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LandEscape A r t

R e v i e w

October 2014

CLARE PETHERICK JANA C. PEREZ MARINDA SCARAMANGA KAHORI KAMIYA GEETHA ALAGIRISAMY GOSIA MIELECH AGATA WISNIOWSKA FRANCES SCHANDERA-DUARTE From We Bleed The Same Color, Gosia Mielech Photo by Andrzej Hajdasz


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Summary

Our net review presents a selection of artists whose works shows the invisible connection betwen inner landscapes and actual places. Apart from stylistic differences and individual approaches to the art process, all of them share the vision that art is a slice of the world to be shared. An artwork doesn't communicate anything: it simply creates a mental space. Language, gestures, or rather a masterly brush-stroke of a painter are nothing but ways to invite us to explore our inner landscapes". Thirty years have passed since this Borgesean deep and at the same time provocative statement has been written by the fine Italian writer Giorgio Manganelli.

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I S S S U E

Agata Wisniowska (USA)

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" What could be a trivial scene for a passerby, acquires new meanings and interpretations once stilled in the frame. I aspire to challenge our connotations about everyday objects and surroundings by focusing on the abstract quality of scenes making them seem ethereal. "

S P E C I A L

Painted by Nature, detail

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Gosia Mielech

(Poland) " In contemporary art there are no rules, no boundaries, no taboo subjects, no limit's and no tool more powerful than imagination. The key is to learn how to really listen to yourself, then observe, to be bothered about questions which may appear and let them begin an inner discourse. "

Piken pĂĽ broen

Marinda Scaramanga

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(Monaco)

" Through colour, form, symbols, relationships, contrasts, I’m looking for the real meaning of the surrounding environment. I strongly believe in the philosophy of what our eyes see is only a small aspect of the universe. There are many universes, as many as our soul can create. Our senses are limited, soul is not. "

O c t o b e r

2 0 1 4

From the Cities series

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Frances Schandera-Duarte (Germany)

Schandera Duarte's work has an alluring quality in that it pulls the viewer closer to the painting in an attempt to gain as much information from the surface as possible. Curiosity often results in the need to gently touch the paintings surface.

Jana C. Perez (USA)

Tell me, what did you dream last night

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" A work of art is an image or object that engages the viewer on an emotional and intellectual level simultaneously. I call this an "ah-ha" moment. The viewer experiences an initial "gut" or emotional reaction, after which an inner dialogue of questions and/or narrative begin. "


Summary

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Kahori Kamiya

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( Japan / USA) O c t o b e r

" Contemporary Art exemplifies the ongoing moment of each era. It reflects pretty much everything what’s going on “now”. I take this personally by observing everyday events, news, and trends in terms of how people are affected from them. " € € from Job Interview

Geetha Alagirisamy (United Kingdom / Switzerland)

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Duplicity

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2 0 1 4

When an artwork lingers with me in my thoughts, due to its physical aesthetics or in instigating an internal discussion about its expressive meaning, that piece of work has interacted with me at some level and made an impression.

Clare Petherick (United Kingdom)

Mixed Metaphors

Thomas S. Ladd (USA)

The camera has lead me to understand that the surface of things are endlessly beautiful; that slow and careful observations of the external world will lead one to deep introspection; that the tension between the photograph and the ‘real’ world will never cease to engage peoples’ imagination; that photography is a form of thinking; that, nothing is ever what it seems to be; and that, one’s intentions

Submit your artworks to http://landescapeart.yolasite.com/how-to-submit.php

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I S S S U E

Los Paramos

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S P E C I A L

My work is based on human emotion, subtle shifts from one mood to another represented mainly through landscape. I work in series and a project can take up to a year to complete. As a drawing based artist I like to use simple materials such as paper, graphite, and water based crayons. I push these materials to their limit by continually inventing new ways of working.


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Agata Wiśniowska (Poland / USA)

An artist’s statement

I like to capture art in nature and surprising compositions in everyday life. Taken out of the context, the reality becomes abstract and not straightforward to interpret. What could be a trivial scene for a passerby, acquires new meanings and interpretations once stilled in the frame. I aspire to challenge our connotations about everyday objects and surroundings by focusing on the abstract quality of scenes making them seem ethereal. I left my home country – Poland – to study at MIT, first Physics and then Medical Engineering in grad school. I don’t have any formal training in photography but I’ve liked going around with my camera for a while. I started exhibiting fairly recently and had quite a success getting my work into many juried exhibitions throughout the US.

Agata Wiśniowska #196 Winter 4


Anonymous, Photo Adam Ciereszko 2


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Agata Wiśniowska

An interview with

Agata Wiśniowska Hello Agata and a warm welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artwork as a piece of Contemporary Art?

Hello and thank you for including me in the Art Review. I think that a work of art has a very broad definition and it’s hard to draw a line between what is art and what isn’t; but I do think that we should be able to relate to art in some way and have an emotional response to it. The work of art can make us feel curious, it can make us think about some specific event or just about what it is that is represented in the piece of art, but if the artwork disgusts us, that’s fine too.

an I agree interview with the generally withaccepted definition of contemporary artwork as produced in 1940s or later; how would I identify it? Well, to me it looks like contemporary art if the piece addresses social or political issues that were important in the second half of the twentieth century or later, or if the piece introduces a new idea never used before in art, or builds upon previous work but is innovative in a substantial way. Would you like to tell us something about your background? As a photographer, you are basically self trained, but I think it's important to mention that you have studied Physics and Medical Engineering at the prestigiuos MIT: how has this experience -an extraordinary experience, I guess- impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity: what's your point?

Agata Wiśniowska

I come from Poland; as you say I graduated from 6


Agata Wiśniowska MIT with a Physics degree and currently I’m a graduate student in Medical Engineering, also at MIT. Has this experience impacted the way I go about photography? Yes. Do I know how? Well, not necessarily. I guess the overall experience at MIT has made me more determined to do what I enjoy and want to do, because it’s hard to do something that you don’t thoroughly enjoy doing. Would formal training stifle artistic creativity? Well… learning different techniques and approaches to difficult situations, like sharp sunlight or photographing fast moving objects, is definitely very useful. For example, after reading The Photographer’s Eye by Michael Freeman, my framing and composition got significantly better. I didn’t try to replicate the photographs in the book, but I found I paid more attention to the ideas that I read about and my photographs started to look better. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

These days one technical aspect that I focus on most in my photographs is composition. As far as planning goes, the majority of my photographs have been spontaneous — when I have a day off I choose a location (often some sort of state forest) take my dog and my camera (and some nuts) and spend a day there hiking, playing fetch, and taking pictures. The subject of my photographs is determined by what I see where I go and what catches my eye. Sometimes I plan to go at dawn and I’m rewarded with a misty abstract-looking horizon (Division), sometimes I don’t choose the time of the day or look at the weather forecast and I’m left with nothing or only a couple of photographs that I’m proud of (Flora for example was captured on a gloomy day and was the only photograph that day that I was happy with). Marinda Scaramanga

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Agata Wiśniowska

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Other times I see a moment that I want to catch: it can be that the surface of a lake rippled just so creating an interesting pattern, or it can be the way my dog looked while chasing after a tennis ball, then I can spend a while — sometimes hours — waiting with my camera ready to capture the moment when it repeats. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. Head in Water originated that way: I loved the way my dog, Driada, pulls herself up in water to spot her tennis ball on the water surface in front of her, so I kept throwing the tennis ball out on the lake trying to capture this exact moment, and… it worked! Longer series of photographs tend to take more planning and preparation. I’ve been planning one particular series for a while now, in which I hope to capture different positions in which my dog rests. To accomplish this, I plan to attach my camera to the ceiling above my dog’s favorite bedding and leave it there as long as necessary without repositioning or moving my camera so as to have the exact same frame. As you can imagine, projects like this one tend to take much longer than a single day. Now let's focus on your artisitc production: I would start from Painted by Nature and Tree Abstraction that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest our readers to visit your website directly at http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/agatawisniowska.html?tab=artwork in order to get a wider idea of your artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these works? What was your initial inspiration?

Tree Impression

like illusion in Painted by Nature, Tree Abstraction and Tree Impression. Maybe it’s just me but it almost feels as if water spent hours painting elaborate patterns with careful brush strokes in these photographs. The reflections that day were truly remarkable; apart from the brush-stroke-like feeling, I also profoundly enjoyed the surreal feel in some of the photographs that day. Ray, for example, depicts a lone ray of light falling just at the edge of a submerged rock that almost makes the rock appear to be floating above the water surface. Another example of surreal look – Siamese – shows the reflection of a twig taken out of context so much so that the reflection seems otherworldly. #196 Winter

These photographs were taken at Ashland State Park, MA in the early spring. I went for the usual stroll with my dog around the Ashland reservoir and was fascinated by tree reflections. I don’t know if it was the time of the day (close to dusk), the spring-like colors, or my mood, but the reflections reminded me of impressionist paintings. I tried to preserve the impressionistTree Abstraction 8


Agata Wiśniowska

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Agata Wiśniowska

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an interview with

Spotlight

Abstract Flower

As you have remarked, in this series you explore how light adds an abstract quality to various surroundings: I would go as far as to state that you have created such a bridge between the inner real feature of an image and the abstract feeling that comes from human manipulation and I think that this brings a new level of significance to the surroundings on which you focus the viewers' attention... one of the features that has mostly impacted on me of this project is the way you have been capable of recontextualizing the idea of environment itself... I'm sort of convinced that some

information & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your opinion about this? I would like to focus my reply on hidden or encrypted meanings of our surroundings. Specifically, I would like to describe two photographs that I’m particularly fond of because they, to me, appear to be something other than they are. Abstract flower seems to be 10


Agata Wiśniowska

Abstract Flower

an upstretched fist with dark fingernails reaching up to the sky, when in reality it was, as the title suggests, an exotic flower at night. Another photograph that makes me think of something it is not is Spotlight: looking at it I imagine a spotlight on a theater stage behind a curtain of sparkling beads waiting for the beads to part and an actor to step into the light, when the circumstances of this shot were much more

mundane. Spotlight was taken on a train through a not-so-clean window, which managed to inflect the mid-morning sunlight. I am always curious to hear what others see in my photographs — I believe that a photograph is merely a starting point and the true meaning of it forms within our imagination, differently and uniquely for every one of us. 11


Agata Wiśniowska

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Water Drops Also your abstract series is far from being an abstract work tout-court and it's strictly connected what we use to define real world... I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience from real world is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process, both for creating a work of Art as well as for enjoying it... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

realize right away what they are looking at: the colors fit together, and the three big blobs of brown, dirty yellow, and brown slowly coalesce into dog paws holding a much-loved tennis ball. Water drops is another example where experience tells us that something is wrong; water doesn’t normally behave this way unless it’s rainy but the sea surface looks placid. It is the experience we have about the world we live in that makes us wonder how this picture was taken. But, in reality, Water drops captures a splash of water in the wake of a motorboat.

As you say, I like to stay close to the real world in my photography but I do enjoy adding an abstract touch to reality or showing a known object in an unexpected way making the viewer think just a little bit. People tend to look at Got it and not always

Hard winter and Motion are another two photographs that are largely interesting because of our expectations derived from #196 Winter

Tree Abstraction 12


Agata Wiśniowska

Tree Impression

Motion

experience. In Hard winter we see skis and expect to see snow as well, but there is grass instead. This photograph was taken on a ski trip when the slopes under ski lifts were grassy and only thin patches of artificial snow allowed for skiing. Motion shows a tire affixed to a wooden pole with jar covers attached to the tire. Ordinary everyday objects really, but put together in a curious ensemble. Our experience is what motivates us to question the sanity of such an endeavor. We see tires in cars or bikes, jar covers in the kitchen or around the house, but the two don’t usually mingle. It turns out that this machinery acted as an innovative straw man scaring birds off the crops in southern Poland.

Hard Winter

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Agata Wiśniowska

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an interview with

Come In myself, I have to say that I have highly appreciated the deep synergy that your works reveal between Art and the imagery of everyday Technology, as in the recent Come in and Key Reflection: as in most of your pieces, you have focused on the abstract quality of a daily situation making it seem ethereal...

Is personal experience indispensable for enjoying artwork? No, but it often allows to more fully interact with pieces of art. Could the creative process be disconnected from direct experience? In my case absolutely not, photography is by default strongly connected to direct experience. What you see in my photography had to first appear in front of my eyes and as such is an integral part of my experience of the world.

Thank you for your praise. Come in and Key Reflection were both taken at home in Poland the day before Christmas Eve. Why do I remember this

Maybe because I have a scientific background 14


Agata Wiśniowska

Rose Still Life

I have highly appreciated the way your multidisciplinary approach to the manipulation of the images leads to going beyond the apparent dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness and I'm sort of convinced that new media art will definitely fill the dichotomy between art and technology and I will dare to say that Art and Technology are going to assimilate one to each other... what's your point about this?

I use Lightroom to make basic edits to my images: cropping, color adjustment, black and white scale. In my experience it’s easy to overdo the edits and the photograph stops looking natural, so I try to avoid excess editing. I think that art and technology can work well together and complement each other; and for every artist there is a sweet spot balancing the two. Some of the digital art out there is fantastic; so I say if technology makes art better, why not use it?

Key Reflection

so well? Because I can’t help but remember that while trying to do justice to these key reflections, my mother kept asking me when am I going to finally vacuum the house (my usual chore before Christmas) and my reply (in an annoyed tone of voice, I’m sure) was that the sun will set if I go now and to wait a moment longer. I enjoy the detectivestory quality of these two photographs and I wonder how it is that an ordinary bathroom door could build up such suspense.

So far your works have been exhibited on several occasions: it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable 15


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Agata Wiśniowska

of supporting an artist I sometimes happen to wonder if an award -or better, the expectation of positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

I always welcome constructive feedback. It especially helps me to hear others’ interpretations of my photographs because it’s interesting to re-discover your own work through the eyes of another. Whenever I’m invited to an exhibition I feel a jolt of excitement, which I think is needed. From my short experience, I feel that the world of art is not an easy one to thrive in and the instances of positive feedback are helpful and encouraging. It might sound mean but I try not to have my audience in mind when I take pictures. I think it’s a common trap to try and deliver what we know people have liked in the past, but I would much rather be stimulated by my surroundings wherever I go, than by the expectations of my audience. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Agata: my last question deals with your future plans... what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Thank you for including me in the Art Review. I very recently completed a short series on Crane’s Beach, MA and I would like to share a couple of its photographs with your readers.

