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MODERN ART & DESIGN FEBRUARY 16, 2020


16145 Hart Street Van Nuys, CA 91406 Preview: February 7 - 15, 2020 10am–6pm (PT) Auction: Sunday, February 16, 2020 12pm (PT)


Oldies but Goodies Since I was a child listening to the oldies station on the

Pettibon’s heels are a new group of L.A. artists that will

car radio has been my favorite pastime when on the

be sure to define the next decades, like Jonas Wood (Lot

road. Over time, the ‘50s and ‘60s hits that I could belt

5) and Mary Weatherford (Lot 6).

out by heart have been joined by the ‘70s, ‘80s (and the occasional ‘90s) hits that have now become “oldies.”

However, those oldies but goodies that have been a main-

LAMA has seen the same evolution. Works by artists once

stay of LAMA throughout the years, including Ed Ruscha’s

considered contemporary or emerging are making their

Double Standard (Lot 23), a luminous 1969 resin work

way into the art canon and changing the landscape of our

by Peter Alexander (Lot 30), a collection of Betye Saar

sales.

mixed-media pieces (Lots 82-84), and a group of craft furniture by Sam Maloof (Lots 39-43), will continue to be

A case in point is the important grouping of Raymond

featured at LAMA for many years to come. And somehow

Pettibon works (Lot 17) that were included in the de-

we continue to discover new-to-us artists and artisans

cade-defining MOCA exhibition, “Helter Skelter: L.A. Art

from Southern California like Hilda D. Levy (Lots 69-70),

in the 1990s.” While LAMA has long supported Pettibon’s

who showed at Ferus Gallery in the late ‘50s and the Pas-

career, the historical impact of his works, and how he has

adena Art Museum (now the Norton Simon Museum), and

come to epitomize the grittier reality of Los Angeles in

the husband-wife artist duo, Karin and Ernst van Leyden

the 1980s and ‘90s in counterpoint to the sensibilities of

(Lot 46), who were popular with the Hollywood-set in

the Light and Space movement of the 1960s and 1970s,

1940s and ‘50s.

has only continued to crystallize in recent years. And on Clo Pazera, Specialist


SESSION ONE: Timed Auction Lots

1000

1001

1002

Untitled #3

Profile brooch

Buffet

CHARLES ARNOLDI $1,000–1,500

JEAN (HANS) ARP $5,000–7,000

JACK CARTWRIGHT $1,500–3,000

1003

1004

Paris Review

Billy Wilder chaise lounge

$4,000–6,000

$2,000–3,000

1006

1007

1008

Vase & Bowl

Cabinet

0 Through 9

WILLEM DE KOONING

EVA ENGLUND $300–500

CHARLES & RAY EAMES

CHARLES GWATHMEY $300–500

1005

CHARLES & RAY EAMES

Leg splint $300–500

JASPER JOHNS $6,000–8,000


SESSION ONE: Timed Auction Lots

1010

1009

TOM FRIEDMAN

GIANFRANCO FRATTINI

Megaron floor lamps (2)

Untitled (Dollar Bill)

$1,000–1,500

$2,000–3,000

1012

GEORGE HERMS

1013

ROY LICHTENSTEIN

Announcement

Foot Medication Poster

$800–1,200

$2,000–2,500

1015

JOHN MCCRACKEN

Metal

$1,000–1,500

1016

HENRY MOORE

Black Seated Figure on Orange Ground; Glenkiln Cross (2) $1,500–2,000

1011

SAM GILLIAM

Manet

$2,000–3,000

1014

ROBERT LONGO

The Entertainer (from the Artists Portfolio)

$1,000–1,500

1017

ROBERT MOTHERWELL

Untitled

$2,000–3,000


SESSION ONE: Timed Auction Lots

1018

GERTRUD & OTTO NATZLER

Cylindrical vase with lip $2,500–3,500

1019

1020

GEORGE NELSON

GEORGE NELSON

Action office desk

MMG desk and return

$1,000–1,500

$1,000–1,500

1021

1022

1023

Half Nelson table lamp

Moon Passage

Untitled

$500–1,200

$1,000–1,500

1024

1025

GEORGE NELSON

RAYMOND PETTIBON

Click My Ruby Slippers $1,000–1,500

LOUISE NEVELSON

GORDON ONSLOW-FORD $4,000–6,000

1026

ALLEN RUPPERSBERG

POST MODERN

Cabinets (2)

Searching for Passion and Sex (and other things)

$1,000–1,500

$1,000–1,500


SESSION ONE: Timed Auction Lots

1027

1028

ELIZABETH PEYTON

1029

Jackie and John

DON SHOEMAKER

Perno chairs (2)

PAUL SOLDNER

$2,000–3,000

$2,000–3,000

$200–300

1030

1031

Teapot

1032

ANDY WARHOL

L’Altare

Fish (from Fruits and Flowers)

DONALD SULTAN

Untitled (from Flash–November 22, 1963)

$400–600

$800–1,200

$5,000–7,000

ETTORE SOTTSASS

1033

HANS J. WEGNER

1034

1035

Side table

HANS J. WEGNER

Nesting tables (3)

EMERSON WOELFFER

$600–900

$600–900

$800–1,200

Untitled


SESSION TWO: Live Auction Lots


SESSION TWO: Live Auction Lots


1 BANKSY

Festival (Destroy Capitalism) 2006 Color screenprint on Arches 88 paper #93 of 500 Published by Modern Multiples Fine Art Editions, Los Angeles Edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image Image: 18.5" x 26" Sheet: 22.625" x 30.25" (Image: 47 x 66 cm) P ROVENA NC E Barely Legal exhibit, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2006)

$10,000–15,000

2 BANKSY

Applause (LA Edition) 2006 Color screenprint on paper #104 of 500 Published by Modern Multiples Fine Art Editions, Los Angeles Edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image Together with poster Image: 26.375" x 42" Sheet: 32.75" x 48.625" (Image: 67 x 107 cm) P ROVENA NC E Barely Legal exhibit, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2006)

$7,000–10,000


3 BANKSY

Morons (LA Edition) 2006 Color screenprint on Arches 88 paper #105 of 500 Published by Modern Multiples Fine Art Editions, Los Angeles Edition in graphite lower right margin beneath image Together with poster Image: 18.5" x 26" Sheet: 22.625" x 30.25" Frame: 25.625" x 33.125" (Image: 47 x 66 cm) P ROV E NANC E Barely Legal exhibit, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2006)

$7,000–10,000

4 URS FISCHER

Sigh, Sigh, Sherlock! (For Parkett 72) 2004 Partially painted fiberglass-reinforced plaster cast #3 of 45 Published by Parkett Editions, Zürich; fabricated by Kunstgiesserei Felix Lehner, St. Gall Retains signed plaque with stamped title, date, and edition to underside 36.5" x 13" x 13" (93 x 33 x 33 cm)

$4,500–5,500

11


5 JONAS WOOD Pot 9

2007 Ink on paper Retains David Kordansky Gallery, Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, Inc., and Franklin Parrasch Gallery labels frame verso Sheet: 13.125" x 11.625" Frame: 16.75" x 15.25" (Sheet: 33 x 29 cm) P ROVENA NC E David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California (acquired directly from the above, 2018)

$30,000–40,000


6 MARY WEATHERFORD Mariposa

1994 Mixed-media on paper Titled, dated, and inscribed “d#139” sheet verso Composition/sheet: 11" x 29.5" Frame: 14.75" x 33.25" (Composition/sheet: 28 x 75 cm)

$6,000–8,000

13 7 VIJA CELMINS Night Sky

2005 Screenprint on Rives BFK paper #4 of 45 Published by Brand X Projects, New York; printed by Brand X Editions, New York Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains publisher’s and printer’s blind stamps lower left and lower right corners of sheet Together with copy of original invoice from Brand X Projects, Inc. dated January 30, 2007 Image: 20.25" x 25.625" Sheet: 26.375" x 31.875" Frame: 30.625" x 36.125" (Image: 51 x 65 cm) P ROV E NANC E Brand X Projects, New York, New York; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2007)

$6,000–8,000


8 KEN PRICE Untitled

2006 Ink on museum board Composition/board: 7" x 5" Frame: 13.375" x 11.25" (Composition/board: 18 x 13 cm)

$6,000–8,000

9 KEN PRICE

Lizard Cup (from Interior Series) 1971 16-color screenprint on Arjomari paper #43 of 75 Published and printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Signed, titled, and dated with edition and Gemini G.E.L. blind stamps lower right Gemini G.E.L. #39.10 Image: 25.375" x 35.875" Sheet (vis.): 29.5" x 39.625" Frame: 30.125" x 40.25" (Image: 64 x 91 cm)

$1,200–1,800


10 JOHN ALTOON Untitled

c. 1964 Pastel and graphite on illustration board Composition/board: 32" x 40" Frame: 40.25" x 48.25" (Composition/board: 81 x 102 cm)

$7,000–10,000

15

11 JOHN ALTOON

Untitled; Untitled (from About Women Series) (2) 1966; 1965-1966 Lithographs on paper #35 of 40; #92 of 100 Printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Each signed with edition and Gemini G.E.L. blind stamp lower right Image/sheet (vis.): 28.875" x 40.625" Frame: 36.25" x 48.25" Image/sheet: 19" x 19" Frame: 20.75" x 20.75" (Image/sheet: 73 x 103 cm)

$1,500–2,000


13 IVAN MORLEY Meteoric Rise

12 HANNAH WILKE Untitled

1976 Chewing gum on board in Plexiglas box Signed and dated in graphite to backing board 2.625" x 2.625" x 1.125" (7 x 7 x 3 cm)

$6,000–8,000

1997 Oil, alkyd, and ink on linen Signed twice, titled, dated, and inscribed “Oil, alkyd, and ink on linen/Soluvared/2/98” linen verso Linen: 21" x 50" Frame: 22.875" x 51.875" (Linen: 53 x 127 cm) PROVE N A N CE Eliot Sekuler, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist, c. 2004)

$4,000–6,000


14 MARTIN EDER o.T.

2010 Watercolor and graphite on paper Signed and dated “5 2010” in graphite lower left Composition/sheet: 11.125" x 8.5" Frame: 16.125" x 13.375" (Composition/sheet: 28 x 22 cm) P ROV E NANC E Galerie EIGEN + ART, Berlin, Germany; Private Collection, Houston, Texas (acquired directly from the above, c. 2010)

$3,000–5,000

15 MONA KUHN Flower

2005 Chromogenic print mounted to board #4 of 10 Signed, titled, and dated with edition verso Image: 19.875" x 19.875" Sheet: 20.25" x 20.25" (Image: 50 x 50 cm)

$2,000–3,000

16 MONA KUHN Papillon

2006 Chromogenic print mounted to board #4 of 10 Signed, titled, and dated with edition verso Image: 19.875" x 19.875" Sheet: 20.25" x 20.25" (Image: 50 x 50 cm)

$2,000–3,000

17


Raymond Pettibon and "Helter Skelter"

