LandEscape Art Review, Special Edition

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LandEscape Contemporary

A r t

R e v i e w

Anniversary Edition

ANNA FINE FOER NATALIE MCGUIRE NAIMA KARIM CÉCILE FILIPE JAKUB PASIERKIEWICZ DONNA CARNAHAN ROMINA SCHIMPF VICTORIA ADKOZALOVA SARA ARRUGA

ART Sara Arruga


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SUMMARY

CONTEMPORARY ART REVIEW

C o n t e m p o r a r y

A r t

R e v i e w

Victoria Adkozalova

Anna Fine Foer

Donna Carnahan

Sara Arruga

Romina Schimpf

Cécile Filipe

Ukraine

USA

USA

Spain

Argentina

Portugal / France

The theme of the artist's works is the theme of the Universe ... The parallel lines present on the canvases symbolize the essence of being and the endless flow forward. Similar to the String theory, which states that the smallest particles are the strings that sound and create our universe. The intention to comprehend the world of emotions and feelings, an attempt to penetrate into the inner world of a viewer to touch the mystery of his soul. The artist mainly paints in oils, but also uses a mixed technique, adding gold foil and acrylic paints. Viktoria chose the grotesque as the main artistic technique with which she creates an integral picture of the world in the image of an animal or a person.

Recurring themes in my work include scientific discoveries, technology, alternative energy, location, and natural or unnatural disasters, though my output cannot be categorized in terms of specific subject matter; instead, it is my underlying approach and aesthetic that represents the unifying element. When I have an idea, I make many sketches to discover the best way to convey the idea and then search for the images to incorporate into the collage. My work has more than one story to tell. I may be both trying describe the curve of the earth on a flat piece of paper and using collaged images to blur boundaries between the natural and the manufactured/technological world, representing simultaneously land, sky, water and architecture. It is made in a traditional way; constructed with cut paper and adhesive and plays with distortions between visual perspective and surface image.

I’m Donna Carnahan, international photographer from Houston, Texas. I opened my first studio during the worldwide pandemic, here in the Arts District Houston, just west of downtown. Born in Texas, inspired in Italy, I created La Donna Foto in Houston. Ever since my aunt gave me a vintage 1960s camera, I have had a passion for photography. My career path transitioned from finance to photography when in 2015 I traveled to Florence, Italy where I became intrigued with the beauty of Renaissance art. With an eye for composition, I have traveled throughout Europe, and extensively within Italy while immersing myself in learning the language, culture, history and art.

As an artist, I mostly follow an intuitive approach, letting myself dive into the act of taking a photograph, entering in a state of trance. Often collaborating with dancers, musicians and artists, other times contemplating surreal landscapes.In landscape photography, I seek a meditative and contemplative state of mind and body. Analogue photography has been by far the best medium, allowing me to play with different processes, types of films, cameras, and embracing the natural randomness of film. Each photographic serie usually differs in composition and style, as the main core of my photography process is to experiment within a more intuitive approach of the subject.

My three-dimensional textile works are strongly influenced by my birthplace, where the main characteristic of soil and rocks is its unmistakable red color due to the presence of iron-rich laterite minerals.Not only the presence of this mineral and its precious color influence and determine my works, but also the lush flora and fauna of the place, giving rise to a rich symbiosis of organic and inorganic elements that converge simultaneously to establish a homogeneous flow and relationship between the different stages and processes of life in general.My textiles express this fusion between living and non-living organisms, that very repeat of nature in every detail, in every being and object.

Painting is for me a necessity. It allows me to expel my emotions, it’s also a constant inner and aesthetic search for light, depth and balance.

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I want to paint what can't be seen, the breath, the wind, the movement, the emotion, the rustle of the leaves, rain, ice seasons. From a mixed technology linking acrylic paint, pure pigments and collages, in an intuitive manner, I weave my links across lights, traces and footprints. I work mainly with acrylic on canvas but also with inks and watercolors on paper.


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Victoria Adkozalova

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lives and works in Kyiv, Ukraine

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Sara Arruga lives and works in Barcelona, Spain

Donna Carnahan

52

lives and works in Houston, Texas, United States

Romina Schimpf

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lives and works in Malaga, Spain

Cécile Filipe

98

lives and works in Paris, France

Naima Karim Naima Karim

Jakub Pasierkiewicz

Natalie McGuire

Bangladesh/ The Netherlands

Poland / United Kingdom

USA

The sky is full of dreams. I discovered this as a child growing up in Bangladesh observing the sky as it constantly changed the colours and the expressions with it. The sunrise, the sunset, the dark night, the rain when it is full of dark clouds all seemed very romantic to me. I have recovered from Guillain Barre Syndrome, a neurological disorder which left me completely paralyzed. It took me one and half year to walk again. When I was lying in bed and couldn’t move any of my limbs, my only dream was to run across the grass field and look at the beautiful sky. After graduating in Fine Arts I moved to the Netherlands and was inspired by the Dutch masters like Van Gogh’s colourful paintings and Ruisdael’s deep, dark yet beautiful clouds.

My main passion is painting and drawing but I have never lost my interest in the medium of photography, which in some sense, is an essential accomplishment of my artistic language.

My images are little mosaics pieces of my memory that I capture and share with the world. Photography is second nature to me and allows me to express how I see things in day to day life. This gift was given to me by my father.My subject matter is driven by my ability to go out shooting with an open mind allowing Mother Nature to show me what she wants to be captured. I look at my scene and decide; am I going for color, texture, lines, mood, or drama? This helps me decide if I shoot color or infrared.My photography is many things, depending on my environment when capturing the image. When shooting infrared, this style of photography brings another worldly look to my photographs, almost a dreamlike state that has a 3D effect. My color images, I primarily use to grab the vibrancy that Mother Nature’s glory offers up to us. I create images that make you feel like you are there with me in the scene.

I use my camera to transfer and materialise the emotions which develop in my mind, the excitement caused by encountered reality. Sometimes the photos can abstract from reality, showing different aspects of colours and forms, whereas other times they can simply reflect certain situations taking place in front of my camera. In my practice I try to recreate an idea which appears through thorough observation of the surrounding world.

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lives and works in Saudi Arabia

Natalie McGuire

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lives and works in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA

Jakub Pasierkiewic

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lives and works in Chatham, United Kingdom

Anna Fine Foer

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lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Special thanks to Haylee Lenkey, Martin Gantman , Krzysztof Kaczmar, Joshua White, Nicolas Vionnet, Genevieve Favre Petroff, Sandra Hunter, MyLoan Dinh, John Moran, Marya Vyrra, Gemma Pepper, Michael Nelson, Hannah Hiaseen and Scarlett Bowman, Yelena York Tonoyan, Miya Ando, Martin Gantman , Krzysztof Kaczmar and Robyn Ellenbogen.

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LandEscape meets

Victoria Adkozalova The theme of the artist's works is the theme of the Universe ... The parallel lines present on the canvases symbolize the essence of being and the endless flow forward. Similar to the String theory, which states that the smallest particles are the strings that sound and create our universe. The intention to comprehend the world of emotions and feelings, an attempt to penetrate into the inner world of a viewer to touch the mystery of his soul. The artist mainly paints in oils, but also uses a mixed technique, adding gold foil and acrylic paints. Viktoria chose the grotesque as the main artistic technique with which she creates an integral picture of the world in the image of an animal or a person. Revealing the interconnection of everything living on Earth. The artist's canvases often feature the image of a woman. Viktoria explains this as follows: "A woman for me is the Universe. Her emotional states and feelings in the beauty of the moment makes me abandon the color and detail of the image, the personification of faces, leaving the viewer to think only the artistic image.”

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

Hello Victoria and welcome to LandEscape. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://adkozalova.com in order to get a wide idea about your mulifaceted artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have a solid formal

training, and after having graduated from the Aivazovsky Art School you nurtured your education in Design and Painting at the Kherson National Technical University, under the guidance of the famous Ukrainian artist Galina Sorokhan: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist and help you to develop your attitude to experiment with different mediums?

Victoria Adkozalova: My studies at the



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Gift, 2020 - acrylic, 100x90cm

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Victoria Adkozalova

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Breakfast, 2020

Silence, 2021

acrylic, enamel, 120x100cm

acrylic, 120x100cm

Aivazovsky School were the first and fateful steps in my development as an artist. During this period I have realized that painting for me is the main means of expression.

ancient parts of the city, which amazed me with for their depth and layering: my gaze seemed to be drowning in the overflow of colors and a variety of forms.

Having received a classical education, I decided to continue my artist path and entered the Kherson National Technical University, where I continued to study subjects as painting, drawing, anatomy, art history and sculpture. At the university in addition to main courses, I was attracted by watercolor sketches. In my free time, I drew in the

Later, I focused my attention on human being. A human as the highest creation of God, what depth and meaningfulness in its eyes, movement of lips, wrinkles and lines. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of LandEscape has at once impressed us of for the way you provide the viewers with such intense visual experience, highlighting the viewers'


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connection with their inner surroundings: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how do you usually develop the initial ideas for your artworks? In particular, do you create your works intuitivelly, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes?

Victoria Adkozalova: I think about a series of works at the very beginning and reveal the most important topics for me, then I study the issues of concern. Over time, an image is formed in the form of a graphic sketch and is gradually transferred to the canvas. Also, sometimes supplement my works with fragments from real life. For example, in the Fragile project, the main theme is a moment. This small dimension of time can radically affect our lives. The world is accelerating, it distracts a person, and in the meantime, the time of our life goes away, and we do not have time to but fully enjoy it now and be in the moment. With their unique visual identity, your artworks such a wide variety of emotions: how does your memories influence your work as an artist and in particular, how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

Victoria Adkozalova: I do not wait for the mood or inspiration, but I get to work, and sometimes I just force myself. I believe that the truth is born in work, the right thoughts and decisions come.


Victoria Adkozalova

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The King Fisher, 2020 - acrylic, 120x90cm


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Cachalot’s family, 2020 - acrylic, 120x90cm

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Victoria Adkozalova

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Sometimes you realize that you do not remember how you achieved such an effect and whether you can repeat it. Silence helps me in my work, then you are completely immersed in the picture, all thoughts, whole internal energy belong to it. You are a versatile artist and besides working in oil, that is your main medium, you also use a mixed technique, adding gold foil and acrylic paints. We have appreciated the intense and at the same time thoughtful nuances that marks out your artworks, and that in The King Fisher draw the viewers to a state of mind where the concepts of time and space become suspended. How does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in an artwork and in particular, how do you develop your textures in order to achieve such unique results?

Victoria Adkozalova: Experiments with materials provide even more means of expression for the artist and help to expand the theme even deeper. I believe you don't need to stop on this road, since in our time it is not enough to draw classical images and paintings, fine art should attract a person, in all possible ways. In King Fisher, I deliberately place the image against an unnatural dark background, emphasizing that this bird is on the verge of extinction. At the same time, the bird's body is bright, filled with


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Dream, 2021 - 100x100cm

various textures and plots, which are the

Nature does not tolerate emptiness and

image of the centuries-old history of the

destroying it we saw off the branch on

existence of the birds.

which we sit on!


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Earrings, 2020 - acrylic, spray paint, enamel, 120x100cm


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Bright moment, 2019 - oil, 120x100cm

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Ethereal, 2020 - oil, acrylic, 100x100cm

We dare say that your works allude to meaning and knowledge through verbal and symbolic and we recognize such a powerful example of this aspect of your approach in

the parallel lines present on your canvases that symbolize the essence of being and the endless flow forward: how do you consider the role of symbols playing in




Beyond, 2020 - oil, 100x80cm


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your artistic practice? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood?

Victoria Adkozalova: Symbols in my works expand the meaning of the depicted and give them the meaning of another reality. In my paintings, I wanted to connect the earthly with the depth of the spirit. Very often, symbols are ambiguous and are almost always associated with the realm of the secret. The image is always shrouded in mystery, its boundaries are erased and can be perceived meaningfully. We have appreciated the way you combine reminders to reality — as in the interesting Rhino, Wisent and Elephant — with such unique abstract visual qualities. Scottish visual artist Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic works of art are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us: how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production? In particular, how does representation and your marked tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work?

Victoria Adkozalova: For me, freedom, experimentation, and innovation are fundamental to creativity. Symbols in my works are conventional signs that connect reality to imagination.

Such a right to fiction allows the artist to embody ideas and feelings in a painting based on the reality he experienced. The artist selects the sides of reality that are essential for him, the main criteria of which - is the authenticity of thoughts and feelings. In my opinion, reality and fantasy are two wings of art. The parallel lines present on your canvases also refer to String Theory, which states that the smallest particles are the strings that sound and create our universe: how do you consider the relationship between artistic research and scientific method? Can you recognize any parallelism between Art and Science?

Victoria Adkozalova: Science and art are closely related. Science logically researches the world, while art affects its spiritual state. Science drives progress and art makes it possible for a person to know himself from the inside. Unfortunately, now we see an uneven development of science, while art is losing its strength. Contemporary artists are faced with the difficult task of returning a person and drawing his attention inward. If we do that - science will get solid moral principles and not overstep the boundaries of what is permitted. Your canvases often feature the image of a woman: do you think that your being a


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woman provides your artistic research with some special value?

Victoria Adkozalova: I choose the female image as the most sensual and emotional. And as a woman, I can fill my work with femininity and warmth. Which is very much felt in the opinion of the audience, there is a well-known English proverb "The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world." It seems to me that this deep thought is inextricably linked with the very being of a woman. It's important to remark that since 2009 you have been actively engaged in professional creative activities and studies at the National Pedagogical University named after Dragomanov at the Faculty of Musical Art: does your experience of teaching with the consequence occasions of being in contact with young creative minds influence your process? Did you ever draw inspiration from your students?

Victoria Adkozalova: Teaching experience and communication with young people definitely influence my career. And sometimes it allows me to look from a completely different angle, but still, the main source of inspiration and search for ideas is books and reflections on the topics that excite me.


Victoria Adkozalova

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Elephant tortoise, 2021 - 100x120cm


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Elephant, 2021 - 100x120cm

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You are an established artist: over the years you won various international art competitions, and your works are present in private collections in the USA, Hong Kong, Germany, Austria, France and Kyiv History Museum: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces — to street and especially to online platforms as Instagram — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Victoria Adkozalova: I believe that social networks such as Instagram enable an artist to communicate directly with his viewer. You can show your workplace, talk about your points of view and interests, even show some parts of your life not embellishing it. This enables a viewer to be more close to the artist and trusts him even more. Communication takes place without intermediaries and becomes clearer. On my Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/viktoria_adk ozalova/ , I often show some fragments of my works, process stages, and moments that exited me. Subscribers reciprocate with interest and look forward to seeing the next stages of the work and my art way in general. We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to


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Painted dog, 2021 - 90x100cm

thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Victoria. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Victoria Adkozalova: Thank you very much too, I am very glad to have a talk with you! At the moment I am still working on the project - The Shadow Of Not Forgotten


Victoria Adkozalova

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Polar bears, 2021 - 120x100cm


Rhino, 2021 - 100x120cm

Ancestors, some of these works are already in private collections. And I continue to develop the topic within a VR world. If we are talking about the next, future project probably it will have reflections

of today's pandemic world. What will be after and how will look the future of humanity?



