO INC ............1321 TRECAN SNOWMELTERS ..1618

You are invitedYou to Landscape are invited toOntario’s

Celebrating excellence in Landscape Construction, Maintenance & Design. Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Awards Ceremony 5:15 pm – 7:15 pm

Ceremony to follow the President’s reception. Wine & hors d’oeuvres will be served at 4:45 pm. Semi-formal attire is suggested. $55 per person

(One complimentary admission per awards entry received) To purchase ceremony tickets, please go to www.loawards.com For more information please contact Kristen McIntyre awards@landscapeontario.com

12

TREE ISLAND INDUSTRIES INDUSTRIES LTD ..........F17 LTD ............................F17 TRELLEBORG RUBBER TRACKS.....................173A TRENCH’N EDGE TRENCHER.................1408 TRIPLE H CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD ...........1166 TRUCK CRAFT INC ...........159 TRYSTAN ........................ S4 TS BENEFIT SOLUTIONS..2011 TSC - COUNTRY PRO SERVICES ..................1666 TUFF TECH BAGS ............GI8 TUFX-FORT INC ..............472 TURBO TECHNOLOGIES ....721 TURF CARE PRODUCTS CANADA .....................218 TURF REVOLUTION..........618 TURFMAKER CORP ..........479 TWIN EQUIPMENT LTD ...1732 TYMETAL CORP ...............F22 TYNE MOULDS AND MACHINERY CO LTD ....1151 ULTRA ALUMINUM MFG INC ............................F35 UNILOCK LTD............ 411, 1356, 1404 UNIVERSAL FIELD SUPPLIES INC ............1357 UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH ..E21 UPPER CANADA STONE CO LTD .....................1361 URE-TECH SURFACES INC..611 UXBRIDGE NURSERIES LTD ..........................1234 VANDEN BUSSCHE IRRIGATION......... 350, 351 VENTRAC BY VENTURE PRODUCTS INC ............ 11B VERBINNEN’S NURSERY LTD ..........................1318 VERMEER CANADA INC ....440

VIA TRAILERS LTD ..........810 VINELAND RESEARCH AND INNOVATION CENTRE .....E12 VISSERS NURSERY & SOD FARM .................1629 VOTH SALES & SERVICES INC ............................884 VRE GREENHOUSE SYSTEMS .....................360 WACKER NEUSON LTD ....... 49 WALLENSTEIN BY: EMB MFG INC ..............571 WATER ARTS INC ..........1347 WATERLOO BIOFILTER SYSTEMS INC ...............452 WEATHER TECH CANADA ..512 WEBER MT (WEBER MACHINE, INC) ..........................107 WEED RECEDE ..............1856 WESTECH BUILDING PRODUCTS...................F12 WESTERN TORONTO INTERNATIONAL TRUCK INC ............................184 WHITEOAK FORD LINCOLN SALES LTD........ 1105, 1112 WILLIAM WALLACE GARDEN FURNITURE INC ...........454 WILLOWBROOK NURSERIES INC ............................760 WINKELMOLEN NURSERY LTD ..........................1306 WOODBRIDGE EQUIPMENT PARTS INC ..................447 WORKPLACE SAFETY & PREVENTION SERVICES .1172 WRIGHT COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS...................150 WSI - WE SIMPLIFY THE INTERNET ...................473 YORK REGION EQUIPMENT CENTRE.....................1167 ZANDER SOD CO LTD .....1336

GREEN ROOFS FOR HEALTHY CITIES WORKSHOPS Choose from three (3) concurrent sessions Thursday, January 12, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Registration is $200 for members of Landscape Ontario and CNLA, and $225 for non-members. Your workshop fee includes a comprehensive resource manual. THREE WORKSHOPS TO CHOOSE FROM Go to www.greenroofs.org to register WORKSHOP OPTION #1 WORKSHOP OPTION #2 WORKSHOP OPTION #3

Advanced Green Roof Maintenance GREEN WALLS 101: Systems Overview And Design GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE: Policies, Performance And Projects

Go to www.greenroofs.org to register

Congress 2012 Preview

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cnlanews The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Gerry Ritz announced in mid-September the approval of $457,000 in funds to the Canadian Ornamental Horticulture Alliance (COHA) to conduct a major economic and environmental impact study of the industry. The aim of the project, known as COHA’s Green Solution for Growing the Sector, is to develop and test a national promotional plan inspired by the comments and impressions of consumers and to capitalize on their concerns about lifestyle, environmental practices and health. The plan, to be completed in late 2013, is expected to contribute to the development of good environmental practices and establish standardized practices on production costs. It is expected that workshops with horticulturalists will take place to develop a model of production costs and good environmental practices to identify variables that have the greatest impact on the industry.

COHA is comprised of CNLA,a partnering with the Fédération interdisciplinaire de l’horticulture ornementale du Québec, and Flowers Canada Growers working through COHA. Director speaks to Ontario nurseries CNLA executive director Victor Santacruz has a message for Ontario nurseries concerning the DPCP/Clean Plants program. “Many Ontario nurseries are already performing valuable processes and procedures, but they have not formalized them in a manual of operations,” says Santacruz. “In Ontario, the adoption of Clean Plants has been very limited due to a misconception that it is a complex program, or it is too costly. The reality is that it is neither costly nor complex, as each nursery’s system is based on its own operations and levels of risk and complexity. It is all relative to the nursery’s specific operation.” The Clean Plants  program, originally

called the Domestic Phytosanitary Certification Program (DPCP), was developed in 2006 by a team of experts operating under Canadian Nursery and Landscape Association (CNLA) supervision. This program is currently accredited by the Canadian Nursery Certification Institute (CNCI) and is approved as a feeder program to supply CNCP nurseries.  “If we were to describe Clean Plants to someone outside of our industry in simple terms: it is an ISO-style certification for the nursery sector, not connected in any way to ISO certification, but following the same principles of documentation and traceability,” says Santacruz. The Clean Plants system has been adopted in B.C. and Alberta. Some attribute the early adoption to the fact that B.C. had to deal with P. ramorum, and City of Calgary requires that all purchased plant materials come from nurseries operated under the Clean Plants program.