©Gary Leonard/Corbis Historical via Getty Images

In 1992, the Museum of Contemporary Art presented “Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s,” Paul Schimmel’s first exhibition as chief curator at the museum. Seeking to deliver an “updated” vision of Los Angeles, the exhibition divorced modern Angeleno art from the environmental factors that had animated the Light and Space movement, as well as prominent individual practices such as David Hockney’s plein air Pop art. Schimmel remarked that the works presented in “Helter Skelter” gave form to the dark disquiet of modern commercial life, in sharp defiance of prevailing notions of Los Angeles as a “sunny mecca of hedonism” and a culturally empty sprawl. The exhibition’s provocative title immediately triggered memories of the Manson murders. Beyond the gory character of many of the works included in the show, this was a pointed allusion to the cultural phenomenon that played out during the Manson trials. Lane Relyea argues in his essay, “Art of the Living Dead” (included in the exhibition’s catalogue), that counter to Manson’s divisive intentions, the fanfare of the trial actually unified the nation in a common discussion. Much in the same way that the Manson murders erased Los Angeles’ dreamlike veneer at the end of the 1960s, the exhibition’s works foregrounded the socially corrosive effects of homelessness, the AIDS crisis, and growing violent crime in the 1990s. In the words of Schimmel, the works demanded “a visceral rather than a purely intellectual response from the viewer,” revealing a unified mood and sensibility within L.A. art that was forged by the chaos surrounding it. Lot 17 is comprised of 23 of Raymond Pettibon’s drawings that were included in this exhibition. Pettibon’s expansive

installation took up an entire room, and the totality of the hundreds of drawings tacked up to the gallery walls was titled A Yarn Spun to No Mend. Of the many drawings that comprised the artwork, only 24 were illustrated in the exhibition catalogue as emblematic of the entire piece, and of those 24, 23 are offered here. Described by one curator as “a scribe to the changing cultural framework of the country,” Pettibon folded rich artistic and literary histories, ranging from Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928) to cigarette advertisements, into easy-to-digest visual colloquialisms. Having come of age amidst the Southern California music scene of the 1970s and 1980s, Pettibon adopted the punk rock movement's “do-it-yourself” mentality. The self-taught artist gained visibility through his illustrations on album covers and posters for Black Flag, the Dead Kennedys, and the Ramones, among many other punk bands. Pettibon’s works flaunted the symptoms of the city’s cultural disorientation and magnified feelings of alienation and dispossession. Contrary to Schimmel’s expectation that the exhibition would be embraced by critics and loathed by average museum goers, journalists were quick to condemn the show while the public “loved it.” Time magazine called “Helter Skelter” “Valley Girl Dada” and reported that the exhibition proved that American art could indeed “get much worse than it was by the end of the 1980s.” It was precisely this critical fervor, however, that attracted worldwide attention and fulfilled Schimmel’s ultimate goals for the show. Schimmel observed that “even the most well-known artists” in Los Angeles had to first show their work in Europe and New York before they could return home with an established reputation. He argued that, due to fear of negative backlash, museums in Los Angeles had refrained from “doing shows about their own communities” and instead had left the city’s artistic identity to be defined by outside audiences. “Helter Skelter” succeeded, in that it was a “regional show” with “international consequences.” For better or worse, the mass attention it received allowed its artists to advertise themselves in a far-reaching manner from their own turf.


Drohojowska, Hunter. “Drawn to Words : Pairing Sketches with Texts, Raymond Pettibon Keeps His Art between the Lines--Where His Mother Could Find It.” Los Angeles Times, 16 June 1991. Muchnic, Suzanne. “Art in the City of Angels and Demons : A

“Helter Skelter” brought Pettibon’s work, in particular, to a global audience. Independent from the music world that he had been so closely associated with, the exhibition presented Pettibon as a defining voice in the bid to reassert Los Angeles’ artistic character, and by 1995 Pettibon was given his first major solo show at David Zwirner Gallery.

Sordid Chapter From the Past Provided the Name for ‘Helter Skelter’–A Show That Aims to Reflect L.A.’s Dark Side.” Los Angeles Times, 26 Jan. 1992. Muchnic, Suzanne. “Public Warm, Critics Cool Toward ‘Helter Skelter’.” Los Angeles Times, 26 Apr. 1992. “Raymond Pettibon Biography.” David Zwirner, www. davidzwirner.com/artists/raymond-pettibon/biography. Schimmel, Paul, et al. Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1992.

ABOVE: INSTALLATION VIEWS OF "HELTER SKELTER: L.A. ART IN THE 1990s," JANUARY 26 – APRIL 26, 1992 AT THE TEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY, COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES, PHOTO BY PAULA GOLDMAN

ABOVE: LOT 17 INSTALLED AT LAMA


17 RAYMOND PETTIBON

23 works from “A Yarn Spun to No Mend” 1990-1991 Ink, watercolor, and acrylic on paper Each signed and dated sheet verso; each retains Robert Berman Gallery labels frames verso; ten retain GEM, Museum of Contemporary Art exhibition labels frames verso Together with MOCA exhibition catalogue Various dimensions This group is comprised of 23 of the 24 works illustrated in the catalogue for the seminal exhibition, “Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s,” curated by Paul Schimmel. P ROV E NANC E Collection of the artist; Robert Berman Gallery, Santa Monica, California; Private Collection, California E XHIBIT E D “Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, January 26-April 26, 1992; “Raymond Pettibon: Hellbent ‘n Hardbound,” GEM, Museum of Contemporary Art, The Hague, December 14, 2002-March 16, 2003; “Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work,” New Museum, New York, February 8-April 9, 2017 ILLUST RAT E D Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s. MOCA exh. cat. 1992. 123-124, 126-128.; Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work. New Museum exh. cat. 2017. 126-127.

$500,000–800,000

21


18 JOE GOODE Untitled

1986 Oil on canvas Inscribed “#7” to canvas stretcher bar verso Canvas: 54.125" x 48" Frame: 56" x 50" (Canvas: 137 x 122 cm) P ROVENA NC E James Corcoran Gallery, Santa Monica, California; Private Collection, Malibu, California (acquired directly from the above); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above)

$15,000–20,000

19 JOE GOODE

Tree #23 (A8) 1987 Oil on wood panel Inscribed “23” three times verso LAMA would like to thank the Joe Goode Studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work Panel: 59" x 144" Frame: 61" x 146" (Panel: 150 x 366 cm) This work is being sold to fund new artwork for UCLA’s hospitals, medical centers, and clinics, along with much needed repairs and upkeep of artwork in the collection. P ROVENA NC E James Corcoran, Los Angeles, California; UCLA Health (gifted directly from the above)

$20,000–30,000


23

20 BILLY AL BENGSTON Untitled

c. 1969 Lacquer and polyester resin on aluminum Dented initials upper center 36" x 34" (91 x 86 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist, c. 1970)

$20,000–30,000


21 ED MOSES Untitled

1985 Oil and acrylic on canvas Inscribed “LAL-9” twice to stretcher bars verso Canvas: 60.125" x 48" Frame: 62.625" x 48.5" (Canvas: 153 x 122 cm) P ROVENA NC E L.A. Louver Gallery, Venice, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 1986)

$18,000–25,000


25

22 LITA ALBUQUERQUE Untitled

1975 Acrylic on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower right; retains Sylvia Haimoff White and two unknown information labels frame verso Composition/sheet: 34.75" x 45.5" Frame: 36.125" x 47" (Composition/sheet: 88 x 116 cm)

$3,000–5,000


23 ED RUSCHA & MASON WILLIAMS Double Standard

1969 11-color screenprint on paper #2 of 40 Published by the artist; printed by Jean Milant and Daniel Socha, Los Angeles Signed by Ed Ruscha and Mason Williams with edition in graphite lower left margin beneath image Image: 19.5" x 36.875" Sheet: 25.625" x 39.625" Frame: 29.75" x 46.75" (Image: 50 x 93 cm) P ROVENA NC E Sotheby’s, New York, New York, May 4, 2002, lot 581; Cecilia Dan Fine Arts, Malibu, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2011) LITERATURE Edward Ruscha: Editions, 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol. II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #32.

$150,000–200,000


24 ED RUSCHA Dog

1994-1995 Mixografia on handmade paper #18 of 75 Published and printed by Mixografia Workshop, Los Angeles Signed and dated in graphite lower right edge of sheet; edition lower left; retains Mixograia Workshop label frame verso Image/sheet: 27.25" x 38.5" Frame: 39.5" x 50.5" (Image/sheet: 69 x 98 cm) LIT E RAT URE Edward Ruscha: Editions, 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol. II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #222.

$12,000–18,000

27

25 ED RUSCHA

Insect Slant (from Reality and Paradoxes portfolio) 1973 Lithograph and screenprint on Rives BFK paper #2 of 100 Published by Multiples, Inc., New York; printed by Styria Studio, New York Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower left edge of sheet; printer’s blind stamp lower center edge of sheet; retains C.G. Rein Galleries label frame verso Image/sheet: 22" x 30.125" Frame: 31.5" x 39" (Image/sheet: 56 x 76 cm) LIT E RAT URE Edward Ruscha: Editions, 1959-1999: Catalogue Raisonné. 1st ed. Vol. II. S. Engberg and C. Phillpot. 1999. #69.

$2,500–3,500


26 CLAIRE FALKENSTEIN Untitled (Fusion)

1975 Fused Murano glass and copper Etched initials and date “FC ‘75” to copper element 7" x 11.25" x 7.5" (18 x 28 x 19 cm) P ROVENA NC E The artist; Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above through California State University, Los Angeles Annual Art Auction, c. 1990); Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above through Los Angeles Modern Auctions, Van Nuys, May 21, 2017, lot 225)

$15,000–25,000


VERSO DETAIL

27 RONALD DAVIS

Orpha (PTG 0604) (from Floaters Series) 1979 Cel-vinyl acrylic on canvas Signed, titled, and dated canvas verso Canvas: 65.625" x 71.75" Frame: 66.625" x 72.75" (Canvas: 167 x 182 cm)

$10,000–15,000

29

28 VASA (VELIZAR MIHICH) RC II

1987 Laminated cast acrylic Etched “”RCII” Vasa © 1987” 71.5" x 3.875" x 2.75" 76" x 14" x 13" (including base) (182 x 10 x 7 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist, c. 1987); Thence by descent

$5,000–7,000


MARKINGS DETAIL

29 LARRY BELL P.F.B.K. #17

1979 Vaporized metal on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower center Composition/sheet (vis.): 45.75" x 37.125" Frame: 47.375" x 38.875" (Composition/sheet: 116 x 94 cm)

$15,000–20,000


31

30 PETER ALEXANDER Untitled

1969 Polyester resin LAMA would like to thank the Peter Alexander Studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work 12.5" x 8.75" x 8.75" (32 x 22 x 22 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist, c. 1970)

$30,000-50,000


31

32

PETER ALEXANDER

CHARLES ARNOLDI

2004 Acrylic on wood panel in two parts

2005 Gouache on collaged paper

Left panel signed and dated; each panel titled

Signed and dated in graphite lower right

Panels each: 48" x 53" Overall: 48" x 106" (Panels: 122 x 135 cm)

LAMA would like to thank the Charles Arnoldi Studio for their assistance in cataloging this work

Mango

$18,000–25,000

Untitled

Composition/sheet: 16.75" x 54" Frame: 25.5" x 62.375" (Composition/sheet: 42 x 137 cm)

$6,000–8,000


33 CHARLES ARNOLDI Untitled

2002 Gouache on collaged paper Signed and dated in graphite lower right; retains Bobbie Greenfield Gallery and Charles Arnoldi Studio labels frame verso Together with copy of invoice from Charles Arnoldi Studio dated January 21, 2005 Composition/sheet: 15.75" x 24.25" Frame: 24.25" x 32.5" (Composition/sheet: 40 x 61 cm) P ROV E NANC E Charles Arnoldi Studio, Venice, California; Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above, 2005)

$3,000–5,000

33

34 CHARLES ARNOLDI Untitled

2010 Archival inkjet and woodblock print on paper #2 of 20 Printed by Angeles Press, Los Angeles Signed and dated in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition with printer’s blind stamp lower left LAMA would like to thank the Charles Arnoldi Studio for their assistance in cataloging this work Image: 31.875" x 18" Sheet: 35.875" x 21.875" Frame: 40.875" x 27" (Image: 81 x 46 cm)

$2,000–3,000


35 ROBERT GRAHAM

Maquette for “Monument to Joe Lewis” 1986 Bronze From an edition of 16 16.25" x 16.25" x 10.5" (41 x 41 x 27 cm)

$7,000–10,000


36 ROBERT GRAHAM Elisa ‘96

2007 Patinated bronze on composite base #177 of 250 Signed in ink “R. Graham” to base; incised “Elisa/8-96/RG” and stamped “177” 3.5" x 2.25" x 2.5" 5.25" x 5" x 5" (including base) (9 x 6 x 6 cm)

$1,500–2,000

35

37 MANUEL NERI

Adagio for Mexico No. 6 1993 Mixed-media on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower left in composition; retains Hackett-Freedman Gallery and unknown information labels frame verso Together with copy of invoice from Hackett-Freedman Gallery dated January 12, 2007 Composition: 17" x 13.625" Frame: 29" x 24.75" (Composition: 43 x 35 cm) P ROV E NANC E Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco, California; Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above, 2007)

$3,000–5,000


Deborah Butterfield's Equine Sculptures One of the rare artists who seems to find endlessly fresh variations on a single subject, Deborah Butterfield has exclusively executed sculptures of horses for over forty years. In what Butterfield often cites as the predetermining factor of her career, the artist was born on May 9, 1949, the same day as the 75th annual Kentucky Derby. Noting that she has had a passion for horses since she “was old enough to think,” Butterfield expressed an early interest in becoming a veterinarian. However, upon the realizing that she could never bring herself to put an animal to sleep, Butterfield decided to pursue art instead. While in graduate school at the University of California, Davis, she sought to articulate feminist themes in her sculpture, but conceded that her professor Manuel Neri, among others, had “already done what [she] would have done with the female form.” It was then that her long held obsession with horses offered an alternative subject matter. Recalling that the horse has long served as a symbol of determination, resolve, and freedom within Western art, Butterfield observed that the animal’s inner qualities were often situated in scenes of male aggression, and used as supporting devices for messages of conquest and manifest destiny. The artist thus sought to craft an alternative visual narrative in which a mare’s strength and force, equivalent to that of a stallion, worked in harmony with her role as a creator and nourisher of life. Butterfield asserts that “it was a very personal feminist statement.” She found that she could examine her own identity by “crawling” into a different “creature’s shape,” and perceiving “the world in a different way." At this more comfortable theoretical distance, she could then execute metaphorical self-portraits through her subjects.