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LandEscape meets

Sara Arruga As an artist, I mostly follow an intuitive approach, letting myself dive into the act of taking a photograph, entering in a state of trance. Often collaborating with dancers, musicians and artists, other times contemplating surreal landscapes. In landscape photography, I seek a meditative and contemplative state of mind and body. Analogue photography has been by far the best medium, allowing me to play with different processes, types of films, cameras, and embracing the natural randomness of film. Each photographic serie usually differs in composition and style, as the main core of my photography process is to experiment within a more intuitive approach of the subject.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

Hello Sara and welcome to LandEscape. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://einesymphonie.com in order to get a wide idea about your mulifaceted artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as a visual artist?

Moreover, how does your cultural substratum due to your current life in Barcelona address the direction of your current artistic research?

Sara Arruga: ¡Hola! and thank you for the opportunity to be featured in LandEscape. My first approach to art was with painting and music. In addition to that, I remember I really liked to use disposable cameras as a child, so later on, that hobby became a passion. What I learned in painting and music school


Sara Arruga (photo by Laura Torres Gandía)


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Sara Arruga

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contributed to my photography imagery and vice versa. Regarding my current life in Barcelona, I have only been here for a year and a half, most of it during lockdown. Few months ago, I decided to join a photography course. This has helped me a lot to open up and get out of my comfort zone. Currently, I am working on a project with a quite different topic from the ones I present here. So, I am happy. I don’t like so much stability and stagnation. For this special edition of LandEscape we have selected Contemplatio, a stimulating body of works that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic research is the it captures the surreal qualities of natural environment inviting the viewers to such contemplative visual experience: when walking our readers through your usual technical setup and process, would you tell us how did you develop the initial idea of Contemplatio?

Sara Arruga: Contemplatio series was not thought of in advance. Actually, after reviewing the photographs, I realised some of them had a pattern of evoking a feeling, a state of being. The moments where I took those photos were in pure bliss of being in nature. For instance, I was cross-country skiing with one of my best friends in the

French-Aragonese Pyrenees, and after a while, we stepped out of the path and sat next to a stream. I realised the moon was rising and some airplanes were crossing the mountains. After a while contemplating, I took the photographs. As you have remarked once, you love to spend time in nature, meditating and enjoying: how did you select the locations for your Contemplatio series and how does your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process?

Sara Arruga: All of the photos were taken at different locations, between France and Aragón. Those places are quite special for me as I used to visit them when I was younger. Coming back there after years was a really special moment. About my everyday life’s experience… Since I arrived in Barcelona, my creative process has changed. When lockdown arrived, I used that time for introspection. I wasn’t inspired at all. Actually, stopping for a few months made me decide to join a photography school and pursue photography more seriously. Attending the course helped my inspiration to come back. I was fueled with different photographers' visions, projects, talks, and I realised I was quite closed into myself.


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Thanks to different everyday’s life experiences that have happened along this year, my interest has shifted to work on topics that affect me and matter to me, but focusing on other people's experiences. Photography is becoming a way of sharing with others. All that has changed me somehow. Now I am also setting an intention. I think all these experiences made me be more present in my creative process and plan some parts in advance. Overall, I am happy I am working on balancing intuition and intention. Your approach to photography combines experimentation with intuition, and highlights the importance of the act of looking in our media driven society, saturated by omnipresent images: how would you consider the creative role of randomness playing within the decision to capture with your camera a particular moment of bliss?

Sara Arruga: First, randomness and intuition are a different thing. I would think of intuition as trusting myself, whereas randomness would be a lack of planning or organization. From my perspective, not everything should be organised or planned, and it is important to trust ourselves. In the last question, I mentioned I am setting intentions for some projects, but it is not that way all the time. Contemplatio


Sara Arruga

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Contemplatio


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Contemplatio

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series is a good example of this. It wouldn’t have been the same if I planned it or thought of it too much. I actually didn’t have any expectations or plans. Those contemplative moments led me to create a photography series. It's no doubt that interdisciplinary collaborations as the one that you have established over the years with dancers, musicians and artists are today ever growing forces in Contemporary Art and that the most exciting things happen when creative minds from different fields meet and collaborate on a project: could you tell us something about the collaborative nature of your work? Can you explain how your work demonstrates communication between artists from different disciplines?

Sara Arruga: A couple of years ago when I started to collaborate with other artists I realised I wanted to get out of my cave. I don’t think it is artistically healthy for me to focus only on my world. Sometimes, it can be repetitive and evolve into patterns that are difficult to get rid of. I love to spend time with myself and work on personal projects, but collaborative ones are a good way of getting fresh air. When I work on an interdisciplinary collaboration it is important for me to spend time with that person. For instance, during the series “Lost Movement”, I spent my last months in


Contemplatio




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Contemplatio

Contemplatio

London collaborating with Frieda Luk, a dancer and performer now based in HK. We eventually became close friends. It was the first time I engaged in a dance and body movement project. I guess there is a real communication when you don’t only understand the other artist but you experience their world too.

for you to create works of art able to draw to trascend ordinary visual experience? In particular, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination?

The works from your Hielo series feature such dreamlike ambience: how important is

Sara Arruga: In the Hielo series I portrayed drifting ice. I was visiting Iceland at a moment in my life when I was feeling lost. So, I linked that scenario with my situation. Reality was the place and my personal situation,


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select the locations for your Ísland series and how did your choices influence your process?

Both Hielo and Ísland series portray the same feeling but from a different point of view. Iceland has incredible landscapes that blow one’s mind. Although, in the Ísland series, I tainted those landscapes with my emotional distress and they turned out to be landscapes of desolation. On the contrary, with the Hielo series, I kind of venerated that feeling photographing the beauty of drifting ice.

Iceland

imagination linked them to create a photography series. Each one of us has a different experience with reality that fuels our imagination and helps us create. With their unique ambience and atmosphere, the works from your interesting Ísland series seems to speak of desolation and have reminded us the notion of non place elaborated by French anthropologist Marc Augé: how did you

Analogue photography is your favorite medium, due to how the different developing techniques, types of film and cameras can influence the work. However, digital technology allows to manipulate the final photograph: what does in your opinion distinguish the most analogue technique from digital one, on the creative aspect?

Sara Arruga: The negative is the original artwork, and then we create an endless number of copies of it after scanning, printing or editing. That is not that different from digital photography, it is possible to create different copies too. That said, I personally care about the creative and technical process that precedes and results in the negative or positive film for slides. I enjoy experimenting with the camera, with the film, during the film processing…


Selenophilia


Hielo



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That is why I choose analogue over digital when working on most of my projects. In a controversial quote, German photographer Thomas Ruff stated that ''nowadays you don't have to paint to be an artist: you can photography in a realistic way". Provocatively, the German photographer highlighted the short circuit between the act of looking and that of thinking critically about images: how do you consider the role of photography in our contemporary age, constantly saturated by ubiquitous images?

Sara Arruga: Personally, social platforms are full of ubiquitous images that we consume and produce. Although, what do those images mean to us or contribute to? The role of photography in our contemporary age is crucial, more than ever. Photography makes us stop, admire, appreciate, react, think, share, it contributes culturally, artistically, socially… it is nourishing. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of occasions: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms — as Instagram https://www.instagram.com/eine.sympho nie — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?


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Hielo





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Sara Arruga: Personally, the audience is a pending subject for me. At first, I didn’t care much. But now that I want to pursue photography, I want to focus on it. Regarding online platforms and how they change audiences, I reckon that Instagram is making artists post their artwork as if it was storytelling, adding text and explanation. They are more accessible, reaches more people but they could be obsessive. I consider traditional showcase spaces more necessary than ever though. Art must be experience in person. We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Sara. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Sara Arruga: Currently, I am focusing on a project about friendship in the 30s. I can’t say more but hopefully it will be exhibited in a few months in Barcelona. Thank you again, it was a pleasure to reply to all these questions. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com


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LandEscape meets

Donna Carnahan I’m Donna Carnahan, international photographer from Houston, Texas. I opened my first studio during the worldwide pandemic, here in the Arts District Houston, just west of downtown. Born in Texas, inspired in Italy, I created La Donna Foto in Houston. Ever since my aunt gave me a vintage 1960s camera, I have had a passion for photography. My career path transitioned from finance to photography when in 2015 I traveled to Florence, Italy where I became intrigued with the beauty of Renaissance art. With an eye for composition, I have traveled throughout Europe, and extensively within Italy while immersing myself in learning the language, culture, history and art. My collection represents majestic beauty recorded while on foot on the Amalfi coast. Bringing back my photos from the Old World reminds me of the renewal of my own mind and refreshment of my soul I experienced at the seaside and exploring the gardens of Villa Cimbrone. Images of Italian summers can be good for the heart, soul, and mental health, as we all get through these times together. Surround yourself in the majestic beauty of Italy and feel the romantic vibes open your heart.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

always had a passion for photography: what did

landescape@europe.com

photography? In particular, what does appeal you of

address you to switch from a career in finance to Renaissance art and of Italian landscapes, in

Hello Donna and welcome to LandEscape. Before

general?

starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit in order to get a wide

Donna Carnahan: Thank you very much for including me in your 15th Edition of LandEscape

idea about your artistic production, and we would

Art Review. I am honored that you chose my fine

start this interview with a couple of questions

art photography collection, La Donna Foto, for

about your multifaceted background. You have

your readers.


Donna Carnahan, Houston


Ironworks, Valle Delle Ferriere, Italy


Donna Carnahan

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Ponte Vecchio, Florence, Italy When I was very young, my aunt gave me my first camera, a vintage 1960’s. Receiving my degree in Finance and subsequently working a variety of positions in my field, enabled me to invest in the American stock market. I saved enough over a long career, so that I could semi- retire and travel to Europe. In 2015, I was inspired by the beauty of Renaissance Art in Florence, Italy. While living in Florence the following year, I climbed up the stairs inside the Duomo to view the beautiful frescos. It was then that I experienced the Stendhal Syndrome. I felt overwhelmed by the

beautiful works of art painted on the ceiling and while outside looking at the complexity of the Florentine landscape. I had not heard of this syndrome, until I learned of it when I began to tell my Florentine friend about my experience. Inside the famous L’Accademia Gallery, where Michelangelo’s David statute resides, as well as the Uffizi museum full of world-class beauty, my eyes saw the masterpieces. For me, walking on the streets of Florence, I felt as if I were experiencing an outdoor museum. All of the beautiful fountains, statues, frescoes, ancient buildings, and sculptures inspired me to record


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hundreds of photos, so that I could savor them when I returned to my hometown of Houston, Texas. Overlooking the city of Florence from Piazzale Michelangelo, I gazed upon the Ponte Vecchio with the beautiful hills in the background and knew I wanted to continue photographing this magical place. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of LandEscape and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once captured our attention for the way you sapiently captured the beauty of European landscape in such spontaneous, fresh way: what was your technical equipment to create this interesting series?

Donna Carnahan: My collection represents many trips and visits to 10 regions of Italy, over a 5 year period. Living in Italy for up to 6 weeks at time, over this 5 year period. I used several Canon digital cameras, and even at times my smartphone when my camera was stolen. Being spontaneous meant recording shots while sailing on ferry boats or hiking up to higher grounds in order to have better vantage point of the landscape below. Post production, using various editing tools on my laptop, included increasing the hues and cropping out unnecessariness. Increasing or decreasing the light exposure in my edits allows the viewer to experience more, the way my eye remembers the scene. Your works seem to be laboriously structured to pursue such effective and at the same time thoughtful visual impact: what was your working schedule like? Did you carefully plan each shot?

Donna Carnahan: When I went for a hike up and over the Lake Garda in northern Italy, I always


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Summer of Infinity, Ravello, Italy


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Summer of Serenity, Lake Garda, Italy

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bring my camera with the intention of recording many images of the heavenly view. Many times I am on foot and other times bicycling with a backpack. Each shot, I tried to frame a beautiful composition. I use the rule of thirds for interest. Including the natural element of water, either the sea, stream, river or lake, as part of the focal point is not so much planned, as it is the fact that I am naturally drawn to the scene with water. I want to ensure the romance is captured in each image that I am sharing with my audience. Your works drawn heavily from the peculiar specifics of the environment and as in the interesting Summer of Infinity and Summer of Serenity you always capture such insightful resonance between the landscapes and states of mind: how do you select the specific locations and how do they affect your creative process?

Donna Carnahan: Contrasting colors, richly colored floral foregrounds, and majestical mountainous backgrounds, as seen in “Summer of Infinity”, were selected and named for the infinite view out on the horizon at dusk, where the Tyrrhenian Sea spills out into the deep blue Mediterranean. Sometimes I am deliberate in selection the locations. My Italian language skills help me to find, for example, the majestic view of a glistening northern Lake Garda overlooking the village of Torbole in Italy, surrounded by the mountaintops. It provided for “Summer of Serenity” where German writer, Goethe, drew his inspiration. It was from this vista in the late 1700s, where he first experienced the Mediterranean lifestyle and the scent of the olive groves he had only dreamt of.



Graceful Grapes, Scala, Italy


Waterdrops, Valle Delle Ferriere, Italy



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You have traveled throughout Europe, and extensively within Italy while immersing myself in learning the language, culture, history and art: how do your memories and your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process?

Donna Carnahan: When I begin to work on a project, for example, this art review, I look through my database of photographs on my MacBook and I can transport my mind back to the time the image was recorded. Seeing it can help me remember the feelings I felt, the scents I smelled, and the beauty that laid before me. When I see a place I find aesthetically pleasing for the first time, my reaction is to immediately reach for my camera and begin shooting. I never want to let the opportunity pass by when the sunlight and scenery are harmoniously perfect. Sometimes, it is only a split second and then life passes by. We appreciate the way your works constantly capture surrounding life of such enchanting landscapes, to address the viewers to appreciate also ordinary aspects of life in Italy, as in your interesting Graceful Grapes: how important is for you to highlight such little as epiphanic details of the landscapes that you capture?

Donna Carnahan: When I am exploring on foot with my camera, that is usually the best time to find the most intricate details, as it was for “Graceful Grapes”. If I had been texting or not paying attention, I would have missed one of my personal favorite images. I was merely walking back to my apartment in Minuta, about 1500 meters above the Amalfi Beach, when I spotted and recorded this perfectly mature, femininely curvy grapevine, with the most beautiful bunch of grapes dangling, as if a bracelet on a ballerina, so elegantly displayed.