Head In Water

First off, I was fascinated by sand erosion marks that created interesting alien-looking patterns. Silhouette is a take on the theme: sand patterns are evident but so is the dark form looming above them. I found an abandoned rose and the gusts of wind swirled my dress yielding a wistful Rose still life. I’m particularly fond of this photograph as it reminds of a Polish patriotic Tree Abstraction

song where a young wife sends her husband off to war and promises to give him a rose when he comes safely back to her. I plan two long-term projects and both of them involve my dog: one is to capture my dog in the #196 Winter 16


Agata Wiśniowska

Tree Impression

Motion

multitude of her natural resting positions; in the other I aspire to capture my dog’s expressions in all her daily activities.

hope to be stimulated by my environment — and who knows what will come out of it? an interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator

I envision that these projects might take years to complete, but in the meantime I certainly

landescape@artlover.com

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Gosia Mielech (Poland) An artist’s statement

My name is Malgorzata Mielech. I am a freelance artist based in Poland. I am a dancer, teacher, creator and a researcher involved with DanceLab. Coming from a Ballet background, I graduated from Olga Slawska-Lipczynska Ballet School (2007). In the years 2007-2012 I was a soloist in the Polish Dance Theatre and had the pleasure to collaborate with many supreme choreographers and directors, what gave me a various amount of artistic tools and creative incentives. I was dancing in the whole repertoire of Polish Dance Theatre and working with many choreographers including in particular: Ohad Naharin, Yossi Berg, Jacek Przybyłowicz , Gunhild Bjoernsgaard, Susanne Jaresand, Ewa Wycichowska and many others. Now I am co-founder of DanceLab, an independent dance company and co-creator of choreography and other artistic projects for the group. The Premiere of “ Sababa” (chor. M. Mielech, Z. Jakubiec) and “ We bleed the same color” (chor. Shi Pratt) happened in June 2013 at the Polish Theatre in Poznań. I also co-created a multidimensional artistic project called DanceLabirynth as well as „Nilreb”- a piece to sum up DanceLab’s residency in Berlin. I have toured with performances from DanceLab’s repertory in (Berlin, Jena, Jerusalem, Wroclaw, Krakow, Poznan), taking artistic residencies (Berlin – Uferstudios) and developing my dance skills by participating in various dance projects, festivals and numerous dance workshops . While being a freelance choreographer and dancer I created and performed a solo piece “Sacre”, directed by Krzysztof Raczkowski, on the 10th Poznań Ballet Spring in the Grand Theatre in Poznan. My latest solo piece called Anonymous had a premier in Poznan, Poland in June 2014. It’s a performance that connects dance, street art, original electronic live music and mapping.

Gosia Mielech #196 Winter 18


Anonymous, Photo Adam Ciereszko 2


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Gosia Mielech

An interview with

Gosia Mielech Hello Gosia, and welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

In contemporary art there are no rules, no boundaries, no taboo subjects, no limit's and no tool more powerful than imagination. The key is to learn how to really listen to yourself, then observe, to be bothered about questions which may appear and let them begin an inner discourse. For me persoan with nally interview any creation ought to have a meaning, a micro or a mini mission to fulfil, in order to be called an art piece. Contemporary Art surrounds us from all around, it invigorates our senses, broadens our horizons and creates, for us, a perception of reality. It is a challenging responsibility to carry, for any Artist to satisfy the viewer’s deep hunger. For me personally a work of art needs to have an individual impact on a viewer, it has to DO something. It is not about seeking dramatic solutions or finding simple answers. It’s about being honest, searching and available.

Gosia Mielech in Anonymous (Photo Adam Ciereszko

mensity of inspirations that Artist's can confront their ultra contemporary approach with.

I wouldn’t say that there’s a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness, I am more inclined to say that they interpenetrate. By acknowledging the past with all its burdens, superstitions and an overwhelming tradition, Artist's can only gain creative incentives. Tradition is immortal, stable and entwined with dailiness. It would be a shame to deny the tradition, an im-

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training and in 2007 you graduated from Olga Slawska-Lipczynska Ballet School: moreover, I think it's important to remark that this wasn't your first experience with dance and that before graduating you already started a career in Ballet... 20


Gosia Mielech

turned out to leave strong technical fundamentals in the body and habits that I was able to confront in the later years, by focusing on improvisation and seeking for different values and qualities of movement in dance. Improvisation opened up a totally new chapter in my life. Dance wasn’t about perfect figures, symmetrical excellence and partly numb body anymore. I started focusing on imagination and more importantly, I started to really listen to my body instead of telling it what to do. From that moment on, I was more careful and conscious about the reality that surrounds me. During my years of dancing in the Polish Dance Theatre, I was able to turn theory into practice by combining my movement research and collaborating with many sublime choreographers. Another mile-stone on my dance self-education route was discovering GaGa language. After several visits to Israel, where GaGa originates from, I became entirely inspired by this movement philosophy, which is created by Ohad Naharin. “There are many things in it: the importance of yielding and the collapse of delicacy, connecting effort to pleasure, working without mirrors, being aware of our explosive power and sometimes using it. Being calm and alert at once.” – Ohad Naharin. Discovering GaGa triggered me to look for more joy, freedom, courage, self- acceptance and to focus on my personal body language. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

How have these different experiences impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently create your dance?

The process of creating a new piece starts long before I enter a dance studio. The beginnings are very blurry, I usually have some scattered images in my head and a general idea of the piece. Then I start my research, I look for inspiration's, mostly focusing on various visual stimulus, which has the strongest impact on me.

Obviously, ballet technique has strongly influenced the beginning of my professional career. Simultaneously I was training in contemporary dance, as well as other dance techniques, that from the earliest years gave me a wide spectrum of dance education. The fascination and dedication to ballet 21


Gosia Mielech

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From We Bleed The Same Color, Photo by Andrzej Hajdasz

The piece explores the differences and similarities of how we understand and experience situations in relation to each other - how we take in our environments, social encounters, emotions and the underlying meaning of the experiences we have. This human experience is shaped by the way our senses and emotions are interpreted in the brain. One of the phenomenons that shape our experience are the mirror neurons. These mirror cells fire up when watching the movements of another living being, as if practising to move the same way as the body we are watching. Their importance is in social interactions and are in the parts of the brain involved in meaning, control and emotions. The mirror cells correlate with closeness and intimacy between individuals. In the piece we play with arousing and disrupting connection and intimacy to highlight the ways in which we form social connections. #196 Winter 22


Gosia Mielech

I see an image, a piece of street art hidden inside a scruffy gate in the middle of a busy, soulless, hectic street and I get absolutely captivated. Even when I come to a rehearsal with a fixed plan, I never know what will come out of it, because I deal with a very sensitive matter, which is my mind. I often connect to my feelings and memories and I am mixing it with my abstractive fantasy world. After a few weeks of more theoretical research I am able to lock myself in the studio. Creating choreographic material is based on different improvisation tasks, it’s an ongoing experiment. It is a unique, beautiful and very challenging time. In a way I am starting a new chapter of my life. I am also facing my demons –I get frustrated, insecure, I fight not to be too judgmental or overly ambitious. It may easily destroy spontaneity, joy and roughness that I appreciate so much. Music is equivalent to dance in my opinion, so I spend a lot of time either discussing thoughts with dj’s, producers and musicians or completing a soundtrack myself. The entire process of creating a dance piece; mastering the technical aspects of it and working on both the dramaturgic and energetic cohesion of the piece as well as bringing together all the other artistic elements (costumes, scenography, lighting) takes few months. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from your extremely interesting work entitled We Bleed The Same Color that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article: I would suggest our readers to visit your website directly at http://www.dancelab.eu/en/content/we-bleedsame-color in order to get a wider idea of it as well as of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this piece? What was your initial inspiration?

We Bleed The Same Color Choreography: Shi Pratt Dancers: Malgorzata Mielech and Zofia Jakubiec Light design: Kyrre Heldal Karlsen Costumes: Shi Pratt and DanceLab

Shi Pratt’s (choreographer of the piece) initial inspiration was a social interaction, closeness and intimacy between individuals. The creative process

Music: Collage Duration: 30min 23


Gosia Mielech

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an interview with

From We Bleed The Same Color, Photo by Adam Ciereszko

was truly interesting. We were given very detailed, surprising tasks, that we individually or jointly were dealing with.

hours in total silence, she saw us struggling, being stuck in one spot, failing but all the time progressing and learning about one another.

For instance, Shi gave us a map of a sewage system in New York – we were supposed to choose one of the routes for ourselves and then transform these paths into movements, making a duet with another dancer who picked a different route. So we were faced with a goal; we had to find a connection between a very real thing: a New York’s sewage system map and our interpretation of it in conjunction with a partner. Shi was watching us for

An other example in the performance: there is a scene called ‘hunt’. It is a very intimate and yet quite strong in meaning, part of the piece. It is about changing stories and shifting between extreme emotions. One time you’re yielding, then you’re attacking. It's a sweet and bitter game. Basically Shi was leading us through movement and a mental rollercoaster and pushing us to 24


Gosia Mielech

From We Bleed The Same Color, Photo by Maciej Zakrzewski

perfect symbiosis that you have been capable of establishing between the harmony of the movement and a skillful usage of light, which creates such a parallel dimension to our perception process... This has reminded me the well known Picasso's quote "Everything you can imagine is real" I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience from real world is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

experiment with our limitations. We Bleed The Same Color creates a hermetic, isolated reality in which we play different parts; we hunt, seduce, protect, dominate and dream. In the piece we play with arousing, disrupting connection and€intimacy to highlight the ways in which we form social connections. As you have remarked, We Bleed The Same Color explores the differences and similarities of how we understand and experience situations in relation to each other and what has mostly impacted on me of this wonderful piece if the

I would rather say that personal experience from 25


Gosia Mielech

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From Anonymous, Concept / performance: Gosia Mielech, Live music Anna Suda, Mapping Olga Warabida Photo by Andrzej Hajdasz

the real world is an inescapable and natural part of a creative process. Experiences are shaping our personality and understanding of the world. I think that the creative process could be disconnected from a direct experience, however Artist needs to have something to relate to, not necessarily something tangible. It can be an abstract image, story or adventure, but substantial enough to visualize. As long as we can imagine something. Then it exists in our mind. We are able to connect to it, reflect on it and make it real for ourselves. The power of imagination is crucial in every creati-

ve process. So the more connected, to the fantasy elements within us, we are, the more creative we become. Every experience enriches us as a human being. We learn and mature through discovering life. Multidisciplinarity and experimentation are a recurrent and very important features of your dance practice: for example, Anonymous which recently had a premier in Poznan it's a stimulating performance that connects dance, street art, original electronic live music and mapping... while crossing the borders of different #196 Winter 26


Gosia Mielech

From Anonymous, Concept / performance: Gosia Mielech, Live music Anna Suda, Mapping Olga Warabida Photo by Maciej Zakrzewski artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

create a multilayered piece of art, that has no artistic, nor cultural boundaries. However, it is possible to make an evenly powerful statement by using less elements. There is a very strong message in simplicity and monism. Sometimes the piece is mainly focused on physicality, roughness, naturalistic dance, which cannot be distracted by fancy lighting, costume or even sound. Everything depends on what the artist is trying to say, how he can express that and keep the cohesion within the performance.

I would be more inclined to say, that synergy definitely helps to achieve some results, but it’s not the only way to do so. By integrating different fields of art, we can enlarge the impact on the viewer and deliver a fuller picture. It is also a chance to present the spectator with a form of art that was unfamiliar to him until now. It gives us unlimited potential and thanks to this, we can 27


Gosia Mielech

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an interview with

From Sababa, Choreography and dancers: Małgorzata Mielech & Zofia Jakubiec, Costumes, Lighting: DanceLab,

A feature of the stimulating Sababa that I have appreciated is the way you force the viewers to a deep intellectual interaction and involvement, communicating a wide variety of states of mind: forcing the viewer to explorate and in a certain sense to challenge the usual way we perceive the space... I would go as far as to state that this work, rather than simply describing something, pose us questions: and in a certain sense forces us to meditate to the way we perceive not only the outside world, but our inner one...

culture of material achievement, power and superficiality. There is seldom a place left in life for deeper contemplation, pursuit of peace and balance. It is a pure luxury being able to appreciate the reality and listen intently to yourself. Sababa is all about sharing and rediscovering inner perception. Sababa is a dance piece, that illustrates Zofia and my (co- creator of the piece) overwhelming fascination with dance, freedom and commendation of Israeli culture. It presents a sine wave of people’s emotions. The viewer can either relate to

We live in a society that cultivates speed, greed, a 28


Gosia Mielech

Music: Collage, Duration: 25 mins, Photo Maciej Zakrzewski

it, or just observe. As you correctly noticed we are not trying to describe anything, or ask questions. We simply reveal a piece of our inner, abstract world. We are inviting the audience to enter a non verbal dialogue,€ from which the spectator takes whatever he or she wishes and builds a fantasy story. The piece does evoke emotions, usually brings positive thoughts and leaves the audience uplifted. People often compare Sababa to their favourite video clip or a mood busting, refreshing song that they can listen to over and over again. Every time we perform that piece I leave the stage

feeling overwhelmed by the enthusiastic feedback and honest satisfaction. There is nothing more awarding than touching other people’s emotions by taking them on a journey. I think it's important to mention that you are the co-founder of co-founder of DanceLab, an independent dance company and co-creator of choreography and other artistic projects for the group: dance is intrinsically a collaborative practice and I do believe that interdisciplinary collaboration today is an ever growing force in 29


Gosia Mielech

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Gosia Mielech, Photo by Adam Ciereszko

Gosia Mielech, Photo by Adam Ciereszko

Art and that that most exciting things happen when creative minds from different fields of practice meet and collaborate on a project... could you tell us something about these effective synergies? By the way, the artist Peter Tabor once said that "collaboration is working together with another to create something as a synthesis of two practices, that alone one could not": what's your point about this? Can you explain how your work demonstrates communication between several artists?

situated on a busy street in Poznan. The main inspiration for Anonymous is street art. It was a perfect opportunity to create, despite the fact that I was surrounded by people and street life, but most of all being constantly exposed to everyone. It was a unique experience. Usually beginning a creative process is a very personal time. In dance it is never overly interesting for an accidental viewer, it is all about endless repetitions, brain work, not much about dancing. It was extremely challenging to stick to my slow, careful research instead of letting my ambition win and dance my heart out while people were stopping to stare at me. In this case, it wasn't about any direct collaboration with an other artist, it was a more blanket experience. I was taking in from the surrounding street life, while being inside it.