Beginning with painted plaster, Butterfield alternated mediums, moving from mud and sticks, to scrap metal, and, in more recent years, bronze-cast wood. These material transformations have followed Butterfield's evolving sense of self. She has used organic matter that emphasizes both grounding and ephemerality, as well more “sinister” textures salvaged from her “pile of junk.” The artist turned away from natural materials in the early 1980s and began assembling found objects and discarded industrial waste. As illustrated by Derby Horse (Lot 38), these materials simultaneously reflected on the horse’s increasing irrelevance in the face of modern technology and the rise of "disposability" culture in America. This shift in medium opened Butterfield’s work to more visual diversity and spontaneity. The artist has said that it was “next to impossible” to find the precise shapes and contours she imagined when charting a work, so in turn she learned to recognize “a quality of line” and how to approximate it in her compositions. Always seeking to coax out the personality of the horses she depicts, Butterfield has established a system of building up her forms from within to reveal a gestural interior space. She has said that in this way, “action becomes anticipated rather than captured,” and each horse introduces itself to the viewer with a “specific energy at a precise moment.” Butterfield, Deborah, and Vicki Kopf. Deborah Butterfield: Artist-in-Residence Program Sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation: 25 February-17 April, 1983. Southeastern Center for Contemporary, 1983. Gauss, Daniel. “New Sculptures by Deborah Butterfield at Danese/Corey.” Arte Fuse, 18 Sept. 2014, artefuse.com/2014/09/18/new-sculptures-by-deborah-butterfield-at-danese-corey-123550/. “Short Takes.” Woman's Art Journal, vol. 21, no. 1, 2000, p. 62. "The World of Deborah Butterfield." Scholastic Art, vol. 33, no. 6, Apr, 2003, pp. 2-3.


37 38 DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD Derby Horse 1985 Bronze #3 of 5 Commissioned by the Kentucky Derby Festival of Arts, Churchill Downs; fabricated by Walla Walla Foundry, Walla Walla Retains incised signature, date, edition, and foundry mark Together with book and original invoice from Thomas Segal Gallery dated December 9, 1986 LAMA would like to thank the Deborah Butterfield Studio for their assistance in cataloguing this work 27" x 39.25" x 13.5" (69 x 100 x 34 cm) P ROV E NANC E Thomas Segal Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts; The Estate of Pat and Jerry B. Epstein (acquired directly from the above, 1986)

$40,000–60,000


MARKINGS DETAIL

39 SAM MALOOF Armchair

Studio, executed 1987 Fiddleback maple and ebony Inscribed "No. 54 1987/Sam Maloof f.a.c.c./©" Together with copy of original invoice from the Maloof studio dated September 2, 1987 30.25" x 21.75" x 23" (77 x 55 x 58 cm)

$10,000–15,000

40 SAM MALOOF Side tables (2)

Studio, executed 1989 Fiddleback maple One inscribed "No. 7 1989/Sam Maloof f.a.c.c./©"; other inscribed "No. 8 1989/Sam Maloof f.a.c.c./©" Together with copies of two original invoices from the Maloof studio dated February 11, 1988 Each: 20.75" x 20.125" diameter (53 x 51 cm)

$10,000–15,000


MARKINGS DETAIL

41 SAM MALOOF Coffee table

Custom, executed 2004 Walnut Inscribed "No. 17 2004/Sam Maloof d.f.a. r.i.s.d./©/M.j. l.w. d.w./Made for my dear/friend/Barbra Saltman" 17.125" x 82.75" x 36.25" (43 x 210 x 92 cm)

$8,000–12,000

42 SAM MALOOF

Executive chair Studio, executed 1960 Walnut and upholstery Together with copy of original invoice from the Maloof studio dated September 7, 1960 47" x 29" x 29" (119 x 74 x 74 cm)

$2,500–3,500

43 SAM MALOOF Coffee table

Studio, executed 1969 Walnut Each drawer branded "designed made/ Maloof/California"; incised "92 7-69/ Levy" and branded "designed made/ Maloof/California" to underside 18.75" x 60" x 33.5" (47 x 152 x 85 cm) P ROV E NANC E Sold by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to benefit future acquisitions

$5,000–7,000

39


DETAIL

44 PHILIP & KELVIN LAVERNE Chan coffee table

Philip LaVerne Collection, designed c. 1965 Etched signature to table top 17.375" x 36" diameter (44 x 91 cm)

$5,000–7,000

LABEL DETAIL

45 PHILIP & KELVIN LAVERNE Classical coffee table

Philip LaVerne Collection, designed c. 1965 Etched signature "Philip K LaVerne" to table top; retains manufacturer's label to underside 15.625" x 47.875" x 35.875" (40 x 121 x 91 cm)

$4,000–6,000


41

IMAGE OF THE ARTISTS IN THEIR STUDIO

46 KARIN & ERNST VAN LEYDEN Screen

Studio, executed 1954 Painted glass Signed and dated lower left Together with photograph Overall: 96.5" x 64" x 1" (245 x 163 x 3 cm)

$15,000–20,000


47 RICHARD PETTIBONE Smoke

1963 Oil on glass panels in artist’s frame Signed, titled, and dated verso; retains Rolf Nelson Gallery label frame verso 24" x 34.5" (61 x 88 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist)

$10,000–15,000


48 RICHARD PETTIBONE Golf Ball (#8)

c. 1965 Acrylic and photoengraving on canvas Signed and inscribed “ca. 1965” and “JH601” to canvas stretcher bar verso Canvas: 4.125" x 4.125" Frame: 4.375" x 4.375" (Canvas: 10 x 10 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist) ILLUST RAT E D Richard Pettibone: A Retrospective. I. Berry and M. Duncan. 2005. 6.

$6,000–9,000

49 RICHARD PETTIBONE Train

c. 1965 Acrylic and photoengraving on canvas Canvas: 3" x 6" Frame: 3.25" x 6.25" (Canvas: 8 x 15 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist)

$4,000–6,000

43


VERSO DETAIL

50 STURTEVANT

Study for Warhol’s Marilyn 1965 Acrylic and screenprint inks on canvas Signed, titled, and dated canvas verso Together with books Under the Sign of [SIC]: Sturtevant’s VolteFace (2013); Sturtevant: Push and Shove (2005) (2); and Sturtevant: Double Trouble (2014) LAMA would like to thank Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac and the Sturtevant Estate for their assistance in confirming this work 20" x 16.125" (51 x 41 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Houston, Texas; Private Collection (acquired directly from the above, c. 1977)

$300,000–400,000


Keith Haring and Zine Culture Described by the work’s consigner, Daniel Durning, as demonstrating a “freer… more pure Keith,” Untitled (1982) is a unique copy of Keith Haring’s (1958–1990) first art zine. According to Durning, who attended the School of Visual Arts (SVA) with the artist, Haring was selling his “little books” at a Leo Castelli Gallery opening. Durning asked Haring to sign his copy, but upon noticing that the cover had been assembled backwards, the artist spontaneously drew him a new cover in felt-tip marker. Durning says that this was before Haring had become “mega-anything,” and that both the book’s contents and its impromptu cover art reveal Haring’s playful character. While Haring would go on to create more mass-produced objects, such as those found at his Pop Shop in Soho, this early zine was printed in two limited editions of under 500 copies. Despite its more rarified nature, Haring’s engagement of the zine format showed his budding interest in producing accessible art that robustly “communicate[d] and contribute[d] to culture” by “breaking down the barriers between high and low art.” The zine, short for fanzine (a combination of the pop culture fans that created them and the magazines they juxtaposed), first emerged in the early 1930s as an outlet for readers of science fiction pulp to air their feelings for the increasingly popular genre. Though there were very few structural rules within the medium, zines generally circulated with fewer than 5,000 copies, were the product of a single person or a very small group of people, and, as they were intended for pleasure and not profit, could be obtained for free or at a very low cost. Zines came to be characterized by their melding of political commentary, literary art, music journalism, and graphic design. This format offered a grassroots platform for amateur writers and artists, many of whom would go on to become respected practitioners in their fields. In the late 1970s, increasing access to Xerox

machines and copy shops led to a further proliferation of the zine, notably within the punk subculture, where reviews of albums and shows often lent bands cult status. Amongst “disaffected youth,” zines established critical communities “meant to disrupt” profiteering media outlets. Some argue that beyond circulation size, the zine designation is most indicative of its author’s outsider status, as it offered a vibrant media channel for “subcultural scenes.” Within this vein, there was also a long-standing practice of zines offering alternative spaces for expression to queer creators and audiences, who otherwise lacked representation in popular media. Some of the oldest queer zines included Der Kreis (The Circle) and Physique Pictoral, which were first published in 1943 and 1945, respectively. Haring’s interest in undermining the conservatism of the 1980s, especially as it pertained to the suppression and stigma surrounding the queer community, led the artist to emphasize “his sense of difference” in his paintings and drawings. This undercurrent of alienation rendered his work a natural fit for the zine medium. Arnold, Chloe. “A Brief History of Zines.” Mental Floss, 19 Nov. 2016, www. mentalfloss.com/article/88911/brief-history-zines. Cane, Shannon Michael. “Xerox, Paper, Scissors.” Aperture, no. 218, 2015, pp. 46–51. “Daniel Durning on Keith Haring, 1982, Untitled.” Los Angeles Modern Auctions, 27 Dec. 2019. Deitch, Jeffrey, and Gianni Mercurio. “His Art Is His Life.” The Keith Haring Foundation, 2005, www.haring.com/!/selected_writing/his-art-is-his-life. “Keith Haring: The Alphabet.” Albertina, 2018, www.albertina.at/site/assets/ files/1799/presskit_keith_haring.pdf. Wills, Matthew. “Before Blogs, There Were Zines.” JSTOR Daily, 19 Apr. 2018, daily. jstor.org/before-blogs-there-were-zines/. Yarrow, Andrew L. “Keith Haring, Artist, Dies at 31; Career Began in Subway Graffiti.” The New York Times, 17 Feb. 1990.

51 KEITH HARING Untitled INTERIOR DETAIL

1982 Felt-tip marker on “Keith Haring” zine cover Signed and dated to interior 5.5" x 4.25" (14 x 11 cm) P ROV E NANC E Daniel Durning, New York, New York (acquired directly from the artist, 1982)

$10,000–15,000

45


52 CLAES OLDENBURG

Profile Airflow–Test Mold, Front End 1968-1972 Cast-polyurethane relief over screenprint on Plexiglas installed in a welded aluminum frame #7 of 50 Published and fabricated by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Incised initials and edition lower left; stamped “Copyright Claes Oldenburg 1972” lower right; retains unknown label verso Gemini G.E.L. #38.15 18.625" x 16" x 4" (47 x 41 x 10 cm) LITERATURE Printed Stuff, Posters, and Ephemera by Claes Oldenburg: A Catalogue Raisonné. R. Axsom and D. Platzker. 1997. #99.

$10,000–15,000


53 ANDY WARHOL

The Star (from Myths) 1981 Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board #12 of 200 Published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., New York; printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York Retains printer’s blind stamp lower left edge of sheet; signed with edition in graphite sheet verso; stamped date and publisher information sheet verso F/S #II.258 Image/sheet: 38" x 38" Frame: 39.25" x 39.25" (Image/sheet: 97 x 97 cm) P ROV E NANC E Wolfryd-Selway Fine Art, West Hollywood, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, c. 1998) LIT E RAT URE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.258.