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Stairway into Dusk, Ravello, Italy


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Positano by Ferry, Italy

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With their unique aesthetics, your works — more especially Ancient Arch and Throat — feature such seductive visual ambivalence, that draws the viewers through the liminal area of perception where reality and imagination find such unexpected point of convergence. As a visual artist whose work is focussed on real enviromental images, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination playing within your process? Are you particularly interested in arousing emotions that goes beyond the realm of visual perception?

Donna Carnahan: Oh, yes, I am interested in arousing emotions that make my audience wonder what exactly they are looking at. Many people from all walks of life have visited my studio in Houston. They spend quite a bit of time gazing at “Throat” which is, in fact, a cave on the coast of the island of Caprí. The image appears to have a throat and teeth that are misplaced. After further examination, one can see the deep blue water at the entrance of the magical cave. The captain of my small boat was yelling, “throat!” “the throat of the cave!” as I was shooting. Manipulation in visual arts is not new, but digital technology has extended the range of possibilities: as a visual artist who started her journey with an analogue camera, how do you consider the role of technology playing within your artistic practice?

Donna Carnahan: Ah, yes, the analogue camera required much patience and practice. I had to wait for my film to come back from the developer and perhaps learn that I missed my focal point all together back in the 1970s and 1980s. Or I would find that it was completely out of focus. Now, with the digital camera, I can see



Mediterranean Summer, Ravello, Italy


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immediately on my camera screen, if I am shooting well and don’t have to waste any time wondering about the images. After all, I may only have that one opportunity to shoot the perfectly lit Italian landscape scene. The role technology is playing in my practice is very important to the outcome. I am extremely grateful about having advanced, modern technology in order to complete my work and show it to the world in a timely manner. Your photographs feature such vivacius sometimes even bold nuances, that in Mediterranean Summer speaks of joy and light-heartedness: how do you structure your tones in order to achieve such enchanting results?

Donna Carnahan: irst of all, thank you for being so observant. It makes me feel highly valued as a photographer! In “Mediterranean Summer” I remember walking around the Gardens of Villa Cimbrone during the hottest time of day, full-on summer sun, clear blue skies with a few cottony, white clouds and laying my eyes on the bold, orange, long-stemmed florals, in contrast to the hazed-over mountainous backdrop. I found myself admiring how much the orange stood out in contrast with the purple and white flowers. I couldn’t help but to increase the orange hues in post production to create even more of a contrast. I wanted to make the colors pop off the canvas. I wanted to allow the viewer to experience the sheer joy of being on the Mediterranean in the summertime. At the time, I did not know what lay only a few short months ahead, that would change the mood of our entire world. In a controversial quote, German photographer Thomas Ruff stated that ''nowadays you don't have to paint to be an artist: you can photography in a realistic


Donna Carnahan

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Bella Capri, Italy


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Dream Realized, Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy


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way". Provocatively, the German photographer highlighted the short circuit between the act of looking and that of thinking critically about images: how do you consider the role of photography in our contemporary age, constantly saturated by ubiquitous images?

Donna Carnahan: I think that photography is very much an art form, each image uniquely created by both the photographer and the equipment. No one can copy another’s photography style and no two shots are exactly the same. The light is always playing around, the environment is constantly changing and there are so many cameras and smartphone cameras that make the details slightly different. I don’t think anyone will ever get tired of looking at beautiful landscapes. There is a certain timelessness about them. How do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms — as Instagram — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Donna Carnahan: My audience has evolved, since I first began to exhibit my work at a fashion designer boutique in Houston, Texas. “Art for Fashion” we named the event that kicked off my career in photography during 2018. It was at that time when I created my website, ladonnafoto.com and instagram https://www.instagram.com/ladonnafoto/. Opening my images for the entire world to see was a connecting experience. Later, I was invited to exhibit my international collection at a variety of events throughout Houston, getting exposure from a wider audience, both indoors and outdoors.



Donna Carnahan, View of Infinity, Ravello, Italy


Throat, Capri, Caprí, Italy


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this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Donna. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Donna Carnahan: Licensing my images is something I am currently working on. Working with interior designers is in the works. Also, participating in international photography exhibits, showing my work in a gallery, keeping an open mind and learning new camera techniques are in my future. Exploring new places will always be in front of me, like traveling back to where my ancestors are from, Czech Republic. Participating in FotoFest 2022 is on my horizon. I hope to return to Valle Delle Ferriere and hike the

Ancient Arch, Valle Delle Ferriere, Italy

nature reserve on the Amalfi Coast to record more images. It will be a much different time, post pandemic. I will be curious to see what changes

In March, I participated in FotoFest Biannual Portfolio Review Meeting Place, an international virtual experience where curators, editors, art collectors, museum directors, art consultants and gallery owners reviewed my body of work.

have taken place there, as nature further reclaims

My collectors range in age from teenagers to 80’s. I welcome in-person studio visits at 1502 Sawyer St. Houston, TX 77007, by appointment, and open studios on the second Saturday of every month. Admiring beautiful landscapes is a commonality that I believe is innate. Beauty is what unites us.

re-record them, to show the world the changes

We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving

the ruins of the ancient paper mill, once powered by running water. I want to go back to some of the exact same vantage points that you see here in the review and that take place over time. Thank you very much for your thought provoking interview. It has been an inspiration for me to continue my work! An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com


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LandEscape meets

Romina Schimpf My three-dimensional textile works are strongly influenced by my birthplace, where the main characteristic of soil and rocks is its unmistakable red color due to the presence of iron-rich laterite minerals. Not only the presence of this mineral and its precious color influence and determine my works, but also the lush flora and fauna of the place, giving rise to a rich symbiosis of organic and inorganic elements that converge simultaneously to establish a homogeneous flow and relationship between the different stages and processes of life in general. My textiles express this fusion between living and non-living organisms, that very repeat of nature in every detail, in every being and object. Everything has a beginning and a course in time, aging, which in my work is intrinsically determined by rust. The production of the pieces is determined by several stages that begins with the selection of metals and plants with which the fabrics are dyed by ecoprint by contact. This process can take several weeks and makes the fabric very delicate, since the fibers of them are affected, making the artistic process a fine work. Next, the design and subsequent shape of the work is contingent on a sensitive and intuitive process, determined by the drawings of the plants and rust in the fabric, giving rise to textures and volume that give corporeity of their own to each work. The entire creative process depends on the fusion of various techniques and materials; the use of contact ecoprint, monoprint and textile handling by heat and mixed media are complemented by hand embroidery and free machine movement techniques; conditioning all the work to several weeks per piece. The materials that make up my pieces are diverse and are chosen not only according to the piece, but also with the aim of unifying in the material sense, the spiritual aspect of the work; that is why metals, plants, papers, fabrics, paper fabric, paints, from acrylics to those containing metal particles, hand and machine embroidery threads are intertwined with strong yet delicate materials such as felts, wools, high-density polyethylene fibers spun with flash and lutradur.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

Hello Romina and welcome to E Before starting to elaborate about your

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artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://rominaschimpf.com in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple



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of questions about your multifaceted background. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist? Romina Schimpf: First of all, I would like to thank you for this opportunity to participate in your important magazine and share my art, my work and my vision of what surrounds me and reflects on it. Answering the question I have to say that I do not have a formal training in Fine Arts, I always think and say, that in addition to being born with the imprint of art we can always reinforce or complement it with something else ... and yes, there are many experiences that have strengthened me IN this aspect. First of all, I was born in an environment very rich in nature, the exuberance of the province of Misiones in Argentina, which is where I was born, is so rich that the province is nicknamed La Hermosa. I grew up playing outdoors, always surrounded by animals and plants, so those moments of solitude with them invited me to develop my imagination even more, which itself was always quite prolific; In addition, my mother, who was a teacher and a voracious reader and music lover, instilled in me a love for books and music, she taught me from a very young age to memorize poetry from great writers, to listen to musical pieces of great cultural significance, And clearly all that had an impact on me. I spent long hours writing, reading, listening to classical music that I always liked a lot. On the other hand, I always had a very lonely character, I was always very observant, I

always stared at everything around me in a very analytical way, I wondered about everything and investigated everything. In particular, how does your cultural substratum direct the trajectory of your current artistic research? Romina Schimpf: In particular, how does your cultural substrate direct the trajectory of your current artistic research? As I said before, the natural environment has always captivated my attention and my main way of enjoying it is to surround myself with nature, silently and observing every specific detail. i have always questioned myself about what i observe. My childhood was developed in a multicultural environment since my country and my province in particular, was founded by immigrants, that also influenced my holistic vision of life and everything involving it. I see life as a repeating whole, I see how living beings in each species somehow repeat themselves in shape, color, and I even see how the inorganic or what was created by human beings carries this imprint. I meditate on it. all the process and artistic research until reaching a work, in my particular case and i am aware that each artist has their own method, is observation. i make a very deep and detailed observation of the subject that i want to capture or am interested in at that moment. my professional preparation in social work somehow influences this aspect, since i have a structured training in professional observation of research and i


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apply all of this to my art. the objective is to be able to obtain very compact visual information, then analyze it and compare it with other things, other objects, situations, even to be able to reach a homogeneous mental and material point that is present in my work. whoever sees my work can observe not only the material, not only the conjunction of what is exposed in something concrete, but also that they can make their own emotional and spiritual journey through my work. The set of works that we have selected for this special edition of LandEscape and that our readers have already begun to know in the introductory pages of this article, has immediately drawn our attention to YOUR exploration of the fusion between living and non-living. -living organisms, is the way in which YOU take the idea of landscape to a spiritual dimension. By guiding our readers through your setup and process regulars, would you tell us how you usually develop your initial idea for your artwork? Romina Schimpf: The starting point is always the same, life and its cycle, both in the living and in the non-living, and it is such a broad topic that i never lack inspiration or intellectual regarding this matter. In a more synthetic way, I can say that many times a color, an image, a sensation, awaken in me the need to create. The process is very mental and spiritual. If it is the image of something concrete what catches my attention, the next step is to observe it, and meditate on it, i find real pleasure in finding the similarities with other things, or with other living beings. recently,

BREDER, 70 cm × 135 cm

for example, i have seen a street mural, deteriorated, corroded and showing a clear neglect, i stopped to take pictures of it because when i saw it, it instantly came to my mind as the current situation of our society is of some way in that chaotic state, since life now has to be understood from another angle, learning to live again, in a


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certain way. then it began to spin in my mind, the power to unify these aspects, these images, one real, that of the mural and the other more emotional if you like, of society or the living. the step that follows this is the search and selection of materials and techniques, always starting from oxidedyed fabrics, for the artistic execution but it

is already the primeval essence for a potential work. Your artistic process is really elaborated and long, and we really appreciate your quirky and unconventional choice of materials, including metals, plants, papers, fabrics, paper and paints. new york citybased photographer and sculptor zoé


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INSOMNIA, 20 cm × 20 cm

leonard once said: the objects we leave behind have the marks and the sign of our use: as archaeological finds reveal a lot about us; we would love to ask you about the qualities of the materials you include, or

the plan to include them, in your artwork: in particular, how important is it for you to use recycled materials, capable of inviting spectators to investigate the tracks left by time?


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Romina Schimpf: I echo the words of Zoe Leonard, because for me the material that I use in my works not only serves me because of its usefulness "per se", it has a meaning and a significant spiritual contribution. AT weekends I go out to look for "treasures" as I like to refer to them, those treasures in view of other people are only rusty cans, old nails, worn fabric, forgotten places, etc. but when i get to them i can see their story, something happened there, for some reason this or that object was used, even for something else it was abandoned, that also tells a story and i like to mentally play with it, recreate it. What qualities must an object own? Old and rusty, for me there is quite a symbolism in it. Last year in a search for "treasures" I found an abandoned house, victim of a fire that literally destroyed the structure, but curiously among the mass of burned things, there were cutlery, clothes, nails, house decorations, mosaics, hinges, keys etc. Seeing all that moved me, I thought, this was the home that someone once loved, and in that second I shared the pain with that stranger and I felt lucky to pick up those objects to somehow, honor that experience, now turned to ashes, in my work. That is why my plan, not intentionally planned, is to continue letting myself be carried away by my spirit and its emotions, I trust it.

ROSEA SOMNUM, 45 cm × 135 cm

Exploring the ubiquitous fusion between living and non-living organisms, their textiles question the notion of time, through the intelligent use of elements such as rust, which give your works of art such a powerful evocative and metaphorical value.


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How do you consider the role of the symbols, including the symbolic characteristics of the materials you include in your works,plays in your artistic practice? And how important is it to you to create works of art rich in allegorical qualities? Romina Schimpf: One of the most significant experiences of my childhood was the loss of my father at a very young age, the bond i had with him was very deep and as time passed i clung to not forgetting his image, his voice, and it was in that exact moment when i very consciously questioned time and its passing. i understood that time can be manipulated inside our souls, that things or people disappear when they lose meaning. i unified all that feeling and extrapolated it to something concrete, and i even went further, i wanted it to have beauty. the rust on my textiles not only tells where i come from, it tells that the mere fact of being alive expresses strength, the passage of time cannot only be seen as deterioration and death, it is accompanied by beauty, you have to learn to see it. all the symbolic, allegorical aspect is essential in my works, because they give life to my textiles, with them i achieve that a textile is practically transformed into an object that will last after me, that the materials that i have included in them have their history before me and from me as an artist. the allegorical importance of my works is that they are an exercise in introspection and reencounter with beauty for those who observe them. By exploring the essential strength and activity of life in fury, as well as the vital homogeneity among living beings of different nature and gender in natural, your

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works of art present a unique combination between the sense of freedom and the subtle yet rigorous sense of geometry, communicating an alternation between tension and release. how do you determine your own psychological composition the nuances of the tones that you decide to include moment in your works of art and, in


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Romina Schimpf

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sometimes the ideas and emotions that invite me to create also become tyrannical and force me to distance myself from my works. sometimes i am overwhelmed by the incessant activity of my mind and my spirit, because i want to capture everything i see and express everything immediately, and it is not always humanly possible. so that game between tension and freedom in which none of them wins the game, can only be helped by solitude and silence. only there do i find myself again, and reconnect with the guidelines that redirect my artistic work. The shades and shapes of my works are not subject to rules. What's more, I could never use the color wheel, I tried and it was chaos. I have my own sense of color, I call it an impossible combination of colors, and there is absolute freedom in it. I rediscover a mixture of unusual colors and I don't register them, I need them to be unique each time. The irregularity of the forms of my works refers to life itself, we all experience a different and unique one.

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particular, is there some special state of mind that you need to make such decisions? Romina Schimpf: This question is fascinating and i hope i can answer it in an understandable way.