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| LANDSCAPE TRADES

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cnlanews “Every reasonable person can expect there will be a plant health issue that will eventually affect our sector in Ontario. This can be a virus, insect, disease or other negative natural impact on the industry. There is no guarantee that participants in the Clean Plants program will be protected from the problem, but it does create a system that will minimize, if not mitigate many issues through best management practices, sampling and testing of stock material, workshop training, and annual audits. The CNLA executive director explained the cost to enroll in the program: small (up to $2-million), $250 a year; medium ($2

to $5-million per year), $500; large (over $5-million per year), $1,000. The average annual cost of an audit is $500 ($100 per hour, averaging five hours per audit). This can be higher or lower, depending on the nursery’s systems and complexity of operations.   “When the next plant health crisis arrives in Ontario, industry will ask its industry associations to fight on its behalf for compensation. Our industry will work, as always, for the best interest of our members. The government will certainly demand that this industry has taken every step to minimize risks and the losses caused by the crisis. A better prepared industry that is proactive in

improving documentation, adopting best management practices, provides training to staff and is annually audited, will be in a better position to deal with the next plant health crisis in Ontario. I urge all our nursery members to consider Clean Plants as a value added certification program for their nursery,” stated Santacruz.  LT The Canadian Nursery Landscape Association is the federation of Canada’s provincial horticultural trade associations. Visit www.canadanursery.com for more information.

Pick Up A Real Truck Visit Tallman Truck Centre at Landscape Ontario, January 11th to 13th at the Toronto Congress Centre. Or visit www.pickuparealtruck.ca today to learn more about how the International TerraStar can work for you. ®

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Oshawa 289-404-3350

Kingston 800-700-0268

Belleville 800-668-8222

Brockville 800-267-8114

East Ottawa 800-387-8966

West Ottawa 800-205-7878

Cornwall 800-267-7179

Kemptville 800-267-7971

JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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novascotiaupdate Landscape Trades devotes space in each issue to provincial association news. This month features Landscape Nova Scotia. April 30 was a sunny, but blustery, day at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College test site, where 42 candidates from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and PEI challenged the Landscape Industry Certified Technician testing process. We continue to enjoy high registration, proving that industry sees value in certification. The certification committee expresses gratitude and appreciation to the dedicated volunteers who work to make the test run a smoothly as possible, as well as the many companies who provide materials and equipment for test day. Atlantic Centre for Landscape Excellence Work continues toward the development of the Atlantic Centre for Landscape Excellence (ACLE). In April, LNS presented over $30,000 toward its construction. The ACLE will parallel and support Nova Scotia Agricultural College’s continued leadership in Landscape Horticulture education and training. The ACLE committee will be launching a fundraising campaign in the near future; contact LNS for more information. Non-essential pesticide ban A provincial ban on non-essential lawn pesticides went into effect April 1, 2011, with a ban on ornamental plant pesticides being introduced April 1 of this year. The ban does not apply to the golf, agriculture or forestry sectors, as the government has deemed these uses as essential. Allowable pesticides are available at stores. Vendors must be certified by the Department of Environment, and products must be placed in closed cabinets that are not publicly accessible. LNS was very active in lobbying the provincial government during the process of enacting the legislation and the creation of the regulations. LNS won a small but significant victory when the final list of allowable pesticides was released including pyrethrins, giving members the ability to sell a product and offer services that deal with chinch bugs. 66 | JANUARY 2012

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| LANDSCAPE TRADES

Bergman Concrete was the winning team at the annual softball tournament.

LNS continues to lobby Halifax City Council to harmonize its permitted list of pesticides with the province’s allowable list. All work and no play... After the spring rush it’s time for a little R&R. We held our second annual softball tournament in Enfield on July 9. Congratulations to the winning team from Bergman Concrete. The team from Atlantic CAT were low scorers in the annual Grant Mosher golf tournament on August 4, held at Sherwood Golf and Country Club. Thanks to sponsors and prize donors for both events. 2011 HortEast The HortEast Trade Show and Conference alternates between Moncton and Halifax. The show for 2011 was held at the Moncton Coliseum Complex in New Brunswick on Nov. 22 and 23, with pre-show workshops on Mon. Nov. 21. New this year was a practical demonstration area on the trade show floor. The show offers a host of seminars, networking opportunities and a chance to meet face-to-face with suppliers. Thanks to everyone who came out and helped to make this year’s event a success — we look forward to seeing everyone in Halifax in 2012, Nov. 19-21 at the Cunard Centre.

Atlantic CAT was the low scoring team from the Grant Mosher golf tournament.

reputation for being the top show for anyone looking to begin a landscape project, and provides a early-season opportunity for business owners and their staff to talk to prospective buyers about their products and services. The 2011 show was a resounding success, attracting nearly 30,000 homeowners, and with every booth occupied by a member of LNS. Intelligent, creative designs showcased the best the industry has to offer. Congratulations to all who took the time and went to great expense to ensure the show was a must-see for householders. Awards of Excellence After revamping the judging criteria for entries, we received 29 submissions for the LNS Awards of Excellence program. Top winners will be entered in the CNLA National Awards program. LNS looks forward to hosting the CNLA National Awards of Excellence gala on February 8 at the Westin Nova Scotian Hotel in Halifax. The awards ceremony is held in conjunction with the CNLA winter board meeting. LNS welcomes Pam Woodman back after her maternity leave and gratefully thanks Tracey Gilbert for ably stepping into Pam’s LT shoes last year.

2012 Garden and Patio Show The 2012 Garden and Patio show is held in conjunction with the Ideal Home Show at Exhibition Park in Halifax from March 30-April 1. If you are interested in exhibiting this year, please contact the LNS office to reserve your spot. This show has the 66 | JANUARY 2012

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sustainablelandscaping

The Big Easy:

‘Eco’ is NOT harder!

