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LegendaryLiving

BULL SPRINGS SKYLINE FOREST P

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MASON & MORSE RANCH COMPANY

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PHOTO —

CHRISDOUGLAS.PHOTOGRAPHY


33,000Âą ACRES B E N D ,

O R E G O N

Bull Springs Skyline Forest has significant long-term appreciation potential with opportunity for sustainable timber management, conservation, abundant recreation, in combination with residential and mixed-use development. P

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MASON & MORSE RANCH COMPANY


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The property is one of the largest contiguous parcels in the western United States with stunning views and abundant wildlife just minutes from Bend, Oregon. O F F E R E D L

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$ 1 2 7, 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 P

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FOREST FIRE PREVENTION

LAND CLEARING

ELECTRICAL LINE DEVELOPMENT

PIPELINE DEVELOPMENT

ROAD DEVELOPMENT

SERVICES PROVIDED NATIONALLY 1 9 0 0 B E A V E R R I D G E C I R C L E • N O R C R O S S , G E O R G I A 3 0 0 7 1 • ( 4 7 0 ) 4 7 1 - 6 0 9 9 O F F I C E • ( 4 7 0 ) 4 7 1 - 6 1 1 6 C E L L • D W F 1 0 @ YA H O O . C O M


Winter

2019

62

O N

T H E

I N S I D E

C O V E R

BULL SPRINGS SK YLINE FOREST Bull Springs Skyline Forest, located just minutes west of Bend, Oregon, is an active privately-held tree farm and recreational wilderness covering 32,995Âą contiguous, deeded acres bordering the Deschutes National Forest. The property has significant long-term appreciation potential with opportunity for sustainable timber management, conservation, abundant recreation, in combination with residential and mixed-use development.

24

B R O C H U R E

R ANCHO ES TRELL A With its combination of rugged South Texas brush and grassland savannahs, the Rancho Estrella, located 42 miles southwest of Hebbronville, Texas, is like two ranches in one. (following page 24)

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LEGENDARY LIVING


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LIFESTYLE

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34

O W N I N G

L A N D

CONCERNING C ANNABIS Cannabis reform is sweeping the nation. Thirtythree states and the District of Columbia currently have passed laws broadly legalizing marijuana in some form. This movement will continue, and the Federal Government will catch up or be forced to approve and adapt in time as reform states lead the way.

44

T H E O F

W I L D

S I D E

B U S I N E S S

BUSINESS BRANDING 101 “I’m a big believer in the power of branding and what branding means in terms of public perceptions and how that ties into market perceptions.”

48

THE O’HAIR R ANCH Situated in Paradise Valley, Montana, is the sixgeneration-strong O’Hair Ranch. The ranch serves as a working cow-calf operation raising prime black angus cattle.

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FEATURES

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32

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WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 101 In a nutshell, wildlife management is ultimately about conservation; the guardianship and best practices of safekeeping our greatest natural wild resources for future generations.

22

W I L D L I F E

41

E X C U R S I O N

CAMPERS USING APPS TO RENT PR I VAT E L A N D Whatever app they use, campers and landowners are creating a whole new outdoor experience. One click, and campers are welcome on private land more than ever before.

56

L I F E S T Y L E

REFLECTIONS FROM THE BROKEN HEART OF A LUMB ER JACK– FORES TER So much has changed in the woods in the last 30 years.

L AND INSIDER Tips, ideas and topics including lifestyle features, social media mentions and movers and shakers in the real estate industry

I AM A L AND SPECIALIS T One-page snapshots of land specialists’ lives

30

TRENDS Unique items curated especially for the discriminating land aficionado

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FAB 5 Five fabulous properties that caught our magazine team’s eye on the Land.com Network and deserve a closer look

WINTER 2019

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LAND

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Property Guide C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

ACRES

PAG E

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

Elbert

ALABAMA Cedar Bluff

63

124

ALASKA –

11

90

ARK ANSAS Polk

45

151

Glenn

PAG E

960

92

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

Putnam

GEORGIA

93

902

111

Cloudland

314

124

Gunnison

142

123

Lafayette

374

124

Gunnison

923

116

Lumpkin

1,088

147

750

124

Adams

30,912

137

Huerfano

325

93

Trenton

Huerfano

IDAHO

17,520

117

139

La Veta

300

94

8,180.33

84

Mancos

225

133

Valley

2,235

137

5,772

137

30,912

137

40

86

5,130

106

Montrose

164

98

Kern

8,525

106

Montrose

225

99

Valley

962

85

Montrose

1,100

99

Mendocino

5,017

84

Montrose

2,175

99

Montecito

5.83

139

36

110

13.73

Montecito

139

New Castle New Castle

237

110

237

139

New Castle

1,883

108

Monterey

2,051

84

New Castle

-

109

Plumas

1,120

84

Oak Creek

1.62

148

San Benito

2,270

107

Ouray

275

95

San Diego

41

146

Ouray

275

99

San Diego

55

146

Ouray

2,495

98

San Diego

126

146

Pueblo

24,778

122

San Luis Obispo

34

107

Pueblo

69,126

122

San Luis Obispo

350

107

Ridgway

158

98

San Luis Obispo

1,127

106

Ridgway

1,681

95

San Luis Obispo

1,920

106

Ridgway

1,681

98

San Luis Obispo

8,525

106

Rifle

154

109

San Luis Obispo

13,570

105

Rio Blanco

2,014

122

San Luis Obispo

14,750

104

Rio Blanco

2,112

92

1,900

58

Routt

1,388

117

Santa Barbara Siskiyou

29.58

85

Routt

Tehama

1,629

85

8.8

85

Trinity

COLOR ADO Baca Carbondale Carbondale

45,039

92

222

111

500

111

4,850

61

Somerset

320

110

Steamboat Springs

6.48

148

Steamboat Springs

35

148

Steamboat Springs

148

FLORIDA Desoto

443

132

Cimmaron

300

99

Desoto

1,387

132

Collbran

482

98

Flagler

1,200

132

Cuchara

160

94

Hamilton

241

132

Delta

8

718

І

132

11,594

Valley

Montecito

PAG E

300

Glenwood Springs

Kern

Lassen

ACRES

9

CALIFORNIA Carpinteria

Fremont

ACRES

LEGENDARY LIVING

123

Lake

1,386

132

ILLINOIS 117

86

170

86

233

86

Chautauqua

1,247

92

Chautauqua

1,247.3

61

861

89

275

91

2,760

91

Piscataquis

1,610

60

22

91

480

91

340

89

1,617

89

1,910

89

45

133

24

87

K ANSAS

KENTUCKY –

MAINE

MICHIGAN

MISSOURI

Drexel

M O N TA N A 167

87

3,549

87

5,643

87

Beaverhead

6,814

151

Buffalo

9,669

114

46,040

120

Carter


C

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

Custer

ACRES

46,040

PAG E

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

120

Rio Arriba

ACRES

PAG E

O

N

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

3,532

117

Klamath

T

E

N

T

S

ACRES

PAG E

15,620

137

Decker

933

119

Rio Arriba

5,463

102

Malheur

196

92

Denton

1,727

115

Rio Arriba

16,309

117

Mitchell

15,754

113

Fergus

5,710.6

137

Sandoval

36,460

100

Monument

553

97

Geyser

34,301

93

2,518

97

30,654

114

Sierra

Golden Valley

3,990

131

Socorro

Golden Valley

9,060

131

Tierra Amarilla

20

133

Helmsville Lavina

North Powder

55,439.22

145

Prineville

77.73

103

Sisters

6,867

113

507.86

112

Umpqua Valley

1.35

134

88

Umpqua Valley

6.41

134

N E W YO R K

6,904

115

Madison

219

93

496.29

88

Umpqua Valley

7.4

134

Meagher

3,322

131

615

88

Umpqua Valley

50.86

134

Miles City

8,100

115

Malone

143

150

Umpqua Valley

160

134

Umpqua Valley

172

134

349.12

88

Musselshell Racetrack Rapelje

435.4

12,467

137

1,108

115

Buncombe

0.5

136

16,589

114

Buncombe

1.5

136

NORTH CAROLINA

P E N N S Y LV A N I A –

Richland

3,642

93

Buncombe

3.19

136

Rosebud

3,464

131

Buncombe

4.6

136

Custer

5

127

Ryegate

2,104

115

Buncombe

337

152

Custer

10

127

Henderson

53

152

Custer

41.46

126

Custer

60

127

Sweet Grass

350

92

Yellowstone

828

131

Yellowstone

948

131

NEBRASKA Dakota

341

93

Maxwell

487

133

N E VA DA Elko

OKLAHOMA

S O U T H D A K O TA

Adair

79

151

Hermosa

70.96

126

Garfield

55

150

Hill City

163

126

Garfield

60

150

Hill City

240

126

Major

1,688

150

Hot Springs

290.35

126

Swink

1,110

94

Rapid City

2.19

126

Woodward

1,230

138

Rapid City

13

126

1,463

92

320

125

3,621

107

586

143

99

90

18,800

143

100

90

8,953

92

Bend

33

112

Hickman

3,828

140

61

112

Williamson

3,876

60

101.31

103

31,721.57

100

1,228

133

63

95

NEW MEXICO

Catron

Tripp

OREGON

TENNESSEE Cumberland Plateau

Catron

29,142

117

Bend

Diamante Mill

32,560

103

Bend

73

113

TEX AS

143

Bend

280

112

Bluff Dale

33,000

62

Engle Lincoln

291.8

145

Bend

Lincoln

1,100

145

Crook

1,135

128

Carrizo Springs

Lincoln

24,442

145

Culver

139

113

Cat Spring

Lincoln

55,439.22

145

Douglas

1,140

142

Childress

1,551

103

Lincoln

143

Klamath

330

135

Colorado

375

97

Lindrith

143

Klamath

464

135

Cuero

132

96

Mora

3,550

116

Klamath

1,019

135

Danbury

1,500

97

Rio Arriba

1,937

117

Klamath

5,515

135

Edwards

2,330

80

Briscoe

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C

O

N

T

E

N

T

S

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

ACRES

Edwards Foard Gillespie Goliad

PAG E

375

97

Goshen

1,440

123

6,651

102

Wharton

1,076

97

Hot Springs

2,505

122

65

78

Zapata

4,624

72

Hulett

55

141

U TA H

Hulett

314

141

20,000

116

40.7

119

Parkman

1,956

118

138

388

76

Haskell

41,000

100

275

144

Hutchinson

9,754

102

Jim Hogg

8,100

24

41,000

100

Jones

Duchesne Summit

1,120

93

446

123

VIRGINIA 944

152

Sheridan

60

96

324

152

Sheridan

75

119

Sheridan

169

119

7,677

96

206

119

1,623

141

WA S H I N G TO N –

122

97

475

102

Kerr

82.44

68

Kerr

108

74

6,651

102

Muscoda

Lavaca

243

130

Trempealeau

Lavaca

424

130

Lavaca

2,467

138

Aladdin

186

141

Columbia Walla Walla

10

90

Sheridan

755

94

Story

3,693

94

Sundance

47

133

200

149

WISCONSIN

170

144

Albany

26,046

116

Live Oak

413

130

Big Horn

1,945

119

Live Oak

4,216

130

Big Horn

83,604

116

Llano

2,728

70

Buffalo

2,605

118

347

96

Carbon

320

93

Montgomery

81

96

Casper

17,147

141

Montgomery

287

96

Cody

160

115

Muleshoe

177

103

Converse

686

116

Palo Pinto

3,100

101

Four Corners

927

141

Paradise

130

103

Glenrock

429

118

Paradise

160

103

Paradise

220

103

Paris

123

94

Potter

9,705

121

Real

2,330

80

300

103

11,370

101

8,100

24

Schleicher Starr Stonewall

41,000

100

22,375.6

101

Val Verde

872.6

82

Val Verde

22,375.6

101

Terrell

Waller

100

95

Weatherford

1,140

103

Webb

4,624

72

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LEGENDARY LIVING

130

I N T E R N AT I O N A L L I S T I N G S COUNTRY

ACRES

Africa - Namibia

W YO M I N G

Liberty

Runaway Bay

Meeteetse

Northumberland

Kendall

Lometa

Laramie

Charles City

Kempner

Knox

PAG E

Wharton

6,302

Hays

ACRES

PAG E

101

Grimes

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

C O U N T Y/ C I T Y

ACRES

14,317.19

T E X A S L A N TA N A H I L L S R A N C H 4,216 Acres in Live Oak County

Africa - Zimbabwe

128

PAG E

19.8

95

7,541

95

O R E G O N Y B E L L FA R M S 1,135 Acres in Crook County


Broker Guide

C

BROKER NAME

PAG E

American Farm + Ranch

94

Arnold Realty Inc.

141

Bachman & Associates

94

Beaverhead Home & Ranch Real Estate

O

N

T

E

N

BROKER NAME

T

PAG E

Harrigan Land Company

116

Hayden Outdoors Real Estate

61, 92

Hood Real Estate, Inc.

24, 68

151

International Sporting Properties

Beaverhead Outdoors Ranch Group

143

Jacobs Properties

Beverly Hanks Realtors

136

Keller Williams Black Hills | Lewis Realty

95 96 126

Blue Mountain Farm & Ranch

94

Keller Williams Greater Downtown Realty | Todd Henon Properties

124

C21 Farm & Ranch Harvey Properties

94

Keller Williams Umpqua Valley | The Mary Gilbert Group

134 130

California Outdoor Properties

84

La Gloria Land Co

Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty | Brook Havens

112

Land and Wildlife

Chas. S. Middleton and Son LLC

100

Land InvesTex, LLC

Chase Brothers, L.L.C.

118

LandLeader

Christmas & Associates

150

Lippard Auctioneers

Clark Company Ranch Real Estate

104

Living the Dream Outdoor Properties

89

Compass | Suzanne Perkins

139

Maine Outdoor Properties Team

91

87

Mason & Morse Ranch Company

62, 120

135

Maury L. Carter & Associates, Inc.

Corder and Associates, LLC Crater Lake Realty, Inc. Deitra Robertson Real Estate, Inc.

95

Eagle Land Brokerage

95, 98

90 144 86 150

132

McEwen Group LLC

60

McLean Faulconer Inc.

152 122

Eau Claire Realty

149

Mirr Ranch Group

Fridrich & Clark Realty, LLC

140

Mossy Oak Properties | NM Ranch & Luxury, LLC

145

National Land Realty

152

NW Forest Properties

142

Powers Land Brokerage

96

Premier Intermountain Properties

131

Ranch and Resort Realty

113 O R E G O N CHERRY CREEK M O U N TA I N R A N C H 15,754 Acres in Mitchell

61

Ranch Aspects | Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

108

Realtree United Country

133

Red Hawk Realty

146

Republic Ranches

138

Rodeo Realty

58

Steamboat Sotheby’s International Realty

148

Superior Land Network

120

Superior Town & Country Realty’

96

Swan Land Company

124 A L A B A M A

S

114

Tarrant & Harman

86

Taylor Land Investments

97

Texas Ranch Brokers, LLC

97

Texas Ranch Sales, L.L.C.

128

The Simpson Company Real Estate

147

WILDWOOD ACRES RANCH

Timberland Realty Triangle Realty

121

63 Acres in Cedar Bluff

Twin Oaks Realty, Inc.

151

88

Whitney Land Company

97

Wilderness Realty, Inc.

60

Wilks Ranch Brokers

137

WINTER 2019

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LAND

11


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Publisher IN PUBLISHING, DEADLINES D O N ’ T P U T O N T H E B R A K E S , so they often slam right into holidays. As I write this, it’s the day before Thanksgiving. I’m carving out a little time in front of my computer before I head to the kitchen.

TOM ALEX ANDER Editor-in-Chief Creative Director

As always, we have the best ranches and country estates from sea to shining sea. Don’t miss the stellar cover property, Bull Springs Skyline Forest, more than 32,000 acres of beautiful, multi-use timberland just outside of Bend, Oregon. Holiday shopping, anyone?

The O'Hair Ranch on page 48

R O B KO S TA N I C H

Production Manager Editor

SUSAN SIDES Design Editor

Social Media Director Designer

K AT I E G O R D O N Copy Editor Designer

Land is a gift that keeps giving to every member of the family. Take a look and find your special place for your special people between our pages.

L AUREN CARSWELL

As I think about you using our magazine as a resource to find your life’s destination, it makes me smile. I love the work I do, even though the deadlines are often on a collision course with the holidays. I have to admit, in the not-so distant past, my blood pressure would be spiking about now as I tried to juggle it all—the magazine, the cooking, the decorating, the preparations. My adrenaline would surge as I bounced from one partially completed task to the other in a race to get them all completed in a manner that Martha Stewart would approve of.

Senior Account Executive

Letters + Comments Lauret Jarvis, Editor-in-Chief, ljarvis@land.com Subscriptions + Information land.com/magazines or email us at magazines@land.com

Bull Springs Skyline Forest on page 62

@landcom_network

And as soon as we got the dishes cleared from our Thanksgiving feast, it would be on to Christmas. First stop? The attic to retrieve the decorations for a frenzied session of festive cheer.

@landcomnetwork

This year is different, though. Instead of rushing through a checklist of must do’s, should do’s and have to’s, I’m deliberately taking it slow and being mindful of every moment. I’m replacing the hurry and the worry that’s come to define the holidays in modern America with gratitude. Although I try to live a life of thanksgiving year-round, I’m dubbing this my season of grateful.

@landcom_network

Instead of fretting about tinsel and lights, I’m going to savor the snow and sparkling icicles on the fir trees. Instead of standing in long lines as Muzak blares over store speakers, I’m going to snowshoe through the woods listening to the birds lift their carols. Instead of obsessing over finding the perfect gift for every person on my list, I’m going to focus on those magic moments of connection over cocoa, coffee and conversation. Family. Friends. Peace. Health. Freedom. Work. Faith. Abundance. We have so much to be thankful for when we just slow down and reflect. While it’s a tad early to make a New Year’s resolution, I’m going on the record with mine now. I’m going to extend this grateful season throughout 2020—and beyond. Join me. Together, let’s embrace the attitude that changes the world.

L AURET JARVIS

Editor-in-Chief • ljarvis@land.com

12

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LEGENDARY LIVING

Production

As I put on the finishing touches, I have to say that this issue is a good one. From the “helpful things to know” file, we’ve got articles on the basics of wildlife management, branding an outdoor company and the laws governing cannabis production in Colorado. From the “people who live life their own way” file, we’re pleased to introduce you to the O’Hairs, a multiContinually grateful for these two—my generational ranching grandaughters, Calli & Camden family who operate in Paradise Valley, Montana, and Daniel Christmas, a lumberjack-forester from Tupper Lake, New York.

Sales

L AURE T JARVIS

© Copyright 2019 CoStar Group. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. LAND Magazines are published by CoStar Group, 100 Congress Ave, Suite 1500, Austin, TX 78701. Information provided to CoStar Group is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The publisher will not be responsible for any omissions, errors, typographical mistakes or misinformation within this publication. Measurements and figures are approximate. Properties are subject to errors, omissions, prior change or prior sale. The real estate advertised in this magazine is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and it’s amendments. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. Printed in the USA.