Marked with such a unique aesthetic, your artworks deeply impressed us by the way they incite the viewer to make new personal associations. The Austrian art historian Ernst Gombrich once noted the importance of providing a space for viewers to screen so they can actively participate in creating the illusion: how important IS IT for you to activate the imagination of the viewers to lead them to elaborate personal performances? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood? Romina Schimpf: I believe and it is my ultimate goal that each person who



MISIONES, 66 cm × 84 cm


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observes my work can make it theirs visually and spiritually. I can tell how and why I have done it, but I want and it enriches me to know that whoever observes it appropriates its essence and turns it into their own exercise of thinking, in their own spiritual and mental journey. May that moment equal the observer and artist on the same plane of intellectual beauty. Someone once commented to me in a social network that he saw a forest in one of the textures that he had created and that made me experience a sense of gratification, someone was traveling intellectually by my side. Each of your works of art is painstakingly elaborated and the process of each one of them is determined by several stages, which include hand embroidery and machine free movement, to create unique physical artifacts with tactile qualities: in In this sense, we dare to say that his works of art use the vision of the lens to rediscovering the concept of material: how important is it to you to highlight the appearance physical of your artworks? In particular, how important is intuition in your process creative? Romina Schimpf: My works are built intuitively, I don't make previous sketches and if I do, I don't follow them. My sketches are in my mind, I see the finished work exactly as I want it to be. That perhaps makes it difficult for them to be produced faster and can have more works. Each work is made as a great puzzle of small parts that will form a whole, each part expresses something and by joining them to the whole,


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be an object, I seek to reify the textile, which transcends its more banal spirit to a more spiritual one ... to be an object, therefore it is essential intuition, the more time I spend in my study, the richer this aspect becomes. Intuition leads me to delve into an idea that will become materially real. I want whoever observes the work to stop at every detail and see what happens there. Your artworks often refer to human processes, such as lack of sleep in Insomnia and vital decline in Oer: how the experience of everyday life feeds your creative process? Romina Schimpf: I believe that everyday life can be the brush and color of life if we do not fill it with routine. In Insomnia I clearly express this. I had insomnia processes and I did not regret them, I saw them as an opportunity to use that time for something new, to search or just think. That experience brought relaxation to my body and I was able to go back to sleep.

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it tells a homogeneous story from the heterogeneous. I work in stages and layers, of embroidery, fabrics, materials etc., that leads the work to

Oer expresses that the everyday is happening and deteriorating, what we call time and it happens intangibly, we are only aware of it when we look older or someone leaves, for example. We have the memory, what we have lived we cover with beauty. Every second lived is a strong incentive to leave a mark, that is what I want to convey and it influences my work. Over the years your works of art have been exhibited internationally on various occasions: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience will get from your artwork? By the way, as the movement of art from traditional galleries


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to the streets and especially to online platforms like Instagram increases, how would the relationship with a globalized audience change in your opinion? Romina Schimpf: I believe that the notion or idea of globalization not only affects art in general as a concept, but also opens the doors to the inclusion of various forms of artistic expression, which clearly leads to a diversity of audience, which is how I believe in particular, should be seen art. It is a product of the human spirit and that makes us equal in an increasingly stratified society, although it may not seem so to us. I myself have experienced how my art was received in a positive way by a very diverse public, these doors were clearly opened by the network because before I believe that art was seen as a sector only intended for a certain public, with very defined characteristics from the economic point of view to the intellectual and to a certain artistic approach. In addition to everything described in this exciting interview, I want the public to understand textile as one of the most versatile and ductile materials with infinite potential for creating art. That is why in my Instagram social network, https://www.instagram.com/romina_schim pf_art, I do not publish the finished works but the elaboration, the process of each one of them. We truly appreciate the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and prior to leave this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and share your thoughts, Romina. What

projects are you currently working on and which ones? Are some of the ideas you hope to explore in the future? Romina Schimpf: I want to be the one who appreciates this invaluable opportunity to be able to talk about how profound the exploration of beauty is for me, which is how I conceive art. That said, I have to say that I am currently working on a sculptural work called Natusferrea, a fusion between paper, fibers, fabrics, threads and various techniques. His name is a word that I have invented in order to unite idea and plasticity. This sculpture is literally a walnut, but it emulates a micro world, where all the elements that will go into it are built by hand from my photographs of objects and beings in nature: fungi, lichens and a large etc. I am really enjoying this creative process and experimenting with unusual materials such as cotton swabs with which I have discovered countless forms of creativity. In the future I hope to be able to venture into other non-traditional sculptural forms of textile fused with other elements, I am sure that I will be showered with amazing ideas that I hope I can turn into an artistic object that expresses work, research and above all the spirituality of its concept .

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com


Romina Schimpf

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WORK IN PROCESS "NATUSFERREA" 30 cm × 55 cm × 30 cm


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LandEscape meets

Cécile Filipe Lives and works in Paris, France

Painting is for me a necessity. It allows me to expel my emotions, it’s also a constant inner and aesthetic search for light, depth and balance. I want to paint what can't be seen, the breath, the wind, the movement, the emotion, the rustle of the leaves, rain, ice seasons. From a mixed technology linking acrylic paint, pure pigments and collages, in an intuitive manner, I weave my links across lights, traces and footprints. I work mainly with acrylic on canvas but also with inks and watercolors on paper.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

Hello Cécile and welcome to LandEscape. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.cecilefilipe.com in order to get a wide idea about your mulifaceted artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have a solid formal training in Interior Architecture and after having earned your Degree from Camondo School — in parellel to your work as an artist — you started your career as an architect and your worked for twenty years as the head of a design office:

how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist and help you to develop your attitude to experiment in fields as in interior design? In particular, what did draw you to decide to devote yourself exclusively to painting? My training as an interior architect, 5 years of schooling allowed me to acquire the essentials of academic drawing, colour, art history and graphic techniques. I learned how to develop a project by going to the essential and eliminating everything that is not. We worked a lot on the notion of concept, the essence of the project and the meaning attributed to it. During my professional years I have always tried to give meaning to projects by eliminating



Sem Palavras / L80xH120 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

artifice with the sole message: "Let only volume and light speak" and by applying the "Less is more". I think that this is what I am still looking for in my pictorial work today. Beyond that I would say that all these years of study have taught me to develop an eye, a look at things.

which I found myself totally in harmony with myself.

I have been painting since I was a child and I have always loved it. As a teenager I took painting and drawing lessons. It's a universe in

Parallel to my career as an interior designer I continued my artistic work, abstraction imposed itself on me after my studies when I started to look beyond the visible. This idea of devoting all my time to my career as an artist had obsessed me for years. I decided to take the plunge in 2020, to quit my job as an interior designer, which had become


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

too routine, technical and confined to an architectural software behind the screen, which made me unhappy. I felt the need to be free and to finally be able to devote all my time to my artistic research in direct confrontation with the material.

when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how do you usually develop the initial ideas for your artworks?

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of LandEscape has at once impressed us of for the way you provide the viewers with such intense visual experience, enhanced by unconventional aesthetics:

I often quote this sentence by Pierre Soulages: "It is what I do that teaches me what I am looking for". I start a blank canvas or sheet of paper without any preconceived ideas and without knowing where I am going.


Desejo L80xH120 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas


Soul - Sul I L100xH140 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

The colours are applied instinctively and impulsively. By throwing away these lines and colours, the elaboration of a path or a search is born. A lot of images come into my mind, I spend a lot of time looking at my painting and often through a mirror, which gives me a new and foreign look at my work, as if I was discovering it for the first time.

stated that in order to make art today one has to reevaluate the conceptual language behind the mechanism of art making itself: do you create your works intuitivelly, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes? In particular, how do you consider the relation between the nature of the emotions that you explore in your artistic research and the physical aspect of your daily practice as an artist?

3) Your artworks are marked out with such sapient combination between geometric patterns and wide variety of tones, that provide your works with a unique aesthetic identity. New York City based artist Lydia Dona once

As I was answering the previous question, starting a painting is totally instinctive and intuitive. I pose the colour in an impulsive way.


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

The story is born over time and in relation to the work I am producing.

L'Intranquillité " by Fernando Pessoa, about the immobile traveller.

Emotion is born with the images that come into my mind. I am looking for light, depth, perfect balance, subtle balance. The process is like a long meditation and research. My senses are in turmoil, I hear the wind, I feel the dew on my skin, the shadow makes me shiver and the sun's rays warm my skin. I am in my imagination, and my paintings make me travel very far... I don't need to travel 10 hours by plane and go to the other side of the planet to feel disorientated. You have to read "

I am this immobile traveller who travels in her painting. I try to paint what cannot be seen. I am in a constant search for simplicity, I trace, I apply the colour, then I erase, I scratch, I remove. How to express the essential, the emotion, with the minimum of lines and colours. 4) We like the way your approach blends the boundary between reality and abstraction, creating such unique dreamscape


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Ultimo Porto / L120xH120 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas atmospheres, as in the interesting Ultimo porto, conveying such a stimulating combination between reminding to ambiguous figurative elements and captivating surrealistic feeling: how would

you consider the relationship between abstraction and figurative in your practice? In particular, how does representation and your marked tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work?


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Ao longo do rio / L90xH110 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas


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And yes, it's very true and I'm often told so. "You are between the abstract and the figurative" and people also say to me "there I see an island, a boat, the sea and a lagoon". Surprisingly, my works often remind me of seascapes or architecture. But this is not what I am looking for, nor is it premeditated. It is pure chance which certainly has a link with my unconscious. I was born in Lisbon. And my childhood was largely inspired by walks, along the river Tagus, or on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, with the wind, the changing skies, my father going fishing with his fishing rod, alone at night on the edge of the cliffs. Childhood was also bathed in this fantastic and popular Lisbon, with the electric wires of the tramway weaving a canvas on the city's ceiling, the sound and light alleys all spinning towards the sea, the clothes drying in the windows and dancing with the wind in a poetic way. I am also passionate about architecture, the history of cities and buildings. All these elements are the pillar of my existence and undoubtedly the source of my creativity. We have appreciated the intense and at the same time thoughtful nuances that marks out your artworks, and that in Blue Soul draw the viewers to a state of mind where the concepts of time and space become suspended. How does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in an artwork and in particular, how do you develop your textures in order to achieve such unique results? Once again, everything is very instinctive. It is my emotional research that will lead me to use this or that tool, to erase or apply the colour in this or that way.

If I mean the wind, the quivering it gives me, then I create a twig, a stem, which I then erase but the trace remains, its shadow seems to bend with the breath... it is very subtle and hardly visible. For this I work with all sorts of tools, spatulas, pieces of wood, brushes, scrapers, sandpaper, sponges, rags, my fingers. I scratch, erase, spread, trace, mark, engrave. Often successive layers on which I work again and again by transparency or by adding material. You are a versatile artist and besides working mainly with acrylic on canvas, you also create with inks and watercolors on paper. What does appeal you of these mediums? Acrylic painting was my reference and my main technique. With the Covid 19 and these periods of confinement I felt the need to get away from it all and create a lot in an urgent and simple way. I started using inks and watercolour on 300 gram paper every day for 1 year. I created 200 small formats which were a necessity for me. I explored the world of watercolour that I knew little about and discovered the infinite possibilities of the transparency and concentration of pigments and the definitive aspect of this technique. A watercolour cannot be retouched or reworked, at the first stroke it is definitive. It was therefore for me a very beautiful instinctive experience. Today I return to my favourite technique, acrylic paint sometimes mixed with collage on large canvas. I like this evolutionary approach, multiple layers over the days on which we work again with a story that is born through this research. Which is not the case with watercolour, which is only a jet, a quick, subtle emotion, a breath thrown on the sheet.



Exhibition - Paris - 2019


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

These are two different but complementary approaches and I will certainly return to watercolour on paper at times. I would also very much like to work with ceramics, I often think about it and I think it is a project that I will develop soon.

particular, how does your everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

7) With their unique visual identity, your artworks convey struggle, joy and such a wide variety of emotions, unveilsing the point of convergence between strenght and vulnerability: how does your memories influence your work as an artist and in

As I mentioned earlier my work is undoubtedly inspired by my childhood in Lisbon. I have within me the feeling and the taste of Portugal, I have the vertigo of Lisbon. At the age of 9, I and my family emigrated to France. I arrived in a country where I didn't know anyone, where the climate, the earth, the sky and the people were foreign to me. I suffered a lot from this and experienced it as a trauma, I missed my homeland a lot. Art allowed me to transcend


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

this lack and to access these buried emotions, it was like a kind of therapy and it continues to this day. I paint what I cannot express in words, painting allows me to access my unconscious and the subtle things that cannot be said or written.

I am a hyper-sensitive person but I have built a wall for myself to resist the world and to be able to trace a path without losing all my feathers and remain standing.

I am often defined as a person as strong as I am fragile, my painting is as you say so well; struggle and joy, strength and vulnerability since that is what I am too.

8) We have appreciated the way you combine reminders to reality — as in the interesting Ao longo do rio— with such unique abstract visual qualities. Scottish visual artist Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic works of art are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us: how do you consider the


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O Paraíso / L100xH100 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production? Yes, that's exactly it. At the beginning the process is instinctive and as the work is

constructed, images from the imaginary appear and a real story and research is born, but always in abstraction. I never try to represent a river, a sky or trees...I try to represent the emotion that these elements


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Ilusões / L120x120 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas give me. It so happens that the result is often a mixture between figurative and abstract, but this is fortuitous and unwanted. Then I give titles and they correspond to the images of my imagination, memories, thoughts that have

been transported to me during the elaboration of the work. As you have remarked in your artist's statement, you want to paint what can't be


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seen, the breath, the wind, the movement, the emotion, the rustle of the leaves, rain, ice seasons. In a certain sense, the abstract feature that marks out your paintings seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface, providing the viewers with freedom to realize their own perception. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich once remarked the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto, so that they can actively participate in the creation of the illusion: how important is

for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood? I don't think about that when I paint. My relationship is only with the canvas and the painting, in a rather solitary and selfish dialogue. I try to say the invisible and the imperceptible. I don't try to please and I don't necessarily want my works to be


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

understood. I try to paint an emotion and if this emotion can be communicated to the spectator then so much the better, if not so much the worse. Some will see a boat, a port, a landscape, some will see only abstract, some will feel emotions and some will see nothing and be indifferent. It is the sensitivity of each being that is different. It is true that I am happy when a painting touches and moves a spectator and it is always very interesting to know what he is going to tell me because I can confront his perceptions with mine. But the

imaginary world is vast and everyone can project their story and their feelings into it. It's really interesting to know that in each work people from different worlds will feel and see opposite things. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of occasions, including your recent participation to VISIONARY PROJECTS — The Era of change in New York City, and your new collaboration with the NoonPowell Fine Art Gallery in


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L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

London: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces — to street and especially to online platforms as Instagram — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

and art exhibitions, everything is happening on social networks at the moment. The most important social network for artists is instagram. I'm very present there and I regularly post my works, as well as my creative process. I have very loyal followers who post very kind and encouraging comments. My activity on Instagram has allowed me to meet artists, collectors, galleries and to have great international opportunities that I would never have had without the social network. It allows for international visibility and if your work

What is happening for artists, especially since the confinement, is revolutionising everything for artists. Because of the closure of galleries


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interests you then people follow you, ask you questions, it's very dynamic and stimulating. I have the impression that the artists have taken off thanks to this, many have started selling live and making virtual exhibitions. For my part, I've discovered incredible artists with whom I regularly talk, that brings me a lot. I am also part of a collective of 60 international artists https://www.instagram.com/ screamingart_group/ who regularly promote our work on instagram. If you want to follow my work on an almost daily basis, I'm there very

actively and I also respond to any comments or questions. https://www.instagram.com/cecile.filipe/ 11) We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Cécile. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of


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Artic 7

Necessidade

L16xH24 cm / Inks & Watercolours on paper 300 grs

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the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

ultimately a bit like my work, it's what I'm

I am currently working on large format acrylic paintings on canvas. I have a big project, to leave Paris and the city world to get lost in the countryside, to reconnect with the seasons, nature, space and animals. I think that this reconnection to the essence of life, the fundamentals will allow me to take another direction in my work but I don't know what it is yet and that's what's exciting. My life is

looking for that teaches me what I do. I would like to thank you very much for the quality of your interview and the relevance of your questions which allowed me to reflect on the development of my process, I also want to thank you for allowing me to talk about my work through this article.