I just met with an old customer

who became a friend over the years. She’s renovating and landscaping her place in the Cayman Islands, where a large tree on the property became infested with termites. She spoke with many local nurseries and landscapers, and got a variety of answers. I was surprised at the route she took. Chickens. All of the chemical solutions were complex and only had a spotty chance of success. She got a dozen chickens and let them roam free and they gradually cleaned up all the termites, and most of the other pests as well. This got me to thinking about simple solutions to common problems for which we often have no good answer. Our mindset is still a bit stuck in the chemical world, but there are often eco-friendly routes to take.

Much of the trick is learning the life cycle of the problem one is trying to control. Black knot affects cherries and plums, including Shubert cherry, and will spread with catastrophic results if pruned at the wrong time of year. If pruned in August, the tree will have a chance to heal the wounds before the fungus releases its spores, so there won’t be any re-infection. I was having a terrible time with red lily beetle in my own garden. I had some success with nematodes, since the beetle pupates in the soil. Thoroughly by accident, I noticed that the beetles were feeding on my Fritillaria meleagris and, with its thin leaves, the beetle was easy to spot. My morning sanity-coffee walks, before the daily craziness, allowed me to hand-pick the beetles when the population was low, and my lilies haven’t been decimated

BY SEAN JAMES

for the past two years. The Fritillaria are a lure crop for the beetles. There are many expensive things that can be done to improve the health of a tree. Some fight disease. Others fight insects. Some just fight stress. A six inch-deep mat of compost, sloped up from the trunk and spread out to the drip line, will help the tree overcome most problems. I had to deal with a Norway spruce which had spruce adelgid and spider mites, and was in serious decline. An application of compost had the tree growing vigorously within the year. It overcame all the problems and now looks amazing. I’d say a re-application every five years would help. Biodiverse plantings seem to be the best way to control almost everything, with the exception of the new mega-pests such as pear trellis rust and emerald ash borer. Remember, we’re not trying to eliminate harmful insects and diseases — just to keep them under control. With a diverse garden, very few problems will get so dominant that they need to be controlled. Birds and pollinators visit my garden in droves for the seed, shelter and water, and I very rarely have issues that need dealing with, since nature cleans up everything. For instance, I can’t resist buying the new hostas, and I chuckle every time I hear folks looking for advice on how to control slugs. I simply don’t have a problem with them because the birds love them. As with all problems, ya can’t win ‘em all. I keep trying though, and do get some interesting surprises. For each infestation, research the pest and its life cycle, then determine when it’s most open to control methods. Learn one pest at a time, depending on the crisis du jour and before you know it, LT you’ll be an expert! Sean James is owner of an Ontario-based environmentally-conscious landscape design/build/ maintenance company.

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11/23/2011 1:38:51 PM


legalmatters

Beyond design: The designer’s responsibility for estimates, inspections and supervision BY ROBERT KENNALEY

In this article we will briefly review three areas of responsibility often assumed by design consultants, which go beyond the design obligation itself: the responsibilities to provide a cost estimate for installation, to perform site “supervision,” and to inspect the work and provide deficiency lists. Estimates and costs Canadian courts have tended to hold design consultants to a rather high standard in relation to estimates. Even where the consultant makes it clear that the estimate is not to be relied on, he or she may be held liable if it can be shown that the required degree of care and skill was not exercised, and the estimate turns out wrong. Accordingly, unless the consultant is comfortable that the estimate is reasonably accurate, estimates should not be given in any circumstance. In some circumstances, estimates can form part of a “cost condition.” Such a condition exists where a designer is found to have represented that his design can be built for the estimated amount. If it is found that a cost condition was given and the estimate is wrong, the consultant is often not entitled to payment for his design. This is because the design may be of no value to the client, who cannot afford to build it. A cost condition need not be expressed in writing. It may also arise by implication. Factors to be considered include whether or not the consultant was aware of the client’s budgetary limitations or expectations, the sophistication of the client, the extent to which the client is active in controlling costs and the extent to which the initial drawings are preliminary or subject to change. Consultants should consider making it clear in their agreements that estimates are

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not to be relied on by the client. Even then, and as indicated above, consultants should consider refusing to provide an estimate, if they are not comfortable with its accuracy. Consultants should also inform clients promptly if conditions change such that a cost estimate is no longer applicable. In addition, many provinces have passed consumer protection legislation (such as the Consumers Protection Act in Ontario) which provides that any estimate provided to a consumer (which in the construction context generally includes a residential client) cannot be exceeded by more than a certain percentage. Consultants who perform work in the residential sector should ensure they understand their obligations with respect to estimates under such legislation. Inspect, rather than supervise Consultants will often either intentionally or verbally agree to supervise the work of a contractor. This is a very risky responsibility to assume. The obligation to supervise generally implies some kind of control over the performance of the physical work. Clients will usually (and understandably) understand this to mean that the consultant is taking responsibility to ensure the work is properly performed. The consultant, on the other hand, cannot possibly do this unless he agrees to be on-site at all times during the performance of the work, looking over the shoulder of the contractor to ensure performance. Further, the consultant generally has neither the skill nor the authority to actually instruct the contractor with respect to the individual components of the work. Consultants therefore usually do, and should, refuse to provide supervision of

construction. By doing this, they want to avoid the obligation to manage and/or control the construction of the work, and because this obligation can expose the consultant to numerous allegations of negligence. Usually, limiting the responsibility to inspection, rather than supervision, is sufficient to meet the client’s needs. Assuming responsibility for the physical work can be looked at from another perspective, as well. Generally, design consultants should not retain subcontractors in their role to perform the physical work unless they themselves are experienced in the construction field and are properly insured, etc. Rather, the construction should be performed by contractors who enter into contracts with the owner directly. Consultants can exercise some degree of control, to protect their interest (and vision) in the end product, by insuring the contractor must construct to the designer’s requirements, allow the consultant to inspect the work, and respond to the consultant’s deficiency lists. Inspection responsibilities With respect to inspection, and absent expressed terms to the contrary, consultants will be expected to perform whatever inspection is necessary to reasonably satisfy themselves that the work is in general conformity with the drawings and specifications. This generally involves being on site to ensure that key elements of the work are installed properly. Usually this means ensuring that important stages of the work have been inspected before they are covered up. To avoid confusion, the scope of the inspection responsibility should be made clear in the consultant’s agreement.