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CHRIS DOUGL AS

KIRK GOBLE

Chris Douglas was born and raised in East Tennessee, and his interest in photography began at age 10, when he began by snapping photos of his surroundings— wildlife and family hunting trips. These passions have persisted. Chris’ photography still reflects his life as an outdoorsman, conservationist and cowboy and expresses the respect and gratitude he has for his Native American lineage. He currently divides his time between Seattle, Washington, where he is the Creative Director at C. C. Filson and Bozeman, Montana, where he lives with his wife, two children and their horses. Find out more → ChrisDouglas.photography

Kirk Goble, ALC, has been a Colorado licensed real estate broker since 1988 and founded The Bell 5 Land Company in 2000. He specializes in farm, ranch, land and water brokerage. He is a member of the National Association of REALTORS®, The Greeley Area REALTOR® Association and the REALTORS® Land Institute (RLI). Goble was awarded the Land REALTOR® of America by the RLI in 2013 and is currently a LANDU instructor and Accredited Land Consultant through RLI. Find out more → RLILand.com

K AREN DEGER MCCHESNEY

GARRE T T ZOLLER SARAH GRIGG Sarah Grigg is a writer based in Bozeman, Montana. Her work has taken her from researching grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area to covering sporting assignments in the Seychelles. She completed her first book this year, Legacy of the Land, detailing the history of two Montana ranches. Find out more→ Sarah-Grigg.com

Growing up in Illinois, Karen’s favorite escape was to ride her bicycle to a forest preserve, sit under a tree and write stories. Her insatiable curiosity led her to work as a magazine writer, public relations practitioner and high school English teacher. Today, Karen teaches writing and storytelling to youth for Lighthouse Writers Workshop, Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities and Redline Contemporary Art Center. And, she’s deep in revising a young adult novel, personal essays and more magazine articles. Find out more→ LighthouseWriters.org

GREG SIMONS

Garrett Zoller, ALC, is the Managing Principal Broker of Record and a founder of both LandAndWildlife.com and LandLeader. Garrett’s hands-on experience in the development of real estate, with strength in rural and commercial properties, administers an expert knowledge of recreational, agricultural and timber real estate. Garret is a certified Accredited Land Consultant (ALC) through the REALTORS® Land Institute and served as the 2019 RLI Pacific Northwest Chapter President. Find out more→ RLILand.com

Greg received a B.S. degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences in 1987 from Texas A&M University and soon after formed Wildlife Systems, Inc., a company that currently manages hunting operations on over 800,000 acres of private land in Texas and New Mexico. He is also co-owner of Wildlife Consultants, LLC, providing technical assistance to landowners and other entities on habitat management and other wildlife-related issues. Greg served as President of Texas Wildlife Association through July 2015. Find out more→ WildlifeSystems.com

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In 1897, C.C. Filson began outfitting prospectors headed for the Gold Rush with apparel and goods strong enough to contend with the toughest spots on earth. Today, Filson is a global manufacturer, wholesaler and retailer constantly developing new products to serve those who refuse to stay indoors. Filson remains committed to producing unfailing goods that live up to its founder’s promise: “We guarantee every item purchased from us. No more, no less. Your satisfaction is the sole purpose of our transaction.” Find out more→ Filson.com

The REALTORS® Land Institute, The Voice of Land, continually strives to maintain its status as the acknowledged leader for all matters pertaining to the land real estate profession. RLI endeavors to remain the essential membership organization for the extraordinary real estate professionals who broker, lease, sell, develop and manage our most precious resource: the land. Find out more→ RLILand.com

L E A D T H E C O N V ER S AT I O N + B EC O M E A C O N T R I B U TO R ON L AND.COM + IN L AND MAGA ZINES Learn more→ Land.com/Magazines/Contribute

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DANIEL M. CHRISTMAS Daniel Christmas is a native of upstate New York and has owned Christmas and Associates, Inc., a recreational land sales company, for 30 years. Throughout his career, Dan has served as a forestry and land use consultant for both public and private initiatives. Dan has built a life and career based on his love of family, his commitment to his community and his fondness for the woods. Find out more→ LandandCamps.com


[ MARKET] Billionaire Buys Florida Mansion for $111 Million, Setting State Record Hedge fund billionaire Steven Schonfeld and his wife bought a sprawling Palm Beach estate for $111 million. The 6-acre estate sale beats a record for the state set this summer, when an estate owned by the late Broadway producer Terry Allen Kramer sold to an unknown buyer for $110.3 million. → CNBC.com

[ MARKET] U.S. Housing Starts Surge October new single-family housing starts in the United States surged to their highest levels since 2007 while future housing permits were also at a 12-year high. New home starts were up almost 4% to an annual rate of 1.31 million. → TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

→ Land.com/Magazines/Subscribe

[LIFEST YLE] Southern Living Launches New Hey Y’all Video Series

Frank Lloyd Wright's Buildings Around the U.S.A. USA Today has a look at many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s best designs including homes, schools, businesses and a museum. Wright designed about 1,000 structures in his 70-year career. Fallingwater (above) is a prime example of how Frank Lloyd Wright incorporated nature into his designs. → USAToday.com

©SouthernLiving.com

[GALLERY]

©Supercel7 / iStock Editorial / Getty Images Plus via Getty Images

Whether she's mixing up biscuits in the Southern Living Test Kitchen or playing with piglets on an Alabama farm, Ivy Odom isn't afraid to get her hands dirty. Born and raised in Moultrie, Georgia, Ivy is defining what it means to be a modern Southern woman. → SouthernLiving.com

Mar-a-Lago Almost Became the Kennedy and Johnson Winter White House In the years that he’s been in office, President Trump has spent every Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago, the Palm Beach, Florida, estate sometimes referred to as his “Winter White House.” And while Trump might be the person most associated with the property today, he’s far from the first commanderin-chief to be beguiled by the 1920s mansion built by the cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post. In this excerpt from Les Standiford’s new book, Palm Beach, Mar-a-Lago, and the Rise of America’s Xanadu, he delves into the history of the seaside playground for the rich and famous, the colorful past of its most famous residence, and how it almost became a home to previous presidents, including John F. Kennedy. → TownandCountryMag.com ©Getty Images

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social [ # GE T YO UR K ID S O U T S ID E ] Keeping our Black Friday tradition alive and well! Instead of going to town and battling it out with thousands of our closest friendswe go to the woods! This year, W brought his sidekick and ended up finding a little something extra. #qdm #thankful #fall #family #getyourkidsoutside → @ sdschwartz, Hortenstine Ranch Company

[#HUNTING] That’s a wrap! Great day shooting at Fox Creek Plantation. God blessed us with a great sunset too! @landleader #quailhunting #deerhunting #georgialandbroker → @JonKohlerAssociates

[#W YOMING]

[ #WELIVE THISS TUFF]

A new experience today with the good folks from @bisonunion moving bison at the Brinkerhoff Ranch. Great people under these western skies doing the kind of work that makes you feel good in God’s Country, Wyoming USA. #sheridanwyoming #bighornmountains #bighornmountainfoothills

Everyday there will be labor and headaches. They don’t always work like we want them to, but we still wouldn’t have it any other way. We live this stuff. Chasing yearlings down at Southern Cattle Lands in Florida. #landleader #yourlandleader #welivethisstuff → @ landleader

→ @twy_mt_ranchbroker, Chase Brothers,LLC

[#WELCOME] Congratulations to Kirby Berger, who has recently joined Swan Land Company as a Sales Associate licensed in Wyoming. Kirby understands the value of relationships and the people that make Wyoming great. → @swanlandcompany

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Follow @LandCom_Network on Instagram to see featured stories, land trends, top brokers, properties and more!

[#COUNTRYLIFE] Nicole and Josh also made it out for a snowy tree hunting trip this past weekend! Fun, a toasty fire and their first Christmas tree together is now ready for ornaments! #newlyweds #christmastreehunting #klamathnationalforest #siskiyou #countrylife #countryrealtor #californiaoutdoorpropertiessiskiyou → @ caoutdoorpropertiessiskiyou

SHARE YOUR L AND LIFEST YLE PHOTOS

[ # S I T K AWAT ER F OW L ] Thanksgiving duck hunt with these two donut bandits. 30 minutes in and they’ve eaten everything in the boat. #happythanksgiving #sitkawaterfowl #mockranches #kwland

#L ANDLIFEST YLE

→ @mockranches

Tag your photos with this hashtag for a chance to be featured.

[#L ANDMAGS] Check out some of our beautiful premier ranch land listings in the latest issue of Land Magazine! View all of our available premier and luxury ranch properties at UCranchesforsale.com. National Marketing, Local Expertise. #unitedcountry #realestate #ranch #luxury #landmags #landforsale → @ unitedcountryrealestate_

[#SPE AKER] We were honored to be the featured speaker at the Chattanooga Civilian Club meeting to share the latest local and national real estate statistics. Combining data with 20 years in the industry, Todd has a unique perspective and professional opinion valued by many.

[ # OFFGRIDRIVERC ABIN] John scouting the upper reaches of Buffalo River | coming soon in the wild forestlands and spring valleys of Lewis County • #highforest #waterinthevalley #silence #offgridrivercabin → @mcewengroup

→ @ toddhenonproperties

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[ON THE MARKET] ©Lauren Keller/LRES Marketing 2017

George Strait Selling Custom Adobe Estate in San Antonio Here’s a home worth singing about. Country music star George Strait is crooning a goodbye tune to his San Antonio, TX, mansion. The 67-year-old "King of Country" now has his custom home on the market for $8.9 million. Tamara Strait of Strait Luxury and Kuper Sotheby's International Realty holds the listing. → Realtor.com

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[ SOLD]

Morris Place Ranch

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Congratulations to Ryan Flair and James H. Taylor of Hall and Hall on the sale of the Morris Place Ranch, a classic Montana mountain retreat ranch within a short drive of Big Timber—one of Montana’s most soughtafter small towns. Its primary feature is that it is a first-class family hunting ranch that the family also treasures as an idyllic spot to enjoy all the seasons in an incredibly comfortable building complex. → HallandHall.com

Kim Kardashian & Kanye West Buy $14M Property in Wyoming LAND Magazine has learned that broker partner Bill Vacek of Hayden Outdoors Real Estate successfully represented the exclusive buyer and the seller of Monster Lake Ranch, as seen in the news. → HaydenOutdoors.com

[ INDUSTRY]

The Realtors® Land Institute Announces 2020 National Leadership

National President KYLE HANSEN, ALC Hertz Real Estate Service

National President-Elect RENEE HARVEY, ALC Century 21 Harvey Properties Inc

National Vice President DEAN SAUNDERS, ALC Saunders Ralston Dantzler Real Estate

National Immediate Past President JERAMY STEPHENS, ALC National Land Realty

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Dean Saunders, ALC, was elected as their 2020 RLI National VP. He joins the 2020 RLI National Board of Directors as a part of their Executive Committee alongside 2020 President Kyle Hansen, 2020 President-Elect Renee Harvey, ALC and 2020 Immediate Past President Jeramy Stephens, ALC. → RLILand.com

[ON THE MARKET] Kelly Clarkson Is Selling Her Massive Lakeside Mansion in Tennessee Kelly Clarkson is selling her stunning home on an exclusive four-acre gated waterfront estate! Home is naturally light and airy, with magnificent views from every window. Quiet wooded cul-de-sac, private dock, saltwater pool, two spas... so much more! Jack Miller of Parks holds the listing. Property ID: 6657063 → LandsofAmerica.com

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L AND IS IN MY BLOOD. IT’S MY LIVING—AND MY LIFE.

JOHN STRATMAN Associate Broker & Principal Owner Mason & Morse Ranch Company

Where do you live? Elizabeth, Colorado Where do you work? Mostly in the agricultural and recreation areas of the western United States What drew you to ranch and recreational real estate? I grew up on cattle ranches in Colorado and Montana, then had a corporate career in Agriculture Real Estate Finance where I worked in most western states and lived in Nebraska, Wyoming, Montana, California, Oklahoma and Colorado, so moving into real estate brokerage was a natural progression. What makes the corner of the world where you work special? Certainly the land and the varied landscape of the great plains, Rocky Mountains and Great Basin with all its differences and similarities What are the three most important tools in a ranch broker’s kit? Live It to Know It Experience, GPS, Drone If you could call anywhere on the planet home, where would it be? Why? So many great choices, but I would say northern Wyoming or the Sandhills of Nebraska because of the excellent grasslands that exist in those locales. What’s the most profound lesson you’ve learned from the land or its people? Nature always has the last say, and people, while they think they do, they generally don’t know what they want. That is why my guidance has been so helpful to my clients’ success. Listener or talker? Listener—I enjoy listening to people to see what they know or think they know. If you had one extra hour of time per day, how would you use it? Exploring nature and showing people its wonderful creations Would you rather be without Internet for a week or your phone? While no broker can go without a phone, the Internet is such a great time-saving device, but I am most happy without either which means I am probably enjoying the outdoors someplace very cool. If you could give one sentence advice about how to live life, what would that be? Don’t waste your time, set achievable goals and always be kind. Describe your perfect work day. Showing a great ranch to someone who appreciates it

My success in the brokerage business has been driven by knowing where to go, how to get there and what to do and say when I arrive.” 22

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What is your most memorable deal to date? I’ve had many choices, but I would say it is either the Ochoco Mountain Ranch in Prineville, Oregon, or The Slash 07 in Gunnison, Colorado.

Learn more about John & Mason & Morse Ranch Company at RanchLand.com


RO O M TO R OA M The Rancho Estrella is divided into four pastures: the Brush Pasture, the Front Safari Pasture, the Back Safari Pasture and the House Pasture. The exterior and interior fences are high to facilitate wildlife management. Miles of all-weather and quick-drying ranch roads provide easy access. Managed for wildlife for almost three decades, the Rancho Estrella is home to white-tailed deer, bobwhite and scaled quail, Rio Grande turkeys, javelina, dove and feral hogs. While quail hunting occurs regularly on the ranch, the native population has been supplemented with pen-raised birds to keep the numbers stable. In addition to healthy populations of native game, the ranch has a full complement of desirable exotics: sable antelope, scimitar-horned oryx, axis and zebras. The well-managed brush country habitat is supplemented with protein feeders as well as winter and summer food plots. The ranch has 24 protein feeders ranging in capacity from 1,000 –2,500 pounds as well as 18 quail feeders. To facilitate hunting, there are 30 Atascosa deer blinds and 30 1,000-pound corn feeders strategically located throughout.


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D E S I G N E D TO E NTER TAIN Rancho Estrella is designed to entertain large numbers of family, friends, colleagues or clients, providing opportunities for both camaraderie and privacy. The scope and scale of the facilities can handle special events. For instance, the focal point of one of the dining rooms is a 24-foot mesquite table. There are two separate compounds to house guests, one in the Brush Pasture and one in the House Pasture. At each location, there is a combination of a main lodge as well as apartments and casitas. The smaller quarters offer partial kitchens and private baths. The Brush Pasture Compound, which reflects the style and tradition of South Texas, also has a swimming pool and a series of common areas designed to bring people together. There is a master plan in place outlining potential expansion of the House Pasture. The owner’s home is located at the Brush Pasture compound. It is a four-bedroom, four-bath house with half baths attached to the kitchen and family room. While it is central to the compound’s design, the owner’s home includes a separate wing where the family can gather privately. The ranch’s infrastructure is also designed to support ranch work and entertaining. For instance, there is a 10’x25’ walk-in cooler for storing game and kennels for housing the ranch’s bird dogs. Guests can enjoy shooting skeet from both a high and low house. A watch tower near the owners’ home provides a view of Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains.


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L I F E O N T H E R ANCH In addition to wildlife, the ranch is well-suited for cattle. The new owners can choose to run their own herds or lease out the grazing for an additional income stream. There are two sets of cattle pens: one on the Brush Pasture, and a newly constructed set that can be accessed from the remaining three pastures. Water for wildlife and livestock are plentiful. The Rancho Estrella has nine water wells, two of which are run on solar pumps and the remainder on electric submersible pumps. There are also four stock tanks, three of which are supplemented by water from the wells; the other relies on rainwater. Plus, there are more than 30 wildlife waterers scattered throughout the property. The ranch has been both a hunting destination and a corporate retreat. If the new owner chooses, Rancho Estrella could easily be transformed into a commercial hunting operation. Brush country. Grassland savannas. Camaraderie. Privacy. Rancho Estrella provides an opportunity for the best of all worlds.


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L AND IS IN MY BLOOD. IT’S MY LIVING—AND MY LIFE.

TODD HENON Broker & Owner Todd Henon Properties

Where do you live? Chattanooga, Tennessee Where do you work? Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama What drew you to ranch and recreational real estate? I grew up doing chores on my grandparents’ Kentucky farm, and caving, hunting and fly fishing from Florida to South Dakota. Passion for wisely stewarding the outdoors makes it a privilege to serve like-minded clients. What makes the corner of the world where you work special? The confluence of the Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama borders offers a lifestyle of year-round recreation gifted by the Tennessee River watershed and easy access to the Great Smoky Mountains. Sportsmen and landowners are drawn by our worldrenowned outdoor opportunities: trout and bass fishing, hiking, rock climbing, hang gliding, hunting and boating. No Tennessee state income tax, affordability and top educational institutions make our area a desirable place to raise a family or retire. Within 90 minutes of several major cities, it’s not uncommon to walk out your back door to hunt deer or turkey in the morning then head to a Broadway show downtown that night. What are the three most important tools in a ranch broker’s kit? 1—Land app, 2—Intrinsic knowledge of land and creativity for its highest and best use and 3—in the South. . . Deet If you could call anywhere on the planet home, where would it be? Why? I love fly fishing and hunting around the world, but there is something special about coming “home” to Tennessee. Our scenic mountain views, clean waterways, vibrant wildlife in pastures and woodlands, colorful flora and fauna and our moderate climate are ensconced in entrepreneurial innovation and rich history. Especially with three grandkids nearby, my wife and I would choose our hometown of Signal Mountain, Tennessee, every day. What’s the most profound lesson you’ve learned from the land or its people? Responsibility and stewardship Listener or talker? Listener If you had one extra hour of time per day, how would you use it? Outside. . . whether helping clients develop vision around a piece of land, chopping wood or casting flies Would you rather be without Internet for a week or your phone? Internet. I can “old school” real estate on my phone and maintain a high level of productivity. Technology certainly makes our days more scalable, but there have been many-a-successful land brokers able to sell thousands of acres just by knowing his/her area and members of the community well. If you could give one sentence advice about how to live life, what would that be? Hard work + trust in God’s provision will win the day. Describe your perfect work day. Everyone on my team leveraging their gifts and talents at full capacity, while I guide a client through a sale or purchase that enables them to fulfill their vision and move into their next chapter. What is your most memorable deal to date? Lightning struck twice when our team helped sensitively transition our seller—an injured cattleman—from his beloved acreage by connecting him with an international dog field trial champion. After a nationwide search, we helped our buyer convert this stunning 193-acre Georgia farm into a beautiful home and perfect venue for global competitions at which our team pitched in to barbecue and extend Southern hospitality. It’s rewarding to see one property fulfill two important dreams.

Learn more about Todd & Todd Henon Properties at ToddHenon.com

It’s all about relationships. Make it about the people, and you’ll win every day.” WINTER 2019

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L AND IS IN MY BLOOD. IT’S MY LIVING—AND MY LIFE.

HUNTER HARRIGAN Ranch Broker Harrigan Land Company LLC

Where do you live? Harrigan Land Company is located in Sedalia, Colorado. Where do you work? We specialize in high-end, recreational ranches in Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, Utah and Oklahoma. What drew you to ranch and recreational real estate? As avid outdoorsmen and ranch owners ourselves, we live what we sell. What makes the corner of the world where you work special? The Mountain West is home to some of the most beautiful landscapes and natural resources in the world. What are the three most important tools in a ranch broker’s kit? Flexibility, work ethic and resiliency. If you could call anywhere on the planet home, where would it be? Why? Sedalia, Colorado. For us, this location allows us to cover a large territory and focus on selling “the best of the best.” What’s the most profound lesson you’ve learned from the land or its people? Large, legacy ranches are becoming a diminishing resource. Listener or talker? We believe you should always be quick to listen and slow to speak. If you had one extra hour of time per day, how would you use it? There is nothing we prefer more than spending time in the outdoors with family. Would you rather be without Internet for a week or your phone? Without Internet. Lots can still be done with a good old-fashioned phone call or faceto-face meeting. If you could give one sentence advice about how to live life, what would that be? Always tell the truth, and never give up. Describe your perfect work day. Closing a deal that the buyer and seller feel good about.

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What is your most memorable deal to date? The marketing and sale of the 21,793-acre Monument Butte Ranch near Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

Learn more about Hunter & Harrigan Land Company at HarriganLand.com


A M U S T- H AV E R E A D FOR L AND LOVERS

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L AND IS IN MY BLOOD. IT’S MY LIVING—AND MY LIFE.

TODD RENFREW Broker & Owner California Outdoor Properties

Where do you live? On a ranch in Vacaville, California Where do you work? California Outdoor Properties in Vacaville, California What drew you to ranch and recreational real estate? In the early 1990s, my wife and I lived on a ranch that was off the grid. We put in the well, solar system and helped build our home. I worked for my neighbor that ran a cattle ranch and we fell in love with the ranch lifestyle. What makes the corner of the world where you work special? We are centrally located in California where you can head to the mountains, the valley and coast, all in a day’s drive. What are the three most important tools in a ranch broker’s kit? Physical: 1—Mapping/GPS program, 2—Polaris 6-seater, 3—A good cowboy hat Actual: 1—LandLeader, 2—Listen, communicate, and follow up with clients past & present, 3—Be direct, upfront, and honest If you could call anywhere on the planet home, where would it be? Why? A cattle ranch on the California coast with my own surf spot because I love the ocean, land and surfing What’s the most profound lesson you’ve learned from the land or its people? How important it is to prepare your family for your death. I have sold so many ranches where the parents had died and did not have a game plan on what to do with the ranch, and their children end up suing each other. Owners of farms and ranches need to plan and communicate on how the farm or ranch will or will not be kept in family hands. Listener or talker? Definitely a listener. God gave you two ears and one mouth for a reason. If you had one extra hour of time per day, how would you use it? I would use it to read. I love to read. Would you rather be without Internet for a week or your phone? Without internet; I live on my phone. If you could give one sentence advice about how to live life, what would that be? I love this quote, it sums it up—“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ‘Wow! What a Ride!’” —Hunter S. Thompson Describe your perfect work day. Go out to breakfast with my wife to discuss business schedule, attend a signing at the title company on a closing of a big ranch, conference call with Landleader on the next TV show schedule, tour a new ranch and get the listing and have dinner with our top agent discussing their new commission rate.

The harder you work, the luckier you get.” 28

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What is your most memorable deal to date? Getting the largest land listing in California, a 50,500-acre ranch located in the San Francisco Bay area; N3 Cattle Company. The amount of phone calls, interest, and all the people that I have met and spoken with has been phenomenal.

Learn more about Todd & California Outdoor Properties at CaliforniaOutdoorProperties.com


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DUCK WORTH

When rifle hunting lost its challenge for teenager Paul Schafer, his analytical nature led him to develop the Silvertip, named after his first silvertip grizzly taken back in 1974. Dave Windauer was just 22 years of age when he was given the opportunity to buy Paul's business and begin a life as a full time bowyer. He builds longbows and recurves available in one-piece and take-down models. All are designed for speed, smoothness, stability, durability and beauty. Every bow leaves the shop with an eye for beauty, excellence and love of the hunt, in tribute to Paul and in commitment to you, the bowhunter.

Duckworth is proud to be the only source-verified, 100 percent Made-in-USA Merino wool clothing company. They carefully manage every step of the process, from raw fiber to finished garment. Knowing wool is their business. Starting at the Helle ranch in Dillon, Montana, where every fleece is graded and selected for its end use, their Merino wool then travels to the Carolinas, the traditional powerhouse of U.S. textile production. The spinning, knitting and dyeing is part science and part art, requiring specialized know-how, trusted partners and the long-term vision of a fourthgeneration ranching family. Duckworth guarantees total supply-chain responsibility, quality and transparency from beginning to end.

Find out more→ SchaferSilverTipBows.com

Find out more→ DuckworthCo.com

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SHINOL A + GEIER DEERSKIN LINED GLOVES Shinola collaborated with Geier Glove Company to customize their style and create the perfect coldweather glove. Made with deerskin leather, these unisex slip-on gloves are polypropylene lined for extra protection against the cold. Their signature Shinola rivet adorns the bottom hem of each glove. Geier Glove Company has been producing premium leather gloves for over 85 years in Centralia, Washington. Since the company began in 1927, attention to detail and fit has been their hallmark. Only the finest leather available is used when making their collection of work, dress, driving and riding gloves. Detroit-based Shinola is a luxury design brand with an unwavering commitment to crafting products that are built to last—from timepieces to leather goods, jewelry to audio.