$45,000–65,000

47


54 ANDY WARHOL

Flowers (Hand-Colored) 1974 Screenprint hand-colored with Dr. Martin’s aniline watercolor dye on paper #121 of 250 Co-published by Peter M. Brant, Castelli Graphics, and Multiples, Inc., New York; printed by Alexander Heinrici, New York Initialed in graphite lower right edge of sheet; signed and dated with edition in graphite sheet verso; stamped publisher’s information and date in ink sheet verso F/S #II.119 Image/sheet: 40.5" x 27.25" Frame: 47" x 33.5" (Image/sheet: 103 x 69 cm) LITERATURE Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné. 4th ed. F. Feldman and J. Schellmann. 2003. #II.119.

$4,000–6,000

55 JIM DINE

Etching Lesson (from Eight Sheets from an Undefined Novel, State II) 1979 Etching, soft-ground etching, and aquatint with hand painting in oil on Rives BFK paper #26 of 35 Published and printed by Pace Editions, New York Signed and dated in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Image: 23.75" x 19.375" Sheet: 29.75" x 22" Frame: 33.25" x 25.875" (Image: 60 x 49 cm) LITERATURE Jim Dine Prints: 19771985. E. D’Oench and J. Feinberg. 1986. #39.

$1,500–2,000


56 JIM DINE

The Poet Assassinated 1970-1971 Etching with hand painting in watercolor on J. Green mould-made paper #31 of 75 Published and printed by Petersburg Press, London Signed and dated with edition in graphite lower left Together with book The Poet Assassinated Image: 27.5" x 21.25" Sheet (vis.): 29.875" x 23.5" Frame: 36.5" x 30.25" (Image: 70 x 54 cm) LIT E RAT URE Jim Dine Prints: 19701977.T. Krens. 1977. #31.

$800–1,200

49

57 JIM DINE

Nutcracker 1973 Lithograph on Arches Cover Buff paper #72 of 100 Co-published by Petersburg Press and Dayton’s Gallery 12, New York; printed by Petersburg Press, New York Signed in graphite lower left; edition lower center sheet; dated with copyright and William Law blind stamp lower right Image/sheet: 30" x 22.5" Frame: 31.375" x 23.625" (Image/sheet: 76 x 57 cm) P ROV E NANC E Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, California; Eliot Sekuler, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, c. 1977) LIT E RAT URE Jim Dine Prints: 19701977. T. Krens. 1977. #107.

$800–1,200


51

58 JASPER JOHNS

1st Etchings, 2nd State (13) 1967-1969 The complete portfolio of 12 1-color intaglios on Auvergne à la Main paper and title page Each: #26 of 40 Published and printed by Universal Limited Art Editions, West Islip Title page signed and titled in black felt-tip marker in lower margin beneath image; twelve signed and dated with edition in graphite to margin; each retains ULAE blind stamp lower left edge of sheet Sheets each: 25.75" x 19.75" Frames each: 27.125" x 21" (Sheets each: 65 x 50 cm) LIT E RAT URE The Prints of Jasper Johns 1960-1993: A Catalogue Raisonné. R. Field. 1994. #58.

$40,000–60,000


59 JEAN PROUVÉ

Row of Three Lecture Theater Chairs Les Ateliers Jean Prouvé, designed c. 1956 34.75" x 65.25" x 21.5" (88 x 166 x 55 cm) These chairs were originally designed for the Faculté des Lettres, Université de Besançon. P ROVENA NC E The Store, Berlin, Germany; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2016) LITERATURE Jean Prouvé. Galeries Jousse Seguin and Enrico Navarra, eds. 1998. 62-63 for similar examples.; Jean Prouvé. P. Rowlands. 2002. 50-51.; Jean Prouvé: Œuvre Complète, Volume 3: 1944-1954. P. Sulzer. 2005. 252 for similar examples.

$12,000–18,000

TAG DETAIL

60 JEAN PROUVÉ Bench

Les Ateliers Jean Prouvé, designed c. 1953 Retains unknown numbered tag 37.875" x 86.75" x 21" (96 x 220 x 53 cm) This bench was most likely designed for the one of the large lecture theaters for the University of Paris, Faculty of Medicine. P ROVENA NC E Modern Design Furniture Gallery, New York, New York; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above, 2016)

$10,000–15,000


MARKINGS DETAIL

53

61 ALEXANDRE NOLL Side chair

Studio, designed c. 1945 Mahogany Retains incised signature "ANoll" to underside 34.5" x 16.5" x 18" (88 x 42 x 46 cm) P ROV E NANC E Friedman Vallois Gallery, New York, New York; Private Collection (acquired directly from the above, 2003); Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California (acquired directly from the above through Phillips, New York, New York, December 17, 2014, lot 202) LIT E RAT URE Alexandre Noll. O. JeanElie and P. Passebon. 1999. 23, 47.; Le Mobilier du XXe Siècle, Dictionnaire des Créateurs. P. Kjellberg. 1994. 455.

$12,000–15,000


62 OSKAR FISCHINGER Egyptian

1944 Oil on Celotex panel Signed lower left edge of canvas; signed and dated verso; retains Gallery 609 label verso Panel (vis.): 30.75" x 37.875" Frame: 33.125" x 40.5" (Panel: 78 x 96 cm) P ROVENA NC E Elfriede Fischinger, Los Angeles, California; Gordon Shwayder Rosenblum, Lakewood, Colorado (acquired directly from the above, c. 1982); Thence by descent EXHIBITE D “Fischinger: A Retrospective,” Gallery 609, Denver, May-June, 1981

$8,000–12,000


63 OSKAR FISCHINGER Perspective #2 1961 Oil on canvas Signed lower right; dated with artist’s cipher lower left; dated and inscribed “#985/40 x 32” in red ballpoint pen to canvas overlap verso Canvas (vis.): 39.75" x 31.75" Frame: 41.25" x 33.5" (Canvas: 101 x 81 cm) P ROV E NANC E Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bertoia, Barto, Pennsylvania (acquired directly from the artist); Private Collection, Pennsylvania; Thence by descent

$6,000–8,000

55 64 OSKAR FISCHINGER Minimal

1952 Oil on canvas Signed and dated lower right; artist’s cipher lower left; signed, titled, dated, and inscribed “62/42 x 30” canvas verso; retains Gallery 609 label canvas verso Canvas (vis.): 41.5" x 29.375" Frame: 43.75" x 31.75" (Canvas: 105 x 74 cm) P ROV E NANC E Elfriede Fischinger, Los Angeles, California; Gordon Shwayder Rosenblum, Lakewood, Colorado (acquired directly from the above, c. 1982); Thence by descent E XHIBIT E D “Fischinger: A Retrospective of Paintings and Films by Oskar Fischinger 1900-1967,” Gallery 609, Denver, May-June, 1981 LIT E RAT URE Fischinger: A Retrospective of Paintings and Films by Oskar Fischinger 1900-1967. Gallery 609 exh. cat. 1980. N.pag.

$4,000–6,000


65 EMERSON WOELFFER Nite Kiss

1968-1973 Acrylic on canvas Signed and dated “68” lower left edge of canvas; signed upper right edge of canvas; signed and dated “1973” canvas verso; signed and titled canvas stretcher bar verso 66" x 50" (168 x 127 cm) P ROVENA NC E The estate of Emerson Woelffer

$10,000–15,000

66 EMERSON WOELFFER Untitled

1988 Mixed-media on canvas Signed upper right edge of canvas; signed and dated canvas verso 30" x 24" (76 x 61 cm) P ROVENA NC E The estate of Emerson Woelffer

$4,000–6,000


67 EMERSON WOELFFER Sic

1975 Acrylic on canvas Signed and dated “8-6-75” lower right edge of canvas; signed, titled, and dated canvas verso 24" x 20" (61 x 51 cm) P ROV E NANC E The estate of Emerson Woelffer

$3,000–5,000

57

68 MARION SAMPLER Untitled

1962 Oil on canvas Signed and dated verso Canvas: 38" x 36" Frame: 38.75" x 36.75" (Canvas: 97 x 91 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$8,000–12,000


Hilda D. Levy’s Fine-Spun Abstractions Over the course of her twenty year-long career, Hilda D. Levy (1908–2001) cultivated a complex vernacular in which textured linear arrangements gave rise to a “spectacle” of “unrest.” Born in Pinsk, Russia in 1908, Levy immigrated to the United States with her mother and siblings shortly after World War I. In the late 1930s, Levy left her adopted home in Boston to earn her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. Upon completing her certificate in Social Service in 1938, Levy pursued social work in San Francisco. After relocating to Southern California with her husband and two children, Levy set out to fulfill her “urgent desire,” arising from childhood, “to express [herself] in some way” and to “[make] some little contribution” to history. In 1947 Levy began studying art at the University of California, Los Angeles, and went on to attend Pasadena City College and the Jepson Art Institute.

Levy exhibited her work actively and was widely well-received between the early 1950s and late 1960s, but the artist ceased painting upon the passing of her husband in 1972. While over the past four decades Levy’s work has largely gone unseen, in early 2019 Levy’s Movement (1956) was included in the second phase of the Pasadena Museum of History’s exhibition, “Something Revealed; California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960.” Joseph Morsman, one of the exhibition’s curators, stated that Levy was already attracting renewed attention and appreciation from art collectors and dealers based on the strength of her single work in “Something Revealed.” Levy stands as a star among female artists who “defied gender and expectation,” and her work represents some of the finest Abstract Expressionist ideals of her period. Hilda D. Levy’s biography, exhibition history, and personal journal entries

Levy first began exhibiting her works in 1953, and by 1957 she broke into the boys' club of Ferus Gallery and received her own solo show, a feat achieved by only two other women, Jay DeFeo and Sonia Gechtoff. Critic Jules Langsner described the works that she exhibited there as “inventive, poetic, sensitive” and “entrancing.” In refining her lace-like motifs, Levy placed increasing emphasis on the role of the viewer. She stated that the "fulfillment” of her paintings emerged from the viewer’s personal recognition of the works’ “flow of truth.” Extending this idea, the orientation of her paintings are often left entirely up to the presenter, in a way “[giving] the work a life of its own.”

provided courtesy of the artist’s son, Jack N. Levy, and daughter, Debra F. Levy. “2019 Past Exhibitions.” Pasadena Museum of History, 2019, pasadenahistory.org/exhibits/2019-exhibitions/#womenartists. Cascone, Sarah. “A Show of More Than 130 Women Artists From California Is Bringing a Once-Sidelined Group Into the Spotlight. See Their Works.” Artnet News, 22 Apr. 2019, news.artnet.com/exhibitions/california-women-artists-pasadena-exhibition-1464745. Howell, Betje. “Hilda Levy, Santa Monica Art Gallery.” Artforum, Jan. 1965, p. 46. Langsner, Jules. “Art News from Los Angeles.” ARTnews, 1957. Reep, Edward. The Content of Watercolor. Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1969.


VERSO DETAILS

69 HILDA D. LEVY Pulsation VIII 1960-1961 Oil on canvas Signed lower right; retains California Palace of the Legion of Honor, McNay Art Institute, Junior League Art Center, and “Art Museum Council/Los Angeles County Museum of Art” Art Rental Gallery labels verso Canvas: 32.875" x 50" Frame: 34.125" x 51.25" (Canvas: 83 x 127 cm) P ROV E NANC E The Estate of Hilda D. Levy

$8,000–12,000

70 HILDA D. LEVY

Cosmic Cleavage I 1963 Casein on paper Signed and titled frame verso; retains unknown information label frame verso Composition/sheet (vis.): 29" x 20.875" Frame: 41.25" x 31.5" (Composition/sheet: 74 x 53 cm) P ROV E NANC E The Estate of Hilda D. Levy

$3,000–5,000

59


71 GEORGE NAKASHIMA Trestle table

Studio, designed c. 1960 Walnut and rosewood Inscribed "Mutt" to underside of table and one leaf Together with two leaves 28.75" x 60" x 36.25" 28.75" x 92" x 36.25" (with leaves) (73 x 234 x 92 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired through Los Angeles Modern Auctions, Van Nuys, California, May 6, 2001, lot 318)

$8,000–12,000

72 GEORGE NAKASHIMA New chairs (6)

Studio, designed 1955 American black walnut and hickory Each inscribed "Lovenberg" to underside Comprised of four side chairs and two armchairs Armchairs each: 39" x 24.625" x 25" Side chairs each: 36.25" x 18.75" x 22" (Armchairs each: 99 x 62 x 64 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired through Los Angeles Modern Auctions, Van Nuys, California, March 6, 2011, lot 218) LITERATURE Nature Form & Spirit: The Life and Legacy of George Nakashima. A. Nakashima. 2003. 96.; George Nakashima: Full Circle. D. Ostergard. 1989. 154.