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Consultants should also consider ensuring that the contract between the owner and the contractor provides that the contractor must heed the instructions of the consultant with respect to making the work available for inspection and correcting deficiencies. It is noted that the consultant is generally not entitled to direct the contractor with respect to how the work is to be performed. This is because the method of work is generally within the contractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discretion to determine, unless the contract documents (including drawings and specifications) provide otherwise. Consultants should also ensure that they have budgeted for the time and expense that may be involved in performing inspections and preparing deficiency lists. If the work proceeds as the consultant and owner hope it will, these attendances may not take very much time. On the other hand, if issues develop between the owner and contractor, or if the contractor runs into unforeseen problems, the amount of time required for inspection and deficiency reviews can become significant. In our next article, we will address the consultantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role, options and risks with respect to selecting or recommending trades for the performance of the physical work. LT Rob Kennaley practices construction law in Toronto. He speaks and writes regularly on construction law issues and can be reached for comment at 416-368-2522 or at kennaley@mclauchlin.ca. This material is for information purposes and is not intended to provide legal advice. Readers who have concerns about any particular circumstance are encouraged to seek independent legal advice in that regard.

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managementsolutions

Projects are taking too long … do you know why? BY MARK BRADLEY

“ The projects are always taking longer than I expected when I submitted pricing.” It seems like every contractor has this sentence at the tip of his tongue when  he starts to discuss production. Almost instantly, the conversation turns to crews  or  people. But are you looking in the right  place? Is it possible, even likely,  that your problems are rooted in the way you sell, design and estimate your projects? By this I mean: l Did the salesperson identify all the contract requirements clearly? l Did we have all the information we needed before we actually priced the work? l Did we identify any missing information, and explain how we will handle price changes if required? l Was the estimate accurate? Were all the tasks — windshield time, production time, layout time, cleanup time — accounted for somewhere in the bid? When landscape contractors are honest with themselves, they admit productivity problems start long before crews lace up their boots. The reason that we’re over hours, or over budget, is because we were  underprepared when we priced the job. When your projects are over budget, you need to look at two questions to discover why. Did your bid cover all of the work required to fulfill the contract? And are your crews following the plan set forth by the estimator, and are they working at expected production rates? Most time issues are related to one  or the other; the crew is too slow, or the estimator was too fast, and sometimes it’s

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a combination of the two. In any case, you need to find the most common sources of overruns, and remedy them before you start  bidding your next project. The good news is that it’s more than likely your problems follow the old 80/20 rule — 80 per cent of the time your crews spend over time budget is because of the 20 per cent of the information your sales team or estimator was missing when estimating. Identify that 20 per cent of missing information, and you will solve 80 per cent of the reasons you’re consistently taking longer than was estimated. Maintenance and snow In the landscape maintenance and snow business, most labour overruns can be quickly resolved by allowing the crew supervisors or foremen to access the contracts (prices can be removed if preferred), so they can clearly understand what was included and how much time was allotted for each work area.  Contractors complain about their crews’ inefficiency constantly, but when asked how they set expectations, I rarely hear a good answer. A good answer includes work plans for every service contract that clearly indicate the labour, materials, and equipment needed for each service type, and a total of the hours expected for the service. When crew supervisors know what was included in the bid, they can execute accordingly. When you don’t tell them, they guess — and it’s madness to think their guess is going to  complete the work to the correct standard and achieve the anticipated profit. They might get one or the other right, but not both. You will almost certainly have

a problem; either the customer is under served and you lose the contract, or your customer is over-served and you don’t make any money … sound familiar? Fix the problem  by taking  more time before you price the job to analyze site information. You should have a standard process or form for this. Understand the scope of work  and the needs of your clients fully — prompt them with a list of standard questions; they’re not the experts. This process ultimately gives an accurate estimate for the client, and then is used to manage work in the field. When the estimate covers all of the work needed, and the crew understands the scope, as well as the labour, material, and equipment planned into the contract price, it can  execute. Provide the crew with a post-service quality checklist, and you have all the ingredients you need for productive, profitable execution. That’s not to say you’ll never have problems, but when you do, your problems will surface much earlier. If the services are consistently taking too long, you’ll know after only a few weeks, rather than finding out after a few months—or worse, at the end of the year. If a crew has been given unrealistic timelines, then members will call attention to the problem, and you can proceed to find out why timelines aren’t being met. It could be the crew has misunderstood the level of service required, or it is inefficient, or maybe the estimator underestimated the time the job was going to require. Make it a priority of finding out why you’re going over time, and add that reason to the 20 per cent of problems you’re going to solve with better information gathering in the sales/ estimate phase.

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Over-runs in landscape design/build In the landscape construction business, I believe problems start long before the project hits the estimator. In my experience, the design phase of a project has an enormous impact on profitability. In design/build projects, landscape contractors have a lot of control and flexibility. Done properly, your design can value-engineer the work to ensure a profit. Done improperly, a design with incomplete information will ensure the opposite; that your work goes out underpriced, and you’ll consistently fail to achieve the profit you deserve. Now you can hope to find or hire good designers/salespersons/estimators who just ‘get it,’ but hoping that my designers/ estimators just ‘got it’ has cost me more money than I care to count. Depending on finding capable people is, at best, rare and probably even unrealistic. Instead,  create a consistent, repeatable  design process that prompts your sales/design/estimation staff to gather the information they need, ensuring the job is value-engineered when it’s designed, then estimated and priced accurately. This process should be a form that’s several pages long — design/build work is not simple — but 30-60 extra minutes studying the job upfront will save

your company hundreds, even thousands, of hours doing  free work on jobs that weren’t completely analyzed before a price was assigned. The form will also help you  get better. As new problems come up, the questions you need to fix them can be added to your form. Your form becomes a living document that gets smarter with experience, and it only takes minutes to update a form — well worth the time invested. If you build projects  designed by others, then you need to analyze the drawings and specifications  even more carefully. In my business, the most costly mistakes that we’ve encountered have come on projects that we didn’t design, and usually resulted from information we didn’t have when we priced the job — but we priced it anyway and hoped for the best. When ‘the best’ turns out to be ‘the worst,’ it can turn a good job into a nightmare for the contractor, the designer, and the customer, as everyone looks to protect themselves from the effects of changes. Just some of the things you should be looking at include: l Was the scale confirmed to be accurate? l Are the property lines marked on site? l Is the demolition plan clear? l Is the drainage plan clear? l Are the depths of all plant beds and the type of soil required clearly marked?