Find out more→ Shinola.com

TA P R O O T K N I V E S TAPROOT Knives is a one-man shop where Mike Tapley designs and builds utility and presentation-grade cutlery. The bulk of his work is fixed-blade knives, including hunters, filet knives and kitchen cutlery. Working from his designs or from a customer's design and specs, Mike takes sole authorship of each step in the process—including heat treating and blade tempering. Each TAPROOT knife is hand-crafted with a focus on function, fit and superior cutting and edgeholding performance. Mike’s goal is to make the last knife better than the one before it! Made in Wetumpka, Alabama. Find out more→ TAPROOTKnives.com

PE AK ANTLER CO. An antler lighting and antler furniture design firm and maker in Colorado, Peak Antler Co.’s American-made products are handcrafted using naturally shed antlers from whitetail deer, mule deer, elk, moose and fallow deer. Bespoke antler chandeliers, antler furniture and antler mirrors by Jeff Musgrave feature quality construction and creative, original designs. Custom orders are welcomed—Peak Antler Co. designs have been featured in the interior designs of many resorts, restaurants, corporate offices and private mountain lodges. Find out more→ PeakAntlers.com

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The Moser family has grown from a one-man operation to comprise a community of nearly 70 skilled craftsmen. Like the wood used to make their furniture, they proudly accept their commitment to the sustainability of their workforce, their families and their communities. The Moser team carries that legacy forward, each and every day, sustaining both new and old tradition for generations to follow. Since 1987, Thos. Moser has called its nationally-recognized Auburn, Maine, workshop home. The space has grown to more than 90,000 square feet, and functions like the furniture it produces, with natural workflows that integrate both handwork and beneficial technology.

Montana Bison Fashion & Furs creates custom yarns and knitwear using Montana ranched bison, sheep and alpaca. All fibers are milled and produced in the U.S. Original patterns are created and knit by the owner, Jennifer Olsson, into hats, finger-free mitts, scarves and more. Jennifer also stretches, fleshes and turns bison hides into soft lovely trim on capes and coats. Soft suede labels and hand-polished deer or elk antler buttons gives all her Montana garments an authentic Montana signature.

Find out more→ ThosMoser.com

Find out more→ MTBisonFashionFurs.com

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CARVING OUT A LIVING ON THE L AND When he first envisioned becoming a farmer, author Emmet Van Driesche never imagined his main crop would be Christmas trees. Carving Out a Living on the Land tells the story of how Van Driesche navigated changing life circumstances, took advantage of unexpected opportunities and leveraged new and old skills to piece together an economically viable living, while at the same time respecting the land’s complex ecological relationships.

Located on a hilltop ranch in McKinney, Texas, the FarmHouse Fresh team grows and crafts skincare products. Whether certified organic or using up to 100 percent naturally derived ingredients, all their products are chock full of fruits, vegetables, milks and more from U.S. farms, including their own. Their products are proudly made in the U.S.A. In their Marshmallow Melt balm, Pure Shea, cocoa and mango butters have been combined into a rich, solid, scrumptious all-purpose balm that melts into skin on contact, nourishing dry, chapped hands, knees, knuckles—and even lips!

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Concerning Cannabis Story by Kirk Goble, ALC Courtesy of The REALTORS® Land Institute

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In 2012, the citizens of Colorado voted decisively to become the first jurisdiction in the world to allow legal adult possession, use, growing and retail sales of cannabis (marijuana). Colorado has had legal medical marijuana since 2000. The 2012 amendment to the Colorado Constitution (Amendment 64) also set forth retail marijuana sales rules, a taxing structure that provides for revenue to schools, public and youth education regarding cannabis and the production of industrial hemp. Colorado became ground zero for cannabis reform and many other states and municipalities have since been looking to Colorado for guidance and example. Colorado citizens, in greater numbers all the time, have supported this groundbreaking change, and the legislature, regulators and industry have been working diligently to construct a business and legal framework within which to operate. Cannabis reform is also sweeping the nation. Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia currently have passed laws broadly legalizing marijuana in some form, and the 2018 Farm Bill set the framework for legal industrial hemp nationwide. This movement will continue, and the Federal Government will catch up or be forced to approve and adapt in time as reform states lead the way. The latest Gallup poll on cannabis shows 66 percent of all Americans across the board support full legalization of this ancient plant. Canada has had legal hemp since the 1990s, and last year they legalized marijuana nationwide. Colorado has managed this matter pretty well by writing good laws, monitoring the law’s status and effects and adjusting regulations as needed to mitigate unanticipated issues for regulation and law enforcement while addressing the needs of the ancient industry. The entire conversation has changed in our state—fewer talk of fears and pot jokes and more talk of business opportunity. In short order, legalization has brought about normalization. For example, in Denver proper, there are more dispensaries than Starbucks. Retail cannabis sales in Colorado began in 2014. Last year, the adult use (recreational) sales alone topped $1.5 billion, with tax revenues of over $266 million in calendar year 2018. Since 2012, the cannabis industry has created over 2,500 new jobs in the state; jobs that are home grown (pun intended) and won’t be exported overseas. Colorado studies have shown little impact to law enforcement due to adult use, declining use by youth under 21, increased tourism and tax revenues in excess of predictions. Appropriately, marijuana is regulated by the Marijuana Enforcement Division of the Colorado Department of Revenue, and industrial hemp is regulated by the Colorado Department of Agriculture. Other states have recognized the futility and costs of cannabis prohibition and are beginning to realize that it is a product that is best regulated, taxed and properly controlled rather than treated as a criminal matter. Idaho, Kansas, Iowa, Texas, Nebraska, Wisconsin and South Dakota are the remaining states that have resisted cannabis reform, and several of those are either reexamining their status or have citizen-driven initiatives attempting to modernize the regulations in their jurisdictions. Current legal retail marijuana sales in the U.S. are approximately $6 billion. With recent legalization in California and Michigan, those figures are expected to grow exponentially. The estimated total marijuana demand in the U.S. (including black market) is $50–$55 billion, which is the potential under nationwide legalization. The hemp products industry is hovering around $620 million and is estimated to exceed $5 billion by 2020. Clearly, this is an exciting growth industry with much opportunity. There are numerous impacts of the changing laws to the real estate industry, including land brokers, and it is a billion plus dollar industry that should not be ignored. At some point, it is likely that we as real estate brokers in reform states will encounter a cannabis issue in the course of daily business. It could be an inspection issue for a home grow, a request for cannabis-appropriate properties, warehouse or retail facilities, leases, hemp production farms and processing, or a myriad of other possibilities. Whether this poses a difficulty or an opportunity, you should be aware of the rules and regulations of the industry. Hemp and marijuana are the same plant: cannabis sativa. The cannabis plant contains over 60 compounds known as cannabinoids which are unique to the plant. Hemp is a variety of cannabis sativa that contains less than 0.3 percent of delta-9 THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the component of cannabis that produces the high from marijuana. Hemp has been a historically important crop and was widely used in industry prior to being made effectively illegal under the Marihuana Tax Act

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of 1937 and rendered completely illegal under the Controlled Substances Act of 1971. Hemp has a long list of useful applications: fiber, cloth, paper, oils, plastics, lubricants, cosmetics, food products, bio-diesel and ethanol, insulation and building materials. It has more than 25,000 documented uses but will not produce a high. Industrial hemp was first addressed in the 2014 Farm Bill, which allowed interested states to establish programs for research of propagation, growing, utilization and marketing of hemp. The first seven states that chose to participate gained a head start in developing a robust hemp industry. The 2018 Farm Bill, passed in December 2019, made major changes to the law: 1. Defines hemp as any part of the cannabis plant containing 0.3% THC 2. Removes hemp, as defined, from the Controlled Substances Act 3. Provides that raising hemp will not impact participation in Farm Service Agency programs 4. Provides that hemp can be included in Federal Crop Insurance programs 5. Requires each state to propose a state plan or operate under federal rules 6. Allows states to opt out of hemp production 7. Allows interstate transportation of hemp and hemp products The passage of the new 2018 Farm Bill has really energized interest in the crop; however, full codification, rule writing and promulgation and implementation of all elements of the new law will take time. Most federal rules will not be complete until the 2020 crop year, and some issues like crop insurance could take longer. Some farmers have tried hemp production and have decided to wait until the rules are clear and the markets settle before planting again. Processors are still catching up with growers, leaving some farmers with a harvested crop with nowhere to go. I always advise a producer to secure the sale before planting the seed. The hemp plant has about a third less moisture and nutrient requirements than corn and far less, if any, pesticides. It is an annual plant that grows rapidly to a height of eight to 12 feet with large seed heads, a fibrous stalk and tap root. About 40 percent of the plant material is returned to the soil, adding organic matter. Hemp is a dicot plant with a deep tap root that improves soil aeration and water permeability, particularly in compaction prone soils. The crop is harvested for seed (used as seed stock and a source of oils and food products), fiber (for cloth, paper pulp, rope, insulation, building materials) and production of CBD (cannabidiol), a non-psychoactive substance used medically to suppress seizures, reduce anxiety, pain relief and other uses. The cannabis plant is resilient and grows well in several different soil types. As commodity prices for traditional crops remain at 30-year lows, hemp is poised to be a viable, productive plant for continued agricultural production and has raised major interest from all sectors of the agriculture industry. Every hemp meeting for farmers that I have attended has been a standing-room-only crowd. Approximately 78,000 acres of hemp were grown in the U.S. in 2018. Of that, 70 percent was grown for production of CBD; 10 percent for grain; 10 percent for fiber; and 10 percent for other uses or crop loss. Some states have opted out of hemp production so far, including Kansas, Nebraska and Idaho. Over-exuberant and uninformed law enforcement has caused several instances of hemp transporters being arrested and detained on marijuana charges. These arrests are examples of some of the rough spots that may occur during the transition to a legal cannabis economy. I have developed a four-hour course entitled Cannabis Country that goes deeply into the topics addressed here plus an in-depth history of cannabis prohibition, the multitude of uses of the plant, phytocannabinoids, endocannabinoids, legislation, propagation, markets and the future of cannabis in the U.S. Watch for it near you or contact me for information and scheduling. °

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A Time for Reflection Thanksgiving has just passed, and as the year draws to an end, it only seems appropriate to reflect on 2019. There is so much to be thankful for in this bolstering economy. Sales have been excellent; our future looks bright and the ranch market is poised for a fantastic 2020. Personally, I have five healthy kids, two are married with spouses I love and proudly call my own. My wife Michelle was not only my childhood friend but married this farm kid 27 years ago, and honestly there’s no place I’d rather be than sitting next to her. What’s the forecast for 2020: during the 80s and 90s there was a vast transfer of wealth in our country; the Dot com era hit, and the emerging internet created great new methods of business. This efficiency of business created vast wealth which bled into a strong economic growth in numerous sections of industry. This wealth allowed the assemblage of large ranch holdings that will dilute and/or sell as estates transfer generationally. Over the next year, we will see product on the market that has not been available for generations. As an example, Eagle Land will be announcing at the January Realtors Land Institute Colorado Chapter meeting in Denver an 11,000-plusacre ranch that exactly fits into this generational transfer scenario: This legacy ranch has it all, river, views, timber, trophy hunting, alpine setting, fantastic location and now available after 35 years. With unemployment at a 50-year low, incredibly attractive interest rates and a fiery economy, I predict we will see opportunities unseen in 30 years and ranch sales at an all-time high. In a previous article, I wrote about the Great Hemp Rush which was the result of the passing of the 2018 USDA Farm Bill. Commercial hemp could now be grown so long as it did not contain over .3 percent THC, tetrahydrocannabinol. Western Colorado was inundated with hemp growers with visions of huge returns as the demand for CBD, cannabidiol, was enormous. Investors flocked to the market purchasing farms, installing state-of-the art drip irrigation systems and partnering with growers with the hope of vast returns. It was anticipated that a grower could expect,

on the low end, approximately 1,700 pounds of biomass per acre, but more likely 2,500–3,000 pounds per acre. In April of last year as farms were being prepared for planting, biomass prices were $3–$3.50 per pound for each percentage of CBD oil in the biomass. Estimates of 10 percent oil was conservative, and likely up to 16 percent CBD per pound was not out of line. As an example, if the market was $3 per percentage point and you had 10 percent oil, the value of the crop was $30 per pound. If you produce 1,700 pounds at $30 per pound, the gross crop value would be $51,000 per acre. I can only speak for the Montrose area, but many farmers produced 700–900 pounds per acre on better crops. Oil production is eight–10 percent, and the price has dropped to one to two dollars per point per pound with rumors now as low as $0.65 per point. As a point of comparison, if you produce 700 pounds at $15 per pound ($1.5 per point at 10 percent oil) the gross crop value would be $10,500 per acre—a mere 500 percent below conservative expectations. Finding a buyer for the biomass has been challenging as well. Many growers are sitting on large product inventories hoping for a better price, but many times they’re not selling because they have no idea who to sell to. 2020 will be very interesting as the Darwin theory of “Survival of the Fittest” will certainly come to fruition. Bottom line: some investors will need to sell the farm creating new opportunities for land investors, while growers, without the financial strength to buy land, will have hemp-ready farms available to lease. As new FDA regulations evolve there is much buzz; if blue chip companies can find confidence in the industry, the demand for hemp could explode, exceeding all expectations. Definitely a rollercoaster ride not for the faint at heart!! Have a blessed holiday season, always seek out a qualified Accredited Land Consultant, buy land!! Joseph (Joey) C. Burns Eagle Land Brokerage Owner/Broker RLI Colorado Chapter President

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Wildlife Management 101 Story by Garrett Zoller, ALC Courtesy of The REALTORS® Land Institute

WHEN LEARNING THAT RLI HAD AN INTEREST IN PUBLISHING AN ARTICLE ON WILDLIFE MANAGEMEN T,

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M O R E T H A N H E S I TANT. MY RESERVATIONS DIDN’ T STEM FROM A “LACK OF KNOWLEDGE ,” MY RESERVATIONS WERE DERIVED FROM “ T H E K N OWL E D G E I H AVE ,” A N D T H E C R I T I C I S M I ’ M AWA R E I T M AY AT TRACT. SUCCESS DOESN’ T COME EASY, NOR WITHOUT TRIAL AND ERROR OR A FAILURE OR TWO, AND SOMETIMES IT DOESN’ T FIT W I T H I N A T R A D I T I O N A L LY A C C E P T E D B O X . Wildlife management consists of so many factors, that the series of books, videos and blogs about the subject are literally overwhelming. Politics, legislation, social perceptions and opinions, environment, mathematics, chemistry, biology, regions, species, habitat and disease are all just a few on a lengthy list of complicated factors that affect managing wildlife. In a nutshell, wildlife management is ultimately about conservation; the guardianship and best practices of safekeeping our greatest natural wild resources for future generations. It also provides an extraordinary enjoyment through a passionate relationship between land and property owners, and justifiably continues to be a motivating factor for folks who purchase land!

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I’m extremely fortunate to own, manage and control a respectable tract of leased and deeded ground in the Pacific Northwest. Taken with a laugh, my personal experience hasn’t been learned easily, nor done inexpensively via traditional venues. Private land wildlife management practices are commonly dominated by whitetail deer, a little waterfowl and an occasional fish or upland bird topic. To be candid, the folks in the Midwest and down South are, hands down, far ahead of the curve in regards to wildlife management. whitetail deer are routinely the primary topic of choice. Justifiably, the whitetail deer geographically dominate North America by the location they reside. Non-profit and traditional organizations such as the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA) and Tecomate have done a fantastic job of promoting and making wildlife management materials available. However, I humbly believe the whitetail species is a much easier species to manage than many others, and another reason why I chose to write on this subject. I know, I know. . . I’m sure I’ll never live that comment down (laugh). Okay, how about this, because there’s more information available on Whitetail wildlife management, justifiably because it’s the dominant non-migratory game in North America, I feel they’re easier to manage and understand (and should be) than other species with less availability and a broader migration range. . . and they’re easier to harvest than blacktail deer. . . KIDDING!. . . sheez. . . relax! Just trying to keep ya’ll interested in reading! In the early 2000s, after reading an in-depth QDMA book, frequenting blogs, watching videos and living the lifestyle we sell, I made the commitment to start managing wildlife on our family’s ground about forty minutes outside of town. Easy right? Just install a few food plots and feeders, develop water sources (if they’re not already there) and voila, the wild game will come flocking in! Yeah? Not so much! As with many topics in life, a person can read all the books they can find, but real life experiences, both good and bad, are the world’s best teachers. In general, the basics are the same: provide a superior food source, water and lush habitat. Doing this, is without question, enticing to wildlife. The primary difference between my management practices and traditional wildlife management practices are dictated by my region. The wildlife management industry started to flourish in the early 2000s. Game cameras were few and a new “hot item,” and feeders were on hunting shows everywhere—plus, they were all over the internet. Ever hear the saying, “Never test the depth of a river with both feet first”? That’s good advice! My original thought process was methodical and focused on the generals; to enhance food, water and habitat within drainages that naturally lent themselves. Logically, it made sense to research and purchase available products that have worked so well for others? So I was off. . . Feeders! Cameras! Food plots! . . .and all the associated equipment! Little did I know that I was in for a completely different education, and all the equipment would eventually be destroyed with minimal results of what I was trying to manage—big blacktail deer, elk and turkey. The failing factor wasn’t a lack of genetics, nor wildlife population. It boiled down to my regional location and the lack of experience managing wildlife in this location. Our terrain isn’t flat to rolling like the South or Midwest, where flatter open plains and pockets of creek bottom thickets monopolize regions. It’s the opposite where I manage wildlife. We have timber covered mountains, drainages and ridges as far as one can see; small pockets of open meadows monopolizing the terrain in hopes to get a glimpse of something. That situation also positions the ultimate unmanageable factor; multiple species of wildlife, including and not limited to, abundant predators! Most importantly, learning how and where those species habituate throughout the year and how to best manage my terrain and climate was a game changer for me.

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Being new and few, the first few game cameras I purchased were “top of the line,” nothing but the best. . . HA! I’ve never been accused of catching on too quickly. After countless dollars in cameras being destroyed, no matter how well I concealed them, a light came on in my head: never set a trail camera after eating without washing and deodorizing your hands in black bear country! Their eyesight is poor in comparison to their smell and hearing. Regardless of what slight scent is on my hands when I set cameras, they’ll wind it—and evidently, bears think trail cams taste like chicken! Traditional feeders? UHG! My three-hundred pound metal feeders were knocked over, ripped open and crumpled up like cheap little tin cans. It’s unbelievable how strong black bear are! So, I improvised by designing and installing “bear-proof feeders.” Ah-ha–Gotcha! Only to learn that feeders, if used too consistently, work like a dinner bell for our abundant mountain lion and predator populations. Luckily, I check my cameras frequently, and DID catch on quickly BEFORE witnessing any lion kills on camera. Embarrassing as it is, at first, I was like, “hey, there’s another mountain lion on camera? I didn’t know they’d come into feeders also after they go off?” Then, a Wait!? Ruh-Row-Shaggy! light bulb came on. So I now only use the feeders, installed in different drainages, sporadically throughout times of the day and week and primarily during the winter when natural feed and food plots sources are dormant from deep freezes and snow. Late fall, winter and into the spring are the most crucial times of year for wildlife management in my opinion. The does are pregnant and bucks are either rutting or later shedding their antlers. It’s truly the best time to provide a solid protein source, vitamins and minerals to the males for recovery, during the rut and horn growth before they migrate to higher elevations. While essential nutrients to impregnated mommas throughout the birthing and nursing process is pertinent. All that being said, the most productive source of wildlife management that I’ve consistently witnessed by all types of wildlife are my licks. The food plots are nice, but there are a lot of natural competitive sources for deer and elk to browse in this area. Ours are primarily frequented by does and younger bucks while the mature ones are at a higher ground, only passing through. My licks aren’t the blocked type purchased and shipped online. Those don’t last long around here. Bear will pick those up and even haul them off like little tennis balls in their mouths or sometimes eat them in one sitting like candy. I use a formula I found online years ago, posted on a blog by a retired biology teacher out of Missouri, called “Mo’s Lick.” I’d sure like to reconnect with that gentleman again to thank him and follow up. He’d posted a detailed story about only being able to afford a fiveacre tract of creek bottom ground to lease and hunt on. He knew there were good genetics in that region, but relying on those deer to reside within his creek bottom without purpose was an unreasonable hope. Similar to our mountainous country, his tillable food plot ground was limited by access and terrain. So, in turn, he started his own biology project using licks. His first deer harvested, and a common size in that thicket scored in the one-hundred and twenty inches, if I recall. By the fifth year, he’d harvested a one-hundred and eighty-six inch whitetail! He never concluded whether he’d thought the original smaller deer were just young, underdeveloped and grew into mature bucks being undernourished prior to his lick supply or if the previously mentioned mature, good genetic bucks from the region frequented and resided his creek bottom more often because of the licks. His only conclusion was, he’d leased the ground for several years prior, constantly scouting smaller bucks. After several years of consistently using the “Mo’s Lick” formula, the average buck’s antler size changed dramatically and more consistently within that thicket. I have used Mo’s lick since and found

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great results. I have pictures of all species using Mo’s Lick: squirrel, fox, turkey, elk, deer and more. However, once again, our regional terrain plays a big role in consistency. We don’t routinely see the same bucks over and over like many whitetail managers. When fawns hit the ground and the weather starts warming, the blacktail deer bachelors up and head for higher elevations where it’s cooler— typical males, right? Babies are still young and can’t travel the distances or terrain that mature bucks go each summer. In turn, I know what I call “my girls” by name when I see them on camera as spring progresses. I keep a fawn count, who’s had how many, a buck-to-doe ratio and so forth, while watching them grow up, or disappear to predators—when Mama appears on camera at the lick or food plot alone later in the year. By the time the babies are strong enough to make the migration to higher ground, Fall is upon us again, days get cooler and the need to migrate higher becomes less and less desirable.

MO’S LICK RECIPE (1) 50-pound bag of Di-calcium phosphate (21% or more) (1) 50-pound bag of Trace Mineral Lick (fine) (1) 50-pound bag of Rock Salt (fine) Dig a hole near a water source, pour and mix ingredients well. I’ve added selenium to the mix in higher elevations and received a good response from elk also.