As long as you keep your integrity and you are open to other influences you can only benefit from any creative collaboration. I take great inspiration from that. Sometimes, leaving your comfort zone, your studio, where without any distractions you can develop your project in an intimate atmosphere, can be very beneficial. I discovered that, while working on the Anonymous performance, I was switching rehearsal spaces. The creative process was literally happening all the time, in various venues. One of them was an art gallery, which exhibits beautiful photographs by a renowned polish photographer, Szymon Brodziak, who specializes in black and white pictures, capturing women’s beauty. The gallery looks like a fish tank, it is a rectangular, mostly glazed space, which is

I often look for unusual ways to intermingle with other Artists, it's always incredibly interesting to find out how people from different art fields are taking my ideas and filtering it through their understanding. DanceLabirynth is a platform of creative exchange, originally founded by DanceLab. It is impossible to assign it to any definite area of modern art, #196 Winter 30


Gosia Mielech

Gosia Mielech, Photo by Adam Ciereszko

because Labirynth is a form, free of the traditional framework and limitations, that theatre has. It’s a meeting of artist's from various areas of art, who are mutually inspired by each other’s work and are either entering a dialogue or consciously denying any interaction. DanceLabirynth was created by an overwhelming desire to share with a spectator, the creativity of unique artists, who are coming from different areas of art.

that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

So far your works have been exhibited in several important occasions and it goes without saying

When I was wondering if there is a possibility of a genuine relation between art and business, my first 31


Gosia Mielech

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From Anonymous, Photo by Maciej Zakrzewski

From Anonymous, Photo by Maciej Zakrzewski

answer was: no, there isn't. But then I thought, often, when art and business meet, great things can happen. It usually introduces art to a wider range of people and allows artists to create without an interview with a constant financial struggle. It also brings colour to business.

about mutual sympathy, I want to take them on a journey and evoke reflections. It doesn’t matter if they are an educated contemporary dance enthusiasts or just a random person. The spectator is my companion, someone I care about. I take him on a journey, talk to him, share feelings, build trust, however I’m always going to be a separate individual, no matter how much we’ve been through together. Art for me is about sharing the magic, creating a “parallel universe” in which the viewer can dream and live the experience. Its roots were still firmly set in the root of the social world.

I guess, if you’re creating a piece for a special request, then you are obliged to deliver ‘the product’ and agree on some compromises along the way. Does it mean that this artistic creation can’t be perceived as a piece of art anymore? The answer is: of course it can. It is still art. The unquestionable fact is that the Artist, in order to be able to exist and to produce new creative material, has to have a financial input. That’s where business comes in. Art and business don’t have to exclude each other as long as artists keep creative freedom and the Artist doesn't end up being forced to sign a contract with the devil, whereby they become limited and censored.

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Gosia. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Thank you for asking me all these intriguing questions. They were quite personal and challenging – I enjoyed this interview a lot.

To answer your first question: I respect my audience a lot, so when I build a performance I think about how certain aspects of it will influence them, but I don’t wonder whether they will like it or not. It’s not

I have a very exciting time ahead of me. I will be involved in a variety of interesting collaborations and performing my own dance pieces nationally 32


Gosia Mielech

From Anonymous, Concept / performance: Gosia Mielech, Live music Anna Suda, Mapping Olga Warabida Photo by Maciej Zakrzewski

and internationally. I will be creating a couple of projects in Poznań, Cultural Center Zamek (an interdisciplinary institution presenting the most interesting pheno-mena of contemporary culture, such areas as visual arts, theatre, film, music and literature).

I will be performing ‘Anonymous’ project in London (The Place) from 4th until 8thof November. I would love to invite all our readers to join me there.

I will be involved in Arbor Cosmica; Andrzej Panufnik's jubilee and ‘My Music’ project. I will also participate in a research project with Isabelle Schad (Berlin based choreographer) in Old Brewery, New Dance.

an interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator landescape@artlover.com

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Marinda Scaramanga (France)

An artist’s statement

"Art links our essence with our physical being. Whatever I express through my work – ideas, memories, emotions, feelings – is created according to my own personal dynamic way of using the camera & my brushes. Through colour, form, symbols, relationships, contrasts, I’m looking for the real meaning of the surrounding environment. I strongly believe in the philosophy of what our eyes see is only a small aspect of the universe. There are many universes, as many as our soul can create. Our senses are limited, soul is not. The knowledge of the soul admittedly contributes greatly to the advance of truth in general, and, above all, to our understanding of Nature, for the soul is in some sense the principle of animal life, according to Aristotle. I like to escape of what we regularly name “reality”. I travail with my mind, exploring the unlimited potential of intelligence, observe the world beyond the obvious & use Art as a tool to depict my findings. My aim is to motivate people to confront life through a different perspective. Let life imitate Art, as an approach to our psyche."

Marinda Scaramanga

Behind this initiative is the Artist-Restorer Marinda Scaramanga. Born in Athens, she has been passionate with art ever since childhood. She studied Conservation-Restoration of Antiquities Works of Art at the University of Athens and at the MST -University of Paris 1 Sorbonne-Pantheon in Paris. Her Masters Degree is on Cultural Management & Communication and today she is PhD Candidate in Place Branding & Culture in France. She works with a large variation of techniques and lots of materials. She has been exhibiting since 2004 in many prestigious cultural establishments around the world. Scaramanga has never been an artist who paints exclusively; her background is also that of a marketing manager for cultural projects, account manager for corporate events, technical purchaser in shipping and all these layers are clearly visible in her work. TheFineArtLab is a creative initiative based at the Principality of Monaco & works in collaboration with the Monegasque National Committee of Visual Arts to UNESCO . #196 Winter 34


«€Warm afternoon- Warm people€» 60x60cm Mixed media€: photo and acrylics on paper Anonymous, Photo Adam Ciereszko 2


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Marinda Scaramanga

An interview with

Marinda Scaramanga

Hello Marinda, and a warm welcome toLandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way,€ what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artwork as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a€ dichotomy€ between tradition and contemporariness?

Hi there! Thank you for having me in LandEscape. It is a pleasure having this interview with you guys. Regarding your question about the definition of

an interview an artwork, I perceivewith it more like a product of a structured intellectual process. Unlike sciences like philosophy or maths and products of the same kind of process, artists use their hand skills to express their ideas through transforming material they dispose. Artists depict thoughts & ideas which reflect how they experience the environment where they live in. Moreover, art mirrors culture and society. Consequently Contemporary Art reflects current life’s elements. Every period in history has its own essentials, from which artists are inspired by using a characteristic material to express thoughts and emotions. Existing technology is used for this purpose showing the connection between art and society. In ancient Greece for instance, they were using marble for sculpture and architecture. Studies have shown - and it by now is obvious that back then, artists we had already attained the knowledge of the physical characteristics of the material, the selection of the stone, the tools and the knowhow of carving it into a magnificent 36


Marinda Scaramanga

artwork. Those artworks have been created with the use of the existing tools that technology provides, aiming to depict society’s values & ideas. Contemporary art is globally influenced and culturally diverse, surrounded by a technologically advancing world, where artists give voice to the varied and changing cultural landscape of identity, values, and beliefs. It is the continuity of all the art movements before our times. It is a sequence of the previous events happened in the history. Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training and after studying Conservation-Restoration of Antiquities Works of Art at the University of Athens and at the MST -University of Paris 1 Sorbonne-Pantheon in Paris you€ have started to pursuing a PhD in Place Branding & Culture in France€ ... How€ have these different experiences impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks?

My bachelors on Conservation-Restoration of Antiquities provided me with concrete knowledge on technology of material & history of art. I have received significant training on manufacturing techniques of several types of artworks like mosaic, vitrail, sculpture, painting and more. The most important advantage was that through the process I developed a high sensibility and appreciation on art. I realised that every art object is unique and reflects the culture of its times. In Paris, I had free access to a great source of original masterpieces. The direct contact to with these treasures has affected and formed my personality. I discovered techniques, feelings and realized the social impact of each historic movement. Regarding my PhD research, I came up with the idea during the time I was living in Paris: What it would happen on the image of place,€ in case culture was communicated as a principal element of its identity. Marinda Scaramanga

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Marinda Scaramanga

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«€From The Top€», 91x60cm Mixed media€: photo and acrylics on paper

I’m based on the principal of place branding: “the practice of applying brand strategy and other marketing techniques and disciplines to the economic, social, political and cultural development of cities, regions and countries”. My research is on the cultural aspect of this multidisciplinary field. Between my bachelors and PhD, I attended a Master 2 at the University Paul Cezanne in Aixen-Provence on Cultural Management. This was the stepping stone for my next moves in my professional life.

All these experiences, have given me the opportunity to meet with many people from different backgrounds, cultures & professions who introduced me to diverse ways of thinking and broadened my horizons. In any case, "ipsa scientia potestas est" and it helps to reduce fear. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on #196 Winter 38


Marinda Scaramanga

«€VeloCity€», 48x33cm Mixed media€: photo and acrylics on paper your work? And how much preparation€ and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?€

My creative process is like dance choreography: there is movement, time and space. Imagine a photographer travelling around the world taking pictures. This is the starting point of the creative process. Once back to the workshop, the material is evaluated and archived. Afterwards the selected ones are edited and send out for printing. I’m only using high quality photographic paper in order to assure the resistance in time and on colours. This stage is where a photo is transformed into a painting: the choreography is now culminated. I’m using several types of

The inspiration my signature technique came when I was working as an art restorer at the Benaki Museum in Athens: we were restoring a collection of old photos. Initially black & white, their surface was coloured to reveal the realistic ambiance of the subject. Considering that as a my starting point, I began imagining how the unseen reveals from a landscape would have looked like.

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an interview with

«€Paris in Las Vegas€», 60x45cm, Mixed media€: photo and acrylics on paper, private collection pages of this article: and I would suggest to visit your website directly at€http://thefineartlab.com€in order to get a wider idea of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis€ of this project? What was your initial inspiration?€

colours: acrylic, pastels, spays and whatever needed in order to achieve the desired result. Regarding time, it depends from the rhythm I want to perform my choreography. Time in art & in life is objective. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from "Big City"€that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory

While travelling and visiting around places, at some point I started feeling the need to imprint 40


Marinda Scaramanga

«€Down Town Bogota€», 30x30cm, private coll.

«€Colombian Ride€», 30x30cm

Mixed media€: photo and acrylics on paper

the initial emotion I experienced at the moment discovering an interesting landscape. I was shooting lots of photos cause I didn’t want to lose this sensation. Once back home, this impression was still living inside me. The source of my impression was still present in my mind. Like the feeling I had when I first visited a rooftop of a skyscraper in New York that never left me. I put myself into painting the photo trying to reproduce this feeling and forever maintain it. Initially, I was attracted to urban environments.

with photos I took in Bogota. The natural colours of this city are warm just like its people. As you have remarked, through this work you aim "to highlight different aspects of the relationship between citizens, public landscape and natural environment"€ and I daresay that€ your work in a certain sense explores the cultural disconnect that lies between understanding our relationship with the natural€ environment and our drive toward economic prosperity: although€ I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif,€ I have to admit that I'm sort of convinced that our drive toward economic prosperity: although€ I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif,€ I have to admit that I'm sort of convinced that Art€ -especially nowadays-€ could play an effective role in sociopolitical questions: not only just by offering to people a generic platform for expression... I would go as far as to state that Art could even steer people's behaviour...

There are many things going on to them at the same time, and this is something very fascinating for me. Furthermore it is amazing if you think about how humans manufacture an artificial environment in which a large part of the population lives in. Cities are so different from one another. They are formed by people and they form in return their citizens. This diversity, for example, is visible in the series “Latina”, created 41


Marinda Scaramanga

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«€VeloCity€», 48x33cm, Mixed media€: photo and acrylics on paper, private collection

what's your point about this? Does it sound a bit exaggerated?

on certain subjects. The project “Big City” triggers a conversation about the environment we live in. It depicts the human arrogance towards the nature.

This is the main role of artists in the society nowadays. Artists can be described as these creatures who see the world differently. They express ideas which seem to exist away from the imposed lifestyles. They observe the sociopolitical state of modern times and they come up with their findings, expressed through their artworks. They aim to pass a message, to influence society. Art has the power to start up questioning. Art starts dialogues with audience

A couple of interesting pieces on which I would like to spend some words are entitled€ Times Square and€ Speed in Las Vegas:€ one of the features of these works€ that have mostly impacted on me is the effective mix between white background and the intense tone of red, which creates such€ a dialoguerather than a contrast: it seems to reveal such a struggle, a

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Marinda Scaramanga

capture intense moments of urban life. Times Square is always crowded by tourists and locals, full of lights and noise. It is not a calm place! The same goes for Las Vegas. People are permanently chasing after something: parties, gambling, girls. Always in a rush. Back in Monaco, during the Grand Prix is again alike. Locals and visitors looking for excitement. Through speed we are experiencing adrenaline getting higher! The sound of the formula 1 is so strong that the only colour which can approach the feeling is red. Multidisciplinarity€ is a crucial aspect of your approach and I have highly appreciate the way you are capable of creating such an effective symbiosis between elements from different techniques,€ re-contextualizing€ the idea of landscape: while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy€ between different disciplines is€ the only way€ to achieve some results, to express some concepts?€

Combination of different techniques was indeed the only way to express my ideas. I feel frustrated when I limit myself. I need to know that I can dispose several tools which I can use to reach the desired result. Surely this involves certain know-how on using the different media, which also requires quite an investment on my side. Once the question regarding tools & knowhow is worked out, harmony is the ultimate challenge. Effective symbiosis, as you state in your question, is the key to achieve harmony in my art. This role also applies in life. It is a low of nature.