FINALSAN

l

l

l

l

l

Is the size and/or condition of all plant material identified? Are other trades working on the property? If so, who is responsible for cleanup? How many times will equipment be required? Have you clearly communicated the cost of re-mobilization, if it’s necessary for reasons outside your control? Are samples required before installation? What is the process for change orders, or information that is unavailable at this time?

These are just some of the many, many questions that need to be answered in order to ensure  your profitability. If you’re lacking a standardized process for gathering information before you price work, then the problems with your job times start long before your crews ever park in front of a site. LT Mark Bradley is president of The Beach Gardener and the Landscape Management Network (LMN), based in Ontario.

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roadtosuccess

Math is not sexy Math is not sexy. That is both my title and my assertion. Whenever I want to talk math, listeners’ eyes glaze over, and I realize how teachers must feel when they teach the subject. Nonetheless, I persist. For those who are tempted to stop reading, you need to realize that the chances are excellent, that above all other topics, you need to address this issue. STORY TIME: I was on a job site last year

with a house contractor. He is reputable, experienced and he has seen economic swings both up and down. Three employees in their twenties arrived for work. All three were driving ‘trick trucks.’ Half-tons with all sorts of customizing and options, which meant they probably had pretty high monthly payments. Even though he makes more money than the young men, he drives an older truck that is basic. It gets the job done but it is not a looker. He turned to me and said, “They haven’t been through the early eighties.”

I knew what he meant. He was citing the period when interest rates hovered around 21 per cent. It was a time when those who had cash reserves did well, and those who had debt, did not. And those who had a tad too much debt were crippled by the interest payments. There were several contractors in my city that collapsed due to the strain of high interest payments. Nothing illustrates this time frame better than the story of Grant Devine being elected as Saskatchewan’s premier in 1982. His major platform plank was to cap mortgage rates at 14 per cent, and he won with a landslide victory. There are always going to be upswings and downswings to the economy. Interest rates are going to be low for awhile and then they will move. What goes up comes down and vice versa. 74 | JANUARY 2012

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Even though we have had a good run of low interest, stability does not mean that it will last forever. The point that I am developing is not to be over extended. In business and in our personal finances, debt should always be manageable. In my conversations with landscape contractors, garden centre owners and greenhouse operators, I have observed a common thread. Those that are doing the math are succeeding while those that are not, are digging a deeper hole. Here are the differences that I have noticed between the two camps. First: Those that are stable only use their credit cards as a convenience, and they always pay off the monthly balance, even on a lower-interest card. This may sound pretty basic, but in the last two years I have encountered two very well educated people who have gotten into trouble from the interest payments on their credit cards. Credit cards should never be used as a source of credit. Credit card debt takes people down for the ten count. Second: A line of credit is designed for, and should be used only as, a short-term financing bridge between payables and receivables. A line of credit should never be viewed or utilized as a longer term debt management tool. Those who are successful, utilize a line of credit for only a short time. Based on my personal experience, my line of credit was never utilized longer than a 60-day period, running from April 15 until June 15. The rest of the year it was inactive, as income exceeded expenditures. Third: Not all banks are the same. Most of us, when we are shopping for a new vehicle, think nothing of visiting three or four dealerships. We check out the product, the pricing and the financing. Yet, when we are arranging our long- and short-term debt, many of us take the first offer that our

BY ROD McDONALD

incumbent bank presents, as if this is written in stone. To be polite, this is a sucker punch. Banks make a lot of money off people who take first offers. As a case in point, I mentor a contractor who was dealing with a national bank. I suspected they were taking advantage of him and I encouraged him to move to a smaller, regional credit union. For whatever reason, it took him a long time before he followed my advice, but when he did, his interest rate dropped from seven to four per cent. He was pleased with the difference the lower rate made to his business. Also to be noted, many credit unions allow for balloon payments on your debt, with no interest penalties. This feature allows you to pay down your loans at a faster rate, if you are having a good year. Fourth: There is a distinct difference between wants and needs. The adage is, we have many wants and very few needs. This applies to both business and personal finances. If you are diligent and prudent with your finances, you will live and mange within a realistic budget. If you live in an alternate universe, then you are in for a rude awakening. STORY TIME: A friend’s son left

high school and went on to become a journeyman electrician. He makes top dollar and is always working. He is broke as well. He saves nothing, spending all of his income. As he has a good job, credit is easily available to him and he views that as a good thing. His view is that if he made more, then he could save something. Not true! Those who are prudent will always find a way to save something. Saving is a habit. They know that it is not an increased income that allows them to save.