$9,000–12,000


61 73 GEORGE NAKASHIMA Suite (4)

Studio, executed c. 1957 American black walnut and upholstery Comprised of two loose cushion lounge chairs, an ottoman, and a side table Together with copies of sales receipts and copy of original payment Lounge chairs each: 33" x 24" x 34.25" Ottoman: 15.75" x 24.125" x 24" Side table: 10.5" x 24.25" x 24" (Lounge chairs each: 84 x 61 x 87 cm) P ROV E NANC E Rudolph Zaprauskis, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (acquired directly from the artist, c. 1958); Private Collection, Camden, Maine (acquired directly from the above); Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above through Palms Springs Modernism Show, Palm Springs, California, 2004) LIT E RAT URE George Nakashima: Full Circle. D. Ostergard. 1989. 158.

$8,000–12,000


MARKINGS DETAIL

74 HENRY MOORE

Maquette for Seated Woman 1957; cast 1978 Bronze #1 of 9 Fabricated by Morris Singer, London Retains etched signature with stamped edition and foundry mark Together with two books, signed photograph, and appraisal from Harcourts Gallery 7.375" x 4.125" x 4.125" (19 x 10 x 10 cm) P ROVENA NC E Harcourts Gallery, San Francisco, California; The Estate of Pat and Jerry B. Epstein (acquired directly from the above) LITERATURE Henry Moore: Sculptures and Drawings. 2nd ed. Vol. III. A. Bowness, ed. 1986. #439b.

$20,000–30,000

ALTERNATE VIEW


75 RICHARD DIEBENKORN

Works from Seated Woman Series (5) 1965 Lithographs on Rives BFK paper A: #70 of 100; B: #92 of 100; C: #93 of 100; D: Artist’s proof aside from the edition of 100; E: #82 of 100 Published and printed by Original Press, San Francisco Each initialed and dated lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; three retain Original Press and Joseph Zirker blind stamps lower right; one retains Original Press and Bruce Lowney blind stamps lower left Comprised of A: Untitled (Seated Nude); B: Untitled (Seated Woman in an Armchair (with wine glass)); C: Untitled (Seated Woman in Director’s Chair); D: Untitled (Seated Woman (with arms and legs crossed)); and E: Untitled (Seated Woman in a Striped Dress) Largest (E): Image: 26.25" x 20.125" Sheet: 28" x 22.25" Smallest (A): Sheet: 26.25" x 19.875" (Largest: 67 x 51 cm)

$10,000–15,000

63


MARKINGS DETAILS

76 CHUCK CLOSE Untitled

1961 Oil on canvas Signed and dated lower right; signed and dated canvas verso Canvas: 24" x 18" (Canvas: 61 x 46 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1961)

$30,000–50,000


Lester Johnson: Poetry of Congestion A descendant of the Abstract Expressionist movement, Lester Johnson (1919–2010) is best known for his monochromatic male silhouettes and renderings of crowded urban spaces, which have been affectionately described as “the poetry of congestion.” Johnson, who was born in Minneapolis in 1919, commenced his artistic career at the Cosmopolitan Art Company, making frames and copying landscapes for calendars. Following this apprenticeship, the young artist attended the Minneapolis School of Art but transferred to the St. Paul School of Art when his mentor was ousted by the faculty. He completed his education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and moved to New York in 1947. At this time Johnson worked primarily with landscapes and abstractions, but an Alberto Giacometti exhibition in 1948 inspired what would become his signature figurative forms. Johnson was quick to gain attention from fellow abstractionists when he held his first solo show in 1951. By the mid-1950s Johnson had committed fully to the human figure and was among the few figurative artists admitted into the Eighth Street Club. With epoch-defining founding members such as Willem de Kooning and Franz Kline, “the Club,” as it was also known, offered Johnson’s work a public stamp of approval at a time when figurative representation had fallen out of critical relevance.

Johnson’s thematic and formal situation between the interiority of the Abstract Expressionists and the cultural obsessions of the Pop artists has unfortunately allowed his work to slip through the cracks of popular consideration. Nevertheless, the enduring strength of his images is demonstrated by his extensive exhibition history, which has included twelve posthumous exhibitions to date. Johnson’s works are currently held in the collections of the Guggenheim Museum, New York, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among many others.

Grimes, William. “Lester Johnson, Expressionist Painter, Dies at 91.” The New York Times, 9 June 2010, p. A23. Yau, John. “Lester Johnson's Last Paintings.” Hyperallergic, 15 Nov. 2011, hyperallergic.com/40449/lester-johnson-last-paintings/. “Biography.” Lester Johnson, lesterjohnson.net/about/bio/. “Curriculum Vitae.” Lester Johnson, lesterjohnson.net/about/exhibitions/.

65 77 LESTER F. JOHNSON Lovers

1961 Oil on canvas Signed “Lester” lower right; retains Holland-Goldowsky Gallery label verso Canvas: 32" x 32" Frame: 34" x 34" (Canvas: 81 x 81 cm)

$3,000–5,000

78 LESTER F. JOHNSON Untitled (Head)

c. 1959 Oil on canvas board Retains Martha Jackson Gallery label verso Board: 18" x 14" Frame: 19" x 15" (Board: 46 x 36 cm)

$2,000–3,000


79 YNEZ JOHNSTON Tower

N.d. Mixed-media sculpture 29.75” x 10” x 10” (75 x 25 x 25 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist)

$4,000–6,000


80 YNEZ JOHNSTON Figure

N.d. Mixed-media sculpture 9.875" x 9.125" x 5.625" (including base) (25 x 23 x 14 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist)

$1,500–2,000

67

81 YNEZ JOHNSTON Untitled

1957 Pencil, ink, watercolor, and pastel on handmade paper Signed and dated in black ink lower center in composition Composition/sheet (vis.): 32.125" x 16.75" Frame: 38.625" x 23.25" (Composition/sheet: 82 x 42 cm) P ROV E NANC E Jack Drake, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above, 1978)

$2,000–3,000


Betye Saar: Fragments of the Past A California native and key figure in the Black Arts Movement, Betye Saar (b. 1926) weaves layers of memory and resistance into her prints, collages, and assemblages. Saar graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1949 with a degree in design, which she parlayed into a greeting card line and an enamelware company. At this point, she had no aspirations of becoming an artist and instead had set her sights on interior design. In the late 1950s she went back to school with hopes of becoming a teacher, but a chance encounter with Cal State Long Beach’s print workshop redirected the course of her career. She worked primarily in drawing and printing, as typified by the 1964 print with ink additions, Dog Bones (Lot 84), until a Joseph Cornell exhibition at the Norton Simon Museum inspired her to also take on assemblage. This medium shift very quickly led Saar to accumulate racist memorabilia, such as ‘mammy’ jars, that she would then adorn with symbols of defiance. In the early 1970s, trips to both the Field Museum in Chicago and to Haiti drew her to begin artistically considering the intersections of black culture with magic and mysticism. Reportedly interested in the “visual ways in which magic could be conveyed,” Saar started replacing Eurocentric references in her work with African symbols. Within the African-American tradition of magical realism, inherited myths are used to restore identity. In mobilizing the opposing forces of magic and "the real," the objectivity of histories, often authored by enslavers, is undermined and renders the personal narratives of the enslaved more visible. Through her use of scavenged photographs, documents, and personal mementos, Saar crafted “a surreal blend of autobiographical reference and cultural history,” that visually appropriates this form of magical realism. She connected objects with ancestors to both document her own version of past events and stake a claim on a modern identity. This “mood” of memory and longing was further buttressed

by the passing of Saar’s great-aunt in 1975. Among the decades-worth of personal belongings left behind by her aunt, Saar found a portrait of a slower time when “people still collected memories.” In response, she recycled her aunt’s memories through her work as a spiritually imbued method of reinventing a personal and communal narrative. As seen in both Lot 82 and Lot 83, Saar embraced “the soul” of her objects and the “untold stories” of the characters she assigned as their owners. These “fragments of the past,” inevitably conjure notions of death, which the artist has identified as a “transitional state” linking the past to the future. Now in her 90s, Saar continues to mingle the personal, political, and magical in her robust output. Evidencing her ever-expanding national and international profile, Saar recently received a solo exhibition at the newly renovated Museum of Modern Art, New York, “Betye Saar: The Legends of ‘Black Girl’s Window,’” and she is currently the subject of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s exhibition, “Betye Saar: Call and Response.” In addition, her works are in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Carpenter, Jane H. Betye Saar. Pomegranate, 2003. Miranda, Carolina A. “For Betye Saar, There’s No Dwelling on the Past; the Almost90-Year-Old Artist Has Too Much Future to Think About.” Los Angeles Times, 29 Apr. 2016. Wall text for Black Girl’s Window, by Betye Saar. Betye Saar: The Legends of Black Girl’s Window, 21 Oct. 2019-4 Jan. 2020, Museum of Modern Art, New York. Wall text for Keep for Old Memories, by Betye Saar. Betye Saar: The Legends of Black Girl’s Window, 21 Oct. 2019-4 Jan. 2020, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

82 BETYE SAAR Untitled

1976 Mixed-media assemblage Signed and dated to underside Closed: 2.25" x 3" x 1.25" Open: 2.75" x 3" x 2.625" (Closed: 6 x 8 x 3 cm) P ROVENA NC E Gary and Caroline Kent, Los Angeles, California (gifted directly by the artist)

$2,000–3,000

ALTERNATE VIEW AND DETAIL


83 BETYE SAAR Untitled

1976-1977 Mixed-media collage on handkerchief Inscribed “Betye Saar” to frame; retains unknown information label frame verso Handkerchief: 9.75" x 10" Frame: 13.5" x 13.25" (Handkerchief: 25 x 25 cm) P ROV E NANC E Josine Ianco-Starrels, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000

84 BETYE SAAR Dog Bones

1964 Print with hand additions in ink on paper Titled lower left; signed and dated lower right Composition: 13.875" x 18" Sheet (vis.): 14.375" x 18.375" Frame: 21.75" x 25.75" (Composition: 35 x 46 cm) P ROV E NANC E Josine Ianco-Starrels, Los Angeles, California; Thence by descent

$2,000–3,000

69


85 ALISON SAAR Untitled

c. 1985 Mixed-media on paper Retains Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery label sheet verso Composition/sheet: 19.125" x 18.375" Frame: 23.75" x 22.5" (Composition/sheet: 49 x 46 cm) P ROVENA NC E Josine Ianco-Starrels, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000


86 VARNETTE HONEYWOOD Untitled

N.d. Mixed-media Image/sheet (vis.): 28.25" x 20.75" Frame: 41.25" x 33.25" (Image/sheet: 72 x 53 cm) P ROV E NANC E Laura Beth Hendrix Estate, Los Angeles, California; Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000

87 OMAR LAMA Untitled (2) c. 1970 Ink on paper Signed “Omar Lama” lower left; signed “Omar” lower right Composition/sheet (vis.): 23.375" x 17.375" Frame: 31.875" x 26" Composition/sheet (vis.): 17.375" x 23.375" Frame: 25.875" x 31.875" (Composition/sheet: 59 x 44 cm) Omar Lama was a member of AfriCOBRA (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists), a Chicago-based Black artist collective that had a significant impact on the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and ‘70s. P ROV E NANC E Laura Beth Hendrix Estate, Los Angeles, California; Thence by descent

$3,000–5,000

71


88 FERNANDO & HUMBERTO CAMPANA Cake Stool

Estudio Campana, Brazil, designed 2008 #76 of 150 Retains stitched label to raccoon's tail "Campana/Cake Stool #076/150" Together with copy of certificate from Estudio Campana 27" x 52" x 46" (69 x 132 x 117 cm) LITERATURE The Campana Brothers: Complete Works (So Far). D. Alfred, et al. 2010. 286.