«€Times Square€», 91x60cm, Mixed media€: photo and acrylics & glitters on paper

deep tension and intense emotions... I can recognize such interesting feature also in Monaco...By the way,€ any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?€

And I couldn't do without mentioning your PÉLOPONNÈSE, MANI€ series€ which have particularly impressed me and which I guess has been inspired by your homeland's imagery: by the way,€ your works often reveal a clear reference to€ real world... and they remind me the well-known Picasso's quote "Everything you can imagine is real" I€ would

My palette changes over the subject. Cities are by default intense. Long distances, speed, stress, a total chaos! Red is the colour linked to the excitement and intensity. All those paintings

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«€Flowers & stones€», 100x70cm,

“Agitria”, 100x70cm,

Mixed media€: photo and acrylics & glitters on paper,

Mixed media€: photo and acrylics & glitters on paper,

private collection

priv. coll. pf Saint Spyridon Church in Nice, France.

like to ask you if in your opinion€ personal experience€ from real world is€ an absolutely indispensable part€ of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be€ disconnected from direct experience?€

deeper process we have our instincts, feelings, thoughts, dreams, souls. In my work the creative procedure is the same: I start by the things our eyes are able to see, those the objective can capture. Next step is to paint the projection of my soul. To reveal the “dream”. The Grand Master has taught us how to see the world and yes everything we can imagine is real and possible to experience.

What most people define as “real world”, in my mind sounds more like “the things that we can understand through our five senses”. Our senses nevertheless are tools nature has equipped us with, for decoding the world. On a higher level is the understanding of our environment. For this

Regarding Mani, it is a project I started ten years ago. This place fascinates me. It has a very particu44


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Since 2004 you have exhibited your artworks in many prestigious cultural establishments around the world: from France to Japan, from Greece to Italy, and I think it's important to remark that you are an active member of UNESCO for Fine Arts in Monaco... Could you tell us something about the impressions that you have received in these occasions? By the way, how much important is€ for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?€

“Light”, 100x70cm, Mixed media€: photo and acrylics & glitters on paper, private collection

particular culture and primitive nature. Mani is the place for my meditation. I started by taking photos randomly and then I applied the same concept. Part of this project has to do with the large number of Byzantine Churches in the area. Samples of this series were exhibited at the Greek Orthodox Church of Saint Spyridon in Nice during spring. We have rediscovered the gracious ambiance of Mani, the revealing enigma,€ a romantic mystery, a pretext to travel to these arid lands. There is hidden passion in those steady stones!

Every time I organize an exhibition or I participate in a group one, it feels like the first time. Every occasion is a unique experience. Different places, different people, new artworks. I get easily bored, so I’m chasing always a new challenge. On the other hand, it is an opportunity to travel and meet new and interesting people. The most important part is the interaction with the audience. People interested in arts, seeking to enrich their intellect, ready to get into deeper conversations. Regarding my membership at UNESCO in Monaco, I believe I’m very lucky to be chosen to work with this worldwide organisation. They respect artists’ work and they are passionate on promoting it! During my inner creative process, I think of nothing else but the relationship I am developing with my artwork. The feedback comes next, once the artwork is exhibited. I don’t like creating art limited to “catch” particular segments. It’s like faking it. Whatever happens, a fake brand usually fails. Consciously, I want to feel free to create according to my inspiration. Besides, my beloved collectors are usually interested to approach me and find out what is new and I think that for them this process is even more challenging! Multidisciplinarity€ does not concern yourself just as an artist: in fact, it's remarkable that besides producing stimulating artworks, you are experienced as a marketing manager for cultural projects, account manager for corporate events so I would take this occasion to pose you a bit cliché question, but all in all, an important one... € what are in your opinion

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"Island" 35x45cm, photography, acrylics


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I believe that there is no manual for that. Everyone applies his own principals according to his personality. For me it would be more appealing to focus on the art of business. Within my short business career, I’ve been fortunate enough to meet people with the same approach in business as if an artist. They are brilliant and talented people with many original ideas. Sometimes I’m wondering how these business people feel when they see their creations coming to life. Is there such a big difference between this feeling and the feeling artists experience in front of their finished artworks? Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Marinda. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

First, I need to thank you very much for this profound conversation. Many things are coming up this season. I will exhibit in Monaco, China, France and other places. I invite readers to stay tuned online via the social media or my newsletter in order to receive updates on all the upcoming events.

an interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator landescape@artlover.com

#196 Winter 1


«€Bridging the gap€», 60x45cm, Mixed media€: photo and acrylics & glitters on pap


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Frances Schandera-D (Germany) An artist’s statement

"Everything you can imagine is real." (Pablo Picasso) Frances Schandera-Duarte include´s a large palette of eclectic art materials in her paintings. These are fashioned in a way that merge and blend all elements into a unified and compelling whole. She layers oil paint with ink, incorporates glued surgical gauze, mineral sands and various papers to create these meditative paintings. White provides her with an imaginary space, specific visual elements layered into the whiteness appear to ‘glow’ from within the surface. This allows for many different interpretations of the final piece. Without any figurative context, Schandera-Duarte manages to direct the living surfaces of her works with idiosyncratic structures to create dream-like mindscapes. Her work has an alluring quality in that it pulls the viewer closer to the painting in an attempt to gain as much information from the surface as possible. Curiosity often results in the need to gently touch the paintings surface. Frances Schandera-Duarte (born in 1975, near Dresden) first studied Fashion Design in Schneeberg / Germany. After creative periods in Kazakhstan and Switzerland, Schandera-Duarte completed a postgraduate course at the University of Fine Arts in Dresden / Germany. Since 2006 she works as a professional artist, residing in both Germany and South Africa.

Frances Schandera-Duarte #196 Winter 50


Massimo Cataldo

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Frances Schandera-Duarte

An interview with

Frances Schandera-Duarte 1) Hello Frances, and a warm welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art?

Thank you for your warm welcome. It is a pleasure to talk to you. Art can take all forms. I think of a "work of art" as something created by a human being with the objective of producing a reaction in another human. As an artist, creating a piece of art is an act of transferring an image from a place where it has meaning. The viewer knowing nothing of the intent of the artist is visually influenced in both obvious and subtle ways. The observer's interpretation is as valid as the artist's intent.

an interview with

By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Frances Schandera-Duarte

This is really a difficult question. I will give it a try. Traditional art tends to be figurative and is mostly painted in oil on canvas or wood. The subject of the art is clear, a portrait or a landscape is pictured in a very realistic way. Contemporary art, by contrast, tends to be more abstract and conceptual. The focus is on elements of design, such as size, composition, texture and color. Contemporary artists rebel against tradition and explore the freedom of experimentation. In my opinion a piece of contemporary art can only develop when the artist is constantly looking for new ways to express himself.

have studied Fashion Design in Schneeberg and Fine Arts at the University of Dresden: moreover, I think it's important to remark that you have spent a creative periods in Kazakhstan and Switzerland... How have these different experiences impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks?

I grew up in East Germany in a small town near Dresden. As a kid, I spent a lot of time dreaming about traveling as this was a big issue in East Germany. After the Berlin Wall came down in 1989, East and West Germany reunified into a single German state. I suddenly had all the opportunities to explore the world. After finishing my studies in Fashion Design I worked for a small but very

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training and you 52


Frances Schandera-Duarte

artistic fashion label in Zurich / Switzerland. Zurich’s art scene blew my mind. I have seen cutting-edge experimental work, a vast collection of minimalist art and modern paintings in museums and galleries. Then the opportunity of spending two years in Shymkent€ / Kazakhstan came along. Kazakhstan has a breathtaking landscape with beautiful mountains and deserts, all very inspiring for an artist.

by using things I collected as an integral part of the process of making art. By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

I personally agree with your thought. On the one hand formal training is very important, an artist should know about art history and learn various technical skills.

Life there is still very traditional and only a very small amount of people have access to contemporary art. In this period I worked on a series called “Tracks”. I collected all sorts of “collage material” I came across on a daily bases. For example, the vender's at the market wrapped there goods in old book pages which I then used in my collages. I think this was my way of adapting to this country

On the other hand everyone could be an artist. Artists need the ability of visual analysis, a concept and some kind of compositional skill. The problem with this is that an artist has to make a living and where you train / study can effect your starting point of your career. For example if you want to participate in a serious art competition it is essen53


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essential to have a concluded study. I first trained as a fashion designer. The most important skills I gained from my studies are my sense for colors, forms and proportions. I have a good feeling for

texture and material and I might be more courageous in crossing borders of artistic fields than someone who studied fine art. #196 Winter 54


Frances Schandera-Duarte

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your

work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

I love starting a new canvas. There is nothing more 55


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stimulating then a white background waiting for the first dash. I get all my paints and inks ready and start quite freely with a loose composition. This composition will change many times during the process. I also like to work on more than one piece at the time. It lets me go back and forth between the paintings and I always look at each one with a fresh perspective. I very seldom use a brush. Most of my art works are a continuous process of an overlapping concept. This in turn one could say takes a lifetime towards reaching each finished work. Technically speaking a work can take anything from a week to a year. € Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from your recent pieces entitled Blühend Schmelzen Rote Meere and Letzte Blüte, Erster Schnee that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: I would suggest our readers to visit your website at http://www.duarte-artists.com/frances-schandera-duarte.php in order to get a wider idea of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

The inspiration of almost all my pieces comes from nature. I often dream about my work. I guess subconsciously my mind takes me back to a places or an object I have seen and creates an image which I then transfer into a painting. Usually all falls into place during the process. I absolutely love painting. I feel an very interview close to my corewith when I am creative. Another interesting works of yours on which I would like to spend some words are entitled Blütenschauer and Feuerblüte: one of the features of these pieces that have mostly impacted on me is the effective mix between white background and the intense tone of red, which creates such a symbiosis, a dialogue rather than a contrast: it seems to reveal such a struggle, a deep tension and intense emotions... I can recognize such interesting feature also in Dandelion...By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

One thing that has never changed is my desire for white. Maybe because I was born in winter and I enjoy the European winter season. It gives me a great peace of mind when the landscape is covered in snow. Everything looks so puristic and beautiful and calm. Little flowers or bushes that made it through the surface become such an important detail because of the color contrast but also kind of merge in with the surroundings. This is an excellent inspiration for me. I have become a bit braver with color over the past few years but I still need to add white to give that calmness to my paintings. My personal favorite of the paintings you mentioned is€Dandelion.€It took me a long time to finish, but I really love the way it came out. To me, it almost looks like the blossom dissolves into the background. I clearly see a flower but this flower still floats between reality and imagination. 56


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Multidisciplinarity and experimentation are a recurrent and very important features of your Art: you layer oil paint with ink, you incorporate glued surgical gauze, mineral sands and various papers... while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

You are absolutely right I enjoy experimenting and I like to break free from the traditional use of oil paint. Oil and ink are opposed characters which means they don´t really like each other. In my case because of that they create beautiful organic shapes and textures. I have great pleasure in taking a risk and crossing the borders of artistic mediums. I use glue with Japanese paper, gauze and sand to design my surfaces. On top of it I add oil paint, ink and water which generates unusual bubbles and structures. I do have an idea when I start but this also very often changes during the process. I respond to things that happen rather than pursuing a stringent plan. A feature of the stimulating Adaption that I have highly appreciated is your capability of creating a deep intellectual interaction, communicating a wide variety of states of mind: forcing the viewer to explorate the work in a three-dimensional space... I would go as far as to state that this work, rather than simply describing something, pose us questions: and in a certain sense forces us to meditate to the way we perceive not only the outside world, but our inner one...

And I couldn't do without mentioning Nana's Garden which I have to admit is one of my favourite pieces of yours: by the way, although marked with a deep abstract feeling your pieces often reveal a clear reference to real world... and since you have mentioned the well known Picasso's quote "Everything you can imagine is real" I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience from real world is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

Adaption is a piece I initially created for a space with round walls. But during the process it became more of a three-dimensional object then a painting. I love how it changes its feel the way you present it. If it hangs concave it kind of surrounds the viewer. It feels like you are inside the painting. If it hangs convex the observer surrounds the object and needs to walk all the way around it to get more information. The viewer who looks at it has to adapt to its shape. Adapting is very important to me since I live with my husband, a South African artist and our little daughter in both Germany and South Africa. I have to adapt all the time to a new culture, language and new

“Nana´s Garden”€ has a great meaning to me because it directly relates to my memories I have of my grandmothers garden. As a child a spent every summer holiday my Nana´s house and I #196 at Winter 58


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remember her wild garden with lots of flowers, bushes and an old cherry tree. I had a great affinity for this garden and entering it was like going to a different world. When I painted “Nana´s Garden� I was taken back to this place. Of course, today I

can only imagine what the garden looked like but this image still feels very real to me. I personally think it is difficult to create without direct experience. My paintings always take me straight to a place or a memory. 59


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an interview with

remember her wild garden with lots of flowers, bushes and an old cherry tree. I had a great affinity for this garden and entering

it was like going to a different world. When I painted “Nana´s Garden” I was taken back to this place. 60


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Of course, today I can only imagine what the garden looked like but this image still feels very real to me. I personally think it is difficult to create

without direct expe-rience. My paintings always take me straight to a place or a memory.