Fifth: Those that are successful have learned to take only what they need from

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

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their companies. Those that are less than successful have taken an income that was too high. In short, they have bled their companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cash assets. There are even those who have paid themselves based upon future income. They have made a dreadful mistake. There is nothing on your balance sheet that ensures your companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success as much as the account labeled Retained Earnings. I am always surprised at the number of people who I chat with who do not know what this account on the balance sheet means. Simply put, this account indicates the excess income that you have earned versus that which you have taken out. Retained earnings is the amount that your company still owes you, and that above all else, demonstrates prudence. It should increase as time moves along, as long as your company has the wherewithal to honour the amount payable. Retained earnings not only demonstrate prudence, but also enable you to obtain better interest rates when you borrow. Nothing made my lending institution pay better attention to me than when I pointed out that I could self-finance new construction and expansion due to retained earnings. For some strange reason, banks are very attracted to people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need their lending services. Also, retained earnings act as a savings account

and a pension plan for those of us who are self employed. STORY TIME: There was a small coffee shop four blocks away from my garden centre . It was operated by a man who ran the kitchen, his wife looked after the order counter and his sister-in-law did the clean up. His mother-in-law would come in when they were busy to assist. A real family operation. The place served up a decent egg salad sandwich for lunch, with hand-cut fries. At coffee time, the place was packed with people eating homemade cinnamon buns, fresh from the oven. In short, they were a success. One day, they were closed for good and no one could understand why. I ran into his mother-in-law a few weeks later. She told me that her son-in-law, while running a good kitchen, had little business sense. He regarded a dollar in the door as a dollar in his pocket. Revenue Canada and his suppliers disagreed. He had violated my fifth rule of math.

There are those who are wondering why I am ringing the bells. My answer is simple. There is an epidemic of inappropriate financing occurring, and it is more often amongst the inexperienced from our

Selling Flower Bulbs for over 20 years

business community. They are operating from a position of naivetĂŠ, believing that nothing changes, when in reality, everything changes. When I was writing this, I shared some of my thoughts with my longtime friend, Garfield Marshall. Garfield owns the reputable Advance Orchards in Grand Forks, B.C. Garfield talked about surviving the debt crisis of the 1980s, something I mentioned earlier in this column. He said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those of us that survived debt in the early 1980s worked to eliminate that debt ASAP in our business and to develop fiscal strength. Our banks told me over the years that we were much too conservative.â&#x20AC;? Conservative is not the word I would choose. Prudence is the correct description. A careful and budgeted approach to business, expansion and income is prudence. Financial prudence, retained earnings and managing within a realistic budget will keep all of us on the road to success, and that to me is sexy. LT Rod McDonald owned and operated Lakeview Gardens, a successful garden centre/ landscape firm in Regina, Sask., for 28 years. He now works full-time in the world of fine arts, writing, acting and producing in film, television and stage.

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11/23/2011 1:39:18 PM


newproducts

the handle and pulls up the hopper right from his seat. A tough, high-volume side panel air induction system reduces clogging and produces 27 per cent more air volume than conventional collection systems. The 14-cubic foot hopper is specially lined to assure that all material is dumped each time. Ferris Industries www.ferrisindustries.com www.snapperpro.com

Mini excavators Caterpillar introduces three new mini excavators. The 300.9D weighs in at 2061 lbs., making it the

smallest machine in the Cat range. With an overall width of just 28.7 in., this machine is capable of driving through a standard doorway. With an operating weight of 2921-3340 lbs., depending on specification, the Cat 301.4C extends choice in the popular 1.5 ton market. Tipping the scales at 5681 lbs. with a canopy and 5886 lbs. with full cab, the 302.7D CR is the lightest Cat compact radius model, making it easy to transport for a rental company or contractor. Caterpillar www.cat.com

LT acorus

11/15/06

1:11 PM

Page 1

Markant by ACO HexaDrain

Brickslot

PointDrain

HexaDrain is an innovative plastic residential trench drain system. Ideal for use in residential driveways, patios, walkways or pools.

HexaDrain Brickslot provides a discreet slot drainage system for domestic paver installations. Ideal for use in residential driveways, doorways, patios, walkways or pools.

PointDrain is an aesthetic solution for small scale applications. Its polymer concrete construction offers excellent mechanical and thermal properties. Iron or galvanized steel grate. ACO Systems, LTD. (877) 226-4255 www.acocan.ca

Check with your local landscaping yard for availability or contact us for supply information

JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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comingevents January 4-6, Northern Green Expo, Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis, Minn. www.minnesotagreenexpo.com

January 18-20, Mid-Am Trade Show, Navy Pier, Chicago, Ill. www.midam.org

January 9-11, Great Lakes Trade Exposition (GLTE), DeVos Place, Grand Rapids, Mich. www.glte.org

January 23-25, CENTS, Greater Columbus Convention Center, Columbus, Oh. www.onla.org

January 10-12, Congress 2012, Toronto Congress Centre, Toronto, Ont. www.locongress.com

January 24-27, International Plant Fair, Essen, Germany, www.ipm-messe.de

February 9-11, Association of Outdoor Lighting Professionals annual conference, Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Contemporary Resourt, Lake Buena Vista, Fla. www.aolponline.org

January 11-13, The Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show, Baltimore Convention Center, Md. www.mants.com

January 25-28, ANLA Management Clinic, Galt House Hotel, Louisville, Ky. www.managementclinic.org

February 14-15, Manitoba Green Show, Victoria Inn, Winnipeg, Man. Contact Rebecca Doutre at 866-383-4711.

January 11-13, Indiana Green Expo, Indiana Convention Center, Indianapolis, Ind. www.indianagreenexpo.com

January 29-February 2, CGTA Spring Gift Show, International Centre and Congress Centre, Toronto, Ont. www.cgta.org

February 21-23, Salon Du Vegetal, Parcexpo, Angers, France. www.salon-du-vegetal.com

January 18-20, The Tropical Plant Industry Exhibition (TPIE), Greater Fort Lauderdale/ Broward County Convention Center, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. www.fngla.org/tpie

February 1-3, New England Grows! Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Boston, Mass. www.newenglandgrows.org

February 5-9, CGSA/WCTA Canadian International Turfgrass Conference and Trade Show, Calgary Telus Convention Centre, Calgary AB. www.golfsupers.com

March 6-7, Michigan Green Industry Association Trade Show and Convention, Suburban Collection Showplace, Novi, Mich. www.landscape.org/trade_show.cfm