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Pai / L90xH110 cm / Acrylic & Collage on canvas


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LandEscape meets

Naima Karim The sky is full of dreams. I discovered this as a child growing up in Bangladesh observing the sky as it constantly changed the colours and the expressions with it. The sunrise, the sunset, the dark night, the rain when it is full of dark clouds all seemed very romantic to me. I have recovered from Guillain Barre Syndrome, a neurological disorder which left me completely paralyzed. It took me one and half year to walk again. When I was lying in bed and couldn’t move any of my limbs, my only dream was to run across the grass field and look at the beautiful sky. After graduating in Fine Arts I moved to the Netherlands and was inspired by the Dutch masters like Van Gogh’s colourful paintings and Ruisdael’s deep, dark yet beautiful clouds. Now I live in Saudi Arabia where the sky is clear with simple yet rich colours, inspires me to paint and experiment with all kinds of media. I work with watercolor, acrylic, oil and mixed-media depending on the mood and intended texture. My works are sometimes realistic, sometimes impressionistic or a bit abstract. My paintings are my dreams, my happiness and my celebration.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

Hello Naima and welcome to LandEscape. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.naimakarim.com in order to get a wide idea about your multifaceted artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about

your multifaceted background. You have a solid formal training: after having earned your Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Dhaka, you nurtured your education in the field of Pattern Making, Fashion Design and Couture at the Artemis Mode Academie: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum as well as your current life in the Netherlands direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?




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Naima Karim: Hello LandEscape and thank you so much for featuring me in your 15th edition of LandEscape. During my study at the university and before, I was interested in Fashion designing as well. I think I wasn’t completely sure in which direction I want to go at that time but I was sure to be in creative field. When we moved to the Netherlands, with my 5 months old daughter, I wanted to get a masters degree in fashion design but I needed a portfolio. To prepare for it, I took some diploma courses in Artemis Mode Academie in Rotterdam. I have always been sewing, and making clothes since I was a child. Apart from drawing and painting, this is something I loved a lot. But to apply for Masters degree at any university I needed a portfolio, and also with a toddler to take care, it seemed almost impossible to pursue a full-time school. Daycare was very expensive so I could only prepare my portfolio and work for a short time with a designer and that’s it. Then I had my 2nd daughter and became a full time mother until I moved to Saudi Arabia. Bangladesh is very rich in culture with art, poetry, music etc.. The influence is very strong in me and it helped to build the foundation in me. I loved my time at the university of Dhaka where some very good artists of Bangladesh were created. I am always inspired by Shahabuddin, Jainul Abedin, Monirul Islam. Netherlands is also one of my big inspiration because of its landscape and the sky full of clouds. Also the artists from

the Netherlands, Van Gogh, Ruisdael, Willem de Kooning, Mondrian inspired me a lot. In the beginning though I still did not know I will be painting sky and bird but I can clearly see where I got the influence from. I live in Saudi Arabia now. but every now and then we go to the Netherlands. It's been seven years in Saudi Arabia but when ever I go back to Netherlands, I work there as well. I started painting since 2016 and kind of knew what my interests are. For my bachelor degree, my major was oriental painting and I studied mostly watercolor. Since I started painting again I wanted to try Oil and Acrylic as well. So I was experimenting and taught myself Oil and Acrylic. I was enjoying all the mediums and was getting confident using these mediums along with watercolor. I started painting birds in the beginning, because of the movements of the birds, always attracted me. During my final year at the university suddenly a neurological disorder called Guillain Barre Syndrome left me completely paralyzed. For five months I couldn’t move any of my limbs. It took me one and half year to walk again. Since my paralysis, movement is very important to me. I see movements in the sky too and love showing it in my strokes. Soon after the birds where disappearing in my paintings and it transformed into much more simpler, long strokes of the clouds moving with the wind. Here I must mention Shahabuddin, my most favorite Bangladeshi artist. I love how he shows figures in strong motion, on a big empty background.


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The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of LandEscape and that our readers have already had the chance to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once captured our attention for your meta exploration of the concept of landscape, enriching the image of real places with such enchanting dreamscape ambience: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how do you develop your artworks?

Karim: I take a lot of photographs of the sky, clouds and landscapes, wherever I go, but I mostly work from the memory and feeling. These memories and feelings are from my collection from the childhood till now. I also sometimes combine memory and photographs. When I paint in impressionistic way, I do it from my photographs and adapt it according to how I want to express myself. Sometimes I change the composition, or I choose a part of it and I play with colors as well. I enhance the colors to make it more dramatic. Certain compositions, that nature has, is very pure and untamed, that I want in my work. I try to capture that. For abstract and minimalist work I depend exclusively on my memory. The color palette I choose, depends on the day and mood. It influences the style as well. It can be impressionistic, abstract or minimalist depending on what I want to express. I love this change of styles, which I really enjoy. That way I don’t feel I am doing the same thing everyday. My friends and acquaintances, always send me photographs of the sky. They tell me this beautiful sky reminded me of your paintings. Which I feel is the most amazing thing. This is how I feel I am connected with them.


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Your artworks are marked out with such sapient combination between rigorous sense of geometry — as the interesting Skyscape — and wide variety of intense tones — as the interesting Rain — that provide your works

with a unique aesthetic identity. New York City based artist Lydia Dona once stated that in order to make art today one has to reevaluate the conceptual language behind the mechanism of art making itself: do you


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create your works intuitivelly, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes?

instinctively. I paint directly on the canvas, without any sketch. What I see and feel, I seem to keep it in my memory.

Naima Karim: I work intuitively and

In my “Skyscape Purple”, I painted the sky


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in simple stokes, where the purple with a tint of bright pink and orange is the dominant color. So the back ground and other empty places are plain and white. The layers of colors created the geometric

patterns, which I didn’t plan before I started the painting. My intention was to build the layers like the sky is with layers of clouds and to show the lightness and transparency. I love playing with the


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strokes that create those geometric forms unintentionally. It gives me so much pleasure to see how it turns out. In “Rain in Saudi”, the feeling is very

romantic. I was painting it when it was the first rain of the season here in Saudi Arabia. The desert sky was full of dark, heavy clouds. It was so beautiful. I saw the sky pouring, as if the water was dissolving the


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colors in the clouds, into the ground. I wanted to show the mix of colors in the sky with the tones, sometimes using my finger and mixing it on the canvas. As the whole canvas become a big palette. I also

use some colors that might not be exactly in the photographic memory but somewhere in the collective feelings, I felt, that needed to be emphasized.


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We have appreciated the intense, and at the same time thoughtful nuances that marks out your artworks, and that in Epiphany joyfully draw the viewers to a state of mind where the concepts of time and space become suspended. How does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in an artwork and in particular, how do you develop your textures in order to achieve such unique results? Naima Karim: As I mentioned before, I don’t plan or make a sketch before I start a painting. Most of the time I follow my intuitions. As a result sometimes my painting can be something that I don.t like much at all. But after a while the same painting can turn into a very beautiful one if I work on it with a different view. “Epiphany” was a painting just like that. I started it thinking of something else but later it turned out to be something I didn’t think of. I kew what I was doing.This painting doesn’t have the movement usually I like to show in my paintings. Instead I painted a very close up, tranquil but powerful cloudscape, that draws the viewers sight into the depth of the clouds and holds it there. As if this were it is supposed to be, the inner vision becomes clear and connected with the soul. It is almost like meditation. Adding layers of colors, I wanted to have the texture of the cloud but carefully kept it still. My intention here again was to stop the time, to feel the silence and forget everything for a moment. As you have remarked in the starting lines of your artist's statement, you discovered the romanticism of the ever-changing


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palette of the sky when you were a child growing up in Bangladesh: how do your memories and your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process?

Naima Karim: For any artist, the root plays an important role. I am so lucky to grow up in Bangladesh. It is a tropical country. It has six seasons and every season comes with a


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significant character. In monsoon it rains a lot. Summer is very bright and sunny. Winter is cold and dry. The whole country is colorful with flowers, fruits and green trees. When the rain starts, it is such an orchestral and dramatic view. The sound of thunder and the dark clouds, make the whole rain very theatrical. Those memories are very strong in my mind. As a child I was running out side to get wet in the rain. It is a joyous experience. After a warm and humid day, rain is a blessing. My feeling of rain is very romantic because of Bangladeshi rain. It still is the same, as I am

mostly in Saudi Arabia, which is most of the time dry, but when the rain comes, it is very special and my heart fills up with the joy just like my childhood. It brings back my beautiful memories and the songs we used to sing during the rainy season. Both realistic and impressionistic, your artworks have definitely fascinated us for the way you sapiently balance such apparently opposite visual qualities. Scottish artist Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic work of arts


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are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production?

Naima Karim: I agree with Peter Doig, even I work from a photograph, I change the mood of the painting by choosing the colors and stokes. Sometimes I like to work very fast like Van Gogh. Because I don’t want to loose the moment of my feeling. I also love the result that way. I feel the power and energy in me that I can transfer

quickly and reflect it in my painting. Between realistic and impressionism that is what I feel the difference I see in my paintings. When I feel calm and my painting is more realistic, I emphasis the drama more than my confidence, my vulnerability more than my power. On the other hand I love to show my vigorous strokes and confident, with contrast colors in my impressionistic paintings. Another interesting body of works that has impressed us and that we would like to introduce to our readers is your Megher Kole


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Rod Hesheche series, that has impressed us for the way its essential minimalism challenges the viewers' perception process, urging them to elaborate personal asssociations. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich once remarked the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto, so that they can actively participate in the creation of the illusion: how important is for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? In particular, how open would you like your

works to be understood?

Naima Karim: Rich with songs and poems, we Bangladeshi people grew up singing songs of Rabindranath Tagore, Nazrul Islam and many more poets. Among these poets specially my this art work is inspired by one of Tagore’s song called “Megher Kole Rod Hesheche”. Tagore is the first Non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. When it rains in Bangladesh, it can rain for days. Sometimes causing Flood and of course no school. Children miss


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playing out with their friends. When the rain stops and sun is shining again, children feel the joy to go out and do all that they missed these last few days. Tagore wrote this song telling us about all the exciting plans of what to do next. watercolor on paper I wanted to capture the sunlight behind the clouds, like a smile on a Childs innocent face. Playing around the whole sky after the rain has stopped. The Title of this artwork is “Megher kole rod heshecchhe” means “Smile of the sunlight

behind the cloud”. While creating and experimenting with this series, I was feeling the challenge my viewers will feel to understand and connect with this work. But at the same time I was having so much fun just to express myself and projecting my memories with the simplest color and minimum strokes. I knew that for another Bangladeshi, it will be easier to connect but for other viewers it is a composition of the sunlight around the clouds in different ways. Which is also investing because of the negative space that creates the illusion.


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I like how viewers can interpret in their own way. I love to give them that chance and to understand it in their own way. I find it fascinating. This series consists of several pieces. To understand the feeling I have translated the Tagore song below. “The sun smiles from the cradle of clouds, Rain seems over, what a joy. Today is our holiday, O dear, what a joy. Hard to decide what to do next, which woods to explore – losing steps, Which ground to run about – together with all the boys, What a joy. We’ll make boats from KEYA leaves, with floral decorations, Set them sail on TAAL-DIGHI, they should rock and move. We play on the flute, with the shepherd boy, follow grazing cattle, We roll on the CHAMPA-forest floor, body covered by pollen, What a joy.” You are a versatile artist and your practice encompasses a variety of media and techniques, including watercolor, acrylic, oil and mixed-media, as well as brush strokes, knives and sponges: how important is for you to experiment and how do you select each medium to develop your textures?