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As winter storms blow in and the rut approaches, the mature bucks start heading to lower ground. Depending on which direction the storms blow in and the amount of snow that falls on which facing slope, this can dictate the drainage taken by those mature bucks over previous years. (Bear in mind, our ground isn’t flat; a grid of one-hundred and sixty acres can be three-hundred and twenty plus acres of surface ground, it’s just not flattened out on grid view). The younger bucks stay local for a couple years then start to migrate each spring with the other mature bucks as they mature. Every year we get mature bucks on camera that we’ve never seen before, and likely may never see again. Cattle have been known to do similar. Oregon is an open range state. We’ve often had cattle in our drainage with tags belonging to a rancher whose range is three drainages over. As feed thins, they start heading down the drainage they’re in. Oregon is extremely diverse. I’m aware of an area, ten miles away as the crow flies, that buddies of mine manage who find the same deer sheds every year. . . ? Those deer also migrate and only frequent the area in late fall and shed in winter. The difference is that there’s really only one major drainage option, a highway and a river that I believe naturally funnel those deer back every year. For me, the wildlife management learning curve has been an expensive and dedicated commitment worth every second and cent spent. My advice is that there is no perfect solution or magic wand in managing wildlife. If there was, the book would have been written and no more needed. Consider your terrain, species and the final results you’re seeking to obtain before buying a bunch of things that have worked well in other regions and species. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve used, continue to use and try new wildlife management products all the time—because they work! However, keep in mind that each area possesses different circumstances. Talk to others in your region that have been successful. What’s worked for my region may not work for your region. Most of all, get out and do it, enjoy the process. Management practices can change, but the goal should always stay the same—best practices of safekeeping for our greatest natural wild resources for future generations. Thank you for taking the time to read my article and best of luck! °


Campers Using Apps to Rent Private Land Story by Karen Deger McChesney

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T H E B L A C K-A N D -W H I T E P H O T O S O N T H E WA L L S of Amy and George Barley’s farmhouse tell the story of their turn-of-thecentury homestead, where The Mill Dam Farm once thrived—along with all the other dairy farms—in the charming rural town of Accord, nestled in the heart of the mid-Hudson Valley of New York. One photo dates back to 1913, showing George’s grandfather in a horse-drawn wagon in front of The Barley Mill; another shows a two-story saw and grist mill that operated until the early 1930s. When the Barley’s purchased the farmhouse, the only remaining structure on the 52 acres, they envisioned sharing the history of the land—giving “history lessons” and showing off their rare photos. But, like many first-time landowners, it was daunting to think of paying the property tax. Enter Tentrr, one of a growing number of Airbnb-type online booking platforms and apps for campers to find and instantly reserve spots on private land across the U.S. With state and national parks and forests booking up months in advance, Tentrr, Glamping Hub, Hipcamp, Harvest Hosts, and other online platforms are all on the same mission: to give private landowners an opportunity to share their secluded, unique space with campers and other outdoor lovers. “A friend came by and said this would be a great Tentrr site,” says Amy, who had seen Tentrr’s catchy hard copy postcards (still distributed by Tentrr). “Tentrr was everywhere in New York City in 2018!” The postcards delivered a straight-forward message: Are you a landowner? Would you be willing to share your land? Share your land, you earn money. That year, the Barley’s joined 30 other Tentrr “CampKeepers.” They were especially impressed with Tentrr’s rigorous, personal vetting process, which included meeting with them in the living room of their farmhouse. “Every single one of our campsites is vetted by a campsite specialist,” explains Tentrr Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer Michael D’Agostino. First, the specialist has a phone conversation with a landowner about Tentrr’s top criteria: privacy—a minimum of 15 acres in a quiet area; accessibility—parking near campsite.

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Then, researchers study videos and Google Maps, according to Tentrr Cofounder and Sales/Development Director Eloise Bune. And, the final step is a walk-through. “Before we accept a site,” says Bune, “we send a scout with a checklist.” The Barley’s had the signature Tentrr “wow factor.” What could be better than camping next to your own private waterfall? “We had the ideal property for this,” says Amy, who grew up visiting the Mill Trail Falls on the Barley’s farm. The timing and location were ideal, too. “The Hudson Valley is booming with wineries and breweries.” To date, Tentrr has sites in 38 states, including the Pacific Northwest, Southwest and Mountain West. Shhh! The D’Agostino’s own one of the sites. Don’t tell their campers! It’s all about knowing their product, they believe; and, keeping up to date on what works for landowners and what appeals to campers. “I love being a CampKeeper!” says D’Agostino. “We use our site as a test bed for the whole company—to test new equipment and ideas.” That’s a must for D’Agostino, since he sat at his drafting table and drew the original design for Tentrr’s “standard kit” or setup. Every site gets a kit for the same price. “It’s important to us that the payment is the same for every landowner,” says the former investment banker. “We have a lot of landowners who own hundreds of acres and they can divide up their land for several campsites.” Tentrr charges CampKeepers a one-time fee of $6,500 for a kit that Tentrr staff build and set up on each property, including a canvas expedition tent on a wooden platform, a queen-sized memory-foam mattress with featherbed toppers, wooden crates for storage, two Adirondack chairs, a Brazilian wood picnic table, a stone firepit, a woodburning stove, cookware, sun shower, and a portable toilet. The fee also covers a listing on Tentrr’s app, liability insurance, 24-7 customer support and marketing, and photography. Today, the Barley’s have two Tentrr setups and a continuous flow of reservations to pay their taxes—and show off their historic land, including remnants of the saw mill’s foundation and pulleys and tracts.


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Today’s New and Improved Camping According to Kampgrounds of America’s 2019 Camping Report, the market for camping is huge and growing, with 62 percent of U.S. households having active campers. Perhaps, more people are camping because they can stargaze on secluded private land, everywhere. But, campers and landowners alike may benefit from brushing up on the sport’s new vocabulary. There’s traditional camping, glamping, gamping, yurting, canopy camping. . . . KOA recommends sticking to the terms, camping and glamping: Camping = Tent + Sleeping Bag (including car camping and backpacking) Glamping = Glamorous + Camping (including cabins, yurts, treehouses, safari tents, teepees, Airstreams, RV’s, etc.) Whether camping or glamping, people can now camp in state parks, even if they don’t own a tent or sleeping bag. Tentrr and Maine State Parks recently launched The Maine State Park Experience, comprised of sites that are set up and booked through Tentrr. “We think adding Tentrr will appeal to individuals and families looking for a fun and unique outdoor recreational experiences,” says Melissa Macaluso, Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry, pointing out that all profits go back into supporting state parks. Simple For Landowners; Simple For Campers Every day, Ruben Martinez receives emails from landowners telling him of their innovative idea for a camp. The Glamping Hub Co-Founder, who grew up camping in New Mexico, realized that landowners need more than just a booking platform; they need resources to create their camp. After all, they’re small business owners who are earning a steady income and “getting a business opportunity with extremely low start-up costs,” he says. Who can top that? A consummate connector, Martinez seized the opportunity to educate landowners and co-founded American Glamping Association in 2018. A fitting concept for Martinez, who proudly reveals that he started Glamping Hub with his best friend so they could talk on the phone daily across the miles. “It’s an exciting time!” says Martinez. “There is a strong network that allows a high level of access to tools and resources for all business owners.” Martinez’s leadership has yielded fast results: a trade magazine, Glamping Business USA, and three conferences, known as The Glamping Summit/USA—a gathering and product expo for landowners, booking platform companies, techies, custom tent and furniture makers, outdoor hospitality consultants, and campground owners. There’s more. In 2020, the association will start an accreditation process for glamping business landowners. “It’s very complex to open a B&B or put up a traditional building,” Martinez explains. Landowners have to pull permits, learn local zoning regulations and restrictions, and building codes. It’s simple to put up a yurt or other campinglike structure. “If I had a listing on Glamping Hub, I’d put up a yurt!” he jokes. “You can rent it out (through a website platform) for a fraction of start-up costs.” Creativity + Connecting With Campers = Happy Landowners Many landowners delight in turning their campsite into a unique, memorable outdoor experience, as well as getting acquainted with campers. Last summer, Hollis Wayne and her Happy Horse Band entourage on kazoo, rhythm guitar, and drums had a group of bicycle campers singing and dancing to original songs and favorite old cover tunes at her Happy Horse Hotel, west of Austin, Texas. A lot of campers come to the 22-acre Hipcamp “resort” for the live music, according to Wayne, lead singer and owner, who belts out original tunes and plays harmonica in a pavillon that’s amid RV/tent sites, pens, and covered stalls.

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Formerly a “horse people only” campground, Wayne and her husband, Beaux Graham opened their land to campers and started listing it on Hipcamp, an online platform that boasts 285,000 sites across America. Since 2015, Hipcamp has partnered with landowner “hosts” who set their own prices and design (graphics, photos, copywriting) their own online listings. Hosts keep 90 percent of a camper’s payment. Hipcamp’s latest venture is mapping out campsites in the path of “nature-based events,” as yet another way to help hosts attract campers. So far, last summer’s Total Solar Eclipse, butterfly migrations and meteor showers have been a hit. For Glamping Hub host Julia Kastendiek, improving and sharing her oneacre sandstone mesa outside of Los Angeles has been a dream come true. “We’ve had people from all over the world—Norway, China, the Phillipines, Japan. . .” says Kastendiek, who custom renovated and built Tiny Tiki Retro Hideaway. “They get out of the car and they say ‘wow, thank you,’ and I say, ‘you haven’t even seen everything’”! Upon arrival, Kastendiek gives every camper a personal tour of her “highly unusual” resort: A 1954 Spartan Manor, considered more collectible than vintage Airstreams because of their monocoque aircraft construction, a 1963 Office trailer, and gazebo with furniture, curtains and bed covers designed and sewn by Kastendiek. Bottom line, both landowners and apps need to fuss over campers, says Joel Holland, who recently recruited the mayor of the City of Pontiac, Illinois, known for Illinois Route 66 Hall of Fame and Museum, to personally meet and greet RV’ers with a gift bag. Helping Landowners Sell Their Products When Holland bought Harvest Hosts (HH) in 2018, it was an outdated website with a great concept, connecting RV’ers with local businesses. The video technology entrepreneur immediately knew he wanted to create a benefit for private landowners. The easy part was a built-in membership. “RV’ers are already happy to be traveling,” he explains. “I wanted to make sure RV’ers purchased their [landowner’s] product when they visit.” Today, HH has 44,000 RV members who pay a $79 yearly membership fee, so they can visit and park for 24 hours in exchange for supporting an HH “host” business located on private land. When an RV’er signs up, they have to agree to a code of conduct to purchase a product grown or produced by the landowner. Ask Holland who is joining HH, and he jumps into a story about the first host, Heartland Farm, run by the Dominican Sisters of Peace Catholic nuns and volunteers. “I drove up in my RV and the nuns—all over 80 years old—told me to park wherever I wanted. They gave me a tour. One of the nuns creates alpaca scarves, one makes soaps, one gives massages. . . . I bought scarves and soaps, and got a massage!” Ever since, Heartland Farm in Pawnee Rock, Kansas, has had an increase in visitors, and they give their HH income back to their nonprofit. Sharing The Great Outdoors Whatever app they use, campers and landowners are creating a whole new outdoor experience. One click, and campers are welcome on private land more than ever before. “We’re sharing our land with people who want to share the great outdoors,” says Barley. And, ensuring that stories of land are preserved, believes the third-generation owner of The Mill Dam Farm. With a view of the Appalachian Mountains out the front door, and the Catskill Mountains out the back, the Barleys’ stories are a testament to the area’s industrial past. Perhaps, landowner’s stories will spark new campfire stories that begin or end in Barley’s words, “this is where it all happened. . . .” °

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Business Branding 101 Column by Greg Simons

The enterprise aspects of wildlife-based recreation taking place on private land across the country

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Business branding is often most effective at a community level, requiring a multi-prong approach that includes a sound operating culture.

While standing in line at a Minneapolis airport Starbucks some

Names, Logos and Slogans

years ago, a lady who was also waiting to place her order

Start-up companies are well-advised to place a great deal of

asked, “You from Texas?” and I answered, “Let me guess, my

thought into creating the name of their new business. Company

accent gave me away?” She then replied, “No, I saw the logo

names do not have to tell a story or even be reflective of the type

on your shirt. You own that company?” Not knowing where

of product or service that is offered, but it’s important that the

the conversation might be headed, I looked at her suspiciously

name is simple and easy to remember. Once a business name is

and replied, “Why do you ask?” and she then went on to

established and has been in place for a while, it’s hard to go back

explain that she had a friend whose husband hunts with a

to the drawing board if you feel like the business name is not a

company in Texas that is owned by a wildlife biologist and

good fit. Simple things, such as will the name easily fit on a cap or

that the company offers more than hunting services; they

perhaps on a logo without looking too busy, should be considered.

also provide wildlife management services. I asked her how

Smith Enterprises, LLC may not tell a story, but it’s simple and easy

she made that connection to me and she said that the logo on

to remember, which can be important.

my shirt matched the logo on a hat that her friend’s husband sometimes wears. I asked her if she hunted and she responded, “I’m not a hunter but I love nature and I appreciate a hunting

Logos are a bit more pliable. Ideally, a business will have a “good” logo that remains in-place for many years and remains relevant

company that also places emphasis on wildlife conservation,

over the long haul. However, unlike company names, logos can be

and I understand that you guys do that. I also like the name of

changed without as much collateral damage. Logos may tell a story

your company, as it sounds like you’re not simply into killing

or may simply create some degree of eye-appeal for marketing and

wild animals.”

other business functions. Same as with business names, there is something to be said about the benefits of keeping things simple

Regarding business branding, there are at least three features

with logos. Having images with clean and simple lines make it easier

of the conversation that I just described which are noteworthy.

to reproduce logos that are clearly legible, especially when it comes

One, a total stranger who lives on the other end of the

to embroidery. To create marketing power through logos, they

country recognized our company logo. Two, our company

should be used universally across various business tools including

name, Wildlife Systems, Inc., apparently provided a positive

letterhead, signage, business cards, websites, labels, caps, shirts

connotation to her. And, thirdly, she knew that our company

and other forms of visual tools. Ideally, over time, the market will

offered wildlife management services in addition to offering

associate or connect the company name with the logo without

outfitted hunting trips, and she seemed to appreciate who we

even seeing the name.

are and what we do, even though she is not a hunter. Slogans tell a story. They are like logos in that slogans can be What I just described is a form of branding, or a result of

more pliable than business names, but there needs to be some

branding. I’m a big believer in the power of branding and what

consistency with the use of slogans. Some companies use their

branding means in terms of public perceptions and how that

mission statement as their slogan, but in that case, the mission

ties into market perceptions. I’ve lightly studied branding

statement must be concise. Shorter is generally better with

for many years, and though I do not consider myself to be a

slogans so that it can be neatly bundled along with logos or

branding expert, I do think that some firms and experts who

conveniently built into various types of communications like media

offer such services tend to over-complicate their philosophies

releases or at the bottom of stationery. Collectively, the combined

and communications on this topic. So, I’m going to provide a

use of the business name, logo and slogan should create a tie that

few mile-high thoughts on this subject, condensed, 101.

the market connects with, while also telling a story.

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Operating Culture

effective communication is part and parcel to business branding,

A business’s “operating culture” often defines the market’s

plain and simple. Messaging content and messaging style, along

perception of that business, which in turn, defines the business

with frequency and mediums of delivery, are the trump cards when

itself. A strong business platform will have best management

it comes to using communication and messaging to build your

practices (BMPs) in place that consistently yield quality products

brand. Say it right, say it often and speak to the right audience,

and services through sound mechanics and through friendly,

again and again.

positive behavioral attitudes. Fundamentally, the basis of an effective branding campaign begins and grows from satisfied

Repetition and Longevity is Key

clients who hopefully become loyal patrons and who serve

Effective branding does not happen overnight. For people or

as ambassadors for that business. Such successful business

markets to connect with businesses in a meaningful way, this often

practices do not generally happen by accident, so it should

requires continued exposure to those potential markets over long

be incumbent for the business proprietor to intelligently and

enough periods of time to help ensure that an identity is created

deliberately create a path of developing BMPs that help build

within those markets. As a rule, industries and markets that are

client loyalty and consequently set the business on a positive

highly competitive with other vendors often require more time

branding trajectory that is built upon over time and is a

and exposure to create successful branding initiatives, principally

reflection of the operating culture.

due to the dilution effects of such highly competitive markets. Be consistent with your efforts, recognizing that effective branding is

Communication and Messaging

more of a marathon than a sprint.

I’ve heard said, “It’s not what you say, but how you say it.” I beg to differ with this philosophy, especially when it comes to branding,

Also, it’s very important to remember that successful branding

and my slant on this philosophy is, “It’s what you say AND how

does not have to take place on a national or global level. Effective

you say it.” These days, during

branding campaigns are often best tackled more at the community

the digital era, especially through social media,

level, whether that community be geographically defined by city or township, whether it be a community group that makes up an NGO, or whether it simply be a community of existing clients that are already part of your business portfolio. Think big, while starting small, is a good rule of thumb for successful business branding. °

Logos and slogans have become commonplace branding tools used with promotional tools often referred to as swag.

The author, Greg Simons, co-owns a company that specializes in the development of wildlife enterprises and wildlife management programs on private lands. For further information on his company, check out WildlifeSystems.com.

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ranch

S I T UAT ED I N PA R A D I S E VA L L E Y, M O N TA N A , I S T H E S I X- G E N E R AT I O N STRONG O’HAIR RANCH. THE RANCH SERVES A S A WORKING COWC A L F O PER AT I O N R A I S I N G PR I M E B L AC K A N G U S C AT T L E . LO C AT ED JUST SOUTH OF LIVINGSTON, M O N TA N A , A N D 3 5 M I L E S N O R T H O F Y EL LOW S TO N E N AT I O N A L PA R K , THE R ANCH BORDERS THE FAMED YELLOWSTONE RIVER WHICH

Courtesy of

F LOW S T H R O U G H T H E G R E AT ER YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM, A L ANDSCAPE FILLED WITH A M ER I C A’ S M O S T C H A R I S M AT I C

Story by Sarah Grigg Photos by Chris Douglas

SPECIES, INCLUDING BISON, W O LV E S , G R I Z Z LY B E A R S , E L K , D E E R A N D B I G H O R N S H E E P.


BEFORE THERE WERE O’HAIRS, THERE WERE A R M S T R O N G S . And like most homesteaders, the Armstrongs arrived at Paradise Valley, Montana, by way of misfortune looking for fortune. In 1876, Owen T. Armstrong (“O.T.”), age 27, and Mrs. O.T., age 26, decided it was time to up and leave Missouri where they had hewn out a meager existence. Mrs. O.T.’s brother wrote them from faraway Montana Territory, regaling them with tales of running cattle yearround without supplemental feed. “Perfect cattle country,” he wrote. His letters convinced O.T. and Mrs. to make their choices and take their chances. They loaded two covered wagons with tobacco, bacon, beans, apples, lard, a rifle, yarn and other supplies. Drawn by teams of mules, they embarked across an ocean of grassland for Montana Territory, their two small children and an adopted boy of 12 years old in tow. They passed through Missouri to Junction City, Kansas, steadily pointed their team west through Nebraska via the Oregon Trail and kept onward to Cheyenne, Wyoming. Rather than cut north to Montana Territory on the Bozeman Trail, the Armstrongs instead traced the southern border of Wyoming Territory into Idaho Territory. The center of Wyoming Territory at that time was not safe for wagon trains as it was just after the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and tensions ran thick between tribes and Euro-American settlers pushing by the dozens westward. So, the Armstrongs took the old stage coach road from Fort Hall, Idaho, north to the gold mining town of Virginia City, Montana. Mrs. O.T. fastidiously kept a daily diary on the trail, recording things like weather, wildlife sightings, livestock health, passing through ghost towns, ferry tolls, layover days for washing and cooking and road conditions: “Crossed the creek this morning. Water ran into wagons and mud deep on both sides . . . Went 8 or 9 miles and mired in the mud . . . Lost shovel out of wagon. . . The buffalo gnats have tormented us all day.” Flowery landscape descriptions and especially feelings never touch the pages. After three months and 1,400 miles of plodding along in a wagon train, they reached their destination: Paradise Valley, Montana Territory. Mrs. O.T. claimed that when they reach their home site the children had ridden in the wagon for so long that they had forgotten how to walk. The Armstrongs homesteaded about nine miles south of presentday Livingston, Montana, along a spring and just on the west side of the Yellowstone River. The east side of the Yellowstone River was designated Crow Territory, and per Treaty terms, homesteaders were not allowed to stake claims there. They built a small log house which stands to this day. To reach the upper floor where everyone slept, they had to go outside and climb a ladder to the second-story window. Armstrongs were credited for bringing the first registered cattle (meaning purebred cattle, with documented pedigrees) into the Valley. In the 1890s O.T. bought his first Herefords in Bozeman and Kansas City. Soon after, he rode to White Sulphur Springs and bought him two bull calves. He didn’t have enough money to pay for the stock, and the fellow selling told O.T. to take them anyways. He figured anyone willing to ride that far to drive two bulls back to Paradise Valley had to be honest. O.T. trailed the bulls home and mailed the remaining payment to White Sulphur Springs. The rest of the cattle were trailed to Armstrong’s place from A.B. Cook Ranch in Townsend, Montana.