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So far your works have been exhibited in several occasions around the world: from Austria to Belgium, from Poland to South Africa and even Botswana... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

Making a piece of art is a very selfish thing and very rewarding as well. When I paint I never think of my audience.€Revealing your work as an artist to the public is nerve-wracking. There is nothing in the world that makes me feel more vulnerable. I can only paint what is in my mind and soul not what an audience expects me to. I hope there will always be someone who connects to my paintings and is touched by my work. Since making art is my profession and I have to make a living, I can´t totally ignore the business side of it. I organize my own exhibitions and keep in close contact with my clients. This takes a lot of time and effort and often interferes with the creative side. € Awards are a great way to be recognized in the art scene and can help an artist with a successful career. In 2001 I received an appreciation for two of my collages at the International Marianne Brand Competition. http://mariannebrandt-wettbewerb.de/de/frances-schandera.htm It was an amazing feeling being awarded and a great stimulation for my future as an artist. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Frances. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I am currently preparing for a show at the€ Fraunhofer€ IPA Institute in Stuttgart in November 2014 and for an exhibition in South Africa in March 2015. At present I am very inspired by the South African scenery and color palette. I am working on big landscapes in earthy tones including a lot of texture and white.

an interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator landescape@artlover.com

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Jana C. Perez (USA)

Jana C. Perez is an artist, graphic designer, photographer and teacher. She currently holds the position of associate professor of visual arts, graphic design, at Texas Woman’s University, Denton, Texas. Perez has worked as a designer for over ten years, and influenced by her background in advertising, her fine art utilizes the mechanics of language and image to communicate personal and humorous reactions to advertised ideas of female identity and beauty. Working mainly with natural light, Perez’ commercial photographic work reflects her expertise in both framing and creating an intimate environment that invites the viewer into the composition. Perez’ work has been featured in juried and solo exhibitions nationwide including the 4th Photography Biennial, the ReFresh Print Biennial I, as a Portfolio Winner at The Houston Center for Photography, Woman Made Gallery in Chicago, Art Basel Miami, Ohio’s Fitton Center for Creative Arts and at The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science. Perez has presented research at The 7 th Annual Hawaiian International Conference on Arts and Humanities, National UCDA (University & College Designers Assoc.) Design Education Summits and TASA (Texas Association of Schools of Art) Conference at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

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«€Warm afternoon- Warm people€» 60x60cm In the Alley, from Her Stories media€: on paper (22 x 28”Mixed archival printsphoto from and filmacrylics negatives), 2007 Anonymous, Photo Adam Ciereszko 2


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Jana C. Perez

An interview with

Jana C. Perez Hello Jana, and a warm welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Thanks so much for having me. It's an honor to talk with you today. In my opinion, a work of art is an image or object that engages the viewer on an emotional and intellectual level simultaneously. I call this an "ah-ha" moment. The viewer experiences an initial "gut" or emotional reaction, after which an inner dialogue of questions and/or an interview withto contemporary and narrative begin. In regards traditional artworks, I believe that these two differ from each other in terms of, technology,€and€artistic goals. To me contemporary art is a shift in visual language, a duality of narratives, and a definition of the photographic truth rather than a dichotomy.€

Jana C. Perez

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training in Art and you hold both a M.F.A. of Photography and a M.A. of Graphic Design that you have received from the Texas Woman’s University, Denton: moreover, worked as a designer for over ten years... how have these different experiences impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks?

grandfather were all artists. My great-grandfather was a professional photographer and his wife was a painter. Their daughter, my grandmother, was my first art teacher. We would spend hours drawing beginning when I was about 5 years old. Later, as an undergrad at The University of Texas in Austin, coursework introduced me to graphic design, and the theories of combining text and image fascinated me.

Personal design experience and formal education influenced my artistic development, but my journey actually started very young. My grandmother, great-grandmother, and great-

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Infinite, from Water (17 x 22” archival prints), 2014

Nocturne, from Water, 2014

Water is an ongoing body of work that explores the ocean near my family’s vacation home on the Treasure Coast of Southern Florida. Lushly contemplative, these images reveal not only the earthly wonders of water, but also transport the viewer into a mysterious space of emotionally charged color planes, sublime movement and an intimate viewpoint. Ocean morphs into a spiritual being that rises and falls, both acting as a guide, bringing the viewer, as witness, to an awareness of a physical and temporal presence. Water investigates the following themes: • Water as a living presence in a constant state of flux • Intimate and solitary viewpoints • The sense of a moment in time alluding to the mysterious happenings of nature • Creation and juxtaposition of spaces both vast and intimate, allowing an emotionally participatory experience for the viewer • Meditation on the wonderment of Nature as seen through one of the primary elements of our existence –water

Marinda Scaramanga

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Sublime, from Water, 2014

Synergy, from Water, 2014

Going back to school after working in the professional world changed my work ethic and gave me more confidence to create a personal voice and address issues such as feminist subjects and gender politics. Additionally, I had some amazingartists/mentors/professors/creative directors along the way.

and manipulative; it is process-driven whereas fine art is more emotional and reactionary to me. My work combines both, and this satisfies something inside me as a "maker". Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and #196 Winter

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Intermission, from Water, 2013

Residue, from Water, 2013

time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

work is spontaneous and dependent on the light and nature. Any work using props and models, such as with objectify and Her Stories, is much more time intensive. Purchasing props, getting location permissions, and juggling schedules uses more time than simply grabbing my camera and hitting the beach or photographing in my studio.

In the beginning of my process, I get ideas from experience and lately from things I see in the landscape that inspire me. I usually make a series of word lists and sketches, very rough thumbnails really. Then I move on to making images that follow the sketches. The only body of work that relies totally on what happens in the moment is Water. For that series, I am in the water and the

Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with your body of work entitled Water that our readers have already started to

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objectify, from the series by the same name (13 x 25� archival prints), 2007-2011

admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest them to visit your website directly at http://www.janacperez.com in order to get a wider idea of your artistic production... in the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this stimulating project? What was your initial inspiration?

on the beach, but never in a serious way until my best friend and colleague challenged me to do so. I began to stand in the surf and frame the ocean in a way that tells my story of what this amazing space means to me. One of the themes which Water effectively investigates is the sense of a moment in time alluding to the mysteries of nature: one of the features of the stimulating series that I have highly appreciated is your capability of creating a deep intellectual interaction, communicating a wide variety of states of mind and -in a certain sense- forcing the viewer to explorate the concept of Nature... I would go as far as to state that this work, rather than simply describing something, pose us questions: and in a certain sense lead us to

My husband is from Florida (and Cuba originally) and his family currently lives in Florida. We have been going there and to the beach for 17 years, and about six years ago, he and his brother purchased a house near the Atlantic Ocean. In the summer, when school is out, I spend a month at the little beach house. There was always something for me in the ocean; a longing, a power, a mystique, the "other"– something I felt, but could not name. Previously, I photographed 72


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modify, from objectify, 2007-2011

meditate to the way we perceive not only the outside world, but our inner one...

Another interesting project of yours on which I would like to spend some words is Objectify: and one of the features that has particularly impacted on me is the way you have humourosly challenged the commonly established ideas of female identity and beauty, by an itriguing process of juxtaposition...maybe I'm going wrong but I can recognize such a subtle sociopolitical criticism in this: I mean a constructive criticism... and although I'm aware that this might sound a bit exaggerated and naive, I'm sort of convinced that Art could play an active role in moving people awareness... what's your point?

Thank you so much for your beautiful and accurate description. Water poses questions about an inner state through an examination of the outer world. The act of spending time with and in an element of Nature, such as the ocean, allows it to touch you, to change you, and move your spirit. To participate with that force of Nature both physically and mentally is to open yourself to an awareness that leads to deeper feelings and understandings. As an artist, the important part of the process for this body of work is to be in the ocean rather than to look at the ocean. Water is very new for me; much more open and less controlled than my previous works.

I believe that art can play an active role in moving or influencing people's awareness – especially via my experience as a designer. 73


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nullify, from objectify, 2007-2011

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Crossroads, from Her Stories, 2007

This happens everyday and even more so through technology. Objectify uses the machinations of commercial imagery and the language of consumerism to force connections that question the nature of advertised messages in our culture. In this realm, female viewers, in particular, are often persuaded that something is

wrong with them and can be remedied by the purchase of a product. In addition, media images of women have themselves become symbols of standards defining what is expected and accepted as “the norm� when in reality, the images have been transformed through digital technology and perfected to advertising’s ideals. 76


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The Whisper, from Her Stories, 2007

Stories: I can recognize such a channel of communication between this body of work and the aforesaid Objectivity, but I daresay that while Objectivity tell us about the relation between outside and inner world, Her Stories focuses more on a particular point of view... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely

As with Water, I am utilizing the outer to question the inner. By taking this ubiquitous type of visual language out of context, objectify asks viewers to examine the message and question media. And I couldn't do without mentioning another interesting series of yours that has particulary impressed me and which is entitled Her 77


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In the Woods, from Her Stories, 2007

indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

somewhere in the art. Many of my professors said "paint what you know" or "write about what you know". My direct experience inspires my creative ideation. Perhaps some parts of the process are not directly related, but the final piece tells a #196 Winter

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artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

story that is unique to the artist and her/his experience. Objectify and Her Stories channel experiences from my personal life as a female and as a designer, and I find that all of my work utilizes the duality of inner and outer worlds. Besides producing your stimulating artworks, you have also gained experience as a teacher, and you currently hold the position of associate professor of visual arts, graphic design at Texas Woman’s University: have you ever happened to draw inspiration from the works of your students? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

I love feedback from the viewer because it allows me to see my work through their eyes and gives me insight into different points of view. The idea of awards or rewards from making art is not what drives me, personally. Art in our culture remains challenged because it is not valued enough. Many times artists must do something else that subsidizes art making. Graphic design has afforded me a way to follow my passion and generate income, but the commercial aspect of design involves a compromise. More and more my art, and design, is a selfish undertaking where I create solely for myself. Of course I want the viewer to garner something from the work, but my goal is free expression.

Each day my students inspire me– not in terms of subject matter– but in the innocence, intelligence and newness they bring to art making and designing. Their energy is addictive! Sometimes, as a more experienced artist, you forget that. When I step into the classroom, I feel that I am "home" and when I leave, I experience a "high" from what my students have shown me. Being among young creatives is invigorating, thoughtprovoking and challenging. It is a gift to have the responsibility and opportunity to guide them and to empower them to create an artistic life that feeds them as an artist and as a person.

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Jana. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Currently I am developing another body of work with fellow artist and photographer, Angilee Wilkerson. We have been making a series of performative self-portraits. We want to continue that work for another year and then begin to promote it– so watch my website for that.

For myself, my formal training validated much of my art making rather than stifling it. As an educator, I do, however, believe that being pushed out of a "comfort zone" can also be enriching for students. I refer to this as not readily giving answers, but being comfortable in the struggle. Because students will face that in life as artists and need to be prepared to problem-solve, defend and negotiate.

Thank you.

During these years you have exhibited your works in several occasions around the United States: it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an

an interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator landescape@artlover.com

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Kahori Kamiya

An interview with

Kahori Kamiya Hello Kahori, and welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art?

Thank you so much for inviting me to participate in LandEscape! Personally, a work of Art is the medium that establishes the strongest and deepest connection between society and€ myself.€ Generally, a work of art is different for every artist, and this factor gives art the flexibility and different possibilities to inspire people to keep exploring their own ways to the present. €

an interview with

To answer your second question, I think Contemporary Art exemplifies the ongoing moment of each era. It reflects pretty much everything what’s going on “now”. I take this personally by observing everyday events, news, and trends in terms of how people are affected from them. € € Would you like to tell us something about your background? Besides the MFA in Fine Art that you have received from the School of Visual Arts, New York, you hold a MFA in Sculpture that you gained from the The Nihon University of Art, Tokyo... How has studying in different countries impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

Kahori Kamiya

They often told me how even a general known “fact” can be approached from a completely different point of view and it can result in a “new possibility” and “new fact”. I was always fascinated to hear their unique illuminations from some insignificant subjects. I could say both schools that I attended had an effect on the order and timing of my art practice. During school in Tokyo, I was working with largescale sculptures that people could enter or wear. I recently realized those sculptures were thematically relating to my current video works, by explo-

I was born in Nagoya in Japan as a youngest child of three. My older brothers, 14 and 10 years€ older, are both Medical Doctors and working as researchers in their field. 82


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I do agree that formal training can stifle a young artist’s creativity, but I think the most valuable lesson from training is to learn how to define yourself as an artist and find a strong concept through conflict and failure. Since refining a concept is€ inherently€ a struggle€ with yourself, formal training time is not a bad opportunity to know how to overcome these problems and find your true concept/idea. Personally,€ I have€ spent a total of six years in formal sculpture training, but I don’t have any training of video editing. For me, many of the digested€ knowledge and experience through education reflect in my art practice as its fundamental point, but formal training for a specific technical skill is not a significant factor of my works. It was during my formal training time that I came to consider my concept and how I want to present it.€ € € Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

My video making process begins with the development of my concept in an organic way. I spend a lot of time to collect various types of subjects from everyday life that I’m really interested in. Then I take some time to investigate the reason why I’m so interested in them by researching the different interpretations and their contradictions. This process is always going on even while I might still be working on a different project.

ring the point of relationship between people and the world that surrounds them.

When I find some certain level of destination to go forward as a new project, I start to think about how my ideas can be visualized. I usually write down my thoughts over many pages and occasionally attach small drawings. Since I go back and forth so much, this part can sometimes take three to five months.

In 2006, I had the opportunity to attend SVA in New York. Conceptually, critically, and technically my art was greatly influenced and reinforced by this experience. Specifically, I was stimulated by other talented students and learned from some influential and knowledgeable artists / faculties, I could explore my interests more deeply and see wider possibilities to transform my idea. One of the great new mediums that I met in this period of time was video.€ € €

In the meantime, I go outside and shoot video without purposely planning how to use that video. For me, this intuitive practice often helps resolve € 83


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Outsourcing Mothers (2014) 10:53 HD, single-channel, color, sound

any problems as well as opening my mind to new solutions. €

After shooting is concluded, I move on to the editing part of my project. I approach this part as if connecting different puzzles that make a bigger picture. I adjust the tempo and add rhythm to accentuate certain pieces and add sound effects to convey a specific experience. I also consider how this project will be exhibited. For example, if I am working on a short length work that would typically be viewed by on loop at art space, I try to make sure how viewers will see the information at any point in time while watching the video.

I used to include myself inside of my video, but currently I prefer to work with other people as performers. In this transition, my art process started to have more direct connections between the public and myself. In my current works, I worked with people whose occupations are librarian, financial worker, artist, etc. At the begging of our communications, I typically let them know what the project is about. However, I do not inform them in advance about the actual shooting plan, such as what type of actions they would be doing or what specific questions I would ask them. This results in some unexpected behavior and responses during the shooting that I find to be similar to unedited stories or first impressions.

Now let's focus on your art production: I would like to start from your recent piece Outsourcing Mothers that our readers have already started to get to know in the starting pages of this article: I would suggest our readers to visit http://kahorikamiya.com/outsourcing-mothers 84


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Outsourcing Mothers (2014) 10:53 HD, single-channel, color, sound

in order to get a wider idea of this extremely stimulating project. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this piece? What was your initial inspiration?

I wondered if a mother could raise a child together with a multitude of other “mothers” similar to outsourcing style not unlike Facebook's€ "share"€ idea. This brought me to the question of how much people really can share with others.