Naima Karim: As an artist I know if I don’t


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change and innovate with my creations, then I am not an artist at all. I do practice my usual styles mostly. Because it is important to practice and develop so that I can evolve and become as good as I can but at the same time I like to try and experiment with new ideas, new materials. It is important and exciting as well. Creativity has no limitations. Depending on my ideas I decide what style and materials would be the best to express my feelings. You are an established artist: your works are held in private collections in Saudi Arabia, UK, UAE, US, Canada, Italy, Netherlands, Singapore, France, Bangladesh and India, and over the years your artworks have been international showcased in several exhibitions, : how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms — as Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/naimaka rim_) — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Naima Karim: My paintings are the reflections of my soul. I pour my love and passion on my work. When I work, my only intention is to create something that can express my feelings of that moment. It is important for me that the audience can connect the same way with me through the work and


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feel it. To see a work in live makes a big impact on an audience rather than to see it online. I think the connection is not the same. The size, the texture, the depth is only felt the most when an audience is standing in front of a work. Though lately because of the pandemic this is the only option but I am sure it is temporary. Still, online platform plays a very important role in the art world, because it can cover the whole world in an instance and it is not possible for audiences to visit all the exhibitions. Also as an artist, even if it is hard to give away the work, it is necessary to sell artwork too. To attract curators and collectors, to share the portfolio easily, online platform is very helpful. I still love participating live exhibitions because that way I can engage the audience fully. It is very important to me that the collector want my work because they really love my work and feel the connection. We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Naima. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Naima Karim: Thank you so much for your time to look through my works and I greatly appreciate for featuring me in this edition. I feel very lucky to be a part of it. My current project that I developed, is a

collaborative project using immersive technology. The title of the project is “Rain”. Not sure yet if it will be approved and will become real at this time. But I am very excited and really want it to be experienced by the audience. I am also excited and waiting for the result of an installation project that I submitted for an exhibition. It is about the garment factory workers of Bangladesh. An Eight-story commercial building, Rana Plaza, collapsed in Bangladesh. It is one of the deadliest garment-factory accident in the history, killing 1,134 people and around 2,500 injured. The victims were the workers in ready made garment factories. When the crack in the building was discovered the day before the accident, the garment workers were still told to come back to work. There was a pressure on them to complete the orders on time. My this particular installation project is dedicated to these workers and the tittle is “Faceless Crowd”. Apart from these new ideas I am working on some paintings as well, which is my regular practice that I love the most.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com


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LandEscape meets

Natalie McGuire My images are little mosaics pieces of my memory that I capture and share with the world. Photography is second nature to me and allows me to express how I see things in day to day life. This gift was given to me by my father. My subject matter is driven by my ability to go out shooting with an open mind allowing Mother Nature to show me what she wants to be captured. I look at my scene and decide; am I going for color, texture, lines, mood, or drama? This helps me decide if I shoot color or infrared. My photography is many things, depending on my environment when capturing the image. When shooting infrared, this style of photography brings another worldly look to my photographs, almost a dreamlike state that has a 3D effect. My color images, I primarily use to grab the vibrancy that Mother Nature’s glory offers up to us. I create images that make you feel like you are there with me in the scene.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

attending a number of seminars: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? Natalie McGuire: Growing up in a blue color

Hello Natalie and welcome to LandEscape. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://nmcguirestudio.com in order to get a wide idea about your multifaceted artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. Your art education began at a very early age in your family: you later nurtured your technical skills enrolling the Hennepin Technical college’s digital photography program, as well as

family, we didn’t go without but if we wanted more, we had to get creative. I would make crafts and sell baked goods at the end of my driveway so I could make money. Moreover, how does your cultural substratum help you to develop your attitude to experiment that culminated in the creation of Photozaics? Natalie McGuire: Early on I realized that some

of my images were lacking something,



Aspen Fields infrared photograph


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Poplar n Pine Photozaic

making me think outside the box. I experimented with Rocks, Driftwood, flowers, leaves; ultimately found stain glass was my best option to bring out the beauty I was looking for. The body of works that we have selected for

this special edition of LandEscape —and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article — has at once captured our attention is the way it highlights our connection with Nature, to balance the sense of becoming that marks out our contemporary age. In particular, we have


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Friday Night Lights Photozaic

really appreciated your sapient use of the photographic medium as a narrative tool, to pursue such thoughtful visual impact: when walking our readers through your usual technical setup and process, would you tell us how do you develop your ideas? Natalie McGuire: In particular, what does

draws you to decide to shoot in black & white, as well as in color and infrared? When shooting I scene I process the drama, texture, mood, lighting, that will decide if I shoot color or infrared. Infrared is great to express mood, drama,


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Golden Gate Bridge Photozaic


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Rainy Lake Blues Photozaic

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Colorado Bound Photozaic

luminosity giving a 3D dreamlike effect to the image. When photographing Golden Gate Bridge, I wanted to show the iconic image in color, showcasing the vibrant red bouncing off the green ocean and blue sky.

your ability to go out shooting with an open mind allowing Mother Nature to show you what she wants to be captured: how important are intuition and improvisation in your process?

As you have remarked in your artist's statement, your subject matter is driven by

improvisation go hand in hand when capturing my photograph, framing my images.

Natalie McGuire: For me, intuition and


Floating Solo infrared photograph



Rolling Peaks infrared photograph



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Moreover, how do you consider the creative power of randomness playing within your artistic research? Natalie McGuire: Not really, most of my

photographs are intentional I will shoot a scene knowing that I want to make this a photozaic. Rainy Lake Blues and Golden Gate Bridge feature such thoughtful nuances of tones, that provide your images with such dreamlike ambiance: how do you select the tones to include in your artworks? Natalie McGuire: This is what I saw, and the

camera captured, I did minor software editing to extenuate the dreamlike quality I witnessed with these images. Photography allows you to express how you see things in day-to-day life, and more specifically, it also allows you to document your road trips over the years of the US and Canada: how do your memories and your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process? Natalie McGuire: As I work on a photozaic I

remember the day where I was, how I felt, was it warm, sunny, etc. This carries through in my selection of glass and placement of the glass. We were very struck by the unique visual atmosphere that provides under the tracks with such recognizable identity, reminding us of the concept of non-place, elaborated by French anthropologist Marc Augé: how did you select the locations for your works and how do your choices influence your process? Natalie McGuire: Paying attention to my

surrounding I see things others miss. I also


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Lone Tree I infrared photograph


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Lone Tree I infrared photograph

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pick out places that offer drama, color, personality. Bridge to wonder and Crissy Beach feature such dreamlike ambiance: how important is for you to create works of art able to draw to transcend ordinary visual experience? In particular, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination? Natalie McGuire: I don’t always see the

difference between reality and imagination; sometimes reality is a dream?? Sometimes imagination can be made real through my art. With their unique 3D, almost sculptural qualities, your photozaics are carefully created through glass hand-cutting technique, remarking the fact that a work of art is a physical artifact with tactile qualities: how important is for you to highlight the physical aspect of your artworks? Natalie McGuire: Growing up in an “ugly

frame” household I believe the frame is a much part of the art as the photo is. The glass reflects, adding another dimension for the viewer. As a visual artist particularly interested in creating images that make the viewers feel like they are there with you in the scene, how important is for you to trigger the viewers' imagination to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood? Natalie McGuire: I will allow the viewer to

interpret my work themselves without input at first. If questioned I will tell my interpretation. I love to hear their input on my artwork.


Beached infrared photograph



Under the Tracks infrared photograph



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Oklahoma Road photozaic

Pine Edged Road photozaic

Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of occasions, both in Canada and in the United States: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms — as Instagram https://www.instagram.com/nmcg uirestudio — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalized audience?

image and hand-cut glass that come across in a 2d screen.

Natalie McGuire: I would love to relate to my

audience by sharing my love of Mother Nature and my interpretation of nature through my art. My photonics are best for the first-time viewer to witness in person, you need the personal connection with my

We have appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Natalie. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? Natalie McGuire: I love the infrared

photozaics as they challenge my eye, forcing me to look at the image differently than in color. I’m always looking to adding different materials to my photozaics like the use of Stringer rod to emulate a bridge. I’m currently exploring beads to use in my future photozaics.


Danger infrared photograph


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LandEscape meets

Jakub Pasierkiewicz I was born in 1980 in Poland and I graduated from the University of Silesia with a Masters in Fine Arts in 2005. My main passion is painting and drawing but I have never lost my interest in the medium of photography, which in some sense, is an essential accomplishment of my artistic language. I use my camera to transfer and materialise the emotions which develop in my mind, the excitement caused by encountered reality. Sometimes the photos can abstract from reality, showing different aspects of colours and forms, whereas other times they can simply reflect certain situations taking place in front of my camera. In my practice – be it photography, painting or drawing – I try to recreate an idea which appears through thorough observation of the surrounding world. In other words, if we agree that vision is something abstract, something that is invisible and represents an individual need to self–express, then art becomes a tool enabling to capture our ideas. Through art I try to translate my experience into the image. I can definitely say that in my work/practice the whole process of creation is more often intuitive and spontaneous rather than planned and posed. It is an encounter with the unknown but somehow familiar.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

Hello Jakub and welcome to LandEscape. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit http://www.kubap.com in order to get a wide idea about your mulifaceted artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have a solid formal

training and you hold a MA in Fine Arts, that you received from the University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum direct the direction of your current artistic research? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: Hello LandEscape and thank you for your invitation to this interview. Considering your question I must admit that the time which I spent at the University played definitely a massive role in shaping my artistic preferences and interests. At the beginning I did



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not have any experience in creating or converting my observations into any form of art. I had a camera (Zenith 12XP) which I used to memorise my life rather than an instrument which I started using in a creative, intending process. As time passed, I started to develop my skills, which allowed me to make a final decision about continuing art education. I chose painting as my main discipline but soon after I realised what photography has to offer. In short, it was during my studies when I consciously started to control or use a chosen medium to clearly express my ideas. I strongly believe that any form of art is - in some way - a result of every human cultural development or transformation, which responds to its own territory, context or experience. I get my inspiration from everything that surrounds me: people, objects, nature etc., so it is a natural process of having my creativity responding to and reflecting on the place where I lived or currently exist. In short, everywhere I travel to or temporarily live, I “collect” the pictures of places in which I recognise next frames for my project. Growing up in Poland during the time of changes, when the Communism regime was finally over, surely gave me the opportunity to witness the beginning of a new era. This big transformation allowed people to celebrate their own culture and develop back their identity. This left a huge impact on my personal perception and believes and is coming back at any point in time influencing my art and life. For this special edition of LandEscape we have selected The inverted world, a stimulating body of works that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic research is the way it unveils the


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elusive connection between existing reality and the sense of becoming that amarks out our contemporary age: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how did you develop the initial idea of The inverted world? I must admit that the process of developing the idea for this series was very complex. Jakub Pasierkiewicz: Firstly, I wanted to reflect the traditional way of developing photographs in my digital photography. As I have the ’analogue background’, which I learnt during my studies, I remember the process of getting into digital technology. I must admit I hated it and did not want to recognise it as a form of photography. This changed when I started using DSLR cameras with RAW format - all good memories came back as I was able to use some softwares to develop my files in a similar way to traditional ‚darkroom' techniques. I am aware that this is something completely different but there is always a kind of analogy which I cannot deny. I simply started working on my photographs by inverting them first and developing them working on this form of file - it was definitely the first aspect of creating my series ’The Inverted World’. Initially I realised that the world photographed by me has a completely different dimension when I invert it and develop in this form. I started analysing the current COVID situation which our lives faced wondering how our existence would change? Is it going to stay the same? What kind of new character will it be given? And by who? Will we have any opportunity to choose the way our new world is going to look? All these questions are still left without the answers. Even if we believe that time is something constant or not - the world evolves persistently and his final form stays unrevealed.




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As I described it in my statement: ‚by setting these diptychs, which are the combination of positive and negative of the same capture, I wanted to emphasise potential opposite elements of the same subject’. Maybe in this way, we realise that the existing reality will change gaining new qualities and values. It's important to mention that the photographs of The inverted world present abstract coastal landscapes, that you personally captured in different regions of the world: as an artist particularly interested in the exploration of human relationships and identity, how does your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: In my practice – be it photography, painting or drawing – I try to recreate an idea which appears through thorough observation of the surrounding world. Whenever I can, I take the opportunity to travel as this is definitely the best source of inspiration which I can experience by myself. Unfortunately, at the present, because of the lockdown, these options are very limited so naturally I started exploring my local area and my connection to the place I currently live. These reflections gave the foundation to reconstitute my own identity and efforts in developing my own, personal artistic language. This is why my art/photography has transformed and has gone into different directions. I believe that sometimes it is necessary to scrutinise yourself and learn something absolutely novel about us as humans and our correlation with reality. Your diptychs feature positive and negative of the same capture, in order to emphasise potential opposite elements of the same subject: how do you consider the role of metaphors playing in


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your artistic practice? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: And how important is it for you to create artworks rich of allegorical qualities? The visual metaphor is an image which we are supposed to recognise as a symbol for something else and this can be used in a variety of ways in any discipline of art. I definitely try to use it as it creates connection to the viewers in the sense that it helps them to read the art at a deeper level. Metaphorical character triggers our imagination so the artist can deliver in a more subtle way all emotions and impressions which often are hidden inside himself. I like to think that the artwork full of allegorical elements has a forceful impact and everlasting effect on the viewers. It makes the values included in art more momentous and allows them to stay in our memory for longer. I try not to reveal all the information and avoid all direct comparison - it gives the viewers the opportunity to think in a more instinctive and abstract way. In conclusion, I believe that art has a very strong educational function and can be used sensibly in the pedagogical process helping to make our world better. The duality that marks out the works from The inverted world also reflects such a subtle but insightful socio-political analysis, and it can be also considered as an allegory of the conflictual connection between the currently existing world and the outcome of our deconstructive activity on our planet: many contemporary artists, such as Thomas Hirschhorn and Michael Light, use to include socio-political criticism and sometimes even convey explicit messages in their artworks: does your artistic research respond to a particular cultural moment? In particular, do you think that artists can raise awareness to an evergrowing





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audience on topical issues that affect our everchanging society? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: I have always thought that every art can provoke the changes and artists can be the advocates of these transitions. Art should definitely contemplate the current time and engage in polemics about any aspects of our lives. Dada poet Hugo Ball once said: ’For us, art is not an end in itself … but it is an opportunity for the true perception and criticism of the times we live in.’

I definitely consider myself as someone who is trying to change my habits and live in accordance with rules which are environmentally friendly. Three years ago I became a father which made me even more focused on the ecological crisis. My considerations have a reflection in many of my artworks and definitely can be found in the series ‚The inverted world’. It is never enough to remind us that our reality is endangered and our world will look diametrically opposed. Art can bring people together and this fact should be recognised as a huge potential for the artists who


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should take an active part in building a collective responsibility for many problems. Your Encoded Suprematism series, with its collection of images marked out with human footprint in a wasteland has reminded us the concept of non-place, elaborated by French anthropologist Marc Augé: how did you select

particular anthropological space which is passing away - for this reason this place is not recognised and loosing importance. Looking into some aspect of the above definition, my series is responding to non-place phenomena. The places photographed in the series certainly wear the stigma of civilisation but only the code created by the anonymous creator.

the locations for this stimulating body of works? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: The neologism ‚non-place’ invented by Marc Auge talks mainly about the anonymous existence of human beings in a

To reply to your question let me briefly explain a few things about my series. We need to remind the viewers that the inspiration comes from an art movement called Suprematism founded by



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Kazimir Malevich. Just as Suprematism focused mainly on basic geometric forms, my photographic compositions, which are full of geometric shapes, reflect a personal and simplified form of ‘Malevich’s grammar’. A primeval function and meaning of these geometrical signs are being switched off. The visual characters are being replaced with a minimalism– style aesthetic, a new language. No longer linked to the objects they identified – they are insignificant. I do not want to say that the locations for this set of photographs was chosen coincidentally but I did not have the list of places I wanted to go to complete my concept. Simply, I realised that these geometric abstractions, containing coded information, are wherever the human was so every time I visited any agglomeration my suprematism compositions were waiting for me. You are a versatile artist and you also create drawings and mixed media works, as the interesting triptych Transition, that has at once impressed us for the way you sapiently balanced realism and unique visual atmosphere that provides your artworks with such recognizable identity: as an artist particularly interested in translate your experience into the image, how do you consider the relationship between the real and the imagined playing within your artistic practice? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: I have chosen the idea of Transition as the title for some of my mixed media artworks as this is a change from one form into another one or the process which accompanies this transformation. The Dadaist’s theory that ‘everything is everywhere and conversely’ seeded some ideas inside me about starting to collect some pre-existing materials and giving them new significance in my artwork. I took


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away the primary functions of the found objects by interrupting their real anatomy. When one process stops, another starts: by alternating, layering and arranging them together, I allow the materials to develop, almost like being reborn, gaining new implications within a new context. By adopting found fragments of paper and other materials I observe the metamorphosis which has taken place and either follow the initial motif/ structure/ form or by ignoring this imprint of nature I try to discover a new potential by introducing new mechanisms in order to develop new integrity. The materials are treated here as a medium and a process rather than as a surface. Turning upside down Jeff Wall's words — when he stated that "a picture is something that makes invisible its before and after"— you underlined that art is a tool that enables to capture ideas, providing their abstract nature with visible features: is your process completely spontaneous or do you methodically transpose your ideas? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: I cannot eliminate the phenomenon of coincidence when I discuss the process of my creation - it would be a total negation of my personal experience. The resultant of an unconstrained action takes a very important part in my artistic achievements and it has the same value as well-conceived processes. Spontaneity allows you to open yourself more on every aspect of learning. It makes you predict some outcomes and makes your skills more developed. All the mistakes, which are very often inevitable, teach you how to avoid them or even oppositely: how to repeat them so you can then convert these effects in the way you like.