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They found Mrs. O.T’s brother’s claims of perfect cattle country to be partially true. Because of the wind howling through Paradise Valley, snow didn’t stick to the high ridges and kept the range exposed. But soon, the Armstrongs figured out they couldn’t run cattle year-round without supplemental feed. It became clear they needed to irrigate fields to raise hay for feed. O.T. began building a canal for flood irrigation, Armstrong’s Ditch, which he worked on for years and which today still diverts water from the Yellowstone River to ranchers throughout the Valley. The Park Branch Canal, as it’s now known, could use some riprap and repair to hold up eroding banks, but ranchers can still count on getting their water from here. Most would agree it took a big man in a tough place to homestead in Montana. Wild game was the main food source for many of the earliest Euro-American pioneers. Steam and hydraulic tractors wouldn’t arrive to this corner of Montana until the 1920s, and even then, many continued to use horses, oxen and mules. Irrigation ditches had to be dug with a scoop shovel. Electricity wouldn’t reach Paradise Valley until after WWII. Telephones arrived in the early 1960s. Supplying the larder with flour and sugar, socializing and educating children all presented challenges in those earliest years. As luck would have it, there happened to live a doctor across the river, on the Crow side. When a horse stepped on his six-year-old daughter’s leg and broke it, O.T. rode to the edge of the river and shot in the air. “An old man come to the edge of the river. O.T. pointed to the doctor’s home and then to himself. The old man ran up and got the doctor. The doctor had to ride to . . . Carter’s Bridge and catch a ferry and then ride to the ranch to set Grace’s leg,” recorded one of O.T.’s sons. The next generation of Armstrongs expanded the family substantially, as did the marriages of those children. “My dad, Allyn O’Hair, came from Dakota and was a young man working in Terry, Montana,” explained Andy O’Hair, the fourth generation to live on the ranch. “He had worked in threshing and sheep shearing and arrived here to work on the Armstrong ranch in 1931, during the Depression. He rode by freight train, switched out at Livingston and got here on the caboose of the Park Branch Line. The conductor found him and asked for his ticket. Dad said, ‘I’m sent C.O.D.’ They let him off. It was 30 below that day and he walked two miles into the ranch to get his job. He was 20 years old and desperate for work. My mother, O.T.’s daughter Agnes Armstrong, was still in high school. Dad worked here one summer and then O.T. let him go. Then they called him back. He came back and went to work herding cattle here for Armstrongs. In 1936 he married my mother, Agnes.” As soon as Allyn and Agnes took over the ranch, the place was known as O’Hair Ranch. “Labor on ranches has always been a situation. I can remember my dad having a hard time finding hired hands. Part of his success was due to the people he was able to hire. He had some awful good people working for him. We inherited some of that for awhile,” said Andy. Allyn O’Hair’s approach to the labor situation was to hire old drunks hanging around the bars of downtown Livingston. “He’d go to the bars and get these guys out and he’d make them irrigators. He’d buy them boots, shovels, whatever they needed. They came out to work for a month or all summer. If he lost one, he’d go back to the bar and find another. Agnes cooked for all of them. Some of the hands they hired, it’s a wonder these O’Hair boys turned out at all,” said Karen O’Hair, who married Andy after falling in love as teenagers on a pack trip up to Electric Peak. “We were married in 1964 and I moved onto the ranch,” Karen explained. “I had to have a cowboy. He had to love horses as much as I did.”

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- PAUL ALLYN O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Grandson & Jr Bronc Rider

- ANDY O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Patriarch

- KAREN O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Matriarch

- BOBBI JO PAYNE O’Hair Ranch Daughter

- SIDNI PAYNE O’Hair Ranch Granddaughter - MCCLAIN PAYNE O’Hair Ranch Grandson

- BOBBI JO & JOHN PAYNE O’Hair Ranch Daughter & Son-in-law

- SOPHIE O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Granddaughter

- MCKADE PAYNE O’Hair Ranch Grandson

- MELISSA O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Daughter-in-law

- TODD O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Son

- JUSTIN O’HAIR Outfitter & Nephew to Andy & Karen

Today, the sons and grandchildren of Allyn O’Hair and Agnes Armstrong live on the ranch, representing a Montana legacy six generations deep. They occupy houses and cabins that were built and then moved around by teams of horses atop rolling logs long ago. They work cattle across the same land O.T. Armstrong worked cattle more than 140 years ago. °

- JARRET O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Justin’s Son

- ZOEY PAYNE O’Hair Ranch Granddaughter

- JAYDEN O’HAIR O’Hair Ranch Justin’s Son


As a rancher, you have to adapt to the times. We use pivot irrigation instead of flood irrigation. We switched from Herefords to Angus in the 1970s. Hired hands are even harder to find these days. They want too much and they don’t want to work as hard as we’re doing it. But we’re still here. Everyone in the family holds interest in the ranch, and we all work together to run it. We don’t interfere with the way another person does things. We ask how we can help. The youngest generation of the family has expressed interest in carrying on with this. That’s the best thing we could ask for.”

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Reflections from the Broken Heart of A Lumberjack-Forester Story by Daniel M. Christmas

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SO MUCH HAS CHANGED IN THE WOODS OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS. Much of those early years, the characters I’ve met and the experiences I’ve had now, sadly, represent a bygone era. The hardest part of it all, besides seeing the modernization of logging, is that there’s no one to talk to about those days in the woods—nobody to reminisce with. Most woodsmen I knew back then were older than me, so now they are gone or close to it. Once in a while, I sit down with an old timer who has worked in the woods, and when that happens, I lose all track of time. We share remembrances, drop names of the big men we knew and we tell stories that only he and I understand without explanation. In the early 1980s, I arrived in a small logging town called Tupper Lake in New York State’s Adirondack Mountains. Much like other remote Adirondack towns at that time, Tupper Lake was a woodsman’s town comprised of hard working, hard charging, risk-taking men who knew “the lady of the woods” was always there waiting to take you away if things went wrong. When I got to Tupper Lake, one of my first experiences was noticing the size of the arms on every lumberjack. Whether barrel chested or skinny as a rail, everyone had big strong arms. The second thing I noticed was how each could sharpen a chainsaw free hand, making it throw long ribbons of sawdust while the saw literally pulled you into the log you were cutting. Those early days were intimidating—guys like Leon, Slim, Nutsy and Pisser started at 4:00 A.M. and usually hit the tavern by 4:00 P.M. Back then, trees were all cut with saws as big as a car motor with a razor sharp chain that cut through a tree like a hot knife through butter. One of my first lessons was learning where a tree wanted to fall, because once I made my cut, it was on its way. There were big trees to cut—40 inches on the stump—and when they came down, all hell broke loose! Big timber takes down anything in its path, and a good lumberjack keeps one eye on the tree and another on the flying limbs, broken splinters and whipping tops overhead. I learned quickly that if things began badly on any given day they stayed bad so I would either quit while I was ahead or I’d be damn careful. When I was tired, wet or distracted I learned to stop because that’s when accidents happen. Skidders in those days were operated manually with shifting levers, winch lever and clutch. There were no enclosed cabs and few machines even had doors. In wintertime, some operators placed a grain bag full of hay on the steel floor to keep the cold iron away from their feet and if they could, they reversed the exhaust back toward the cab which gave some warmth at thirty below. Skidders were loud and echoed off the mountains and valleys below. If you’ve ever heard a Detroit diesel starting and revving, then you know the sound carries for miles. On weekends, I cut, limbed and skidded my own “hitches” or loads. I cut mostly pulpwood and some logs. A good lumberjack could cut 70 trees per day. I was paid $1.25 per tree and could cut 75 per day, and if things were really going good, I’d try for 100. That was big money in those days. Pine logs went to Canada, cherry was shipped to Vermont, and birch and maple were sent to plywood and furniture companies throughout the northeast. Softwood pulp had to be cut into four-foot bolts and was sent to paper mills that made fine writing paper. In order to load a tractor trailer for these mills, we “bunched pulp” using a pulp hook in piles stacked about four feet to six feet wide for a loader to pick up and load into eight tiers on the truck. This was dangerous because as we bent over bunching pulp, the loader worked above our heads, and it wasn’t unusual to see a big chuck drop out of the bunch as it passed over. Loader operators had to be good and careful. We knew never to bunch pulp under a new loader man! As I bunched pulp, my arms started to look like everyone else’s! Hardwood pulp was cut in eight-foot lengths and was sent to a different mill to be made into low grade paper, newsprint and cardboard.

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Too bad we didn’t have Amazon back then with all their need for boxes! While recycling is good for the environment, it was bad for the paper business, and thus the mills began rationing out weekly tickets to limit the loads they would accept. There was intense competition and finagling amongst the crews for those tickets. Some weeks a crew would open the envelope to find only three tickets for the week, which could easily be put up in just one day. The bigger logging contractors, or jobbers, would estimate additional loads and advance the logger the money to get by. However, this often led to trouble, discrepancies and even fist fights on the landing. Because the biggest wood was located deep in the forest, miles off the main road, temporary haul roads, or winter roads, were cut for access to the big wood. Beginning in late December, subzero temperatures meant the start of 24-hour days spent “roughing out” and freezing winter haul roads. We cleared the snow off swamps and marshes to help them freeze down deep. Brush and mud were packed down and frozen using skidders or bulldozers. This usually involved getting buried in the mud and then winching each other out. It also meant that we had to park our machinery on log piles and spend long hours at the day’s end cleaning mud out of the tracks, otherwise come morning, the tracks would freeze tight and stay that way for a week. As the roads became frozen enough to hold tractor trailers weighing over 100,000 pounds, they were then cut smooth with drags made from railroad rails cabled together. Eventually the mud, brush and ice created a smooth highway for truck loads bringing out the big logs and pulp traveling at 50 miles per hour. I have seen winter roads that were 40 feet wide, stretching up to 20 miles, and to this day I’m amazed that we did it. It was amazing to see these roads break up and return to nature in the spring. Sometimes I’ll snowmobile along an old winter haul road that’s barely wide enough to pass through, and I’ll tell my fellow riders, “I remember when we used to haul tractor trailers over these trails.” Of course they don’t believe me! Unfortunately, in one more generation, these logging stories and memories will fade like the day’s last echo of a chainsaw as it’s shut off. Today’s timber is harvested using monstrous, push button machinery that cuts through 200 acres in a week—the same 200 acres that lasted us all summer. Men and chainsaws have been replaced by mechanized equipment, whole tree processors, GPS locators, computerized enclosed cab spaces and equipment with tires the size of a house. The new equipment crushes everything in its path, leaving only a few pole sized trees that will take 100 years to grow into mature trees. We used to think that as the young trees grew, we’d never run out. However, today’s biomass production is simply not sustainable for long-term forest growth, and that impacts the health of its animals and human enjoyment. Add to this the crippling expense for timber companies to buy and maintain new equipment, and you see why it’s the end for the lumberjacks. Despite this, I continue at age 60 to work in the woods with my sons as I did back then. . . freezing roads, piling wood and watching out for the lady of the woods. Today I cut 25 trees, not 75, and on a good day 30 not 100, yet I still smell the fresh, turned over dirt, summer leaves and sweet maple and cherry sawdust. My arms have grown smaller over the years, but my saw is still sharp enough to cut ribbons out of wood. Nowadays, I cut wood on my own land, and occasionally I get a good paying job from a landowner looking for low impact logging. The pay isn’t enough, but I do the job anyways because the woods are in my heart and soul and my memories live on and can be shared with my boys. Years ago I asked an old lumberjack friend, “Hey, Bump, what would you do if you won the lottery?” Without hesitation he answered, “Well, that’s easy. I’d log it till the money ran out.” ° — Daniel M. Christmas, forester and co-owner of Christmas & Associates, a recreational land company located in upstate New York.

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F I V E FA B U LO U S P R O P ER T I E S T H AT C AUGHT OUR MAGA ZINE TE AM’ S E YE ON THE L AND.COM NET WORK

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Eagle Canyon Ranch S A N TA B A R B A R A CO U N T Y • C A L I F O R N I A

1,90 0 ACRES | $50,0 0 0,0 0 0

Rodeo Realty—Casey Gordon • CaseyGordonRE.com

PROPERT Y ID: 9842727 SUMMER 2018

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Triple Creek Farm WILLIAMSON COUNT Y • TENNESSEE 3 , 8 76 A C R E S | $ 4 9, 0 0 0 , 0 0 0

McEwen Group LLC—Dan McEwen • McEwenGroup.com

P R O P ER T Y I D : 3 3 4 8 74 3 3 9

Burnt Jacket at Moosehead Lake P I S C ATAQ U I S CO U N T Y • M A I N E 1 , 610 AC R E S | $1 2 ,75 0 , 0 0 0

Wilderness Realty, Inc.—Matt Miller • BurntJacket.me

P R O P ER T Y I D : 70 3 1 0 74

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Big Creek Ranch ROUT T COUNT Y • COLOR ADO 4 , 8 5 0 A C R E S | $ 3 9, 9 0 0 , 0 0 0

Ranch and Resort Realty—Christy Belton • RanchResortRealty.com

PROPERT Y ID: 6317062

Haden Ranch

C H AU TAU Q UA CO U N T Y • K A N S A S 1 , 2 4 7. 3 A C R E S | $ 2 , 4 9 5 , 0 0 0

Hayden Outdoors—Stacy Callahan • HaydenOutdoors.com

PROPERT Y ID: 7503403

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Located just minutes west of Bend, Oregon, is an active privately-held tree farm and recreational wilderness covering 33,000± contiguous, deeded acres bordering the Deschutes National Forest. More than 80 percent of the landscape is dominated by a highly productive timberland mix of coniferous forest, winding creeks and springs. The elevation ranges f rom 3,600 feet along Bull Spring Creek up to 5,600 feet along the property’s western boundary. From deep canyon breaks and expansive forest, to rugged high alpine timber with sweeping views of the Deschutes River Basin and Cascade Mountains, Bull Springs Skyline Forest encompasses a variety of landforms. O F F E R E D

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Located near the center of Oregon, Bull Springs Skyline Forest is east of the Cascade mountains on the west side of Bend, one of the nation’s fastest growing mountain towns in the United States. Bend has significant urbanization potential and is a traditional timberland industry region with infrastructure for logging and wood related products. Bull Springs Skyline Forest is accessed year-round from multiple public roads, the southern entrance is located approximately two miles west of Bend, Oregon, and the northern entrance approximately five miles from Sisters, Oregon. With close proximity to major metropolitan areas, airline service and other nationally recognized resort destinations, the property is positioned well for future residential, commercial and tourism development opportunities. Central Oregon is further distinguished for its all-season recreational amenities. Mt. Bachelor, known for exceptional skiing and extended season is located within 15 miles of Bull Springs Skyline Forest. The Deschutes River, within a few minutes of the property, provides exceptional fishing and other water recreation. National monuments and parks, including the Pacific Crest Trail, are also within short distances. Clean air, spectacular mountain scenery and comfortable climate provide inviting conditions for all types of outdoor recreation available within minutes of Bull Springs Skyline Forest. Variation in the elevation and topography create the wonderful ecosystems that benefit the flora and fauna found on the property. With timbered mountainsides, juniper hillsides, deep canyons and open grasslands, the property provides a microcosm of central Oregon habitat within its boundaries. Juniper and Sage interspersed between the rimrock ledges along the deep live water canyons provide nearly perfect habitat for mule deer and a variety of bird species. The Cascade Mountain foothills with water, timber and grass provide ideal habitat for elk, bear, mountain lion and bobcat. Lower elevation lands provide a viable habitat for deer, turkeys, coyotes and other small animals and birds. Hunting remains a prized activity year round, and abundant habitat for mule deer provides the opportunity for trophy class bucks. National monuments, national forest land and parks are within short driving and hiking distances to Bull Springs Skyline Forest. Mt. Bachelor, known for an extended ski season, is located within 15 miles of the property. The Deschutes River also is within a few minutes providing exceptional fishing, whitewater rafting, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding and canoeing. Other popular activities in this area include rock climbing, mountain biking, hiking and camping. The property has a long history of stewardship dating back to 1916 when Shevlin-Hixon and Brooks-Scanlon opened their logging camps for production. The first Shevlin-Hixon logging camp was placed at Bull Springs, which was active until 1946. Since that time, the forest has been owned by a variety logging companies and portions exchanged with the U.S. Forest Service. In recent years, the property has become of major interest to the surrounding community of Bend, Oregon, conservation groups, land planners and developers who are interested in working together to balance its valuable attributes that ascend across private ownership, forest management, community recreation, government legislation and the westerly urban expansion of Bend, Oregon. The current zoning is F1 Forest Use. The Deschutes County F1 Forest Use Zone is intended to conserve forestlands with a minimum 240-acre parcel size. Potentially rezoning through Oregon’s Destination Resort designation as a cluster development has become a popular balance between sustainable forest management, recreational open space and urban expansion. F1 Forest Use Zone permitted uses include forest operations or forest practices, provisions for wildlife and fishery resources and other farm uses. Conditional uses permitted include private hunting and fishing, private parks and campgrounds and single-family dwellings.

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Mason & Morse Ranch Company has been fortunate enough to list and sell some of the finest American farms, ranches and recreational lands across the country, Bull Springs Skyline Forest is one of America’s legacy properties without question.”

—Bart Miller M A N A G I N G

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Once you lay eyes on Bull Springs Skyline Forest, you will agree that it is unquestionably one of the most beautiful blocks of contiguous timberland, not only in Oregon, but in the entire western United States.”

—Robb Van Pelt L I S T I N G

Easily accessed year round from multiple public roads, the southern entrance is located approximately two miles west of Bend, Oregon, and the northern entrance approximately five miles from Sisters, Oregon.

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A combination of productive timberlands, conservation and development opportunities together with privacy. The property is one of the largest contiguous parcels in the western United States with stunning views and abundant wildlife just minutes from Bend, Oregon.

R O B B VA N P E LT ROBB@RANCHL AND.COM 970 -930 -1026

J A K E P O LV I J A K E @ P O LV I . N E T 5 41-410 -3050

BART MILLER BART@RANCHL AND.COM 970 -930 -1026

RANCHL AND.COM

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hill country living. Robin’s Rock Ranch is nestled in the beautiful heart of the Texas Hill Country. The ranch is

perched on one of the highest elevations in Kerr County creating magnificent views of the Hill

Country terrain. While the majority of Robin’s Rock Ranch is manicured, it retains its wild

spirit. Several natural springs with numerous dam building sites meander through the canyon and provide water for the abundant wildlife. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

82.44 acres | kerr county, texas | $2,495,000 | property# 4685009 Conner W. Hood • 830 928 2317 • Conner@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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#71832B

plentiful water. The Sandstone Mountain Ranch, with its striking landscape, plentiful water and well-managed

wildlife, is the pinnacle of ranch living. While the land makes a statement, the water makes the

ranch truly exceptional. With more than 80 acres of surface water, it is one of the “wettest” in the

Hill Country. It also includes a half mile of the coveted Llano River with holes deep enough for fishing and tubing. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

2,728 acres | llano county, texas | $29,500,000 | property# 5115261 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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exceptional hunting. The 4,624± acre Jacalon Ranch, located near Hebbronville, is home to exceptional hunting with

abundant whitetails (managed under a MLD Level III permit), quail (both Bobs and Blues), dove and waterfowl. The ranch brings together the Coastal Plains’ red sand, brush motts and savannah

grasslands and South Texas’ rolling hills and flatlands. Thanks to the Bordas Escarpment, the ranch also offers stunning views. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

4,624 acres | webb & zapata counties, texas | $6,704,800 | property# 5099555 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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undeveloped on the guadalupe. The Flowing River Ranch, located about 10 minutes south of Hunt in Kerr County, offers the rare opportunity to purchase 108± acres of undeveloped land on the Guadalupe River’s south

fork. The south fork, known for its high water quality and stunning scenery, courses through the ranch for about 1,700 feet, giving the owner private access. The native vegetation and plentiful water attract wildlife. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

108 acres | kerr county, texas | $3,750,000 | property# 3222929 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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rustic elegance. The Lucky A Ranch, located six miles east of Navasota, is 388± acres of thoughtfully customized perfection. The 5,000± square-foot home is a testament to fine craftsmanship with magnificent,

one-of-a-kind rustic elegance where even the windowsills are granite in the three-bedroom,

three-and-a-half-bath home. The front and back porches, that encompass a total of 1,625 square feet, overlook professionally landscaped grounds. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

388 acres | grimes county, texas | $6,750,000 | property# 4684998 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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live water oasis. Wolf Creek Ranch offers a private, live water oasis on 65± acres that includes rolling hills,

bottom lands and dense patches of hardwoods. Blackbuck antelope, axis deer and whitetails call

the high-fenced ranch home. Wolf Creek burbles through the ranch for about 750 feet, providing access from both banks. Hardwoods shade the watercourse and the custom concrete creekside patio. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

65 acres | gillespie county, texas | $3,250,000 | property# 4778693 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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privacy & convenience. Reward Ranch, which gets its name because it sits in both Real and Edwards Counties, fronts

Highway 41 providing the ultimate combination of privacy and convenience. The ranch, which

features rolling pastures resplendent with native grass and live oaks, is a testimony to pioneering

stewardship that can be traced back to the early 1900s when the historic ranch was founded. Its

large-scale landscape offers the best of the Hill Country. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

2,330 acres | real & edwards counties, texas | $6,174,500 | property# 6180020 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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recreational water property. Picturesque Lake Amistad Ranch, with four miles of lake frontage, is the ultimate recreational water property. Delight in hunting wild game or hiking in the hills of this scenic 872.6± acre

property, located only 25 minutes north of Del Rio. This property is versatile and well-suited for development, a corporate retreat, recreational camp or a private getaway. Learn more at HoodRealEstateInc.com.

872.6 acres | val verde county, texas | $2,600,000 | property# 951942 Howard W. Hood • 830 739 3815 • Howard@HoodRealEstateInc.com

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LA PANZA RANCH S A N TA M A R GA R I TA , CA L I F O R N I A

14,750± acres | San Luis Obispo County | $43,000,000 | Property ID: 6373874 The sprawling La Panza Ranch is a 14,750± acre holding with abundant water, diverse operations, impressive improvements and a rich, fascinating history that includes Jesse James and gold. La Panza Ranch produces a variety of crops on over 1,000± irrigated acres (vineyard, oat hay, alfalfa, forage hay and olive trees), includes a state-of-the-art olive mill and offers all necessary infrastructure for a cattle operation.

CLARKCOMPANY.COM INFO @ CLARKCOMPANY.COM | ( 805 ) 238-7110 1031 Pine Street, Paso Robles, California 93446 View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/9116 Licensed in California & Nevada: CA DRE# 00656930, NV RED# B.41551


LAS PILETAS RANCH CA R R I SA PL A I N S, CA L I FOR N I A

13,570± acres | San Luis Obispo County | $15,500,000 | Property ID: 6156394 Rare opportunity to acquire Las Piletas Ranch, an incredible 13,570± acre cattle ranch with additional BLM and USFS acreage for grazing. Adjacent to and contiguous with La Panza Ranch. Combined, these properties offer 88 certificated parcels and over 28,000 acres.

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PRITCHARD SUMNER RANCH SH A N D ON, CA L I FOR N I A

8,525± acres | Kern & San Luis Obispo Counties | $11,250,000 | Property ID: 7285240 First homesteaded in the 1860s, the 8,525± acre Pritchard-Sumner Ranch is rich with history and available to purchase for the first time in over 150 years. Operated as a cow-calf cattle business, the Pritchard-Sumner Ranch is completely outfitted with cross fencing, pastures and troughs, plus over 80,000 gallons of water storage.