Before having my child, I thought I€ wouldn't€ make something about mother-child type of work and my mind didn't change even after€ having my son. However, when he was just two years old his daycare security camera captured child abuse by his caregivers and this resulted in four teachers’ arrests. I hovered between a sense of guilt and fury. This incident destroyed my trust in people as if a stranger strongly beat my head from behind. I€ didn't€ intend to make art from this experience, but I just couldn't€ stop thinking about this unfortunate event so I decided to consider more deeply into the role of mother, child, and€caregivers.

As you have explained once, Outsourcing Mothers playfully explores the relationships between the individual self and a broader unknown through a visual feast representing the "mother" and "child" against the backdrop of world globalization... even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naïf, I have to admit that I'm sort of convinced that Art could play an effective role in sociopolitical questions: not only just by offering to people a generic platform for expression... I would go as far as to state that Art Art could even steer people's 85


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Outsourcing Mothers (2014) 10:53 HD, single-channel, color, sound

behaviour... what's your point about this? Does it sound a bit exaggerated?

I understand what you meant, but let me explain a bit more about the reason why I used those words to describe about this work.€ If this social system€ “Outsourcing(-ed) Mothers”€ is broadly established would it be just like the old saying of€ “it takes a Village to raise a child?”€ an interview withWhile on the one hand we can imagine how a child can be taught manners and disciplined by a few people, what would it be like if we could extend that to hundreds if not thousands of people? I believe this system would be a chaotic but interesting way to bring about the eventual decay of the€ “One Mother Myth”€ and all of its ethical implications. €

I never intended to steer people’s behavior through my work. My primary interest is to observe the contradiction arising from their comprehensive Outsourcing Mothers (2014) 10:53 HD, single-channel, color, sound

perceptions and social expectation on people’s psychological reactions or emotional transitions. The result of this investigation may meander into a sociopolitical part, but my aim is to share the question rather than leading viewers’ thoughts or behavior to a conclusion. € 86


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A feature of the stimulating Job Interview that I have highly appreciated is your capability of creating a deep intellectual interaction, communicating a wide variety of states of mind: but especially forcing the viewer to explorate his/her own perception of our society ... I would

go as far as to state that this work, rather than simply describing something, pose us questions: and in a certain sense forces us to meditate to the way we perceive not only the outside world, but our inner one... By the way, I would like to ask you if in your 87


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Job Interview (2014) 2:47, HD, single-channel, color, sound opinion personal experience from real world is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

during meditation, can it positively be confirmed as his/her direct experience or not? For me, the answer is “Yes.” I sometimes follow what my meditation shows me and bring that information into my work as my direct experience. In general, I think the scope of “personal experience” is either very restrictive or obscure like a border between subconsciousness and€ consciousness€ it depends on one’s definition. € €

I really appreciate your deep thoughts about this work.€ To say ideally, direct experience may/can bring artists unexpected awareness and wider potential ways to visualize their ideas on the creative process. However, I think it’s not always necessary to have a direct experience unless an artist whose personal experience becomes an absolutely indispensable part of his/her creative processes.

Modern technology plays a crucial role in the creation of your works: for example. for the Outsourcing Mothers, you adopted an unique shooting style which most of performance parts were shoot in Australia while you connected via Skype to direct them... I'm sort of convinced that new media art will definitely fill the dichotomy between Art and Technology and I

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Job Interview (2014) 2:47, HD, single-channel, color, sound

going to assimilate one to each other... what's your point about this?

are wider possibilities to digitally get connected with other artists, galleries, and organizations. I made these two videos, Job Interview and Outsourcing Mothers, during a one-year period of Digital Art Residency at Prospect Gallery in Australia to remotely work from state of New York where I live and work now.

Painters, sculptors, video artists, and performers are striving to utilize technology to access their aesthetics and I think this will be expanded more and more in the future. For me also, Technology is a very useful tool and my art observation often emerges from Technological phenomenon, such as social network, and its people’s response and behavior. However, I believe that technology is still in its infancy and needs to be confirmed as an art piece more. I can’t say both areas (art and technology) completely overlap to assimilate each other, but the part where it does overlap can grow more.€ €

I’m sure that the physical experience of a typical residency style directly affects artists such as making new connections and bringing new ideas. However, a digital residency also has a merit to cut the cost for both the gallery and the artist as well as give more flexibility to maintain artists’ other jobs or routines. Moreover, as you mentioned, I had great support from local artists and residents to participate in my video projects. In particularly, I liked this coincidence that a method of shooting

In regards to the system of artist residency, there 89


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Job Interview (2014) 2:47, HD, single-channel, color, sound

I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

and my project concept are both “outsourcing”. We were always completely opposite about time and seasons, but technology connected and gave us a new type of art relationship.€ € €

I’m always interested to know what the viewers perceive from my work and how they interpret it through their own looking glass of knowledge, experiences, and emotions. I believe that the viewer’s feedback is a helpful way to consider my work objectively. I sometimes refer to the feedback from my past works and even directly ask the participant's opinion during the process of my work. It’s hard to say that feedback is a significant influence to my work, but it does gives me a clue as to how to improve my work.

So far your works have been exhibited in several occasions around the world: I think it's remarkable to mention that you took part to the 14th Media Art Biennale Alternative Now in Poland and Dumbo Arts Festival in Brooklyn... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

€

If I was making a product that must sell then I believe it would be better to focus on a very pinpointed target for better marketing. However,€ 90


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Job Interview (2014) 2:47, HD, single-channel, color, sound

I don’t make my work for a specific viewer, I enjoy having multiple intellectual layers to my work that not only€ those with academic art theory background or viewers who have higher knowledge about this field can enjoy. I bring wit and lightness to sometimes-serious issues and when I see that viewers are laughing or smiling when viewing my€ video€ I can almost hear the sound when Super Mario hits the block and gets a coin. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Kahori. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Many thanks for reviewing my works and having a productive Interview!€ Currently my new video

works,€ Job Interview€ and€ Outsourcing Mothers, are part of a solo exhibition at Prospect Gallery in Australia. It’s on view until the end of September. € In the meantime, I’m planning to start working on the next video project. Through past year, I collected quiet a lot of images and sounds. The sounds are based on interviews where I asked people about their very specific type of memories through their unique backgrounds. I can’t say this will end up being my next project, but I would be very happy if you could keep in your mind to check my future projects!€

an interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator landescape@artlover.com


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(United Kingdom / Switzerland)

On Identity Our existence is shaped by our social experiences and interactions. The interactions in our personal and social experiences create distinct domains within our family, friends, school, work, travel, religion, relationships, acquaintances, etc. Within these domains, we present multiple versions of our ‘self’ because we choose what we hide or reveal depending on the social context and with whom we interact. The 'us' that we put forth is always an edited version of our real self. Even God is not spared. My art acknowledges the multiplicity in us and the paradox of the inevitable duplicity. It is my hopeful and optimistic assertion that the unedited version of each one of us is good enough for the world around us. #196 Winter 1


Massimo Cataldo

What they said: Shall the potter be regarded as the clay?, Isaiah 29:16 2


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Geetha Alagirisamy

An interview with

Geetha Alagirisamy Hello Geetha, and welcome to LandEscape. Hello and Thank you to LandEscape for this opportunity. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artwork as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness? As a visual artist with a focus on form, to me a work of Art is anything that commands my attention to enquire further andwith offers me some food for an interview thought in exchange. It could be a visually arresting piece of work that warrants a second look, a closer investigation, or a form that invites me to explore its texture and interact with it. In the process, it attempts to express what its maker intended for his/her audience.

Geetha Alagirisamy

and besides a a Post Graduate Certificate in Ceramic Design, you hold a MA of Sculptural Practice that you have recently received from the Essex University... How have these different experiences impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

When an artwork lingers with me in my thoughts, due to its physical aesthetics or in instigating an internal discussion about its expressive meaning, that piece of work has interacted with me at some level and made an impression. An artwork can be centuries old and yet, its ability to stimulate thought in any time period makes it contemporary to me, by its mere timeless relevance. On that count, there need not be a dichotomy or separateness between tradition and contemporariness. It is a matter of perspective. To me, traditional art stays contemporary by being relevant to the context of the audience.

My Indian father comes from a long line of very creative entrepreneurs who were goldsmithing artisans, including himself. My beginnings in Singapore were quite a contrast, thanks to my Chinese mother. I graduated with a BSc in Computer Science even though my natural instincts were screaming at me towards artistic endeavours. I was a closet artist for a long time

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Wine pots with dual identities: Sculptural and Functional, porcelain

alongside my IT career; I was a hybrid in that way.

some form or other to the instituitional mind-set, to be seen to have reached those standards.

My experiences in England spurred me towards getting the formal art qualifications in order to be taken seriously as an artist. It was also a personal decision to allow myself the option of being a full-time artist one day, if I ever decided to transition away from the corporate career. Without the certification, I will just be a ‘part-time dabbler who was a computer geek first’.

I had to learn to modify my own expectations in order to adapt and survive in those environments. Of course, the creativity is affected in different ways. Sometimes, there is positive stimulation which enables your art to step up. There are also times where your artistic instincts need to be restrained, voluntarily or otherwise. For me, it was kind of diabolical and contradictory. I was trained in the formulaic field of Computing and after a decade-long career in the industry, I was thirsting for the free-form and free flow of the art world. Yet, there I was trying to fit myself into someone’s ‘box’ again just to qualify myself to be an artist.

To me, to be an artist means to be creative, to be in free-form. No rules, no formula. Yet, it is ironic that in a subjective, non-conformist field such as art, one has to endure bureaucratic and institutionstipulated definitions of what they think is art. My development as an artist is starkly contrasted as the ‘before and after’ of my qualifications. To attain these qualifications, one has to conform in

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Figurative carving, limestone

When I fell in love with clay (porcelain and stoneware), my art took on a totally different facet from my abstract paintings. Working on the wheel with the centrifugal force and with my bare hands on simple mud; it just centers and grounds me internally.

It did affect my process and how I felt or thought about my art. After the last 2 years of getting to grips with the real artworld, I am now at peace with my own work and what I want to produce as my art. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

As a ceramicist, I prefer to throw on the potting wheel to create the fundamental slab pieces in my sculptures, as opposed to rolling or hand-building slabs. I draw separately with underglazes in clay slip and then merge them onto the wheel-thrown slabs before constructing the final finishes.

Visualization is quite a necessity for me; to see in my mind what the piece looks like when finished. I could be sitting in the cafe or reading a book, anything can trigger my mind into imagining a piece I want to create. I will be dissecting and joining and finishing a complete piece of work all in my mind within minutes. Of course, I try to capture these visualizations in my sketches before I lose them in the humdrum of daily life. Most of the time, it is easy to replicate these in the studio. Afterall, I visualized them in my mind. Sometimes, the mind defies the laws of physics in imagination and so creating those intricate pieces can be a challenge in my studio.

Sake wine pot with contrasting curves and geometric-shaped edges, stoneware 96


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Duplicity, close-up view, porcelain

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Duplicity that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: I would suggest to visit directly http://www.alagirisamy.com/index.php/sculpt ures in order to get a wider idea of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

social (and personal) observation that have culminated in my artistic intent about the identity, the self and this fascination that we hold for classifying people we come across. In older Singapore, it was not common to see ethinically mixed kids. Growing up as a half-Chinese, halfIndian (or what the locals call a 'Chindian', the subject of identity has been a major factor in my world because I had a face that didn’t fit the expected stereotype features of either the Chinese or the Indian. · you don't look like an Indian or a Chinese… your face doesn't fit your name... · what are you? where do you come from? you look like you don't know where you belong...

Duplicity was part of the ‘What We Don’t See’ series that I created. My sculptural art works have always been about ‘Identity’. It is simply years of 97


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Duplicity, frontal view, porcelain

Duplicity, top view, porcelain

These were fairly frequent inquisitions I have come across and still come across today, regardless of where I am living or working in the world. The more I felt coerced to 'label' myself, the more I have resisted those who insist on my classification in order to anchor me on the world map. I am proud of my mixed DNA, yet there is something judgmental about having to conform to this social expectation.

formula for my identity. We are intrinsically classified by the colour of our skin or the features of our face; these are the first gateways to anyone in a first encounter. It seems that it is often a way for someone to get comfortable enough to engage with the other person; only by knowing my origins that they feel 'safe' to be themselves. Until then, there is a subconscious block on how they interact and which parts of themselves they feel could be revealed. The reverse is true of course.

Over the years, living in different parts of the world from the east to the west, I have realised that people in general have this built-in innate need to identify and classify someone by ethnicity, nationality or even cultural or religious inclinations. We all have a need to belong, to be part of a team, a group, a community that accepts us as one of them. The family unit fulfils that need in me, yet in our society there is a different kind of expectation.

We edit the public and private versions of ourselves; we manifest or mask different parts of ourselves to different people within different contexts and different domains. So, our identity that we show the world is always edited. There is duplicity in each one of us. Why is the unedited version of you and me not good enough? This is what I hope to instigate in my audience through my art.

My existence or the quality of my life is by no means predicated by my affiliations or by an exact

Another interesting pieces from your paintings that have particularly impressed me and 98


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A Different Journey, 1 of 2, acrylic on canvas

A Different Journey, 2 of 2, acrylic on canvas

on which I would like to spend some words are A Different Journey and Confusion: one of the features of these pieces that have mostly impacted on me is the effective mix between a neutral background and thoughtful tones of red, which creates such a dialogue rather than a contrast: it seems to reveal such a struggle, a deep tension and intense emotions... I can recognize such interesting feature also in Silhouettes, as our readers can notice at http://www.alagirisamy.com/index.php/paintings... By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

special place that makes me feel and be better. So my colours refelect that in the range of reds to the pastels, browns and the occasional mineral hues of silver and copper. To be honest, my ‘palette’ has not changed much over time. You will see the same in my older works like ‘Muse’. But you may notice the simple and different palette of simple blacks and pewter glazes that I use on my sculptures. It is important for me that the audience are not distracted away from the form of my sculptures and their expression. World in Me Series I, it is where I started introducing the 2-tonal palette. The movement in the liquid-like patterns went far towards making my work speak out in their own way. This has become my signature mark.

It is interesting that you picked up on those pieces. They were created during a traumatic time in my life when I was at a personal crossroads. Some people wear their hearts on their sleeves. I wear my heart on my art. Hence, they show what I feel and speak what I don’t about my internal dialogues.