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I have a strong classical background talking about art education and perception. I am not saying that I am good at that - I am still learning but I am trying to explain that for me it is very important to plan everything I am creating. This is why every time I am trying to escape from this type of routine, I need to be more expressive and emotional - this gives me bigger freedom and, quite often, surprising satisfaction. We have particularly appreciated the way From my Nanny's wall clearly show that vivacious tones are not strictly indespensable to create tension and dynamics. How does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in your artworks and in particular, how do you develop your textures? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: The inspiration for this series came from childhood memories about the tapestry which was quite common decoration in the area where my nanny lives. She still has them on the wall so it is a really alive connection which can be seen as autobiographical. There is no denying that this series is kept mainly in monochromatic style and the main accent - talking about the composition - was put on geometry. Obviously, colour can be recognised as the most important factor as it refers to human emotions, mood or even culture. Nonetheless the colour here is not imperative to the narrative of the image. Traditional methods of dyeing carpets relied on natural ingredients, which were often difficult to obtain as their supply was limited and supplies were controlled. As a result, they were valuable and quite rare. In my compositions I tried to copy this process by selecting only essential hues which I found in nature. This allowed me to inspect the

multifarious colouration incurred by different processes like corrosion or caused by natural factors such as time. I tried to arrange my abstract composition in a symmetrical way so the construction of the texture could imitate the idea of the rug. The details were very principal paralleling infinitely complex patterns found in fractals. Dynamic systems of fractals which present the illustrations of chaos, are visible constantly in nature and through photography it is possible to record it and this is what I have done. With their unique ambivalent visual identity, Scene of silence and The velvety dawn challenges the viewers' perceptual parameters, and seem to make the viewers question the reality of the situation, providing the spectatorship with freedom to realise their own perception: how important is for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: I would like to emphasise that I am widely opened to anyone’s personal interpretation of my artworks/photographs. Obviously, I do not need to agree with the way sometimes the viewers add another meaning to my concepts but this is still an extremely beneficial way of learning about my art and the perception of other individuals. You cannot simply show someone how to look at it or dismiss another perspective. You can help to better understand your vision by giving some extra information about the background or technique etc. Everybody is allowed to have personal


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feelings and thoughts and we the artists should respect it.

‘The Velvety Dawn’ series shows pictures of the River Medway in Rochester where I used to live. The photographs were captured very early in the morning when the whole scenery was




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drowned in an incredibly dense fog and filled with the silence which enabled contemplation of nature. I wanted to capture the moment when something completely abstract started reminding us of a realistic view of the river. This is why I used the filter of the morning fog to record the situation when some elements of nature started slowly appearing on the skyline. The ‘Scene of silence’ project refers to a characteristic void which accompanies us while we watch a silent movie. I heard this sentence

once: ‘photography is like the art of frozen time… the ability to store emotions and feelings within a frame’ - this is what became the motto for this series. Certainly, when looking at a photograph we cannot physically retrace any sounds, which quite often were an inseparable part of the captured moment. In this case, natural phenomena appear here muted and motionless, presenting only their visual potential. In a nutshell, photography is a still image. However,


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due to our imagination and previous experiences, these pictures can provide an external stimulus to senses and belie motion and indeed familiar sounds. The above descriptions are only my intended visualisation of created ideas. However everyone should read the works using ‘personal vocabulary’ which obviously are based on individual perception and experiences. In a controversial quote, German photographer Thomas Ruff stated that ''nowadays you don't have to paint to be an artist: you can photography in a realistic way". Provocatively, the German photographer highlighted the short circuit between the act of looking and that of thinking critically about images: how do you consider the role of photography in our contemporary age, constantly saturated by ubiquitous images? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: I would not like to try to describe the role of the photography medium in the contemporary world as I am really away from giving the clear response to it. And this is not the form of escaping from such an important question. I have respect for this medium on any platform and how it is used by a wide spectrum of artists starting with documentary role and finishing on conceptual or experimental one. I must confess that - paradoxically to Thomas Ruff’s words - the photography allowed me to cross the barrier which was constantly stopping me from perceiving reality in a non-representational way. I created my first abstract picture using the camera discovering the geometrical compositions through my lens. I have never taken a brush and copied Jason Pollock’s action painting style but using photography as a tool I managed at least to explore this kind of expression looking into countless structures. In this


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way, I would say that photography became some sort of a bridge which allowed me to step into completely unknown territories. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of occasions, including your participation to Monochrome Awards, D&AD Next Photographer Award and TZIPAC: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms — as Instagram — increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: For me, art is a form of communication. Everyone perceives art individually and subjectively. I can only hope that my art shows a transparent message. I do not expect that all observers will automatically agree with my vision/idea. What I would like to achieve is a dialogue with a viewer. This would not be possible if I would not exhibit my art to the audience. If you present your creativity, you can find out how your art is perceived by other people. What is their opinion about it? Do they understand your intentions? Does the work generate a new message or concept you have not thought of? If you create the art and keep it to yourself, you will never know. Exhibiting your artwork is an effective way of connecting to and being part of that community. It is only recently when I started using online platforms like Instagram, which constructively allowed me to meet a wider audience and gave me the possibility to exchange some perceptions and experiences. A couple of times I received some nice messages from people who I would probably never meet - they reached me through social




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media. We started collaborating: some of them used my art as the inspiration for their own ideas or as a material to their articles. It works definitely both ways - I really enjoy looking into new artworks created by many artists which I met through the internet and it really keeps me motivated. I would like to invite everyone to visit my Instagram account - I hope this will be an entertaining experience. https://www.instagram.com/jakubpasierkiewicz We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Jakub. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? Jakub Pasierkiewicz: I always have plenty of concepts in my mind so to be honest there are a few projects, which I started or I am going to. I do not want to reveal a lot as I always try to finalise ideas before I start talking about it. I can only say that I am close to finish a series of photographs which are about nocturne, which character is mainly dictated by a specific nightly atmosphere. This subject has a very rich and old tradition in the art world. For me the icon of this style is definitely Canadian Post-Impressionism painter Tom Thomson or American artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler. I will try to create the series which will correspond with the vision of these artists. One of my biggest aspirations is to go back to oil painting which I studied at the University. However, this time I would like to decidedly inquire into abstract fields. I hope I am ready for it.


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LandEscape meets

Anna Fine Foer Anna decided she was going to be an artist when she was 11-when she lived in Paris for a summer, visiting every museum and gallery. While a fibers/crafts major at Philadelphia College of Art (now University of the Arts) she became fascinated by the relationship between maps and the land they represent, embarking on a lifelong interest in maps and collage. After emigrating to Israel, Anna worked as a textile conservator in Haifa and Tel-Aviv. She studied at the Textile Conservation Centre, Courtauld Institute in London, where she received a Post-Graduate Diploma in Textile Conservation. Back in the US, Anna worked in conservation for the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C and for many museum clients as a freelance textile conservator. At the same time, she continued to construct map collage landscapes with sacred, political and meta-physical significance, depicting three or more dimensions on a two-dimensional plane. Anna now lives in Baltimore and has two, college graduate sons. Her work has appeared at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the Maryland Governor’s Mansion, and the Israeli Embassy and is in the permanent collection of the Haifa Museum of Art and the Beer-Sheva Biblical Museum. She was awarded a prize for the Encouragement of Young Artists for work exhibited in the Artist’s House in Jerusalem.

Recurring themes in my work include scientific discoveries, technology, alternative energy, location, and natural or unnatural disasters, though my output cannot be categorized in terms of specific subject matter; instead, it is my underlying approach and aesthetic that represents the unifying element. When I have an idea, I make many sketches to discover the best way to convey the idea and then search for the images to incorporate into the collage. My work has more than one story to tell. I may be both trying describe the curve of the earth on a flat piece of paper and using collaged images to blur boundaries between the natural and the manufactured/technological world, representing simultaneously land, sky, water and architecture. It is made in a traditional way; constructed with cut paper and adhesive and plays with distortions between visual perspective and surface image. Technology allows me to duplicate and manipulate images to fit my ideas and to further explore the relationship of the natural world and man made world and how we, as humans, navigate those worlds.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com

production we would like to invite our readers to visit http://www.annafineart.com in order to get a wide idea about your multifaceted artistic

Hello Anna and welcome to LandEscape.

production, and we would start this interview

Before starting to elaborate about your artistic

with a couple of questions about your



Shooting Gallery


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Garden of Quantum Delights

multifaceted background. You have a solid

that you received from the Courtauld

formal training: after having earned your BA

Institute of Art, London: how did those

in Fibres from the Philadelphia College of Art,

formative years influence your evolution as

you nurtured your education with a Post-

an artist? Moreover, how does your cultural

Graduate Diploma in Textile Conservation,

substratum — as well as your life in Haifa and


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Disputed Territory

Tel-Aviv — direct the trajectory of your

a study collection. The teacher and my

current artistic research?

mentor, travelled around the world with Jack

When I was in the Fibre Department at

Lenor Larsen to source ethnic textile design.

Philadelphia College of Art, the History of

He brought back a collection focussed on

Textiles was part of the curriculum and we had

innovative uses of materials. I was well


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acquainted with historic artifacts and the

work were foundational to my training as a

knowledge gained from seeing them up close

textile conservator.

from my work as an exhibition preparator at the Indianapolis Museum of Art while in high school. The history class and previous museum

Working with ethnographic textile collections in Haifa and Tel-Aviv, I took it upon myself to



Tele Aqueduct


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learn as much as I could about the regions and cultures that created the artifacts. My chosen profession suited my need to work with my hands and learn something, at the same time. As an aside, I recall the countless hours spent in the tapestry conservation studio at Hampton Court (the Textile Conservation Centre-TCC was housed in a Grace and Favour Apartment in the palace), listening to the Archers, which meant nothing to me but I knew was important. The informal education not only informed my aesthetic, it gave me an appreciation for all the many and vast ethnicities that were and are the Jewish diaspora. To this day, when I hear about one of the former Soviet republics, I relate to it in terms of the great weaving centers of the region. When it was revealed that the Tsarnaev brothers of Dagestan were accused of planting a bomb at the Boston Marathon in 2013, my first remark was “they aren’t terrorists, they make beautiful rugs!” What I respond to most in ethnic textiles is the uninhibited use of multiple patterns and materials, with no regard for what “matches” as one would expect in the west. A Bukharian ikat robe, lined with a printed cotton pattern with no unifying design elements somehow works elegantly. This design sensibility is the most sophisticated due to its disregard for any standardised, western objectives. As part of our training at the Courtauld, we had lots of lectures by experts in esoteric fields; e.g; the history of fans, the history of shoes, indigo dye, etc. What always struck me as odd was how the lecturer would start with “when indigo


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Beneath Surface


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La Puissance Eolienne

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arrived in England” as if the entire history of indigo began in England. I am taken back to my reaction to these types of pronouncements when there are calls for decolonization of museum collections and when statues and monuments are toppled, which reached a fever pitch this past summer. I can fully understand the feeling of not being represented when artifacts are interpreted from a specific cultural bias. All of this museological training informs my current art vocabulary in that I play with anachronisms (see Tower of Babble). One may be in the ruins of a Greek temple, surrounded by those interacting with the space in a 21st century mode; taking selfies or looking for Pokemon, which fascinates me. Recently, I came to the realization that I am comfortable depicting scientific principles as a direct result of chemistry for textile conservation lessons. Even though I do not fully comprehend all the scientific concepts in my work, I do not let that prevent me from appropriating and interpreting them to my benefit. Lastly, one reason I started working with collage is that all the ideas I had near the end of art school involved imagery that would be very complicated to execute with the available technology. IF digital textile printing was invented by the late 70’s, most likely, that medium could have become my preferred communication method. I dislike work that is a “tour de force”; art that is admired because it was made by a time consuming process. I did



Machtesh, Shetach


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Negev not want my work to fall into this category. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of LandEscape and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article, has at once captured our attention for the way your artistic research about the idea of landscape highlights the bond between the natural and the manufactured/technological world: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how and why you started making landscape collages?

This question is very easy to answer. When I was in my last semester of art school, my friends in the painting department recommended an abstract painting class; they respected the teacher and described her as being very zen. (We were instructed to take a painting or drawing class every semester, as it should be in a craft department well steeped in the Bauhaus tradition.) Our assignment was to make collages using torn pieces of paper; collages, as a way to play


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with colour and shape and the results would inform oil paintings. I had a collection of maps and was interested in geography (and had travelled quite a bit in my young life), so I began by cutting up and rearranging maps. (see United States Reconsidered I) I realized immediately that I could tell more than one story at a time; while working with formal concerns addressing how to depict a three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional plane (and other formalistic concerns that were in vogue at that time). A collage becomes

political based on my selection of maps of specific nations. (see Disputed Territory) When I started using maps as collage material, I had to find multiple copies of the same Altas and other printed maps. In Israel, in the 1980’s, one could buy used school books at kiosks. Softbound Atlases for elementary education were in plentiful supply. I hand coloured the maps for a specific effect. When digital, on-demand printing became ubiquitous I no longer had to hold on to tiny paper scraps for fear of running out and I can manipulate colour, perspective, etc. I have


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en cherchant Pokemon sur la Promenade des Anglais moved on from using maps as the main collage material. As soon as I arrived in Israel I was mesmerized by the arid, mountainous landscape. It was new and yet it was familiar because I lived in the American west for the first five years of my life. Continuing with the formalistic,

minimal concerns that informed my foray into collage, I made collaged compositions portraying map projections, exploring how to display three dimensional conical shapes on a picture plane. (see Projection and Globalization) Some collages from this early exploration dealt with the difference between a map,


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Growing Wind which is an abstraction of a location, and what the actual land looks like. My boyfriend at that time was a reserve field engineer with the IDF (Israeli army). He had a field guide to topography that interested me, because the diagrams portraying topography use the same concentric contours for a hill or a crater. (see Machtesh, Shetach)

We have particularly appreciated the way your artworks — especially the interesting Fire Signals Announce the New Moon and Anthropocene on the Prairie — feature a balanced combination between rigorous sense of geometry and abstract sensitiveness, showing that vivacious tones


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Among Us are not strictly indispensable to create

When selecting the collage material, my

tension and dynamics. How do you structure

intention is not to comply with a specific

your process in order to achieve such brilliant

palette, I choose images that push the

results? In particular, how does your own

narrative forward. Having said that, I do

psychological make-up determine the nuances

change the colour for a desired effect.

of tones that you

Sometimes I go to the Pantone website to find

decide to include in your artworks

colours.