LT

RC814

,QWURGXFLQJDQÂľFKLSSHU WKDWWKLQNVLWŇ&#x2039;VDÂľ Â&#x2021;7RSQRWFKSHUIRUPDQFH Â&#x2021;(DV\RQWKHSRFNHWERRN This compact 8â&#x20AC;? capacity chipper utilizes a powerful 44 hp TWIN TURBO engine at an economical price. The RC814 is the only machine in its class to feature hydraulic front wheel lift and crush.

www.gcduke.com

Email draycroft@gcduke.com Burlington 905.637.5216 I Toronto Area 905.338.2404 Toll Free 1.800.883.0761 I Fax 905-637-2009 I Burlington ON 78 | JANUARY 2012

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

pantone

pantone

485

1235

RG1635 Super Jr. Another industry first, a compact, selfpropelled stump cutter with a 3-position swing-out operator control station. pantone

485

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classifieds SERVICES AND SUPPLIES

EQUIPMENT

michael sheardown freelance incorporated estimating solutions freelance services ď&#x20AC;ł Website search for bid opportunities. ď&#x20AC;ł Quantity and area takeoff. ď&#x20AC;ł Earthwork volume calculations. ď&#x20AC;ł Design and development of spreadsheets. ď&#x20AC;ł Project estimating. Michael Sheardown 9 Bristow Creek Drive Elmira ON N3B 3K7 e: michael@msfreelance.ca www.msfreelance.ca

NURSERY STOCK WHOLESALE TREE NURSERY Growing caliper shade trees and evergreens. Custom tree basketing. Contact us for availability and pricing. STAM NURSERIES INC. 593836 Hwy 59, RR 2 Burgessville, ON N0J 1C0 Ph. (519) 424-3350 Fax (519) 456-1659 E-mail: info@stamnurseries.com www.stamnurseries.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES SALES PERSON WANTED Established Horticultural Broker, looking to expand to Quebec and Eastern provinces. Must have bilingual skills and an established customer base.

FINN Hydroseeders & Bark Blowers New and Used â&#x20AC;˘ Flex Guard FRM â&#x20AC;˘ Soil Guard BFM â&#x20AC;˘ Erosion Control Blanket Seed & Fertilizer Toll free: (888) 298-9911 Fax: (905) 761-7959 www.fibramulch.com

Contact: Mike Tandeski (586) 784-5715

DYNASCAPE DESIGN AND DYNASCAPE COLOR Current versions.They are licensed copies with their appropriate serial numbers. Registration will be transfered into buyers name through Dynascape upon purchase. Selling for $2200. No tax. Retails for $3000 plus tax. Over one thousand in savings. Contact: remi@renvirons.com

Advertise your products and services in

An established industry leading Landscape Contractor Has an opening for LANDSCAPE ESTIMATOR-PROJECT MANAGER Highly motivated results driven individual. Min. 5 yrs commercial estimating and selling experience. College Diploma with C.E.T. preferred. Landscape Design with Dynascape an asset. Excellent communication and leadership skills. Opportunity for advancement. Excellent wages & benefits. helmut@helmutz.com Application info on www.helmutz.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING INFORMATION Payment: All classified ads must be pre-paid by VISA or Mastercard. Rates: $62.15 (includes HST) per column inch (Approx. 25 words). Min. order $62.15. Annual rates also available. Deadlines: The 10th day of the month prior to issue date. (eg: June issue deadline is May 10th). Jan. deadline is Nov. 10. If day falls on weekend or holiday, deadline is the next business day. Space is limited to a first-come, first-served basis. To place an ad: E-mail your name and phone number and your ad to Rob at classifieds@ landscapeontario.com. Also mention the ad is for Landscape Trades. You will be sent a proof/confirmation/payment form by e-mail. Online advertising: All paid ads are posted to our website at www.landscapetrades.com/ classifieds for the corresponding calendar month. Website only ads are available for $67.80 (HST included) and are posted for 30 days. Additional charge for ads over 325 words.



January 2012 final.indd 79

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porous enough. Roots need air, water and drainage. Unlike top soil or triple mix, Gro-Maxâ&#x201E;˘ www.gro-bark.com ??? 1:8,+:4 -86 provides the right balance in a complete blend that will endure. 



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View these ads and many more on our website at www.landscapetrades.com JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |



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JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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CONNECT

Grow and prosper from the connections made at our events pê Increase brand recognition pê Discover new customers pê Capitalize on new markets pê Source new suppliers