$10,000–15,000


89 ROY MCMAKIN Cabinet

Domestic Furniture Co., designed c. 1988 68.5" x 28" x 19" (174 x 71 x 48 cm) LIT E RAT URE Domestic Furniture Co. R. McMakin. 1988. N.pag.; Roy McMakin: A Door Meant as Adornment. M. Darling. 2003. 17.

$4,000–6,000

90 ROY MCMAKIN

Cove dining table Domestic Furniture Co., designed c. 1988 29" x 72" x 39" (74 x 183 x 99 cm) LIT E RAT URE Domestic Furniture Co. R. McMakin. 1988. N.pag.; Roy McMakin: A Door Meant as Adornment. M. Darling. 2003. 25.; Roy McMakin: When is a chair not a chair? R. Roberts and D. Ngo, eds. 2010. 22.

$2,000–3,000

73


91 DALE CHIHULY

Armenian Blue Basket Set with Lead Lip Wraps Studio, executed 2001 Blown glass in seven parts Etched initials and date to one element 5.75" x 13.875" x 12.875" (as illustrated) (14 x 35 x 33 cm) This work is being sold to benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater San Diego. P ROVENA NC E Diane Farris Gallery, Vancouver, Canada; Private Collection (acquired directly from the above, 2007); Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater San Diego (gifted directly from the above)

$7,000–10,000

92 FLETCHER BENTON

Folded Circle - Rectangle 1977 Bronze #6 of 8 Signed twice, titled, and dated with edition along outer edge Together with pedestal 16.75" x 19" x 19" (including base) 48.625" x 19" x 19" (including pedestal) (42 x 48 x 48 cm)

$3,000–5,000


75 MARKING DETAIL

93 YAACOV AGAM

9 x 18 x 27 in Movement 1988 Gold-plated brass Unique Retains etched signature near base Together with copies of original invoice and letters from the artist 29.5" x 13.25" x 9.25" (75 x 34 x 23 cm) P ROV E NANC E Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist, 1988)

$10,000–15,000


94 ELLSWORTH KELLY

Blue/Black/Red/Green 2001 4-color lithograph on Lanaquarelle 640 gram paper #44 of 45 Published and printed by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles Signed with edition and Gemini G.E.L. blind stamps lower right; stamped “Published by Gemini G.E.L. LLC/Los Angeles, California” verso Gemini G.E.L. #28.234 Image/sheet: 24.875" x 88.75" (Image/sheet: 63 x 225 cm) P ROVENA NC E Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above) LITERATURE The Prints of Ellsworth Kelly: A Catalogue Raisonné. 2nd ed. Vol. II. R. Axsom. 2012. #293.

$15,000–20,000

95 DON SUGGS Valentine

1991 Gelatin silver print Initialed and dated in graphite lower center sheet Image: 6.75" x 6.75" Sheet (vis.): 10.5" x 10.5" Frame: 12.125" x 12.125" (Image: 17 x 17 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1994)

$2,000–3,000


LABEL DETAILS

77

96 FREDERICK HAMMERSLEY Again is a gain #6, 1971 Oil on linen Signed and dated lower center edge of canvas; retains artist’s label and Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe exhibition label backing board verso Linen: 44" x 44" Frame: 44.75" x 44.75" (Linen: 112 x 112 cm) P ROV E NANC E Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, Santa Fe, New Mexico; Private Collection, New York, New York (acquired directly from the above, 2006) E XHIBIT E D “1973 New Mexico Fine Arts Biennial of the Museum of New Mexico,” Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, May 20-September 9, 1973 ILLUST RAT E D Frederick Hammersley. D. Hickey, et al. 2009. 93.

$60,000–80,000


97 SAM FRANCIS Untitled

1983 Aquatint on Somerset Satin paper #3 of 11 Published and printed by The Litho Shop, Inc., Santa Monica Signed lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left; retains publisher’s blind stamp lower right corner Image: 23.875" x 17.875" Sheet (vis.): 28.875" x 22.75" Frame: 37.75" x 31.75" (Image: 60 x 45 cm)

98 SAM FRANCIS

An 8 Set - 2 (from the Pasadena Box) 1963 3-color lithograph on Rives BFK paper #84 of 100 Published by Pasadena Art Museum, Pasadena; printed by Joseph Press, Los Angeles Signed in graphite with printer’s blind stamps lower right in image; edition lower left Image/sheet: 14.125" x 11" Frame: 19.75" x 16.875" (Image/sheet: 36 x 28 cm)

LITERATURE The Prints of Sam

L I T E RAT U R E The Prints of Sam

Francis: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1960-

Francis: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1960-

1990. 1st ed. Vol. II. C. Lembark. 1992.

1990. 1st ed. Vol. I. C. Lembark. 1992.

#I39.

#L58.

$2,000–3,000

$1,500–2,000


79

99 HELEN LUNDEBERG Cobalt Sky

1966 Acrylic on canvas Signed, titled, dated “July 1966,” and inscribed “10” x 15”/For Josie/ May your skies/be always cobalt/ Warmly, Helen” in black ink verso Canvas: 9.875" x 15.125" Frame: 11.25" x 16.5" (Canvas: 25 x 38 cm) P ROV E NANC E Josine Ianco-Starrels, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent

$5,000–7,000


100 HELEN LUNDEBERG

An Apple and Two Pears 1976 Acrylic on canvas Signed lower right; signed, dated, and inscribed “9” x 12”/Acrylic” frame verso; retains San Francisco Museum of Modern Art label frame verso Canvas (vis.): 8.875" x 11.75" Frame: 14.25" x 17.25" (Canvas: 22 x 30 cm) P ROVENA NC E Josine Ianco-Starrels, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the artist); Thence by descent EXHIBITE D “Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg: A Retrospective Exhibition,” traveling exhibition, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, October 2-November 16, 1980; The Frederick S. Wight Art Gallery, University of California, Los Angeles, March 17-May 3, 1981

101 HELEN LUNDEBERG Untitled (Study) 1982 Acrylic on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower right beneath composition; inscribed “For Josine, with love, Helen/10/17/85” in graphite upper left edge of sheet Composition: 6" x 9" Sheet: 9" x 12" Frame: 10.25" x 14.25" (Composition: 15 x 23 cm)

LITERATURE Lorser Feitelson and

PROVE N A N CE Josine Ianco-Star-

Helen Lundeberg: A Retrospective

rels, Los Angeles, California (acquired

Exhibition. San Francisco Museum of

directly from the artist); Thence by

Modern Art exh. cat. 1980. 70.

descent

$4,000–6,000

$2,000–3,000


VERSO DETAILS

102 LORSER FEITELSON Magical Space Forms

1962 Oil and enamel on burlap Signed, titled, and dated burlap verso; signed and dated frame verso Burlap: 50.125" x 59.875" Frame: 50.75" x 60.75" (Burlap: 127 x 152 cm) P ROV E NANC E The artist’s estate; Louis Stern Fine Arts, West Hollywood, California; Private Collection, New York, New York (acquired directly from the above, 2005)

$35,000–45,000


103 KARL BENJAMIN Untitled

1954 Oil on panel Signed and dated lower left Panel: 17.375" x 6.125" Frame: 24.625" x 13.5" (Panel: 44 x 15 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, Florida; Private Collection, New York, New York (acquired directly from the above, c. 1990)

$6,000–8,000

104 KARL BENJAMIN #45

1963 Oil on canvas Initialed lower left edge of canvas; titled and dated to canvas stretcher bar verso; stamped “Karl Benjamin” to canvas stretcher bar verso; retains Esther Robles Gallery label verso Canvas: 12" x 15.25" Frame: 13" x 14.125" (Canvas: 30 x 39 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection, New York, New York (acquired through the L.A. Modernism Show, Los Angeles, California, c. 1992)

$6,000–8,000


105 LORSER FEITELSON Two Nudes and a Cat 1919 Oil on cardboard Signed and dated lower right edge of board; artist’s name, title, and date inscribed twice verso; retains Louis Stern Fine Arts exhibition label verso Together with copy of invoice from Louis Stern Fine Arts dated March 18, 2006 Board: 20" x 23.75" Frame: 27" x 31" (Board: 51 x 60 cm) P ROV E NANC E Louis Stern Fine Arts, West Hollywood, California; Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above, 2006) E XHIBIT E D “Lorser Feitelson: The Kinetic Series–Works from 19161923,” Louis Stern Fine Arts, West Hollywood, September 10-December 23, 2005 ILLUST RAT E D Lorser Feitelson: The Kinetic Series–Works from 1916-1923. Louis Stern Fine Arts exh. cat. 2005. #15.

$8,000–12,000

83


106 ARLINE FISCH Necklace

Studio, executed c. 1968 Unique Sterling silver with Egyptian beads Together with original invoice from Forms & Objects, Inc. dated October 22, 1968 22" x 8" (56 x 20 cm) P ROVENA NC E Forms & Objects, Inc., New York, New York; Private Collection, Sheffield, Massachusetts (acquired directly from the above, 1968)

$5,000–7,000

ALTERNATE VIEW


107 DAVID CRESSEY

Bullet planters (3) Architectural Pottery, designed c. 1965 Model nos. 5048 and 5049 from the Pro/Artisan series 16.125" x 14.375" diameter 20.625" x 18.5" diameter 15.875" x 14.125" diameter (41 x 36 cm) LIT E RAT URE Architectural Pottery: Pro/ Artisan Collection. Manufacturer cat. 1971. N.pag.

$2,000–3,000

108 JOHN FOLLIS Tire planter

Architectural Pottery, designed c. 1955 Model no. CPB-25 13.25" x 25.5" diameter (34 x 65 cm) LIT E RAT URE Architectural Pottery Catalogue. Manufacturer cat. March 1961. 8.

$700–900

109 DAVID CRESSEY & ROBERT MAXWELL Planters (4)

Earthgender, designed c. 1968 Comprised of two black/brown and two eggshell white glazed planters A: 11.125" x 15.625" diameter B: 11.75" x 15.5" diameter C: 10.75" x 14.75" diameter D: 11.125" x 15" diameter (A: 28 x 40 cm)

$1,500–2,000

85


Edmund Teske: “Like Dreams You Could Touch” Born in Chicago near the turn of the previous century, Edmund Teske (1911–1996) first got his hands on a camera as a young boy. Initially studying music, one of Teske’s teachers granted him access to a darkroom and the budding artist developed his earliest prints. By the age of 25, after having worked at a local commercial photography studio and spending time in New York, where he met a number of prominent artists, Teske was offered a fellowship at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin. There, he studied architectural photography, documenting many of Wright’s projects, and established a workshop for photographic art. Teske went back to Chicago by the end of the 1930s, where he briefly taught at the New Bauhaus Institute of Design before returning to New York to work as an assistant to legendary photographer, Berenice Abbott. It was during this period that he captured socially conscious portraits of urban life in Chicago, much in Abbott’s tradition. At this time he was also introduced to the work of Man Ray and started to experiment with processing and developing manipulations.

still dominated on the East Coast. He worked increasingly with experimental film techniques, and in particular with solarization, a process in which light and dark tones were reversed to elicit unique shades of brown and red (as seen in three of the prints included in Lot 110.) He also revisited his older negatives and created new composite prints that reflected his evolving spiritual understanding of temporal connectivity, weaving together distant times and places “like dreams you could touch.” Teske produced many portraits of Hollywood icons, often artificially situating them in “otherworldly atmosphere[s]” that replicated cinematic special effects. Working right up until the time of his passing, Teske produced a generous body of radical work, and he has been credited with inspiring the influx of process-oriented practices that took hold of West Coast photography in the 1970s.