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you are executing a plan when you work. I moved away from this method and now work more like a painter which makes for more discovery along the way. A diagram of neural pathways used in Fire Signals Announce the New Moon was printed on grey coloured paper with a matte, metallic finish. Some of the neural images are laser cut, lacy networks. I portrayed mountains at night with bright sparks indicating neurons firing. Red and orange coloured topographic maps of Israel represent fire. The concept dictated the images and colours used. Around the time I made this collage, I saw an exhibition of Japanese woodblock prints and was captivated by the graphic portrayal of mountains combining structure and organic form in a uniquely Japanese style.

Early on, my collages were strictly planned in advance; I knew what colours and maps would be used and an architectural drawing delineated the composition. This approach came directly out of my craft background. Whether woven or surface pattern, there is much predetermination in textile fabrication;

Anthropocene on the Prairie was conceived of when I was on the prairie in Boulder Colorado; my native homeland. While I was there this past summer, I was reading about mammoth de-extinction. (How to Clone a Mammoth by Beth Shapiro) and researching visualizations of geological strata. Copies of these diagrams created a collaged, mountainous landscape, surrounding me. I digitally muted some of the charts’ colours so all would be earth tones. Collaged helicopters are outfitted with insect wings, to liken the pervasiveness of tourist helicopters to a plague of locusts on a once pristine, western landscape. (thanks to Pete McBride’s 2016 photo of Helicopter Alley in National Geographic)


Globalization



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With their unique dreamlike ambience and abit enigmatic visual quality, pnai hadama and la puissance eolienne seem to unveil the bridge between the real and the imagined. Scottish painter Peter Doig once remarked that even the most realistic paintings are derived more from within the head than from what's out there in front of us, how do you consider the relationship between reality and imagination, playing within your artistic production? The artists who most inspired me since I was a young girl visiting the Jeu de Paume in Paris, had no affinity with realistic representation. Design, colour and bold expression were more evocative elements. Chagall was a primary influence and his surreal depictions of shtetl (village) life in the Pale of Settlement made sense to me. I did not try, nor was I interested in drawing from observation. It was only when, a few decades after art school, when my collages became narrative in scope that I wanted to include realistically drawn animals, for example. Then and now I teach myself how to paint something that can pass as representational. Often the result surprises me. The quote from Doig, reminds me of when I paint a watercolour from nature, the object, such as a flower, is changing while I work and I am inventing what is there, based on what was there when I started. Many plein air painters bring their painting inside and recall the scene and lighting from memory. la puissance eolienne lets us see how beautifully adaptable wind turbines are. In my

Fire Signals Announce the New Moon

imagined future, utilitarian, eco-friendly sources of alternative energy are beautiful objects that enhance rather than disrupt the natural environment. P’nai ha’Adama is also aspirational. The title is borrowed from geography and means “the


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surface of the earth”. The Dead Sea in the Negev Desert at 1,368 ft. below the surface of the earth; below sea level, is the lowest point on earth. Ezekiel’s prophesied (~652 BCE) that the sea will one day bloom and flourish and fish will be abundant.

If you are standing below sea level, doesn’t it make sense that water should come out of crevices? (see Mitachat P’nai ha’Adama and Beneath the Surface of the Earth) Early on, I exclusively used maps as collage


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Anthropocene on the Prairie

material to depict the Israeli landscape. I did not want to use photos that were not my own. I like to think of the early work as imaginative depictions in the same way that medieval artists depicted the Holy Land without having been there. In 2010, I took lots

of photos of the Machtesh Hagadol (Large Crater) in the Negev that became much used source material. Experiencing an erosion crater up close was a moving experience. (see Negev)


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We have particularly appreciated the way your artistic practice reflects such powerful synergy between traditional practice and sapient use of contemporary technology in order to manipulate your images: how do you consider the relationship between Tradition and

Contemporariness playing within your work as an artist? In particular, does your artistic research respond to a particular cultural moment? My reply has as much to do with process as


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US Reconsidered

content. I see my use of digitally manipulated

Herod the Great ~ 25–13 BCE) is home to the

imagery in alignment with the anachronistic

ruins of an aqueduct that brought water

situations created by my creative blending of

from Mount Carmel, southward along the

ancient settings with modern technological

coast. In my version of the aqueduct, arches

“advances”. The Roman port city of Caesarea,

are made of images of cell phones and the

(on Israel’s Mediterranean coastline, built by

water trough is lined with cell phone


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Pnai Hadama


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Tower of Babble

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keyboards, sending messages rather than water. I got the idea for this collage when walking alongside the aqueduct. Fragments of Roman stonework were amongst shattered remnants of cell phones. Our technological advances are not unlike those of which the Romans were so proud. I do not research a current event, as my responses to tragedies, for example, do not require research beyond finding appropriate images to copy and assemble. Sometimes one idea morphs into another that can add a layer of meaning and connection to a current event. For example, when sketching ideas for a recently completed collage; A Monument to the Age of Discovery in the Age of Reckoning I noticed that the outline resembled an empty pedestal; devoid of the monument. This led the way for a toppled Columbus statue while augmenting the concept. (see A Monument to the Age of Discovery in the Age of Reckoning) The Corners of Our Fields is rooted in a biblical commandment to not cut the corners of your fields when harvesting to allow for gleaners to partake of the harvest in a dignified way. The well known Jean-François Millet painting “The Gleaners” tells this story. This ancient edict is brought up to date by inserting solar panels into a biblical instruction. New York City based artist Lydia Dona once remarked that in order to make art today one has to reevaluate the conceptual language behind the mechanism of art making itself: do

you create your works gesturally, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes? As an artist particularly interested more in ideas than craft, how do you consider the relation between the nature of the concepts that you explore in your artistic research and the physical aspect of your daily practice as an artist? I am surprised and intrigued by this question (as I am by all your excellent questions) in that my work IS concerned with aesthetics and craft. I went to art school to study textiles as fine art. In those days (late 1970’s) there was a debate in the artworld if craft/textiles could be considered fine art and many textile artists were trying to make the case that craft is, indeed on equal footing with fine art. Minimalism was all the rage which lent craft some gravitas. Most of my recent work is based on scientific inquiry and I follow many Sci/Art groups on social media and attend symposia that bring artists and scientists together. Much of the work I see being made in this arena, focuses heavily on process; e.g; mould or bacteria grown on paper with no recombination of the results after that initial action. These artists leave aesthetic concerns aside when working with scientifically derived imagery. Similarly, in a collaboration between artists and scientists, the scientists never forego the scientific method when collaborating with an artist.


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When I have an idea, I make many sketches to discover the best way to convey the idea and then search for the images to incorporate into the collage. I have progressed beyond using maps as collage material. While I use digital technology to copy, print, and manipulate these images, the collage itself is made in a traditional method—cut with scissors and glued. I place design, composition, aesthetics, decoration, colour and beauty on an equal footing with the conceptual narratives I depict. It is apparent how training in textile design informs my work, for one example, my repetitive and dense use of multiple surface patterns. We can recognize subtle still effective sociopolitical criticism in your artworks. In particular, humour plays an important role in your artistic production, and allows you to focus on human behaviour and our overdependence on technology: do you think that artists can raise awareness to an evergrowing audience on topical issues — as ecological issues and pervasiveness of technology — that affect our globalised and everchanging society? You asked a “leading” question here. I consider my viewpoint, expressed with collage, as a statement of fact. By placing cellphones in an ancient setting, I am proclaiming that these seemingly disparate cultural items/icons exist side by side. Merely by intentionally placing images of divergent objects side by side I am commenting on the irony of a moment.

I comment on the pervasive nature of cell phone usage because I see it as a barrier to communication rather than improving our ability to convey information. en cherchant Pokemon sur la Promenade des Anglais illustrates the irony of the terror attack in Nice on Bastille Day, (July 14 2016) when a jihadi terrorist drove a truck onto the Promenade whilst those promenading were searching for Pokemon; all the rage that summer. You don’t know what I think about politically motivated terrorism, nor my opinion of gaming in augmented reality. You do know that I am interested in the proximity of these concurrent experiences. (see en Cherchant Pokemon sur la Promenade des Anglais) So often I see work that makes a statement but is too obvious. I prefer subtlety in art, when an attentive viewer notices a detail that a casual observer overlooks. Art that uses subtle context clues to subvert the status quo is more intelligent. The limitations placed on Soviet artists during the Soviet Republic, for example, are a creative use of imagery. I had hoped that Americans would adapt this practice when reacting to outrageous behaviour by Trump and was disappointed. My imaginary separation wall between Israel and the Occupied Territories, made of cell phones was made 3 months before Thomas Friedman (a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner who is a weekly columnist for The New York Times) wrote an op-ed in the New York


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A Tree in a Field

Times in which he discussed Israel’s erecting of a wall around the West Bank to prevent Palestinian suicide bombers from entering the country. As of 2010, there had been no successful attacks since 2006. Simultaneously,

there was a rise of the high-tech industry in Israel — which does a great deal of business digitally and over the Internet and is largely impervious to the day-to-day conflict — suggesting that even without peace, Israel can


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Tele Geo

enjoy a rising standard of living. Our ideas and conclusions are similar, having arrived

for example, on social media and it may take awhile for my critique to be realized by mainstream society. When I see an article that

from different vantage points. (see Telegeo) I can share a collage, about cell phone usage,

discusses our over-dependence on technology, I say to myself “duh dude, I made art about


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My collages about alternative energy; wind and solar power illustrate how these technologies can not only improve air quality, they also are beautiful additions to the landscape. The built environment does not have to be all bad. These mechanisms adorn the landscape and remind us of the benefit we derive from them. These compositions could be considered propoganda. (see la puissance and Growing Wind in Greenland) Your work has more than one story to tell: we daresay that your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appears to be seen, rather than its surface, providing the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. Austrian Art historian Ernst Gombrich once remarked the importance of providing a space for the viewers to project onto, so that they can actively participate in the creation of the illusion: how important is it for you to trigger the viewers' imagination in order to address them to elaborate personal interpretations? In particular, how open would you like your works to be understood?

that way back in 2010.” For sure, artists reflect what is going on around us and reflect it back to us, at least the artists I respect, who do that in an imaginative way.

I like to learn what a viewer sees in my work and prefer the exchange to be open-ended. When someone comes into my home or a gallery and says “what is it?” I ask them the same in return. My descriptive labels do not include everything that I thought about when making a collage. I tell you what inspired me in the first place but leave a lot open for new interpretations. Too often a wall text,


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describing a work of art, is more interesting than the work itself, or I do not see the connection the artist is attempting. I prefer to arrive at a conclusion via visual cues. Sometimes a scientist will tell me that I got the science wrong and I tell them that I don’t have to understand it in a straightforward way. The scientific concept is often a jumping off point. (see Garden of Quantum Delights) “How long did it take?” is number one on my list of least favourite questions. Another turnoff is a response only to the colours, then I know not to delve into the concept. Once, when an AirBnB guest was in my home studio, she realized for the first time that art can have meaning. She was so impressed by this discovery that she bought a giclee. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in several group exhibitions, and so far you have had 11 solos, too, including your latest show Tulipmania, at the Clinical Center at The National Institutes of Health in Bethesda in Maryland: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms — as Instagram — increases, how would this in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience? Presenting my work in a non-traditional gallery setting to expand the audience by bringing the work to viewers who are not in the habit of going to an art gallery. When my Tulipmania series was installed at NIH, the researchers who

Hortus Botanicus

saw it actually understood the scientific background. I appreciate exchanges between artist and scientist, especially when I am in the driver’s seat; showing scientists how artists can manipulate their data or discovery into something new and different. At present (during Covid 19 restrictions) my work has reached a much wider audience with inclusion in virtual exhibitions hosted


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by European galleries, including this opportunity. Since many exhibitions are virtual, anyone in the world can submit jpegs, with no concern for shipping costs, insurance and worry about safe handling. One of my collages is included in an exhibition about the anthropocene from a gallery in Warsaw, Poland. A venue in Scotland is presenting my work soon. I seem to be getting more

recognition from Europe these days and this is because of the pandemic. One thing I like about sharing my art on Instagram is the immediacy and ease of reaching a global audience. Among Us, about the insurrection at the US Capital on 6 January, can be seen instantly and without waiting for a call for artists’ response to the insurrection. I made a collage about September 11th a few


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days later. I knew there were curators looking for art about the tragic event, but we had no way to find each other. Now, thankfully, that collage is included in the online 9.11 memorial museum. (see 9.11.01) I can share a collage on the anniversary of an historic moment and gain a wider audience. Additionally, a benefit of Instagram is that an artist can get the attention of an important curator, critic or journalist simply by commenting on their post or sending a direct message. There are no gatekeepers. https://www.instagram.com/afineartiste) We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Anna. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? The foundation of a new series, in a production stage follows my recent collage and watercolor series about the Netherlands’ sixteenth century “Tulipomania.” A section of one of the collages was inspired by a Renaissance collector’s cabinet of curiosities. These cabinets of curiosities (often entire rooms) were the precursors to museums, and publishing images of their contents was thought to serve the cause of scientific advancement. (see Hortus Botanicus) In my Netherlandish work, I arranged images of seventeenth-century engravings of animals,

shells, and dinosaur skeletons in a fantastical array to create nonexistent animals. (see Hortus Botanicus) Seeing the result of this initial effort, has inspired me to make many more. For my project, digital copies of my watercolor paintings based on historic illustrations of animals and collectible relics of natural history that might have been included in a cabinet of curiosity will be used for collage material. Some watercolours will include collaged images of man-made parts used to strengthen or fill in missing pieces, to compensate for loss. (see Compensation for Loss) I will explore the best way to work with the exhibition space to present a contemporary version of a curio cabinet including experimentation with projected imagery onto a gallery wall. Many themes from previous work are combined in this project; the first solo show in a setting where I can use the space freely for a more creative installation. For some time I wanted to know how my work would be improved if the collage material was reproductions of images made by my hand, rather than downloaded off the internet. I am applying for funding for this exhibition and to participate in artist residencies, principally those in Europe and take this project back to its original location.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator landescape@europe.com


Compensation for Loss