GreenTrade Expo Eastern Ontario’s Green Trade Show

Co-located with the National Home Show

INDUSTRY TRADE EVENT

CANADA’S GARDEN FESTIVAL

February 15, 2012 Capital Exhibition Centre Ottawa, Ontario

March 16 - 25, 2012 Direct Energy Centre Toronto, Ontario

greentrade.ca

canadablooms.com

Canada’s fall show for the floral and garden industry

Canada’s International Horticultural Lawn and Garden Trade Show and Conference

RETAIL TRADE EVENT

INDUSTRY TRADE EVENT

October 17-18, 2012 Toronto Congress Centre North Building, Toronto, Ontario

South Building, Toronto Congress Centre

loexpo.ca

locongress.com

January 8 – 10, 2013 Toronto, Ontario

For exhibitor or visitor information call: 1-800-265-5656

January 2012 final.indd 80

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classifieds

where to find it ADVERTISER

PAGE

PHONE

Email

WEBSITE

ACO Systems Inc

77

877-226-4255

info@acocan.ca

www.acocan.ca

Acorus Restoration

77

519-586-2603

info@ecologyart.com

www.ecologyart.com

44, 77

800-338-1136

ama@amaplas.com

www.amaplas.com

Atlas Block Co Ltd

71

800-461-0208

info@atlasblock.com

www.atlashardscapes.com

Beaver Valley Stone

44

416-222-2424

info@beavervalleystone.com

www.beavervalleystone.com

Becker Underwood Inc

39

306-373-3060

request@beckerunderwood.com

www.beckerunderwood.ca

Best Way Stone Ltd

31

800-BESTWAY

info@bestwaystone.com

www.bestwaystone.com

Bobcat

25

infocenter@bobcat.com

www.bobcat.com

Brooklin Concrete Products Ltd

27

800-655-3430

brooklinsales@brooklin.com

www.brooklin.com

Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Concrete Products Limited

35

800-461-4888

info@brownsconcrete.com

www.brownsconcrete.com

Connon Nurseries - AVK Holdings Inc

82

519-647-3997

plants@connonavk.com

www.connonavk.com

Exmark Manufacturing Co Inc

29

402-223-6351

www.exmark.com

9

888-831-1085

gosselin@fertilec.com

www.fertilec.com

FSI Landscape Supply

34

905-456-2435

info@fsilandscapesupply.com

www.fsilandscapesupply.com

G & L Group

50

888-907-7258

seany@gandlgroup.com

www.draglamsalt.com

G.C. Duke Equipment Ltd

78

800-883-0761

www.gcduke.com

Galer Farm Equipment

76

905-628-0551

galer@bellnet.ca

www.galerfarmequipment.com

Gravely

23

920-756-2141

info@ariens.com

www.gravely.com

Greenhorizons Group of Farms Ltd

48

519-653-7494

info@justsodit.com

www.justsodit.com

Gro-Bark (Ontario) Ltd

79

888-GRO-BARK

keith@gro-bark.com

www.gro-bark.com

Hanson Hardscape Products

84

800-265-6496

hardscapes@hanson.com

www.hansonhardscapes.com

Isuzu Commercial Trucks

30

www.isuzutruck.ca

Kemptville Truck Centre Limited

65

613-546-0567

www.ktctruck.ca

Kooy Brothers Lawn Equipment Ltd

19

416-242-3513

sales@kooybros.com

www.kooybros.com

Kubota Canada Ltd

15

905-294-7477

info@kubota.ca

www.kubota.ca

Landscape Management Network

63

888-347-9864

workshop@landscapemanagementnetwork

www.landscapemanagementnetwork.com

Limestone Trail Company Ltd

76

905-563-8133

sales@limestonetrail.com

www.limestonetrail.com

M Putzer Hornby Nursery Ltd

46

905-878-7226

putzernursery@primus.ca

Miller Compost - The Miller Group

64

866-887-6457

compost@millergroup.ca

www.millergroup.ca

47, 73

250-652-5888

cam@neudorff.ca

www.neudorff.ca

32

800-265-8865

customer.service@nutrite.com

www.nutriteturf.ca

Oaks Concrete Products by Brampton Brick

2

800-709-OAKS

info@oakspavers.com

www.oakspavers.com

Permacon Group Inc

5

800-265-0692

www.permacon.ca

Peterbilt of Canada

13

www.peterbilt.com

Pro Landscape by Drafix Software

69

www.prolandscape.com

AMA Plastics Ltd

Fertilec

Neudorff North America Nutrite (div of Fertichem)

800-231-8574

sales@prolandscape.com

JANUARY 2012 | LANDSCAPE TRADES |

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classifieds

where to find it Pro-Power Canada Inc Proven Winners

83 42-43

800-361-0907

propower@on.aibn.com

www.propowercanada.ca

800-633-8859

www.colorchoiceplants.com

Sidhu & Sons Nursery

41

604-826-3537

info@sidhunursery.com

www.sidhunursery.com

Specimen Trees Wholesale Nurseries Ltd

38

604-465-7122

inquiry@specimentrees.com

www.specimentrees.com

Stihl Limited

11

519-681-3000

info.canada@stihl.ca

www.stihl.ca

Stone-Link Corp

67

800-854-0072

sales@stone-link.com

www.stone-link.com

Techniseal

21

800-465-SEAL

info@techniseal.com

www.techniseal.com

Techo-Bloc

33

800-463-0450

info@techo-bloc.com

www.techo-bloc.com

Thames Valley Brick

68

905-637-6997

info@thamesvalleybrick.com

www.thamesvalleybrick.com

The Toro Company

45

800-544-5364

wendy.peskar@toro.com

www.toro.ca

Tradewinds International Sales Co Inc

75

877-654-6458

tradewinds@on.aibn.com

www.tradewindsinternational.ca

Unilock Ltd

17

800-UNILOCK

georgetown@unilock.com

www.unilock.com

Winkelmolen Nursery Ltd

49

519-647-3912

winkelmolen@sympatico.ca

www.winkelmolen.com

Wright Manufacturing

37

301-360-9810

sales@wrightmfg.com

www.wrightmfg.com

Zander Sod Co Ltd

10

877-727-2100

info@zandersod.com

www.zandersod.com

EVERGREENS ***BROADLEAFS*** TREES*** FRUIT*** SHRUBS*** VINES*** ROSES*** PERENNIALS

CULTIVATING EXCELLENCE

We offer : A full range of nursery stock for all your needs Quality caliper trees - 150 varieties On time delivery and professional customer service

Rockton, On. Phone 519-647-3997 Fax 519-647-2951 82 | JANUARY 2012

January 2012 final.indd 82

***

Email- plants@connonavk.com Online-www.connonavk.com

| LANDSCAPE TRADES

11/23/2011 1:39:23 PM


Fast, Easy, Beautiful Mowing

Distributed By: Pro-Power Canada Inc. 1-800-361-0907 www.propowercanada.ca January 2012 final.indd 83

11/23/2011 1:00:14 PM


out of the ordinary

Hanson Hardscapes provides modern and innovative solutions for an expanding world. Environmental solutions such as our AquaPave ® permeable paving system and SmartCast® Clean rooftop paving tiles reduce energy costs, conserve water and remove pollutants from our groundwater and air - an achievement that is truly out of the ordinary. Our entire line of interlocking pavers, architectural tiles and retaining walls are made primarily of local, natural or recycled materials and will last a lifetime, making all of our products inherently sustainable. Let Hanson Hardscapes inspire you to create extraordinary landscapes that support a healthier future.

Visit us in Booth 648 at Landscape Ontario Congress to see what’s new for 2012.

hansonhardscapes.com

January 2012 final.indd 84

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January 2012 Landscape Trades