PAMPA RANCH

FLYING T

O HOPPER RANCH

BE NA , CA L I FOR N I A

S A N TA M A R G A R I TA , C A L I F O R N I A

SH A N D ON, CA L I FOR N I A

5,130± acres | Kern County

1,920± acres | San Luis Obispo County

1,127± acres | San Luis Obispo County

$4,500,000 | Property ID: 6919346

$1,632,000 | Property ID: 7090468

$2,250,000 | Property ID: 6437683

Beautiful, 5,130± acre cattle ranch in eastern Kern County with extensive water development.

Flying T Cattle Rangeland is ideal for cattle grazing and offers recreational advantages.

O Hopper Ranch is easily accessible and is presently utilized for cattle grazing.

CLARKCOMPANY.COM INFO @ CLARKCOMPANY.COM | ( 805 ) 238-7110 1031 Pine Street, Paso Robles, California 93446 View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/9116 Licensed in California & Nevada: CA DRE# 00656930, NV RED# B.41551


WILD COYOTE ESTATE PA S O R O B L E S , C A L I F O R N I A

34± acres

| San Luis Obispo County | $5,200,000 | Property ID: 7493057

Situated in Paso Robles wine country in the highly sought-after Adelaida District AVA, the extraordinary Wild Coyote Estate consists of a 15± acre vineyard plus winery, distillery and bed and breakfast complemented by a remarkable main residence.

VINEYARD HILL IRRIGATED GROUND

JL RANCH

SH A N D ON, CA L I FOR N I A

PA I C I N E S , C A L I F O R N I A

350± acres | San Luis Obispo County $4,500,000 | Property ID: 7090469

2,270± acres | San Benito County $6,500,000 | Property ID: 6743193

Comprised of 100± acres irrigated farm ground, 230± acres grazing land complemented by farm house, an employee house, barns and corrals.

John Andreini’s spectacular horse and cattle ranch with numerous residences and extensive equestrian improvements.

NORTH STARR RANCH D E E T H , N E VA DA

3,621± acres | Elko County | $7,250,000 | Property ID: 6156393 A hunter’s and outdoorsman’s paradise located at the base of the Ruby Mountains, North Starr Ranch abounds with limitless opportunities for recreation: hunting, fishing, camping, hiking and beyond. This ranch is utilized as a seasonal cow-calf operation, making it a complete turnkey operation.

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FA R M & R A N C H

PROPERTIES

R&B R ANCH $24,000,000

# 201608213

507.86

ACRES

SISTERS, OREGON – Encompassing 507 acres, this Central Oregon ranch located just five minutes from the charming town of Sisters is a diverse mixture of productive pasture for livestock, high desert pine forest and an irrigated oasis of manicured grounds. RandBRanch-SistersOregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

BOX S R ANCH $5,950,000

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BEND, OREGON – Unmatched seclusion and privacy and Cascade Mountain views. Main home, water rights, canyons, stocked ponds, guest home, barn with office and shop, garden and hay barns. This ranch is a one-of-a-kind, recreational lifestyle property! BoxSRanch-BendOregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

B E N D E Q U E S T R I A N E S TAT E $4, 500,000

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BEND, OREGON – Exquisite timber-frame-style home with massive timbers, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan and custom stonework throughout. Patio overlooks waterfall, stocked pond and Cascade Mountain views. Barns, studio, bunkhouse; borders public land. 66500GerkingMarket-BendOregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

HORSE BUTTE EQUESTRIAN CENTER $2,495,000

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BEND, OREGON – 61 acres with 40 acres of irrigation water rights and pond with an updated 1,764-square-foot home. Equestrian facilities include two barns, an outdoor sand arena, conditioning track and 12 loafing sheds. Property has access to national forest. 60360HorseButte-BendOregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

PAM M AYO-PHILLIPS,

PRINCIPA L BROKER

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FA R M & R A N C H

PROPERTIES

C H E R R Y C R E E K M O U N TA I N R A N C H $8,665,000

15,754

# 201907178

ACRES

MITCHELL, OREGON – A rare opportunity in the heart of Central Oregon. The topography is a wonderful combination of forest, timbered draws, rimrocks and meadows, springs, as well as numerous spring-fed creeks that flow into Cherry Creek. CherryCreekRanch-MitchellOregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

MAHOGANY BUTTE R ANCH $8,775,000

6,867

# 201703558

ACRES

PRINEVILLE, OREGON – Mill Creek runs through the property which borders the Ochoco National Forest. The beautiful 4,010-square-foot main home features a saltwater swimming pool overlooking the Mill Creek Valley. Two additional homes, private setting. MahoganyButteRanch-PrinevilleOregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

C U LV E R O R G A N I C F A R M $2, 275,000

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CULVER, OREGON – 96 acres with water rights, updated 1,368-square-foot guest home, 8,448-square-foot shop/greenhouse, threestall horse barn, livestock pastures and Cascade Mountain and Crooked River views. 6319keeneyln-culveroregon.com pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

NW BEND DEVELOPMENT PROPERT Y $18,000,000

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BEND, OREGON – Development opportunity in the Bend UGB. Possibility of 200 single-family residences with the updated City Master Plan Code. Property has varied topography, pine trees and is bordered by good neighborhoods. This property has the potential to be the next great westside community! pam mayo -phillips & brook havens

BRO OK H AV E NS ,

PR I N C I PA L B RO K ER

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PAM M AYO-PHILLIPS,

PRINCIPA L BROKER

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DAVE HARRIGAN

HUNTER HARRIGAN

Dave@HarriganLand.com

Hunter@HarriganLand.com

THUNDER RIVER RANCH A L BA N Y CO UN T Y | W YO M IN G

RED HAWK RANCH

GUN N ISON COUN TY | COLO RADO

26,046± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 5435396

923± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 2239797

With over 40 square miles to its credit, the Thunder River Ranch captures the best of Wyoming. Big game hunting and fishing opportunities are unparalleled, and its cattle heritage is as rich as its well-watered grasslands. Well-blocked and extremely private, this ranch is simply breathtaking in its scale and tradition as a true legacy property. $22,975,000

At Red Hawk Ranch, high in the West Elk Mountains near Crested Butte, Colorado, you’ll not only be away from it all, but also above it all. This 923-acre wilderness ranch for sale boasts sweeping views of the magnificent Ohio Creek Valley that will be shared only by you and the eagles. $3,450,000

BANDERITAS CREEK RANCH

PAINT ROCK CANYON RANCH

M O R A C O UN T Y | N E W M E X ICO

3,550± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 6795317

BIG H ORN COUN TY | WY O MI NG

83,604± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 4558971

The wildlife-rich Banderitas Creek Ranch is situated along the meandering banks of Banderitas Creek and the Ocate River in northern New Mexico. The Banderitas Creek Ranch is 630 deeded acres, plus an adjoining state lease of 2,920 acres. The environmental mix here has worked out perfectly for this ranch to become a remarkable wildlife mecca. $1,900,000

Easily qualifying as one of the finest all-around large ranches in Wyoming, the 83,604-acre (7,177 deeded) Paint Rock Canyon Ranch will capture your Western imagination. This Western ranch offers the best in fly fishing, big game hunting and agricultural production. $19,950,000

LITTLE GUNNYSACK RANCH

IRON MOUNTAIN RANCH

C O NVE R S E CO UN T Y | W YO M IN G

L ARAMIE COUN TY | WY OMI NG

686± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7370406

Under one hour north of Cheyenne lies one of Wyoming’s legendary ranches, equally famed for its history, cattle production, big game and fishing. Iron Mountain Ranch, once the stomping grounds of gunman Tom Horn, is 20,000 acres (15,184 deeded) of some of the best-watered grasslands in this part of the state. $16,500,000

Secluded among the fir, pine and aspen forests of Wyoming’s picturesque Box Elder Creek valley near Glenrock, the 686-acre Little Gunnysack Ranch affords an enticing opportunity to own an excellent elk hunting property in one of Wyoming’s most coveted trophy areas. $1,950,000

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20,000± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7304730

View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/14957


SOUTHERN CROSS RANCH C A T R O N CO UN T Y | N E W M E X ICO

BROKEN BUTT RANCH

RIO ARRIBA COUN TY | NEW MEXI CO

29,142± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7032438

16,309± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 3393551

“World-class” is no exaggeration when describing the exceptional trophy elk hunting on the renowned Southern Cross Ranch in west-central New Mexico. The Southern Cross is indeed a “land of giants,” well-known for amazing numbers of 350- to 400-class bulls that have free access to its 29,142 acres (18,535 deeded). Simply put, the Southern Cross controls over 45 square miles of the finest trophy elk habitat anywhere. $14,950,000

Never before offered on the market, the 16,309-acre Broken Butt Ranch in northern New Mexico easily qualifies as one of the largest remaining elk-rich mountain ranches in the state. Named for a rifle with a broken stock found on the ranch in the early 1900s, Broken Butt Ranch has a long history of careful management as a joint cattle and hunting property. $25,000,000

RED RABBIT RANCH

R I O A R R IB A CO UN T Y | N E W M E X ICO

CITADEL RANCH

H UERFAN O COUN TY | COLORADO

1,937± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7549086

17,520± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7188711

The 1,937-acre Red Rabbit Ranch captures the best of the Tierra Amarilla area on a property graced with extraordinary hunting and equestrian opportunities, mountain scenery and buildings that are the virtual definition of fine craftsmanship. $8,950,000

Stretching from the 6,800-foot sweeping grasslands in the east to over 10,000 feet on the forested slopes to the west, this 17,520-acre (14,800± deeded) ranch encompasses numerous life zones that are perfectly suited to an abundance of wildlife that is simply amazing. $25,500,000

RIO NUTRIAS CREEK RANCH

BROKEN BONE RANCH

R I O A R R IB A CO UN T Y | N E W M E X I CO

ROUTT COUN TY | COLO RADO

3,532± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7549085

Located only 40 minutes from Steamboat Springs and one hour from Vail, lies a Colorado recreational ranch of exceptional quality. Containing 1,388 acres of an ideal blend of mountain irrigated hay meadows, creek bottom and quaking aspens, Broken Bone Ranch has long been prime habitat for elk, mule deer, black bear and small game species. $5,950,000

Ideally situated between the cool high country of northern New Mexico and the rich cultural center of Santa Fe, the 3,532-acre Rio Nutrias Creek Ranch is a remarkable big game hunting ranch with the bonus of a working cattle operation. $4,575,000

1,388± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7433802

HARRIGANLAND.COM | (800) 524-1818


WYOMING

MONTANA

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PAS S CRE E K RANCH

1,956± Total Acres | Parkman, WY | $7,500,000 Everything you’d expect in a Wyoming recreation ranch; for over 80 years, this ranch has offered enjoyment with complete privacy and connection to the outdoors and wildlife. This private, end-of-the-road ranch leverages millions of acres via its state lease and being adjacent to the national forest. Gather your family or guests and get unplugged in the Bighorn Mountains. A swimming pool and rustic hunting lodge compliment the “cowboy-cosmopolitan” lifestyle.

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UP P E R F RE NCH CRE E K RANCH

2,605± Total Acres | Buffalo, WY | $4,300,000 This private ranch has live water and its own mountain, located next to the Bighorn Mountains in the French Creek Valley just a short drive from town. This spectacular ranch will support a small herd of cows and offers lots of recreation and hunting opportunities. For the equestrian enthusiast, this ranch offers miles of beautiful riding from the creek bottom to mountain. It borders Bighorn Vista Ranch, which could be purchased with this ranch.

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RO O T CRE E K RANCH

429± Total Acres | Glenrock, WY | $2,900,000 Incredible fishing and hunting ranch with a beautiful custom log home overlooking the creek. Root Creek Pond offers great stillwater fishing while Box Elder Creek offers blue-ribbon fly fishing for browns and rainbows. This ranch is very near thousands of acres of public land for more fishing, hunting and outdoor recreation. This ranch is 30 minutes from Casper or Douglas, Wyoming, and 2.5–3 hours from the Colorado front range.

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The consummate Bighorn Mountain foothills ranch: unparalleled privacy, uninterrupted views of the Bighorn Mountains, exquisite complimentary homes and an agricultural component of aesthetically pleasing, productive hay fields. Great water rights and irrigation, excellent barns, trophy big game upland birds and ponds for trophy fishing.

Tailwater “cast & blast” ranch located immediately below the Tongue River Dam and only 35 miles from Sheridan, Wyoming. This ranch offers opportunities for amazing trophy deer and elk hunting, plus fantastic upland bird hunting and superb fishing without being too remote. 157 irrigated acres, food plots and a registered game bird farm enhance the ranch.

NORTH LODGE TRAIL LAND

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933± Total Acres | Decker, MT | $6,500,000

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1,945± Acres | Big Horn, WY | $18,500,000

A remarkable gem of a property located in the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains of Story, Wyoming, that offers great views all around, privacy, lots of natural water, diverse terrain and lush vegetation and is rich with wildlife. It is near the national forest, and there is good access to the property.

The Tongue River flows through this horse property for about 1/3 mile, and next to it is over 1,700 acres of BLM land that leverage this property’s size and recreational and hunting value immeasurably. Nice home, and for the equestrian enthusiast, there’s a 60’x120’ indoor arena with an attached eight-stall barn.

TATE RANCH

G RE Y BUL L RI V E R R A N C H

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75± Acres | Sheridan, WY | $1,400,000

H

206± Total Acres | Story, WY | $1,650,000

169± Total Acres | Sheridan, WY | $1,388,600

40.7± Acres | Meeteetse, WY | $795,000

Historic horse property located near America’s original dude ranch and just miles from the best western town of Sheridan. Offers beautiful views, privacy and a slice of Wyoming Heaven. This land embodies the “Sheridan Lifestyle,” a lifestyle built over 140 years from this cowboy-cosmopolitan way of life along the Bighorn Mountain foothills.

The Greybull River flows through this property, offering a fabulous cutthroat trout fishery and habitat for wildlife, plus productive irrigated pasture. The balance of the property is used for livestock and producing hay. The property has a very nice small house and other equestrian improvements that are quite complimentary to the property.

1-844-WYO-LAND info@chasebrothersllc.com

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Red Top Ranch

BX Ranch

69,126± Acres in Pueblo County, Colorado

24,778± Acres in Pueblo County, Colorado

With 69,126 deeded acres, Red Top Ranch represents one of the largest and best known operating cattle ranches in Colorado. Conveniently located near the I-25 corridor and the Front Range, and situated just southeast of Pueblo, the ranch is near the cattle markets. Lying in the Great Plains and Central Shortgrass Prairie Ecoregion, the ranch is recognized nationally for its significant ecological grasslands with its flat to rolling prairie, mesas, sandstone breaks and sculpted canyons. With a cattle operation rated for 1,200 cow/calf pairs, the property offers extensive water infrastructure and important natural habitat for big game, birds and plants. Contact Ken Mirr.

A spectacularly-sited expanse of shortgrass prairie located east of Pueblo, Colorado, the 26,018-acre BX Ranch is one of the great land conservation and regenerative agricultural success stories in the country. Over the past five years the current landowners have made significant capital improvements, installing stateof-the-art holistic short-rotation grazing infrastructure, including miles of new permanent electric interior paddock fencing and extensive waterlines servicing new stock tanks and ponds to set the stage for marked improvements in range production. Contact Woody Beardsley.

$16,500,000

$8,900,000

Property ID: 6972305

Property ID: 7618861

Owl Creek Ranch 2,505± Acres in Hot Springs County, Wyoming

Egry Mesa Ranch 2,014± Acres in Rio Blanco County, Colorado

Owl Creek Ranch is a remote, pristine wilderness property located at the foot of the 12,500-foot Washakie Needles, allowing direct access to the Wind River Wilderness and surrounding 2.5 million-acre Shoshone National Forest. The ranch offers a myriad of recreational opportunities but is also a mecca for several species of big game including bighorn sheep, shiras moose, mule deer and trophy elk. The trout-filled South Fork of Owl Creek runs for over two miles along the southern border of the ranch. Contact Jeff Hubbard or Mac McWhorter.

The 2,014± deeded-acre Egry Mesa Ranch represents one of the most diversified and spectacular recreational ranches on the market today. It includes all the resources you look for with 3.5 miles of boundary with the Routt National Forest, a combined five miles of two rivers and water rights that irrigate approximately 180 acres of meadows and pastures. The area boasts the largest elk herd in North America with the ranch expertly managed for wildlife. Contact Ken Mirr.

$6,500,000

$6,500,000

Property ID: 6314159

Property ID: 6665558

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Info@MirrRanchGroup.com Office: (303) 623-4545 • Toll Free: (877) 623-4545


Table Mountain Farm

Little Bear Ranch

1,440± Acres in Goshen County, Wyoming

446± Acres in Summit County, Utah

Table Mountain Farm is a well-kept, perfectly maintained,1,440-total-acre farm located just two-and-a-half miles south of Huntley, Wyoming. With excellent water rights, 798 acres are under seven 2014 model Reinke Pivots in a nicely laid out modernized farm. Complete with Field Wise Intelligent Farming controls throughout the farm to control pivot function, pump operation and water storage management, this is legitimately a large, profitable farming operation in southeastern Wyoming. Contact Jared Souza.

Set upon the northwest corner of the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, the 446± acre Little Bear Ranch abuts the southeastern corner of the 35,000-acre Two Bear Ranch located in the Whitney area of the Uinta Mountains. The ranch is easily accessible off the Mirror Lake Scenic Byway from the Wasatch Front (90 minutes), Park City (60 minutes) and Evanston, Wyoming (25 minutes). The ranch provides a dramatic setting for a family compound or guest lodge with the great outdoors as your backyard. Contact Chris Corroon.

$4,175,000

$3,300,000

Property ID: 5571542

Property ID: 6665559

Price Reduced

Balcony Farm Snowshoe Ranch

718± Acres in Delta County, Colorado

Located at the confluence of Anthracite and Coal Creeks along a national scenic byway, the 142± acre Snowshoe Ranch is for the fishing enthusiast. Offers one mile of both sides of Anthracite Creek, and in the late spring, the property’s nine stocked ponds await the angler. The property is bordered on three sides by the Gunnison National Forest and has a remodeled 2,100-square-foot Craftsman-style main residence. Contact Tommy Latousek.

The 718-acre Balcony Farm is a mountain hay property located in North Fork of the Gunnison Valley between the towns of Paonia (four miles east) and Hotchkiss, Colorado (five miles west). Situated on the south slope of the Grand Mesa, this former polo-horse farm borders U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land and offers end-of-the-road privacy on a low-traffic county serviced road. With spectacular views, senior adjudicated water rights and unique agricultural and conservation values, the property represents an attractive long-term investment opportunity in one of the state’s last affordable mountain corridors. Contact Woody Beardsley.

$1,950,000

$1,600,000

Property ID: 5571532

Property ID: 7054688

142± Acres in Gunnison County, Colorado

www.MirrRanchGroup.com

901 Acoma Street, Denver, Colorado 80204 View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/11912

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Todd Henon Properties

LEADERS IN SOUTHEAST LIFEST YLE • TN | GA | AL Wildwood Acres Ranch CEDAR BLUFF, ALABAMA 63± Acres | $975,000 • • • •

Farm-fenced pasture with stocked 5-acre lake 4-bedroom home, caretaker’s cottage, barn 7,000-square-foot metal building Video, photos, highlights: ToddHenon.com/Wildwood-Acres-Ranch

Moon Lake: Hunting Paradise CLOUDLAND, GEORGIA 314± Acres | $1,595,000 • • • •

5-bedroom home, multiple outbuildings 53± acres in pasture 1 hour to Chattanooga, 2 hours to Atlanta Video, photos, highlights: ToddHenon.com/Moon-Lake

750± Hunting Acres near Chattanooga, TN TRENTON, GEORGIA 750± Acres | $2,250,000 • • • • •

Hunt deer & turkey 25 minutes to Chattanooga Pond and seasonal streams 1.25± miles of brow frontage Video, photos, highlights: ToddHenon.com/Brow-Road-Hunting-Land

Hidden Springs Farm: 374± Acres LAFAYETTE, GEORGIA 374± Acres | $2,648,000 • • • •

Working farm, mix of woodlands & pasture 3,400+ feet of State-managed trout stream Home, 5 barns, caretaker’s compound Video, photos, highlights: ToddHenon.com/Hidden-Springs-Farm

CONSIDERING THE SOUTHEAST? Our corner of the world appeals to investors, sportsmen, farmers, retirees and families for common “wins.” No State Income Tax in Tennessee | Affordability, Low Cost of Living | Rural Opportunities Near Metropolitan Cities | Mild Weather

423.664.1900

Each office is independently owned and operated

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Picturesque Equestrian Estate SOUTHEAST TENNESSEE

CUMBERLAND PLATEAU, TENNESSEE • 20-stall luxury horse barn, riding ring • 8-acre lake, creeks, pond

• Mix of pasture and woodlands • 30 minutes to Chattanooga, TN

320± Acres | $2,300,000 • Multiple configurations available • Large banquet hall, 2 kitchens & 2 bedroom apartment

Todd Henon

ALC Accredited

Land Consultant

Broker-Agent: TN, GA, AL Chattanooga’s Only Accredited Land Consultant Realtor’s Land Institute, TN Board Member

423.413.4507 | ToddHenon.com

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Black Hills Hidden Treasures! IF YOU’RE LUCKY ENOUGH TO LIVE IN THE BLACK HILLS, YOU’RE LUCKY ENOUGH!

11061 S Castle Creek 163± ACRES | HILL CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA | $2,300,000 | PROPERTY ID: 7537428 Bring your horses or recreational vehicles for the rides of a lifetime exploring all the miles of beautiful USFS lands in this most coveted area of the Beautiful Black Hills!

27128 Big Valley

25553 Glen Erin

24741 Timber Ridge Rd.

290.35± ACRES | HOT SPRINGS, SOUTH DAKOTA

41.46± ACRES | CUSTER, SOUTH DAKOTA

70.96± ACRES | HERMOSA, SOUTH DAKOTA

Wide open spaces! No covenants.

Beautiful, rare 41± acres nearly surrounded by USFS lands.

High-end, custom-built home with endless amenities.