“Edmund Teske (American, 1911 - 1996) (Getty Museum).” The J. Paul Getty in Los Angeles, www.getty.edu/art/collection/artists/1561/edmund-teske-ameri-

After fulfilling his wartime service as a photographer with the Army Corps of Engineers, Teske moved to Los Angeles in 1943 and took a position in the photographic stills department of Paramount Pictures. Through his friendship with heiress Aline Barnsdall, Teske soon integrated himself into the area’s bohemian art circle and began studying Hindu philosophies. Teske’s move to California imprinted his work with an air of romanticism, a stark contrast to the social realist photography he had once pursued, and which

can-1911-1996/. Grundberg, Andy. "Edmund Teske." Artforum International, vol. 42, no. 9, May 2004, p. 91. H. E. “Photographs by Edmund Teske.” Calendar of the Art Institute of Chicago, vol. 64, no. 2, Mar. 1970, p. 11. Naef, Weston. “Remembering Edmund Teske, a Poet-Pioneer of Photography.” Los Angeles Times, 2 Dec. 1996. “Teske, Edmund.” Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College Chicago, www.mocp.org/detail.php?type=related&kv=7775&t=people.


110 EDMUND TESKE Group (27)

c. 1960 Various mediums Each signed in graphite, with the exception of one photograph; two signed, titled, and dated in graphite verso Comprised of six portrait photographs of Josephine Chuey, six portrait photographs of a young girl (including one solarization print), two portrait photographs of Josephine Chuey’s family, a portrait photograph of Marjorie Eaton, seven abstraction and landscape photographs including Sieve in Deterioriation, three additional solarization prints, a note card, and a poem Together with ephemera including a signed exhibition catalogue, sketch, and two newspaper clippings PARTIAL ILLUSTRATION

Various dimensions P ROV E NANC E The Chuey House, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Los Angeles, California (acquired directly from the above) LIT E RAT URE Spirit into Matter: The Photographs of Edmund Teske. J. Cox. 2004. Pl. 66 and 68.; “A Sequence of Photographs by Edmund Teske.” Aperture. Vol. 12. No. 3. 1965. N.pag.

$3,000–5,000

87


111 LUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE Settee

Knoll International, designed 1930; this example produced later Retains Knoll International upholstery tag 25.25" x 62.25" x 31.625" (64 x 158 x 80 cm)

$3,000–5,000

112 LUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE Tugendhat chair

Knoll, designed 1929-1930; this example produced later Model no. MR 70 33" x 28.75" x 24.75" (84 x 73 x 63 cm) LITERATURE Mies Van Der Rohe. S. Dachs, P. de Muga, and L. G. Hintze, eds. 2010. 58-59.; 1000 Chairs. C. Fiell and P. Fiell. 1997. 175.

$2,000–3,000


89

© J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

113 RICHARD NEUTRA Camel table

Custom, executed for the Tremaine House, Montecito, California, 1948 13.5" x 74.25" x 38" 28.25" x 74.25" x 38" (extended) (34 x 188 x 97 cm) ALTERNATE VIEW

$5,000–7,000


114 HENDRIK VAN KEPPEL & TAYLOR GREEN Dining suite (9)

VKG (chairs); Custom (table), designed c. 1960 Model no. 622 (chairs) Comprised of a dining table and eight side chairs Dining table: 25.125" x 96" x 42" Side chairs each: 29.75" x 17" x 22" (Table: 64 x 244 x 107 cm) P ROVENA NC E Hendrik Van Keppel, Los Angeles, California; Sold by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to benefit future acquisitions

$3,000–5,000

115 CHARLES & RAY EAMES

Lounge chair and ottoman (2) Herman Miller, designed 1956; this example produced later Model nos. 670 (chair) and 671 (ottoman) Each retains manufacturer's label to underside Chair: 33.375" x 32.375" x 33" Ottoman: 16.5" x 25.5" x 21.375" (Chair: 85 x 82 x 84 cm) LITERATURE Eames Design: The Work of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames. J. Neuhart. 1989. 206-207.; 1000 Chairs. C. Fiell and P. Fiell. 1997. 337.

$3,000–5,000


116 CHARLES & RAY EAMES

Aluminum Group reclining lounge chair and ottoman (2) Herman Miller, designed 1958 Each with stamped manufacturer's mark to underside Chair: 37.375" x 24.75" x 33" Ottoman: 18.25" x 21" x 21.5" (Chair: 95 x 63 x 84 cm) LIT E RAT URE Eames Design: The Work of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames. J. Neuhart. 1989. 226-229.

$1,500–2,000

117 CHARLES & RAY EAMES Rocker

Herman Miller, designed c. 1950 Model no. RAR Retains impressed manufacturer's mark and Later Cincinnati Milacron (Star) stamp to underside 26.5" x 24.75" x 27.5" (67 x 63 x 70 cm) LIT E RAT URE Eames Design: The Work of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames. J. Neuhart. 1989. 138-141.; 1000 Chairs. C. Fiell and P. Fiell. 1997. 276.

$1,500–2,000

118 GEORGE NELSON

Thin Edge roll top desk Herman Miller, designed 1955 Model no. 5496 34" x 42.125" x 24.5" (86 x 107 x 62 cm) LIT E RAT URE George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher. J. Eisenbrand. 2008. 260. ALTERNATE VIEW

$3,000–5,000

91


Jan de Swart: Art of Revelations Jan de Swart (1908–1987) was known within artistic circles as a technical virtuoso and a creative hero. De Swart rose to prominence through his visibility in Arts & Architecture and his close relationship with the magazine’s publisher and editor, John Entenza. The Dutch-born sculptor began his practice at a young age, apprenticing to a liturgical carver. Through his training in traditional treatments of precious woods, de Swart gained a deep appreciation for the character and subtleties of his materials. In 1928, he immigrated to the United States and was one of the first artists to take up residence at Park Moderne in Calabasas, William Lingenbrink’s “pointedly modern fairy-book retreat,” that would go on to attract some of the period’s most prolific creatives. After pursuing colorful jobs such as gold prospecting and furniture making, de Swart found remarkable financial success designing commercial and industrial accessories. Despite his lack of formal technical training, de Swart had an intuitive understanding of engineering principles and could flawlessly eyeball the hefty calculations that burdened other inventors. With a knack for discovering new applications of plastic technologies, de Swart designed a wide array of products, from attachments for warcraft machinery to pharmaceutical and cosmetic packaging. By the end of World War II, de Swart had registered over one hundred technical patents, many of which are still used today. According to his wife, Ursula, he “kind of [played] with” his new materials “along the way” and discovered aesthetically fascinating new forms. Wartime demand for his inventions offered de Swart the financial security to invest more time in his art and he began using new plastics to articulate his signature abstract sculptures. In 1944, the artist was featured in his first solo exhibition, and the following year his works were shown at the Pasadena Art Museum.

Though passionate for modern materials, the artist and inventor maintained a fondness for the medium of his youth. According to de Swart himself, he found that in moving beyond the tedious hand-carving methods of his early education and by adopting the use of a bandsaw, he could quickly and easily “reveal [the] inner structure” of his wood and “indulge in a rich diversity” of its inherent design. His laminating process then lent his wood works a unique structural elegance. While de Swart’s works were conceptually dense and helped significantly advance the period’s language of design, they strayed from many other modernist trends within sculpture at the time. Instead of assuming self-importance or preciousness, de Swart’s objects were intended to be integrated directly into their architectural setting, accommodating not only their environment but its inhabitants as well. “Biography.” Jan de Swart, The Jan de Swart Foundation , www.jandeswart.com/ about-jan-deswart/jan-de-swart-bio/. Folkart, Burt A. “Known for Works in Wood: L.A. Inventor, Sculptor Jan de Swart Dies at 79.” Los Angeles Times, 25 Apr. 1987. McGee, Mike. “First Interview with Jan de Swart.” Laguna Art Museum, Internet Archive, 1985. archive.org/details/calgbam_000027/calgbam_000027_a_access. mp3. Meares, Hadley. “Park Moderne: LA's Lost Oz.” Curbed LA, 15 Sept. 2016, la.curbed. com/2016/9/15/12922422/calabasas-park-moderne. "The Pure Research of Jan de Swart." Craft Horizons (Archive : 1941-1978), vol. 1, no. 18, 1958, pp. 10-18.


119 JAN DE SWART Parade

1967 Ebony and boxwood Together with two photographs 7.25" x 38.5" x 3.5" (18 x 98 x 9 cm) P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent E XHIBIT E D “Jan de Swart,” Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, November 11, 1986-January 24, 1987 ILLUST RAT E D Jan de Swart. Laguna Art Museum exh. cat. 1986. #29.

$5,000–7,000

120 JAN DE SWART Untitled

N.d. Aluminum and glass elements 14.5" x 2.375" x 1.75" (37 x 6 x 4 cm) P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$4,000–6,000

MARKINGS DETAIL

121 JAN DE SWART Untitled N.d. Wood Signed 6.25" x 11.5" x 2.375" (16 x 29 x 6 cm) P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$3,000–5,000

93


122 JAN DE SWART Box

Studio, N.d. Wood 4" x 19" x 6.25" (10 x 48 x 16 cm) P ROVENA NC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,000–3,000

123 JAN DE SWART Box

Studio, N.d. Wood 7.5" x 7.5" x 7.25" (19 x 19 x 18 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection (gifted directly by the artist, c. 1972)

$2,500–3,500

ALTERNATE VIEW


124 JAN DE SWART Untitled

1957 Charcoal on paper Signed and dated in graphite verso; mount inscribed “4006” twice in graphite recto and verso Composition: 17.25" x 23.25" Sheet: 18" x 24" Mount: 20" x 26" (Composition: 44 x 59 cm) P ROV E NANC E The artist; Thence by descent

$2,000–3,000

125 HANS HOFMANN

Untitled (Still Life) 1932 Charcoal and graphite on paper Signed upper right; signed, dated, and inscribed “Chouinard School/ Hofmann/Los Angeles/1932” lower left Composition/sheet (vis.): 18.5" x 23.75" Frame: 24.625" x 30.375" (Composition/sheet: 47 x 60 cm)

$4,000–6,000

95


126 GIO PONTI

Diamond flatware (86) Reed & Barton, designed 1958 Each impressed "Reed & Barton/ Sterling," "Reed & Barton/Mirrorstele/ Sterling handle," "Mirrorstele/Sterling handle," or "Reed & Barton/Super Stainless" Comprised of a six-piece service for 12 (dinner forks, salad forks, dinner knives, butter knives, soup spoons, teaspoons), large carving fork, large carving knife, serving spoon, serving fork, sugar spoon, master butter knife, seafood fork, olive fork, and cheese knife, plus additional pieces Together with wood case Various dimensions LITERATURE Modernism in American Silver. J. Stern. 2005. 245.

$6,000–9,000

127 VERNER PANTON

Flower Pot pendant chandelier Louis Poulsen & Co., designed c. 1968 Model no. 16562 Two shades retain manufacturer's paper label; one shade retains manufacturer's and model number labels Overall: 49" x 26.5" diameter (124 x 67 cm) LITERATURE Verner Panton: The Collected Works. M. Remmele and A. von Vegesack, eds. 2000. 108-111, 288.

$3,000–5,000

128 EILEEN GRAY

Bibendum chairs (2) Aram Designs, designed 1926; these examples produced later Each: 28.75" x 38" x 31" (73 x 97 x 79 cm)

$2,500–3,500

PARTIAL ILLUSTRATION


129 VLADIMIR KAGAN Shorty sofa

Directional, designed 1990 Model no. 9440 Together with manufacturer's label 28" x 92" x 48" (71 x 234 x 122 cm)

$4,000–6,000

97 130 VLADIMIR KAGAN Snail coffee table

Selig, designed c. 1954 14.75" x 41.25" x 41.25" (37 x 105 x 105 cm) LIT E RAT URE Vladimir Kagan: A Lifetime of Avant-Garde Design. A. Chen and A. Hellman, eds. 2009. 228.

$3,000–5,000

131 BILL CURRY

Honeycomb Modules Design Line, designed c. 1970 Model no. HM-3 56.125" x 66" x 12" (142 x 168 x 30 cm) This structure can be used as bookshelves, seating, or a room divider. LIT E RAT URE Design Line. Manufacturer cat. 1970-1971. 14.