Multidisciplinarity and experimentation are a recurrent and very important features of your Art, and I think that this allows you to go beyond the dichotomy between Tradition and Contemporariness: I would like to mention Unlaced II, which is a clear example of this interesting symbiosis... while crossing the bor-

We all wear the colours that we feel. I am very much a ‘feeling’ person who feels everything and anything deeply. When I am in my creating mode, I am in my 99


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left: unlaced II, right: unzipped II, porcelain

ders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

One may expect a typical head bust or face, but if my audience steps back to ponder when they see the lace or the zip, then my works are expressing my intent effectively.

I am really glad to hear you broach these topics. As a sculptor, the medium I use is never an issue. It is simply a matter of preference for effective expression of my intent. I do not let my artistic intent on the topic of Identity be limited with any ‘boxes’, be it the clay, stone or glass. The goal is reached when my audience can feel the natural symbiosis exuded by the contrasting mediums in one finished piece of art. Unlaced II and Unzipped are examples of the unexpected in the expected.

The works that I have done in limestone are figurative pieces, with a focus on the female form. The softest subject of femininity carved out of a hard material like stone; that to me is the juxtapositioning of two contrasting identities. Casting the human face in cold glass is another example. Currently I am creating a body of work that are functional vessels but sculptural in the visual form. 100


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near: Unzipped II, far: Unlaced II, porcelain

This is another take on the duplicity of identities. What you see is not always what you get. These are functional pots for Japanese ‘sake’ or wine pots, yet visually, they appear to be decorative and sculpture-like. The traditional expectation of a functional pot and the decorative sculpture are married into one; a symbiosis for me.

The World in Me, Series II, 1 of 3, porcelain

meditate to the way we perceive not only the outside world, but our inner one...

A feature of the stimulating Identity Theories Unmasked and of the aforesaid Duplicity and that I have highly appreciated is your capability of establishing a deep intellectual interaction, challenging with the viewers perception and forcing them to explorate the work in a three-dimensional space... I would go as far as to state that this work, rather than simply describing something, pose us questions: and in a certain sense forces us to

Thank you for articulating that so well! I was late coming into the art world, so I was an outsider for a long time, trying to make sense of many contemporary artists and their expressions. Throughout my journey, I have realised, learnt and valued the importance of making art that matters. It is easy to make a statement to someone in a se101


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The Chronicles of 'i', porcelain

cond, but it takes longer to illicit an answer from someone because the answer would warrant a thought process. And that is exactly what I want for my audience: a thought process that engages them from the inside out.

comes from deep within. We feel from everything that we experience. What I feel is what allows me to imagine and visualise my creation. If I don’t feel it, I cannot imagine it. If I cannot imagine it, I cannot create truthfully. I will only be postulating. To me, that is an artistic black hole which is unfathomable in my creative world.

And I couldn't do without mentioning Chronicles of 'I' which I have to admit is one of my favourite pieces of yours: by the way, although marked with a deep abstract feeling your pieces often reveal a clear reference to real world... and since you have mentioned the well-known Picasso's quote "Everything you can imagine is real" I would like to ask you if personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

Afterall, my art is a direct culmination of my personal encounters and experiences. It is essential to me that my work has relevance in the real world in order to be art that matters. Still, I am happy to hear that Chronicles of ‘I’ is your favourite. Many have mentioned the same to me. Thank you indeed. So far your works have been exhibited in several occasions around the world: from Europe where you are currently based to the

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what is the artist creating at that point? Through the free flow of his or her own creative juices? Or is it a production project planned to meet the end reward? Then, one begins to question where the line is between the artistic integrity and artistic motivation. Over the years of various exhibitions of my work, I have come to realise that feedback is not necessarily a good thing all the time. It is a subjective matter between the audience and the artist’s state of mind. Is the feedback going to spur the artist or demotivate? I know some who have completely changed the direction of their art practice based on feedback. It is not always clear, simply because of the nature of art; subjective and relative. A single piece of work can elicit various contrasting feedback. Then, apart from the resulting internal confusion, it leaves the artist in a conflicted state, especially when trying to make a living out of the art practice. Yes, I have tried to visualise the audience for my works. It is easier for me to do so when the body of work is de-

United States... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how important is it for you to have the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think about who will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if there could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art... since you have studied Project Management I think that our readers will find your opinion very interesting... Yes, I certainly believe that awards and expectations of one definitely affect the artist’s process. There is an element of pressure (self-inflicted or otherwise) to change or improve the output which of course alters the course of the creation. On the flipside, 103


Identity Theories Unmasked, 2013, porcelain


Piece me up, 2013, porcelain


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Place aux Artistes, Les Automnales, Geneva Palexpo, 2013

Studio work in the Bruckner Ceramic Foundation, Geneva, CH

signed to be functional rather than sculptural or decorative. It’s process that I am still trying to improve.

Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Which brings me to the topic of business and Art. Being an artist is in itself an entrepreneurial venture. There is indeed a direct and genuine relationship between the two. One has to put on the business hat to think practically and logically about the strategy of one’s art practice. To implement the targeted strategy, one has to know his or her target audience. This can only be achieved by putting out works and testing the market. This becomes project management, per se, of your planned sales and marketing strategy. The polar end to this approach is that as an artist you just want to create; afterall that was exactly the objective of becoming an artist. How many hours does one dedicate to each hat? It is again very subjective. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Geetha. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you?

I have recently been exploring another avenue in my creative outputs. I will be launching a new line of functional and sculptural works, designed to be modern and contemporary, but still in keeping with my artistic intent. I plan to participate extensively in design competitions, locally and abroad, in order to get the relevant feedback I need. It is also my goal to venture my art more in US and Canada in the future. I totally appreciate this opportunity to talk to LandEscape about my art practice. Thank you again.

an interview by landescape@artlover.com


Geetha Alagirisamy

Florence Biennale 2013: IX Edition Ethics DNA of ART

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Clare Petherick (United Kingdom)

An artist’s statement

My work is based on human emotion, subtle shifts from one mood to another represented mainly through landscape. I work in series and a project can take up to a year to complete. As a drawing based artist I like to use simple materials such as paper, graphite, and water based crayons. I push these materials to their limit by continually inventing new ways of working. An early influence on my work was printmaking. As a student I became intensely involved in stone lithography learning it first at the Ecole de Beaux-Arts in Paris and continuing to practice it at the RCA. Since then my work has been heavily influenced by process and I continue to explore unexpected ways to create works on paper. My most recent project is based on an Island off the North Devon coast. As a child I had a view of this Island from my bedroom window. I was fascinated by the way the weather changed the Island’s appearance from being concealed by a curtain of rain to then reappearing on the horizon. As with all my projects I developed a format or grid that I would prepare before going out and working entirely on the spot. I reacted to what I saw in front of me; at times the elements would become part of the work such as when it rained. I built up a series of works over a period of a year. What unfolded was a series of stills, same view with very varied results.

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#196 Winter


Mixed Metaphors Anonymous, Photo Adam Ciereszko 2


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Clare Petherick

An interview with

Clare Petherick Hello Clare, and a warm welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what does in your opinion define a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Hello, thank you for asking me to be here. Clare Petherick

What constitutes a work of art is a complex question. In an age where all the boundaries have fallen away anything and everything could be considered a work of art. I actually think of this as a positive thing. For me, personally, it has to be work that has integrity, authenticity and most importantly moves me. an interview with Is there such a thing as contemporariness these days as opposed to tradition? I really enjoy artists who use traditional ways of working to address contemporary issues. I really enjoyed a recent exhibition at Alan Cristea Gallery in London. ‘Drawn to the real’ featured five contemporary artists, each with an individual take on drawing, the work was quiet contemplative and powerful. I particularly liked Richard Forster’s work in the show.

stone lithography and continued to practice lithography when I returned to the RCA. I felt as if I had traveled back in time at the Beaux-Arts, the building and library were extraordinary. What was also interesting was that the school had a contemporary art program and classical art program both separate from each other. It was so different from the RCA where there was no differentiation between the two. I also spent a month in Lisbon where RCA students could stay in a studio within the grounds of ARCO. Lisbon was beautiful, the light extraordinary, I remember going out at night and painting in watercolours. The sky was an amazing inky blue and the city’s parks and gardens like a backdrop to a film. It was from this trip that I developed a fascination for drawing at night. I returned to London and started to go out in twilight drawing the streets of Fulham where I lived at the time. The residential streets were unremarkable, but the quiet, the lighting was just like a film set with a

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training and you have studied both at the Ecole de Beaux-Arts in Paris and at the Royal College of Art: how have these experiences impacted on your development as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks?

I actually spent three months at the Ecole de Beaux-Arts while at the RCA. It was a printmaking exchange program. I spent my time learning

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From the Island series

sort of artificiality. I pinned 49 of the drawings to the wall for my MA show.

preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

You might say that my interest in place and working in series started at the RCA, but I have actually been drawing onsite since the age of thirteen. In fact I produced my first series of drawings aged fourteen when I documented the construction of a bridge and viaduct in my home town.

Preparation is probably the most important part of the process for me. Once I have worked out what I am doing and how I am going to do it I work quite quickly. The actual preparation can take up to a couple of months researching materials and drawing methods. I always aim to find a different approach with each series of works. I think it is important to maintain some mystery around how I produce the work. The only thing I will say is that I prepare the paper before I work outside. I like to give the impression of a lightness of touch. How I feel at the time of drawing and my

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much Marinda Scaramanga

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Island II

us something about the genesis of this project? What was your initial inspiration?

reaction to the enviroment is at the heart of the work. There is no doubt that my time in the college printmaking department had a profound effect on the way I work today, and it is something I would like to return to at some point.

The Island is off the North Devon coast where I grew up. It is three miles outside a bay that seems to have its own microclimate. Often a storm at sea will simply sweep across the bay and not come inland. This gives the impression of a curtain “sweeping� across the island and concealing it. When the storm has passed the Island is revealed again.

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from your Island series that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest to visit your website directly at www.axisweb.org/p/clarepetherick in order to get a wider idea of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell

The ebb and flow to me is representative of our own lives. To sit outside for several hours watching the drama of changing weather patterns #196 Winter

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Island III

to ask you if in your opinion personal experience from real world is an absolutely indispensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

and at times getting caught up in it, even using the elements to draw with was very exhilarating. As you have remarked in your artist's statement, your work is based on human emotion, subtle shifts from one mood to another represented mainly through landscape and your most recent project is based on an Island off the North Devon coast of which you had a view from your bedroom window. I have been always fascinated with the way childrens memories impact on an artist's imagery, especially because often the unavoidable memory distortion brings a new level of significance to the subjects on which viewers' attention is focused... So I would like

I think personal experience from the real world is an absolutely indispensable part of my creative process, but I don’t think I can really speak for other artists. Experiences as a child have such an impact, you are seeing things for the first time and with that is the emotion of the experience. I think you carry it for the rest of your life. Of course even as an adult you experience or see new things that have a profound effect on you but 113


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Island IV

By the way, many contemporary landscape artists have some form of environmental or political message in their works: do you consider that your images are political in this way or do you seek to maintain a neutral approach?

they become fewer. Perhaps that’s why as adults we actively seek out new experiences to give us the same thrill, the same wonderment that we felt as a child. To experience shivers up our spines and butterflies in our stomachs makes us feel alive. I do have a bit of a preoccupation with the past and did as a child.

I am fairly neutral as rather than call myself a landscape artist I use it as an analogy for our lives. At times I am purposely ambiguous. Bring to the work what you will, your own stuff. I think people forget to just look, to take in nature, to notice all the small changes, to just be still. I am just as guilty really, head down, thinking about what I need to do next. It is not until I am out drawing, in the same place for up to five hours

There is something fascinating about what went before, even a couple of decades ago. Looking at an old book as a child, there is the feel, the smell, the language, the imagery, like another world. Otherworldliness is fascinating, beyond grasp, intangible and something I try to recreate in my work.

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View

Another interesting pieces of yours that have impressed on me and on which I would like to spend some words are entitled In Memory of Catherine Linton and View: I have been struck with the intensly thoughtful nuances of blue that suggest me a sense of dramatic -and I would daresay "oniric"- luminosity that seems to flow out of your canvas... by the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

if I use too many colours. I think it also lends the work a meditative quality. I spend an inordinate amount of time selecting the correct colours. Using so few makes it imperative to choose the correct ones for the work. I think the papers and materials that I work on are equally as important. It is an ongoing process.

I have continued to work in a monochromatic way as the subtleties and textures of my work are lost 115


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Tree Abstraction 5


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Island III

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Mixed Metaphors, Tree

Mixed Metaphors, Boat

And I couldn't do without mentioning your Mixed Metaphors series: in particular, I would like to stop for a moment to consider the "function" of the landscape suggested by this stimulating series: it has suggested me the concept that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a wayto decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

By isolating a single object on an intensely black background gives an iconic feel however ordinary the subject happens to be. I wanted to create a special/ordinary dichotomy. Why a boat? Why a tree lined lane? Perhaps its an affinity I have with some of the older parts of London, standing in the shadow of something newer but always there, layered in history. During these years your works have been exhibited in several occasions and I think it's important to remark that you have been recently shortlisted for the Jerwood Drawing Prize, Jerwood Space, London... Could you tell us something about the impressions that you have received in these occasions? By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Mixed metaphors developed when I decided to move away from landscape and isolate single objects. They were randomly picked from places that I like to visit around London. These are places that I feel are special and have a story. They are also places that I visit just to go for a walk, or to contemplate, so there is a very personal connection. I had also just seen Eadweard Muybridge’s exhibition at the Tate and was inspired by his plate photography.

Being selected for the Jerwood is always an honour as it is one of the most important drawing 118


Clare Petherick

Mixed Metaphors, Bastion

competitions in the UK. The three selectors are different each year and you are always curious as to who in particular selected your work.

The selections are always very varied and of a very high quality. It is wonderful that drawing now has such a platform. 119


Clare Petherick

The Pool, Tide coming in Tree Abstraction

#196 Winter 5


Clare Petherick

Island III

6


The Pool, Tide going out


Clare Petherick

Land

E scape I always hope that the audience will relate to the pieces that I make. My motivation comes from my own need to express myself and create work. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Clare. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I continue to generate work and push what I do to its limit. I am looking to work on a larger scale, and am currently experimenting with a new material that is producing some very interesting results. I would like to realize my ambition for a solo show in the future.