$750,000 | PROPERTY ID: 7496507

$829,200 | PROPERTY ID: 7323479

$1,650,000 | PROPERTY ID: 6593631

13179 Bridge Lane

13821 Clydesdale Rd.

Copper Mountain Ranch

2.19± ACRES | RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA

13± ACRES | RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA

240± ACRES | HILL CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA

Sweet dreams are made of this!

A beautiful place to call home!

Completely surrounded by Black Hills National Forest lands!

$649,000 | PROPERTY ID: 6427069

$999,000 | PROPERTY ID: 6995554

$1,550,000 | PROPERTY ID: 4815642

You Gotta Have Faith! FAITH LEWIS, BROKER ASSOCIATE 605.863.0725 | FaithLewis@kw.com View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/1073979

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Canyon Rim Ranch WILDERNESS PRESERVATION COMMUNITY IN THE HISTORIC RED CANYON Canyon Rim Ranch is a Wilderness Preservation Community that takes in part of the historic Red Canyon. There are underground utilities and rural water. Only 39 private lots are available with shared ownership of 2,500 acres plus 4,500 acres of public lands in and around the historic Red Canyon! Ammenties include the Red Canyon Saloon Social Club Cabin, nice horse facilities and the founders cabin picnic area. BRING YOUR HORSES!

Escape to the Beautiful Black Hills of South Dakota 60± ACRES | CUSTER, SOUTH DAKOTA

Heirloom-quality, custom-designed home with million-dollar views! $2,475,000 | PROPERTY ID: 7548020

26923 Elk Run Rd.

26580 Stage Stop Rd.

Red Canyon Rd.

10± ACRES | CUSTER, SOUTH DAKOTA

5± ACRES | CUSTER, SOUTH DAKOTA

Home of your dreams!

Buy five acres and get 7,000 acres to play on!

$999,000 | PROPERTY ID: 6104883

$99,500 | PROPERTY ID: 6440907

You Gotta Have Faith! FAITH LEWIS, BROKER ASSOCIATE 605.863.0725 | FaithLewis@kw.com View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/1073979 WINTER 2019

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Farms Y BELL

Crook County,Oregon 1 , 1 3 5 ± AC R E S • $ 4 4 ,75 0,0 0 0

• 8 , 8 6 3 ± S QUA R E - FO O T M A I N H O M E • 2 ,7 7 5 ± A C R E B L M L E A S E • I N C R E D I B L E E Q U E S T R I A N FA C I L I T I E S • ONE GUEST HOUSE & THE MANAGER’S HOMES INFO@TEXASRANCHSALESLLC.COM

8 3 0 . 74 1 . 8 9 0 6 TEXASRANCHSALESLLC.COM

• 4 0 ± AC R E S O F F L O O D I R R I G AT I O N • P O D R E S E RVO I R T O C A N A L & P I VO T S F O R I R R I G AT I O N • N U M E R O U S E Q U I P M E N T & H AY B A R N S


a true paradise

The breathtaking Y Bell Farms is a true paradise featuring majestic views of the Cascade Mountain range, exceptionally manicured pastures, magnificent improvements and unparalleled amenities. Located only eight miles west of Roberts Field Airport and Redmond, Oregon, the main ranch encompasses 435± acres of deeded land, along with a BLM lease spanning an additional 2,775± acres. The marvelous 8,863± single story main home features highlights of local materials found on the property, including an impressive floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace separating the grand entry from the living room. This modernized home is built for relaxation, comfort and overall luxurious country living. This home boasts every convenience a family could need and is well suited for family, entertaining and friends. The home includes a state-of-the-art gourmet kitchen, spacious family room, full bar, game and media rooms, private offices, an extraordinary master suite and more. In total, the home encompasses four bedrooms and four-and-a-half bathrooms. Attached to the main home is a 9,916± square-foot trophy room, large patios, a salt-water pool and hot-tub and a three-bay garage. Within the main home compound is an additional two-bay detached garage with heated dog kennels and a dog run and a four-bay detached garage with weight room. Just up the drive from the main home are some of the finest equestrian facilities available. An indoor arena spans 59,500± square feet and features 29 automatic roll-up doors, a hot walker, round pen, bar and viewing area, custom mechanical cutting cow and more. Across from the arena is a luxurious horse barn with feed and tack rooms, hay storage, washrooms, an apartment, a foaling stall and nine stalls with runs leading to a pasture. Within the same compound is a 7,200± square-foot, L-shaped equipment and storage barn. The barn has eight bays with 14’x14’ automatic roll-up doors and one bay with a 20’x14’ door, allowing even the largest implements to be effortlessly stowed. Just south of the compound is an 8,700± square-foot, eight-bay shop with walk-in meat processing cooler, beer taps, laundry facility and two-bedroom loft living quarters. West of the main home, the Y Bell Farms also features a 2,967± square-foot guest home with two bedrooms and 1.5 bathrooms and attached two-car garage. A large back patio with an atrium sprawls from the rear of the guest home. A storage barn, small horse barn and paddock is situated near the guest home. Near the southwest corner of the main property is the manager’s home and cattle working facilities. The managers home is an open-concept 3,020± square-foot house with three bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms and attached two-car garage. A two-story calving barn with six stalls, medical room, hay loft and storage is surrounded by custom steel cattle working pens. Nearby is another hay barn and a detached three-bay garage with dog kennels. Separate, but within one mile from the main ranch, are 700± acres of working farms. These farm tracts include nine houses and living quarters for employees, caretakers and managers. Additionally, there are several shops, garages, sheds and a 15,000± square-foot steel hay barn. Much of the farms are irrigated via pivots, flood irrigation and COID irrigation. The potential for agricultural yield and production in this area is quite significant. The entirety of Y-Bell Farms has been well thought out and designed to create an exceptional farming, recreational hunting and working cattle ranch. It is truly an outstanding property that is appealing to a distinguished buyer for any walk of life. Property ID: 7323743 The Y-Bell Farms are exclusively listed with Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty & co-marketed with Texas Ranch Sales, LLC.

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Matt Mann/Broker  •  matt@lgland.com • (713) 402-8827  •  www.LGLand.com

• LITTLE BRUSHY CREEK RANCH • 424± Acres in Lavaca County, Texas • Property ID: 5385767 Located 1.5 hours from Houston, this gamey hunting ranch features Little Brushy Creek, two ponds, diverse rolling terrain and hundreds of giant live oaks. The improvements include a nice and functional barndominium, game cleaning station and new water well. Minerals negotiable.

• CIRCLE B RANCH • 243± Acres in Lavaca County, Texas • Property ID: 4258799 After years of intense management and breeding operations, this highfenced property is poised to produce 200-inch class whitetails. Heavily wooded with miles of seasonal creeks. Very nice lodge and barn.

• LANTANA HILLS RANCH • 4,216± Acres in Live Oak County, Texas • Property ID: 7372237

• SALT BRANCH CREEK RANCH • 413± Acres in Live Oak County, Texas • Property ID: 6870316 This ranch has a mile of Salt Branch Creek bottoms, elevation changes, food plots, outstanding native brush and deep dark sandy loam soils. Great habitat for deer, turkey, dove and quail hunting. There is a great road system, and a water well and electricity are in place.

Situated in the hilly area of the Nueces River valley between San Antonio and Corpus Christi, Lantana Hills Ranch awaits a new land steward. Truly a legacy property, the ranch has been meticulously groomed to become some of the most conveniently located native quail country, as well as having possibly one of the finest wild whitetail herds in the state of Texas. The ranch is highly improved and is set up for entertaining large groups, with all kinds of activities in mind. Ample amounts of surface, underground water, 250-inch Boone and Crockett deer, turkey, quail and dove hunting. Rolling hills, creek bottoms, bull mesquites, irrigated fields and deep loamy soils within an hour of San Antonio make this ranch a rare find. 1,626 high-fenced acres can be subdivided.

309 Leisure Lane, Friendswood, Texas 77546  |  View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/10693

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Meagher

New Listing

Big Horn Pivot Farm

Sarpy Ridge Ranch

94 8± ACRES • $3,300,000 • YELLOWSTONE COUNTY, MONTANA

3,464± ACRES • $4 ,200,000 • ROSEBUD COUNTY, MONTANA

This farm has 607± irrigated acres with 542 acres under Zimmatic

In one of the most sought after hunting regions in the world with

pivots, with the ability to irrigate an additional 149 dryland acres.

monster bull elk, heavily timbered draws feeding to productive fields

With its access, location and ample water, this truly is a prime piece

and ample water sources. Large numbers of mule deer, whitetail deer,

of farm ground in an area where farm ground is hard to come by.

antelope and the occasional black bear have been seen on the ranch.

Green Hills Ranch

Three Pines Ranch

3,990± ACRES • $3,900,000 • GOLDEN VALLEY COUNTY, MONTANA

9,060± ACRES • $8,900,000 • GOLDEN VALLEY COUNTY, MONTANA

The location of these 3,350 deeded acres and 640 state leased acres

Three pivots, 11 drilled wells, Painted Robe Creek and Musselshell

along with the irrigated ground, improved pastures, exceptional

River frontage and its location in the Bull Mountains provide an ideal

water rights, including Musselshell River rights and Deadman’s

setting for ranching or hunting. The current owners have harvested

Basin Water, would make this an outstanding purebred operation.

180-inch whitetail, huge mule deer and world-class bull elk.

Price Reduced

Big Ox Bottom Ranch

Robidou Ranch

828± ACRES • $5,700,000 • YELLOWSTONE COUNTY, MONTANA

3,322± ACRES • $2,150,000 • MEAGHER COUNTY, MONTANA

This 828-deeded-acre ranch provides it all. With approximately

The Robidou Ranch is located in Martinsdale, Montana, and consists

501 irrigated acres along with 2.6+ miles of the Famed Big Horn

of 1,598 deeded acres and 1,724 state leased acres. Ample water off

River, this property provides excellent habitat for a wide variety of

both Daisy Dean Creek and Mud Creek allows the current owners

species. The fishing possibilities on the Big Horn River are endless.

to produce a substantial amount of feed on 170+ irrigated acres.

PI PM O N TA N A .CO M B RYA N A N D E R S O N & R O G E R JACO B S , B R O K E R S 406 .259.2544 • RANCHES@PIPMONTANA .COM | 406.839.7439 • ROGER@PIPMONTANA .COM VIEW ALL PROPERTIES: LANDSOFAMERICA .COM/MEMBER/51298 WINTER 2019

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS | MANAGEMENT | BROKERAGE | DEVELOPMENT | L AND

Suwannee River Ag Land 241± ACRES HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROPERTY ID: 2950037 Gorgeous property with pine, oaks and other natural habitats. Deer, turkey and other Florida wildlife species call this property home. Includes 1.25± miles of frontage on the Suwannee River, a major river in southern Georgia and northern Florida that is a total of 266± miles long. $795,000 or $3,300 per acre

Old Starke Road Ranch 300± ACRES PUTNAM COUNTY, FLORIDA PROPERTY ID: 7318509 Farmers, ranchers, equestrian, high-fenced game operations, recreational enthusiasts and other land buyers, this is the opportunity for you! Currently being utilized for horse and cattle ranching and previously for goat farming. Perfect for a recreational buyer. High-tension transmission lines run through the southwest corner of this property, making it a good candidate for solar power. $1,197,000 or $3,900 per acre

Hog Bay Farm 1,387± ACRES DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA PROPERTY ID: 7304447 1,387± gross acres and 1,300± net acres of tillable land with seven wells. Formerly used for an organic citrus operation, it has been used for the farming of alternative crops and can offer potential income streams from various uses. A high-tension transmission line runs the northern boundary of the property, and given the amount of usable acreage, the subject site would work nicely as a solar farm. $7,351,100 or $5,300 per acre

Residential Development Land 1,386± ACRES LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROPERTY ID: 2917314 Two parcels with a yield potential of 1,140 to 1,340 total residential units. Land has been annexed into the City of Mascotte. Parcel 1: 304 acres, ideal for mixed use. Parcel 2: 1,082 acres, rural residential with one unit per acre (900–1,000 units for the property). $9,009,000 or $6,500 per acre for both Parcel 1: $1,976,000; Parcel 2: $7,033,000

Middle Haw Creek Ranch & Timberland 1,200± ACRES FLAGLER COUNTY, FLORIDA PROPERTY ID: 5850089 Whether you are an avid outdoor enthusiast, a hunter, a cattle rancher or a timber investor, this property offers it all. The property is located near large metropolitan areas and Florida’s east coast. The land can be described as “Old Florida” Pine Flatwoods with scattered cypress heads, oak hammocks and palmetto stands. Hunting, fishing, camping and other outdoor activities are readily available and ideal for this site. NOW: $5,040,000 or $4,200 per acre WAS: $5,880,000 or $4,900 per acre

Cabbage Hammock Ranch 443± ACRES DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA PROPERTY ID: 6845697 This ranch offers productive Bahai ground for grazing and/or harvesting sod, with beautiful hardwood drains into native Florida cabbage hammocks. This property is the epitome of South Florida ranching. Come see why this ranch should be the next investment you enjoy. $1,749,850 or $3,950 per acre

M A U R Y L . C A R T E R & A S S O C I AT E S , I N C . has sold over 200,000 acres of land and has closed over $1 billion in transactions over the past 35+ years. Since January 1, 2012, we’ve sold over 49,902± acres and closed over $500 million in transactions (over 4,728± acres and $73,032,680 in 2018). Our core competencies include brokerage, land investments and land management.

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Find your bliss...

Life on the Umpqua.

155 Upper Camp Loop Road

Steamboat Falls, North Umpqua River

130 Cross Creek

160± Acres • Umpqua Valley, Oregon • $1,699,000

7.4± Acres • Umpqua Valley, Oregon • $1,500,000

Beautiful lodge-style estate nestled in your own private forested retreat on 160 acres! Spacious bedrooms, guest quarters, manicured grounds with gated entrance, pond and trails. Property ID: 5574611

Ultimate custom home for the most selective buyers! This impressive and expansive home sits on seven+ acres with many upgrades. Large spacious rooms with boundless views of mountains and vineyard. Property ID: 5683650

1081 Umpqua College Road

6.41± Acres • Umpqua Valley, Oregon • $1,299,950

Life on the Umpqua! One-of-a-kind estate on 6.41 acres with over 334 feet of North Umpqua River frontage with private boat ramp. Full-length patio takes in the river and mountain views! Property ID: 7134276

1007 Ash Creek

172± Acres • Umpqua Valley, Oregon • $1,149,000

Live the Oregon dream on this 172-acre ranch with two homes and multiple ponds. Full-sized outdoor arena! Good horse property with BLM access! Property ID: 6423236

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541-371-5500 • sold@marygilbert.com 5 MaryGilbert.com M

1055 Melrose Heights

50.86± Acres • Umpqua Valley, Oregon • $1,295,000

Amazing custom-built ridgetop home with spectacular views of the surrounding foothills and valley. With 50+ acres, enjoy privacy and tranquility from this lodge-style home. Property ID: 7011068

121 Boatwatch Lane

1.35± Acres • Umpqua Valley, Oregon • $850,000

Distinguished home with impressive views of the Umpqua Valley and the North Umpqua River! Double door entry leads you into the home with 14-plus-foot ceilings and views from every window! Property ID: 7177961

For more information about these or other listings check out our app! Scan this code or go to www.MGGRE.com and download!


Cr a t e rL a keRe a lt yInc. com Linda Long, Principal Broker/Owner | (541) 891-5562 | Linda@CraterLakeRealtyInc.com 33550 Highway 97 North, Chiloquin, Oregon 97624 | (541) 783-2759 | (541) 783-2724 Fax

C USTOM LO G HOM E

C E RT I F I E D ORGA N IC FA R M

464± Acres in Klamath County, Oregon

1,019± Acres in Klamath County, Oregon

Magnificent 4,760-square-foot custom log home with oversized twocar garage on 464 acres overlooking beautiful farming valley and backed by your own private timber ridge with lots of wildlife. Irrigated pasture from private well, impressive gated entrance, paved drive with welded steel fencing, nice 2,700-square-foot horse barn and 2,400-square-foot shop/RV garage. Private creek, waterfalls, foot bridge, professionally landscaped with slate paved paths through the gazebo at the edge of the beautiful flowing private pond. MLS #3005777

Certified organic farm on 500 of this 1,019-acre farm with 765 irrigated from private well and good district water. Productive soils for alfalfa, grains, potatoes, garlic and hemp in a private valley protected by timbered ridge, home for wildlife and 150 cows in the summer. Feedlot with two of the five hay barns, and four grain silos also offer great wintering area. Historic Bedfield home, plus three additional houses, shops and equipment storage complete this balanced farm and ranch offering. MLS #3005782

Property ID: 7524898 | Offered at $2,250,000

Property ID: 7535463 | Offered at $4,300,000

DOU BL E R R A NC H 330± Acres in Klamath County, Oregon

S WA N L A K E R A NC H 5,515± Acres in Klamath County, Oregon

The Double R Ranch is 330 acres nestled in cattle and hay country just outside of Lakeview, Oregon. Cottonwood Creek runs through the property providing stock water and 13 acres of flood irrigation. An additional 180 acres of water rights are permitted as per Permit G-13526. Two wheel lines, irrigation gun and some handline are fed by an irrigation well, and pump is powered by a 150-horse-power Duetz diesel generator. Two ponds and multiple wells—one well is set up with a solar pump for livestock water. Main home is three bedroom, two bath with hardwood floors, gas stove, copper hood, custom cabinetry and jacuzzi tub. There are two manufactured homes that are older but in good shape—rental potential for sure! Contact Andra Campbell (541-281-2180) or Linda Long (541-891-2552). MLS #3003529

Swan Lake Ranch gives new meaning to owning it all; as far as the eye can see, this 5,515-acre ranch offers some of the most secure water rights in Klamath County. Seven irrigation wells, excellent sandy soils and 22 pivots create an efficient operation for organic and nonorganic alfalfa, grain, orchard and timothy hay. Two homes built in 2012 have a bird’s eye view of the ranch. 150 pair of cattle also graze the ranch and the adjacent 10,000-acre BLM permit. Excellent cattle handling facilities; welded steel feedlot, corrals, covered working and loading chute, 30,000-pound scale. Seven hay barns, huge shops, equipment storage, multi-use buildings, grain bins. MLS #2969516

Property ID: 7538359 | Offered at $895,000

Property ID: 3513698 | Offered at $17,000,000

View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/15114

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Binford Jennings, Broker BEVERLY-HANKS.COM • BINFORD@BEVERLY-HANKS.COM • 828.707.6442

10 Thistledew Lane, 5 Acres, Mini-Farm Arden, North Carolina 4.6± ACRES IN BUNCOMBE COUNTY NORTH CAROLINA • $799,000 Modern farmhouse with barn, fully fenced. Two miles from bustling Biltmore Park. Home fully renovated and loaded with upgrades. Second living quarters with separate entrance ideal for Air B&B additional income or mother-in-law suite. Large, level field behind barn for equestrian, frisbee golf, camping, you name it. See fireworks of Lake Julian on July 4th like it’s your own show. An extra building lot on periphery is approved by city to sell. This property allows you to breathe. Feels like an estate, rather than a development.

149 Fortress Ridge Weaverville, North Carolina .5± ACRES IN BUNCOMBE COUNTY NORTH CAROLINA • $170,000 Long-range views of the Great Smoky Mountain range year round. This lot is located on an easy-to-access, paved cul-de-sac with privacy and quiet. Your contractor will love this easy-build “shelf lot” just two minutes from shops and restaurants of beautiful and quaint Weaverville (10 minutes from downtown Asheville). House plans go with sale.

66 Lake Town Lane, 3 Acres Asheville, North Carolina 191 Elk Mountain Scenic Highway Asheville, North Carolina 1.5± ACRES IN BUNCOMBE COUNTY NORTH CAROLINA • $250,000 Gently sloping, easy build, 1.5-acre lot in established neighborhood with long-range winter views, near Robinhood Road at 191 Elk Mountain Scenic Highway. Originally Thom’s Estate’s highest elevation lot. Two minutes from the well-known and loved Grove Park Inn. Five minutes from downtown Asheville, one minute from restaurants and grocery stores. City water and sewer. No HOA fees.

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3.19± ACRES IN BUNCOMBE COUNTY NORTH CAROLINA • $675,000 Three+ acres, long-range views of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park as a panorama over 220 degrees from this gentle, easy-build lot. Walking trails extend the distance of three football fields across this park-like setting, tucked into the west side (near the top) of Reynolds Mountain. An owner can have their own privacy gate off the cul-de-sac. Views of Downtown Asheville to the south, the Great Smokies to the west and Cherokee National Forest to the north, leading to Johnson City, Tennessee. One-ina-million sort of lot, only eight minutes to downtown Asheville. Located in established and loved Reynolds Mountain Village with shopping, restaurants and new class-A fitness center (YMCA) right in the center of the community. Build your dream house here.

View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/1392683


WILKSRANCHBROKERS.COM

W ILK S R A NCH BROK ER S

Kenna lly Creek Va lley R anch

Willow Creek R anch

Spectacular mountains and major trout stream valley. Numerous streams throughout. Minutes from major resort town.

A unique geographically positioned mountain timber ranch just minutes from the major resort town of McCall.

5,772± DEEDED ACRES • $11,415,390 • PROPERT Y ID: 7323848

2,235± DEEDED ACRES • $2,793,750 • PROPERT Y ID: 7047077

Little Snow y Mountain R anch

Sprague R iver R anch

FE RGU S C O U N T Y, M O N TA N A

KL A M AT H C O U N T Y, O REGO N

This ranch is essentially two ranches in one. A rolling pasture, good grass ranch combined with a rugged, timber high mountain ranch ideal for hunting. Will divide.

This expansive cattle ranch dominates the Sprague River valley, while 16 miles of the Sprague River—along with Meryl Creek—provide world-class trout fishing.

5,710.6± DEEDED ACRES • $12,250,000 • PROPERT Y ID: 6046217

15,620± DEEDED ACRES • $23,350,000 • PROPERT Y ID: 5850520

VA LLE Y C O U N T Y, I DA H O

McCa ll Red R idge R anch

VA LLE Y C O U N T Y, I DA H O

Bull Mountain R anch

ADAMS & VALLE Y COUNTIES, IDAHO

M U S S E L S H E LL C O U N T Y, M O N TA N A

Large timbered mountain range spanning a major drainage divide with 10 streams and rivers. Overlooks the town of McCall. Unique first-time offering.

With its abundant water and excellent grass for grazing, Bull Mountain Ranch is easily one of the best elk hunting ranches on the market. Will divide.

30,912± DEEDED ACRES • $1,995 PER ACRE • PROPERTY ID: 5145525

12,467± DEEDED ACRES • $14,750,000 • PROPERT Y ID: 4313540

J I M M Y W I L L I A M S , B R O K E R • I N F O @ W I L K S R A N C H B R O K E R S . C O M • 8 17 - 8 5 0 - 3 6 1 0 VIEW ALL PROPERTIES:

L A N D S O FA M E R I C A .C O M / M E M B E R /26 814 4

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Rancho San Carlos Montecito, California – Reginald Johnson estate built in 1931 with features that include 10 residential cottages, an office, producing orchards and extensive equestrian facilities. $75,000,000 | #18-3461 | 237± Acres

T heRa nchoSa nC a rlos.c om

El Mirador Estate Montecito, California – Part of the historic El Mirador Estate with legendary Japanese gardens, a large building site, a 1918 gate house and private water, making this a one-of-a-kind opportunity to own your own piece of Montecito history. $12,500,000 | #18-4351 | 13.73± Acres

El M i radorE state.c om

Rancho San Leandro Montecito, California – This ocean-view property is undergoing a complete renovation on an adobe house, built circa 1850, and the Monterey House, a separate two-story guest wing with an adjacent library, exercise studio and three-car garage. $12,750,000 | #19-1702 | 5.83± Acres

30 8En n isbrook Dr.c om

Rancho Monte A legre Carpinteria, California – A level parcel in the exclusive Rancho Monte Alegre offers expansive views. The proposed house and barn were designed by Shubin + Donaldson with the building pad already designated and cleared, and a new well was installed. $4,000,000 | #18-4121 | 9± Acres

MonteA leg reDr.c om

SuzannePerk ins.com SUZ ANNE@SUZ ANNEPERKINS.COM 8 0 5 . 8 9 5 . 2 13 8 | D R E # 0 11 0 6 5 12 View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/21750

Suzanne Perk ins, Agent WINTER 2019

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Centerville Hunting/Timber Investment

3,828±ACRES | HICKMAN COUNT Y, TENNESSEE | $3,808,860 Only $995 per acre! We rarely see properties this size here in middle Tennessee, making this a great opportunity to own such a large parcel only one hour to Nashville Tennessee. The property was select cut in 2017–2018 to 16 inches, and there is approximately 1,000 acres of readily marketable trees still remaining. The property has over ten miles of road system running the ridge lines, making most of this enormous parcel accessible. The property has a pond and a creek, plus four access points on three roads including road frontage on Tennessee HWY 50 in the city limits of Centerville, Tennessee.

Property ID: 6771707

Call the Man who Loves the Land Travis Robeson Properties

615-944-3909 | 615-263-4800 twrobeson@gmail.com | www.TravisRobeson.com For regular updates, follow me on Instagram @TravisRobesonLand

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View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/228033

RESIDENTIAL


BLACK HILLS AREA PROPERTIES JIM PEDERSON, BROKER | (307) 746-2083 | ARNOLDREALTY.COM 505 WEST MAIN STREET, NEWCASTLE, WYOMING 82701

SPRING CREEK RANCH

DEER CREEK VALLEY HOME

BEAVER CREEK PRESERVE

1,623± ACRES SUNDANCE, WYOMING

55± ACRES HULETT, WYOMING

927± ACRES FOUR CORNERS, WYOMING

A premier setting with 1,623 deeded acres and a 40-acre state lease. Live water, unparalleled privacy, an impressive Black Hills landscape and excellent wildlife habitat. A first-rate Black Hills ranch. $4,700,000

Scenic 55-acre foothills property with a rustic log home. Custom one-and-a-half-story home with walk-out basement has three bedrooms and 2.75 baths. A woodland setting for year-round living or a Black Hills getaway. $500,000

Captivating Black Hills setting in elk country with two miles of live stream, trout pond and excellent wildlife habitat adjacent to a vast amount of public lands. 927 deeded acres and 310-acre BLM lease. A private wilderness. $1,625,000

AMERADA DIVIDE RANCH

OAK CREEK RETREAT

MULESHOE RIDGE

17,147± TOTAL ACRES CASPER, WYOMING

186± ACRES ALADDIN, WYOMING

314± ACRES HULETT, WYOMING

Hard-grass ranch with 17,147± acres, including 15,540± deeded acres and a 1,607± acre BLM permit. Trophy mule deer and excellent antelope habitat. Numerous water sources, two sets of corrals and a scale. $7,700,000

Impressive 186-acre Black Hills property with a one-of-a-kind home that combines maximum efficiency with detailed elegance. Also has a guest house, barn and shop. Handsome country estate with live water. $1,387,000

Secluded Black Hills property with 314 acres in a very private location at the end of the road. The diverse landscape offers great scenery with pine and bur oak plus incredible long-range views. $645,000

View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/11659

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Nickel Mountain Ranch 1,140± ACRES • DOUGLAS COUNTY, OREGON • $1,499,000 Escape it all! Hunting, camping, trail riding—an ATVer’s paradise! Plus it has an estimated 2,600 net MBF harvestable timber with many times that much volume growing into merchantable size over the next several years. Ideal for selective logging. Only $1,315 per acre! Minutes from I-5. Property ID: 7068321

The Natural Choice For Forest Land Real Estate

Fred Sperry

Jean Sperry

Lauren Read

Jill Cogley

Principal Broker, Owner

Vice President, Owner

Broker (Homes & Land)

Bookkeeper, Staff Support

Fred@NWForestProperties.com

Lauren@NWForestProperties.com

William (Bill) Marre Forester, Broker Bill@NWForestProperties.com

N W F O R E S T P R O P E R T I E S . C O M • 5 4 1 . 5 0 5 . 3 3 7 7 • P. O . B O X 4 2 2 7 3 , E U G E N E , O R E G O N 9 7 4 0 4

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View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/42037


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RIVER BEND RANCH • $ 1,682,000 170 beautiful acres off FM 2610 with about 8/10 of a mile of frontage on the high bank side of the Trinity River. An inviting three-bedroom, two-bath home is nestled among gorgeous, mature oaks and other native hardwoods, providing the perfect outdoor entertainment setting. Large 3,000± square-foot “man cave” with wet bar and a work barn just steps from house. Big Thicket National Preserve borders the north side of the property. Three large ponds sit parallel to the Trinity River, creating a peaceful view among the trees. Currently used for grazing livestock and keeping honey bees, this property offers good perimeter fencing and an interior high-fenced enclosed area for exotics. There is an abundance of deer, turkey and other game. Come see this unique property and all it has to offer.

170± ACRES | LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS | PROPERTY ID: 6862851

BLUFF SPRING RANCH • $3,850,000 Really pretty raw ranch land ideally located between Wimberley and Dripping Springs on Ranch Road 12. Offers an ideal mix of bottom land, hardwood trees, creeks, springs, seeps, bluffs and flat-top hills with grand views for building sites. Big, high-end neighbors. Electricity and well. Less than an hour to San Antonio or Austin. Very special ranch land.

275± ACRES | HAYS COUNTY, TEXAS | PROPERTY ID: 6862360

200 Northcrest Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78213

www.LandInvesTex.com | Jim Fuchs, Broker

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View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/60408

(210) 901-1000 | info@landinvestex.com


mossyoak properties.com

100 RANCH

EL CAPITAN RANCH

55,439.22± AC R E S • $11,000,000 L I N CO L N & S O CO R RO CO U N T I E S, N EW M E X I CO

24,442± AC R E S • $14,250,000 L I N CO L N CO U N T Y, N EW M E X I CO

The 100 Ranch offers big game hunting opportunities with elk, mule deer, antelope, oryx and mountain lion in the area. This working ranch is currently permitted by the BLM for 1,200 Animal Units, so there is opportunity for cattle production as well. Amenities include four mobile homes, barn, shop, scales and equipment, six water wells, solar and electric, extensive pipelines feeding numerous water storage systems with game and livestock drinkers, four sets of working corrals and 38 dirt tanks. The acreage is comprised of 15,941± deeded acres, 9,208.22± state lease land and 30,290± BLM. Located 20 miles northwest of Carrizozo, New Mexico. Co-listed with Scott McNally, Bar M Real Estate 575.420.1237, or call Paul Turney, Mossy Oak Properties 575.808.0134.

The El Capitan Ranch on the north face of the Capitan Mountain is 24,442 acres of unbridled beauty. Scenic ponderosa pines in a park-like setting with springs and water rights. Wildlife abounds in this setting with deer, elk, turkey, bear and mountain lion. Elevation ranges from 6,000 feet to as high as 8,000 feet where the summer is cool and the winter is mild. Located in Lincoln County, New Mexico, and only 35 miles to the destination resort village of Ruidoso, New Mexico. 11,708 acres is deeded land and the balance is a Lincoln National Forest Allotment. This is a year-round ranch for your enjoyment and located in Unit 37, a prime elk and mule deer hunting area. Twelve miles of highway frontage, six water wells, a four-bedroom lodge, metal barn and more. Breathtaking views and pride of ownership while owning this property.

Property ID: 7366883

Property ID: 3800219

MOUNTAIN RANCH WITH IRRIGATED FIELDS 1,100± ACRES • $2,695,000 • LINCOLN COUNT Y, NEW MEXICO With six irrigated fields, four water wells and abundant water rights along with elk and mule deer, this ranch is made up of 991.314 deeded acres, 69.438 state lease acres and 39.51 BLM acres. There is paved highway frontage, access to underground utilities as well as electric, natural gas, fiber optic date/phone. From the property there are mountain views, and it has rolling terrain in addition to the fields along with Nogal Creek, a wet weather creek. The elevation ranges from 6,300 to 6,500 feet. This land was once part of the working cattle ranch owned by Fern Sawyer, a Cowboy and Cowgirl Hall of Fame inductee and New Mexico icon. The ranch has access to the national forest and is also located only 20 minutes to the destination resort village of Ruidoso where there is shopping, snow skiing, restaurants, casinos, golf and world-class horse racing.

291.8± ACRES • $995,000 • LINCOLN COUNT Y, NEW MEXICO

Property ID: 7490487

Property ID: 6170202

VISTA DEL MALPAI RANCH Named for its view of the fascinating Valley of Fires lava flow, this ranch is nestled on the Tularosa Basin at 5,340 feet elevation in the shadow of two mountain ranges with unobstructed panoramic views. The ranch features 292 acres, a classic Californiastyle ranch house, swimming pool, tennis courts and outstanding horse facilities.

View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/495749 | 2825 Sudderth Drive, Suite F, Ruidoso, New Mexico 88345

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575.336.1316 | nmranchandhome.com

S t a c y Tu r n e y Q u a l i f y i n g B r o k e r | 5 7 5 . 8 0 8 . 0 1 4 4 P a u l Tu r n e y A s s o c i a t e B r o k e r & O w n e r | 5 7 5 . 8 0 8 . 0 1 3 4 Destri Vincent Associate Broker | 575.973.4547 Sunni Nance Associate Broker | 325.234.2507


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LU M P K I N C O U N T Y, G EO R G I A

Chestatee River Tract

1,088± Acres • $9,600,000

The Simpson Company is pleased to present this unique opportunity to acquire this beautiful mountain property in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in northeast Georgia. The property sits adjacent to an 860-acre, privately owned ranch, known as Cottrell Farms, and sits across from the Chattahoochee National Forest, which consists of over 60,000 acres of federal land. • 1,088± contiguous acres with pristine mountain views throughout • Over 9,000 feet of river frontage along the Chestatee River • Well-maintained road system throughout to access almost the entire tract by vehicle • One of the last few large, privately owned land tracts in northeast Georgia • First time on the market in over 30 years • Seven miles from downtown Dahlonega, Georgia, and one-and-a-half hours from downtown Atlanta, Georgia • Ideal for a private mountain estate, large-scale mountain residential development, golf course or vineyard • The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) recently designated the “Dahlonega Plateau” as the newest American Viticultural Area in the United States and the first within the boundaries contained in the state of Georgia

Brian T. Hughs, CCIM S A L E S A S S O C I AT E The Simpson Company of Georgia, Inc. Brian@SimpsonCompany.com • 770-532-9911 S I M P S O N C O M PA N Y. C O M 425 Spring Street S.E., Suite 200, Gainesville, Georgia 30506 WINTER 2019

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Catamount Ranch’s Best View STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLOR ADO

360-degree views from Flat Tops to the ski area. Lot 10 has 6.48 acres and an incredible building site.

$1,449,000 2 1

Only Lake Front Lot Available on Lake Catamount STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLOR ADO

Incredible access to Colorado’s largest private lake. Build your dream home and enjoy some of Steamboat’s finest recreation.

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$1,495,000 • #S171402 3

Black Horse II OAK CREEK, COLOR ADO

This 1.62-acre lot sits right at the entrance to the secluded paradise that is Black Horse II. Lot #18 on Colt Trail; has utilities in place with both water and sewer tap fees paid in full.

$61,000 • #6966716 4

South Valley Timbers Preserve STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLOR ADO

35-acre lot with an unbeatable location close to town and the ski mountain with majestic views of the Flat Tops, Lake Catamount and the Yampa River winding through the valley floor.

$495,000 • #S171231

Build at Catamount Ranch STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLOR ADO

Overlooking the golf course, valley views; 6.64 acres with an incredible building site and roughed-in drive.

SOLD • $975,000 • #6768114

South Valley Tranquility STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLOR ADO

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Build your dream home with caretaker on a 38.78-acre lot overlooking two ranches and Lake Catamount.

SOLD • $765,000 • #S139516

Darlinda Baldinger C: 970.846.7192 O: 970.879.7800 Ext. 104 darlinda.baldinger@steamboatsir.com 1855 Ski Time Square Drive Steamboat Springs, Colorado 80487 STE A M BOATLOCALBROK ERS.CO M


N45212

County Road V 200± ACRES TREMPEALEAU COUNTY

WISCONSIN $919,000

ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY to own 200 continuous acres nestled in East Bennett Valley in Eleva, 30 minutes south of Eau Claire and 1.5± hours to the twin cities and Rochester, Minnesota. Located in northwestern Trempealeau County, where Boone and Crocket recordholders preside, and less than five minutes from the Buffalo County line. ATV trails are located throughout the property that overlook the valley and an abundance of wildlife. N27202 Nyseth Lane has a bunkhouse and bathhouse for guests or just a quiet getaway. This 1,800+ squarefoot home features main-level living, a beautiful living area with gas fireplace, large rec room with half bath with seperate entrance. This space is excellent for entertaining a large group or just enjoying the panoramic views. Land is income producing on the 104 acres of tillable ground. Currently no leases or government programs on acreage. Check out the panoramic tour and 360 tour online. Schedule your private showing today!

Property ID: 7604819 E r i ca L a w ton REALTOR ® Er i c a @E ri c a L a w to n . co m 7 1 5 . 49 5 .04 5 6

V ie w A l l P ro per t i e s : L a n d s o f Am e r i c a . co m / m e m b er/12 12 3 40

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LAND AUCTIONS & LAND FOR SALE 1,688

60

55

Acres

Acres

Acres

1,688± Acres Major County, Oklahoma

60± Acres Garfield County, Oklahoma

55± Acres Garfield County, Oklahoma

This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to purchase some of the best hunting land that northwest Oklahoma has to offer.

Custom-Built Home • 60± Acres • Arena Horse Barn • Equestrian • Rural Water Creek • Fairmont Oklahoma

Building sites located just minutes west of Enid. Tract sizes ranging from 10–55 acres. Some tracts include large ponds.

PRICE : $3,376,000

PRICE : $710,000

PRICE : $205,000

PROPERT Y ID : 6467780

PROPERT Y ID : 7268997

PROPERT Y ID : 6467781

Info@LippardAuctions.com View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/9170

LippardAuctions.com (580) 237-7174 2609 North Van Buren, Enid, Oklahoma 73703

N E W YO R K STAT E L A N D BA RGA I NS I N - H OU S E F I NA N C I N G | L OW PAY M E N T S

LA NDA NDC A M P S . CO M | ( 8 00) 229 -7 84 3 | INFO@LANDANDCAMPS.COM | VIEW ALL PROPERTIES: LANDSOFAMERICA.COM/MEMBER/21043

TI TUS MOUNTAI N RANC H NO RT H E R N N E W YO R K

1 4 3 ± A C R E S | $ 1 2 9 , 9 0 0 | M A L O N E , N E W YO R K Located in beautiful Northern New York, near the Adirondack Mountains, this 143-acre property includes an 800-foot driveway and a 48'x32’ barn, as well as existing hunting blinds and trails. The barn sits on a hill overlooking mountains and forestlands, with Winslow Brook crossing the property. The land is composed of a beautiful mix of Adirondack hardwood and evergreen forests and is located on a county road. Electricity is available at the road, making this property suitable for your hunting cabin or rural home. Lake Titus is nearby, offering great swimming, boating and fishing in a wonderful Adirondack setting. Also close to Titus Mountain Ski Center. This is a great recreational area with Deer River State Forest nearby. Also close to Malone, Potsdam and Canton, New York, and Lake Placid, New York, (home of the 1932 and the 1980 Winter Olympics) is just a 50 minute drive to the south. Reduced to $129,900. Financing available. Property ID: 4679529


8-HOU SE FR EE R ANGE OPER AT ION

8-HOU SE BROILER OPER AT ION

79± Acres in Adair County, Oklahoma $2,285,000

45± Acres in Polk County, Arkansas $3,350,000 Eight 50’x500’ barns built in 2016. Tyson Contract; 35-day flock. Well water, city backup, propane and two generators. Pump house with laundry, shower and 20,000-gallon water storage. Mobile home on property with three bedrooms, two baths and den. Bio-Secure Area; list agent must be present. Property ID: 6861537

Eight free-range barns built 2014–2015. Current Vital Farms contract will not convey to a new buyer, but there are other options to explore. Currently running 250± stocker cattle through a year with cross fencing, rotational grazing, NRCS freeze-proof stock tank and stocked pond. Three-bedroom, two-bath mobile home sits on property. Property ID: 5399935

DAN SCHWIEDER | (479) 824-4434 | INFO@T WINOAKS.NET View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/373090

T WINOAKSRE ALT YINC.COM

BEAVERHEADHOMEANDRANCH.COM View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/125092

CENTENNIAL GATEWAY RANCH 6,814± ACRES IN BEAVERHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA Located in the shadow of the Lima Peaks, where a yard light is hardly visible, but just a short drive to Lima, Montana. The Centennial Gateway Ranch is located in reputation cattle country and is owner rated at a solid 450 pairs. Acreage totals 6,814± with 5,455± being deeded and the remaining being BLM or state lease. Four pivots irrigate 460± acres, providing all of the winter forage needed for the operation. Improvements and fences are in excellent repair with three homes, barn, working corrals and extensive pipeline system for stock water. The recreational buyer will appreciate the Red Rock River winding through the property for several miles providing habitat for fish, whitetail and mule deer, elk moose and an array of waterfowl. The property is protected by a conservation easement with the Nature Conservancy. Full Due Diligence package available upon request.

Entire Ranch Offered at $6,950,000 Additional Purchase Options: South Unit: 2 Homes with Pivots and BLM Lease; 3,023 Deeded Acres • $4,250,000 North Unit: 1 Home with River Frontage/Native Range and State Lease; 2,433 Deeded Acres • $2,950,000

CHANCE BERNALL, BROKER | (406) 683-2234 | INFO@BEAVERHEADHOMEANDRANCH.COM


NationalLand.com

North Carolina Mountains

Black Mountain Wilderness Retreat

Bearwallow Timber, Views and Creek

This hidden woodland is the perfect private mountain retreat for anyone seeking to relax in nature. From the mountain ridges with views, headwater streams tumble into the lush green valley.

Just below Bearwallow Mountain, this unrestricted private woodland includes paved access, a large creek and multiple building site options for your mountain enjoyment.

$1,750,000 | 337± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 6782603 BUNCOMBE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

$299,900 | 53± ACRES | PROPERTY ID: 7239525 HENDERSON COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

Pat Snyder, Managing Broker

View the LandTour 360 TM on NationalLand.com

PSnyder @ NationalLand.com

View All Properties: LandsofAmerica.com/member/1101478

Hurstville

Church Point Farm

3 2 4 ± A C R E S • N O R T H U M B E R L A N D C O U N T Y, V I R G I N I A

9 4 4 ± A C R E S • C H A R L E S C I T Y C O U N T Y, V I R G I N I A

An historic waterfront plantation, with an original Tidewater-style house built in 1776 and consisting of 324 acres with nearly a mile of beach frontage along the Chesapeake Bay and over two-and-a-half miles of tidal shoreline along Ball Creek. The house is a three-bay, story-and-a-half structure with a brick foundation. A garage, pier and boat landing complement the property. The property is managed for waterfowl, deer and turkey.

A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own an entire “neck” of land along the lower Chickahominy River within 50 minutes of downtown Richmond. The property includes nearly eight miles of tidal shoreline and an attractive brick dwelling with three bedrooms, numerous fireplaces and several porches. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods and cypress swamp. The farm is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey and dove. ChurchPointFarm.com

McLeanFaulconer.com • 434.295.1131 P H I L I P R E E D , A G E N T • 8 0 4 . 8 3 3 . 8 3 2 5 • P R E E D @ M C L E A N FA U L C O N E R . C O M 5 0 3 FAU L C O N E R D R I V E , S U I T E 5 , C H A R L OT T E S V I L L E , V I R G I N A 2 2 9 0 3

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REI NVENT YOUR LA ND & P R OSP E R S U S TA I N A B L E S O L U T I O N S F O R B OT H H O M E S & B U S I N E S S E S

SERVICES PROVIDED NATIONALLY 1 9 0 0 B E A V E R R I D G E C I R C L E • N O R C R O S S , G E O R G I A 3 0 0 7 1 • ( 4 7 0 ) 4 7 1 - 6 0 9 9 O F F I C E • ( 4 7 0 ) 4 7 1 - 6 1 1 6 C E L L • D W F 1 0 @ YA H O O . C O M FALL 2019

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LAND Winter 2019