Untitled III 11


Clare Petherick

12


Land

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From the Los Pรกramos series, No 42: El Angel, Ecuador 1

#196 Winter


Thomas S. Ladd (USA)

The camera has lead me to understand that the surface of things are endlessly beautiful; that slow and careful observations of the external world will lead one to deep introspection; that the tension between the photograph and the ‘real’ world will never cease to engage peoples’ imagination; that photography is a form of thinking; that, nothing is ever what it seems to be; and that, one’s intentions never materialize… something more exciting always takes over.

Thomas Spencer Ladd Associate Professor, Chair Design Department University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

2


Land

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Thomas S. Ladd

An interview with

Thomas S. Ladd Hello Thomas and welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? Moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork? Do you think that there's still an inner dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

It is very difficult to define a work of art. Much has been done by visual and performing artists over the last two centuries to expand the traditional definitions. This includes exploring new materials and processes, stretching the limits of representation, overlapping genres, and asking questions about what constitutes an aesthetic experience. There are no identifiable features, no common traits, or unique an interview withqualities of representation within the arts. There is no single definition, milieu, or canon, and the authoritative gatekeepers or critics who oversee "legitimate" expression are changing. There are many outlets for sharing representation. That is positive, allowing for a wide array of representation and expression. I am excited about the future. This open landscape can be difficult to navigate and there are some anxious or difficult questions to resolve, or maybe not resolve, for emerging artists. Yet, none of these conceptual problems should stop anyone from making new work. The best way to resolve the ambiguity is to make something, then make something else, then make something new, and so on. The process of making will lead to new ideas, and elicit new responses to media and new inventions. Or maybe someone may reject the new and embrace an ancient tradition. There is no other way, even if your work is conceptual. It must manifest itself in some manner, and you must make something.

Thomas S. Ladd

All of us work from a process that grows out of a direct experience with materials, and with a large array of concepts and historical works that inspire us. Ultimately, we do what our bodies and minds can manage or control; that is different from person to person and shifts from place to place. There need not be a hierarchy of quality or superiority, just cells that host different perspec-tives in different places. e will gravitate to those cells to which we can contribute or to that to which we respond. Art is contemporary when it collectively and individually addresses the present conditions of our


Thomas S. Ladd

From the Los PĂĄramos series,

From the Los PĂĄramos series,

El Angel, Ecuador

Cotocachi Reserve, Ecuador

The paramo, which is located at high elevations in the Northern Andes, is an austere glacier-formed grassland which is windy, cold, wet, and blanketed by clouds. The land has long been the home of indigenous communities who have grazed livestock and cultivated tubers. Unfortunately, the landscape is changing rapidly. Mining concessions, agricultural encroachment and population growth have transformed most of the land, in some cases irreversibly. In order to document these sublime places I have received generous support from Proyecto Paramo Andino and financial assistance from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

external world. Art is always informed by traditions, which are always, and obviously, related to history. They are linked. It is naive to think otherwise. How can anything made in the moment be anything other than contemporary, and at the same time, not reference things made before it? It is impossible. Some lines are clear and straight, while others are foggy and meandering. That is wonderful. Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have received advanced degrees from Cranbrook Academy of Art and Rhode Island School of Design: how has formal

training that impacted on the way you currently produce your Art? By the way, as an experienced professor as you are, I would ask your point on formal training: I often ask to myself if a certain kind of training could even stifle a young artist's creativity...

I came to the visual arts through an interest in music. I worked for a record store during summer vacations while in high school and college. I had a simple job—I put the inventory out on the retail floor for people to buy. The customers expected that I knew where to find the records they wanted and that I knew something about all the artists.


Thomas S. Ladd

Land

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From the Los Páramos series,

From the Los Páramos series,

El Angel, Ecuador

Cotocachi Reserve, Ecuador

I worked at this job for four or five years. When I began, there were musicians I did not know and some genres of music I had never heard. Over time, I became fascinated by the marginal, the experimental, and the less well-known musicians. I was young and questioned just about everything; for good or bad, music and art were included.

and Ken Quill. Each was dedicated to the educationof his or her students. I found my way there. The camera was a natural choice, as it allowed so many of my interests to come together. The environment became an aesthetic experience that I could record, much like Cage enjoyed sound versus music. The mundane could be transformed into something different through the intervention of the photo-graphic frame. There was a craft and exactness to the exposure, development, and creation of a beautiful print. This was much like classical music training. It was earthy, bound in routines—it had a daily chore-like quality. I could structure my day around photography and I could get out of the classroom. This seemed to be the perfect solution for a person who lacked direction and exhibited attention problems.

Eventually, I came across musical recordings composed by John Cage. His work was very exciting, and everything was turned on its head. Serious, funny, irreverent, spiritual, non-western, etc… When I was young, I couldn’t get enough of contrary points of view. Cage led me to Marcel Duchamp and other contemporary artists that questioned traditional modes of expression. At the same time, I was studying classical guitar, which was steeped in history, technique, and romantic expression. The training focused on technique to produce a prescribed expression of beauty. I appreciated both points of view. ut, I did not gravitate to either extreme. I attended a small college is south Georgia where the visual arts faculty took me under their wing and helped me find my path. I remember them all vividly: Pat Steadman, Tom Raab, Aubrey Henley,

My formal education continued. I studied with Carl Toth at Cranbrook Academy of Art. He was a brilliant photographer, educator, and theoretician. His work truly inspired me and caused a shift in my photographic practice. He constructed or fabricated photographic images. His way of working made me question traditional assumptions about how photographs are "taken." I hadn't thought much


Thomas S. Ladd

From the Los Páramos series,

From the Los Páramos series,

Lake Puya Puya, Ecuador

Ozogoche, Ecuador

about using the camera to literally "make" a picture. So, I emulated Carl and made still lifes that weretaken with a camera. He introduced his students to contential theory, literary criticism, and a thoughtful approach to representation. It was current at the time. I wasn’t particularly original; although I may have thought so, I copied. So much of a person’s education is mirroring, even if the goal is to make a unique body of work.

I don't think the formal education was stifling at all. Yet, I must confess, I was a bit of a bastard at times. The frustrating questions that come up while a person is so focused on one thing can bring out the good and the bad in everyone—students and teachers.

I also studied Graphic Design at Rhode Island School of Design, where I came to understand how visual messages can be controlled and disseminated. The design process became important to me. The whole dialogue was completely different. The program was formal and theoretical. There, I studied with a number of wonderful, thoughtful, inspiring professors: Franz Werner, Nancy Skolos, Tom Wedell, Hans van Dijk, Tom Ockerse, Hammett Nurosi, Donald Keefer, and Jan van Toorn. They worked tirelessly with the students. We were all passionate about the process of making, communication, typography, and the craft of graphic design. This led to a rethinking and realignment of my process. My work became more political, more controlled, more intentional.

From the Los Páramos series, Ozogoche, Ecuador


Thomas S. Ladd

Land

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From the Los Páramos series,

From the Los Páramos series,

Ozogoche, Ecuador

Páramos Road, Ecuador

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your an interview with work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

It is slightly different when I make still life images. I do construct those images. But, there is still the process of creation, discovery, remaking, rethinking, and moving forward. In the end, what you make is generally much more interesting than what you imagined you would make.

Before I begin my landscape photographs, I research the site or location of the images. I mark out a place and then walk within the space to make the photographs. I don't think analytically while I am making the pictures. I respond. The thinking occurs before and after the images are made. There is a decision to shoot within a space and then a decision to edit the images. So many things change after the images are made. Once you see the images, you have to begin again, reassess what you are doing based on the photographs, and then move forward. I go back to the same places over and over again. I ompletely understand the motivation of Giorgio Morandi. It is impossible to exhaust a subject, especially a large section of land. If I tried to find a picture that matched what I imagined I would not make any photographs. They wouldn’t exist.

Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with Sheep Pasture Gardens that our readers can admire in the following pages of this article: and I would suggest them to visit http://www.thomasladd.com/sheep_pasture_garde ns.html in order to get a wider idea of this stimulating project... in the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this work? What was your initial inspiration?

The initial inspiration grew out of two parallel activities. First, I was inspired by a poem by Wallace Stevens, titled "The Plain Sense of Things." In that poem, Stevens describes a bleak winter landscape and then connects that description to profound philosophical reflections on aging and the eventual loss of imagination. It is a poem about the creative process and its connection to the body and things around us. What I found so remarkable is two-fold. First, the imagery is vivid. It reminded me a of a


Thomas S. Ladd

From The Sheep Pasture Gardens series The Sheep Pasture Gardens are community vegetable gardens which are tended by residence of North Easton, Massachusetts. I began to make photographs there as a refuge from my busy and noisy life. I could focus on the beauty of the landscape, reflect on changes of the season and admire the elegant structure of plants. Yet, over time the garden landscape became less fanciful. During my visits I noticed that food was left unharvested to rot. The gardens appear to be therapeutic hobbies—not essential to the people who cultivate them—and were often forgotten. This promoted me to question how gardens are used by people who truly need them. My research lead me to learn about poverty farming within the Andean Communities of South America. I decided to visit. Presently, I am working on two complimentary projects: the Sheep Pasture Gardens and the Cloud Forest Gardens—each serving a different purpose.

photograph by Eugène Atget, titled Parc de Seaux. Mar, 7 h. matin, 1925. The image fits the poem perfectly! It was inspiring. At that point in time, I had not made photographs for several years. The second remarkable thing is that a bleak poem about the end of imagination made me get up and move, I began a series of winter landscapes. One of Stevens’s greatest poems grew out of the despair that he could not write anymore. I took long walks near my home, in the cold, revisiting the same places over and over again. The "Sheep Pasture" gardens are places I visited. Once I was in that landscape, and once I had a number of photographs from the place, my ideas changed.


Land

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Thomas S. Ladd

The garden became political, not a place for romantic musing on nature; it was now about nature and culture. I will continue to make photographs there for years to come. There are so many variables and constants that they are often hard to grasp. Another interesting series of yours that has particulary impressed me and on which I would like to spend some words is Los Paramos. This works is capable of establishing such an atmosphere of memories, using just little reminders of human existance... I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

That is an interesting question. Los Páramos, believe it or not, grew out of the photographs made at the Sheep Pasture. As I made images at the community garden, I noticed that many of the vegetables were left to rot. They were not grown for food, but as a therapeutic hobby. I found a great deal of waste, and I began to think, “Where doesn't this happen? Where does it count? Where is the environment valuable, threatened, precarious?” I researched poverty, agriculture, and environmental destruction. It led me to mountain farms in the Northern Andes. I found a guide and traveled to Ecuador, where I photographed kitchen gardens, so completely different from those in Easton, Massachusetts. They were small gardens in the cloud forest cultivated by people who truly needed the food that they harvested from those gardens. While I was there, I visited the páramo, a beautiful cold, windswept landscape between the tree and snow lines of the northern Andean Mountains. It was sublime. I knew I had to do a body of work based upon what I saw there. It was out of the EXPERIENCE IN the landscape that I found the sublime and beautiful. The concrete and the real created an atmosphere that pointed towards less tangible things—to spirituality, to the mysterious. My body grew tired and my hands got dirty as I hiked into that sublime landscape. Mountains can be spiritual places, but you can't get

From Los Páramos (Ozogoche, Ecuador)

to remote places praying on your knees in a church. I found a great deal of healing energy there. Yet, the páramo is a real place, with real problems, and is not protected simply because of the way it makes some of us feel. It is threatened, it is political, it is a frontier for agriculture, and IT IS NOT A BUCOLIC PLACE. And, yet it is. It is where poverty and the environment clash. It is sublime; it is real. It is a terrain that is being neglected and exploited by both


Thomas S. Ladd work: most of the times it doesn't seem to be just a passive background... and I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

There is nothing neutral about the landscape, or simply sentimental, or passive. It is where we live, we inhabit, we cultivate, we manage. One of the roles the artist can play is by exposing the tension between the political and the aesthetic. To make us look at the ordinary in new ways, to question traditional assumptions on the landscape, and to form a better or more sophisticated dialogue about how nature is represented in our culture. Sometimes an artist can make something that arrest our attention, that make us look, or see something in a way that we may come to political conclusions, powerfully persuasive ones, like… "let's leave this beautiful place alone, let's preserve it." Maybe, the picture doesn't need an overt political message to be persuasively political. By the way, as you have remarked, your research for Cloud Forest Gardens lead you to learn about poverty farming within the Andean Communities of South America... even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naïf, I'm sort of convinced that Art in these days could

indigenous people and industrialists. That tension is all at once interesting, sad, and human. So many people get confused; the bucolic is political—it isn’t just sentimental. We don’t seem to understand that anymore. And since our review is called "LandEscape", I would like to stop for a moment to consider the "function" of the landscape suggested by your

From Los Páramos From Los Páramos


Thomas S. Ladd

Land

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Odd Shoe from the series Close Wander

from the series: Sheep Pasture Gardens

play an effective role not only making aware public opinion about socio political issues: I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can an interview with even steer people's behavior... I would take this chance to ask your point about this. Do you think that it's an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in our society?

It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist, encouraging him: I was just wondering if an award -or even the expectation of positive feedbacks- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

Yes, I have stated this before; your reading of my work is accurate. We cannot overlook the social and political aspects of photographic representation. It frames elements in a way that creates questions and dialogue and provokes reaction. So, yes, if it is seen in the right place, presented with a sophisticated voice, and received by a thoughtful audience, the landscape image can steer people's behavior. It can make them question what they see and what they assume. They can find beauty in the ordinary and they can also start to reexamine their traditional, maybe sentimental, notions of the landscape. There is no singular path in the persuasive voices of artists. Yet, as annoying as some can be, they are often very effective at communicating complex ideas.

Feedback, whether positive or negative, is important. This “making stuff” business is about communication; it is about sharing, dialogue, and realignment, adjustment, and moving forward with new works of art with new ideas. For some, it is about collecting objects. But for most artists, it isn't about the object—it is more often about the dialogue of materials, the stretching of representation and the communication that can occur through various forms of substitution and replacement of signs. It is about exploring. Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Thomas. My last question deals


Thomas S. Ladd

San Carlos, Ecuador from the series: Close Wander

with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Yes. I am starting a new body of still life images that integrate the landscape.

LandEscape Art Review October 2014 Special Issue  

submit your artworks to landescape@artlover.com

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