$2,500–3,500


132 JOEL SHAPIRO Untitled

1986 Oil paint on wood Signed and dated in graphite to bottom of sculpture 7.125" x 4.25" x 3.125" (including base) (18 x 11 x 8 cm) P ROVENA NC E Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist); Private Collection, Houston, Texas (acquired directly from the above through Phillips, New York, New York, November 9, 2010, lot 419)

$20,000–30,000


PARTIAL ILLUSTRATION

133 VARIOUS ARTISTS

Peter Norton Family Christmas Projects (30) 1990-2017 Various mediums Various edition sizes Published by the Peter Norton Family Christmas Project, Santa Monica Most with stamped markings and date Each together with original shipping boxes, and some with original Christmas cards from the Norton family Comprised of The Gospel Abridged (CD) (Richard Kostelanetz); Untitled (Four Napkins) (May Sun); Choice (Daniel Joseph Martinez); Stars Don’t Stand Still in the Sky (for Anybody) (Lawrence Weiner); NO IT CAN ASSESS AN ACTION (Fred Fehlau); Untitled (Miniature Book) (Luciano Perna); III (Three Wishbones in a Wood Box) (Lorna Simpson); Aimai-no-bi (Ambiguous Beauty) (Yasumasa Morimura); Oblique Strategies: A More Universal Edition (Brian Eno

and collaborators); Freedom, A Fable: A Curious Interpretation of the Wit of a Negress in Troubled Times (Kara Walker); Untitled (Double-Sided Blanket) (Jim Hodges); Non Smoking (Vik Muniz); Oval (Takashi Murakami); Untitled (Diorama) (Anna Gaskell); Untitled (Dollhouse) (Yinka Shonibare); Teacup (Robert Lazzarini); Untitled (Glass Bowl) (Do Ho Suh); Silent Listen (Christian Marclay); Untitled (Spiral Pop-up Photo Album) (Peter Coffin); Salt and Pepper Shakers (Nina Katchadourian); Cheshire Smile (Sanford Biggers); Untitled (Bejeweled Antler) (Marc Swanson); Humaliwo Chambers (Benjamin Lord); Bittersweet (Diller Scofidio + Renfro and chef Richard Capizzi); Untitled (Ikebana Kit) (Escher GuneWardena Architecture); Untitled (Trophy Lamp) (Ry Rocklen); Once Again, But Different This Time: The Canasta Edition (Kevin Sommers); Gerald the Dog (Lazerian, et al.); Tangram Mandala (Gabriel Schama); and This is the End: Our Closing Project in Three Parts Various dimensions

$10,000–15,000

99


134

135

BILLY AL BENGSTON

SAM GILLIAM

1983 Watercolor and collage on paper

1987 Relief, etching, aquatint, collograph, and hand-painted collage on handmade paper with embossing

Ka’ao

Initialed, dated, and inscribed “Honolulu” in graphite lower center edge of sheet; retains Aquavella Galleries and artist’s studio labels frame verso Together with poster Composition: 29.375" x 66" x 4.25" (irreg.) Frame: 35" x 69.375" x 4.75" (Composition: 74 x 168 x 11 cm)

$5,000–7,000

Purple Antelope Space Squeeze

From an edition of 40 Published and printed by Tandem Press, Madison Signed and dated in graphite lower center Sheet (irreg.): 40.125" x 40.125" Frame: 46.125" x 46.125" (Sheet: 102 x 102 cm) L I T E RAT U R E Tandem Press: Five Years of Collaboration and Experimentation. Elvehjem Museum of Art exh. cat. 1994. Cover, 45.

$6,000–8,000


136 LARRY COHEN

View of the Coast Highway from Ocean Ave. 2009 Oil on canvas Signed in graphite canvas verso; signed in dark grey paint to canvas stretcher verso Canvas: 16" x 16" Frame: 16.625" x 16.625" (Canvas: 41 x 41 cm)

$2,000–3,000

101

137 LARRY COHEN

View from the Top of the California Incline, Santa Monica 2007 Oil on canvas Signed in graphite canvas verso; signed in grey paint and titled in red colored pencil to canvas stretcher verso Canvas: 18" x 20" Frame: 18.625" x 20.5" (Canvas: 46 x 51 cm)

$2,000–3,000


138 PETER HVIDT & ORLA MØLGAARD-NIELSEN Cabinet and dresser (2)

Søborg Møbelfabrik, designed c. 1956 (cabinet), designed 1956 (dresser) Model no. 305 (dresser) Each stamped "Made in Denmark/John Stuart, Inc./Sole distributors for United States and Mexico" Each: 37.125" x 35.375" x 18.75" (94 x 90 x 47 cm)

$3,000–5,000

139 HANS J. WEGNER Sewing table

Andreas Tuck, designed 1950 Model no. 33 Branded with designer's, distributor's, and manufacturer's names and inscribed "Made in Denmark" to underside 23.75" x 26.375" x 22.5" 23.75" x 46.125" x 22.5" (extended) (60 x 67 x 57 cm)

$2,000–3,000

140 ATTRIBUTED TO HANS J. WEGNER Dining table

Possibly Andreas Tuck, designed c. 1955 Table branded with distributor's mark and inscribed "George Tanier Selection/Made in Denmark" to underside Together with one leaf 28.25" x 70.75" x 41.25" 28.25" x 125" x 41.25" (with leaf) (Table: 72 x 318 x 105 cm) P ROVENA NC E Sold by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to benefit future acquisitions

$1,000–1,500


141 DANISH MODERN Dining suite (7)

Manufacturer unknown (table); J. L. Møllers Møbelfabrik (chairs), designed c. 1965 (table); designed 1954 (chairs) Model no. 78 (chairs) Four chairs retain manufacturer's tags to underside; two chairs retain Danish Furnituremaker's label to underside; table inscribed "MJ.7693." in graphite to underside Comprised of a table (attributed to Arne Vodder) and six chairs (designed by Niels Otto Møller) Together with two leaves Table: 28.75" x 45" x 45.125" 28.75" x 84.25" x 45.125" (with leaves) Chairs each: 31.75" x 19.125" x 19.25" (Table: 73 x 114 x 115 cm) P ROV E NANC E Twentieth, Los Angeles, California; Private Collection, Pasadena, California (acquired directly from the above, c. 2005) LIT E RAT URE Sourcebook of Scandinavian Furniture: Designs for the 21st Century. J. Gura. 2007. 79.

$2,500–3,500

PARTIAL ILLUSTRATION

142 ARNE JACOBSEN AJ flatware (71)

A. Michelsen Silversmith, designed 1957 Model no. 660 Most impressed with manufacturer's mark "A. Michelsen/Stainless/Denmark" or "A. Michelsen Denmark" Comprised of an six-piece service for 11 (dinner knives, dinner forks, salad forks, teaspoons, right-handed soup spoons, and butter knives), plus additional pieces Various dimensions LIT E RAT URE Arne Jacobsen. C. Thau and K. Vindum. 2001. 146-147.; 100 Designs for a Modern World. P. Sparke. 2016. 116-117.

$2,000–3,000

103


143 DIEGO RIVERA

Untitled (Portrait of a Woman) 1942 Pastel and graphite on paper Signed, dated, and inscribed “Mexico” lower right Composition/sheet (vis.): 23.25" x 18" Frame: 31" x 25" (Composition/sheet: 59 x 46 cm) P ROVENA NC E The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Sold to Benefit Acquisitions of Latin American Art

$20,000–30,000


105

144 DIEGO RIVERA Untitled

1949 Chalk on rice paper Signed and dated lower right Composition/sheet: 14.5" x 9.625" (Composition/sheet : 37 x 24 cm) P ROV E NANC E The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Sold to Benefit Acquisitions of Latin American Art

$10,000–15,000


145 PAULA SANTIAGO

De la Serie: “Para Protegerse de la Historia: GUE” (From the Series: “To Protect Oneself from History: GUE”) 1999 Net paper, human blood and hair, sequins, glass, and marble Together with pedestal and glass showcase 14.125" x 13.75" x 5.5" 20" x 20.5" x 11" (including base) (36 x 35 x 14 cm) LITERATURE Paula Santiago. J. Contreras. 2007. 67, 79 for similar examples illustrated.

$5,000–7,000

147 DAVID ALFARO SIQUEIROS 146 DAVID ALFARO SIQUEIROS Untitled

c. 1965 Gouache on paper mounted to panel Signed lower right LAMA would like to thank Dr. Irene Herner Reiss for her assistance in cataloguing this work Composition/sheet: 13.25" x 10.125" Panel: 13.625" x 10.375" Frame: 22.375" x 19.25" (Composition/sheet: 34 x 26 cm)

Untitled (from Prison Fantasies, Portfolio II) 1973 Lithograph on Arches paper #128 of 250 Published by Penn Atelier Graphics, New York Signed in graphite lower right margin beneath image; edition lower left Image: 18" x 13.875" Sheet: 21.875" x 15" (Image: 46 x 35 cm) PROVE N A N CE The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican

P ROVENA NC E Private Collection,

Art; Los Angeles County Museum of

Mexico; Mike Rivero, San Pedro,

Art, Sold to Benefit Acquisitions of

California

Latin American Art

$5,000–7,000

$1,500–2,000


148 JESÚS GUERRERO GALVÁN Face

1971 Ink on paper Signed and dated in graphite lower right in composition Composition/sheet: 19.375" x 20.5" (49 x 52 cm) P ROV E NANC E The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Sold to Benefit Acquisitions of Latin American Art

$1,500–2,000

149 ROBERT MONTENEGRO Untitled (Arches) N.d. Ink on paper Signed in blue ink top center in composition; inscribed “Ballet A Menos Uno” in graphite lower left corner; retains unknown inscriptions verso Composition: 12.75" x 16.375" Sheet: 14" x 17.25" (Composition: 32 x 41 cm) P ROV E NANC E The Bernard and Edith Lewin Collection of Mexican Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Sold to Benefit Acquisitions of Latin American Art

$1,500–2,000

107


Now Accepting Consignments Now Accepting Consignments

ROY LICHTENSTEIN Reflections on a Conversation October 20, 2019 Auction Realized $118,750

Modern Art & Design Spring 2020 Auction PETER LOUGHREY, DIRECTOR | 16145 HART STREET, VAN NUYS, CA 91406 | 323-904-1950 | LAMODERN.COM


Now Accepting Consignments Now Accepting Consignments

MARY CORSE Untitled October 20, 2019 Auction Realized $12,500

KEN PRICE The Blush October 20, 2019 Auction Realized $112,500

Modern Art & Design Fall 2020 Auction PETER LOUGHREY, DIRECTOR | 16145 HART STREET, VAN NUYS, CA 91406 | 323-904-1950 | LAMODERN.COM


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all incurred expenses, such as warehouse and transportation


Index

A Agam, Yaacov. . . . . . . . . 93 Albuquerque, Lita. . . . . . 22 Alexander, Peter. . . . . 30-31 Altoon, John . . . . . . . . . 10-11 Arnoldi, Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-34, 1000 Arp, Jean (Hans). . . . . . 1001 B Banksy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Bell, Larry . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bengston, Billy Al. . 20, 134 Benjamin, Karl. . . . . 103-104 Benton, Fletcher. . . . . . . 92 Butterfield, Deborah. . . . 38 C Campana . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Cartwright, Jack. . . . . 1002 Celmins, Vija . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Chihuly, Dale. . . . . . . . . . . 91 Close, Chuck . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Cohen, Larry. . . . . . 136-137 Cressey, David. . . . . 107, 109 Curry, Bill. . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 D Davis, Ronald. . . . . . . . . . 27 de Kooning, Willem. . . 1003 de Swart, Jan . . . . . . 119-124 Diebenkorn, Richard. . . . . 75 Dine, Jim . . . . . . . . . . 55-57 E Eames. . . 115-117, 1004-1005 Eder, Martin. . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Englund, Eva . . . . . . . . 1006 F Falkenstein, Claire. . . . . . 26 Feitelson, Lorser. . . 102, 105 Fisch, Arline. . . . . . . . . . . 106 Fischer, Urs. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Fischinger, Oskar . . . 62-64 Follis, John. . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Francis, Sam . . . . . . . . . . 97 Francis, Sam . . . . . . . . . . 98 Frattini, Gianfranco. . . 1009 Friedman, Tom. . . . . . . . 1010 G Galván, Jesús . . . . . . . . . 148 Gilliam, Sam. . . . . . . 135, 1011 Goode, Joe. . . . . . . . . . 18-19 Graham, Robert. . . . . 35-36 Gray, Eileen. . . . . . . . . . . 128 Gwathmey, Charles. . . 1007

H Hammersley, Frederick . 96 Haring, Keith. . . . . . . . . . . 51 Herms, George . . . . . . . 1012 Hofmann, Hans. . . . . . . . 125 Honeywood, Varnette. . . 86 Hvidt, Peter. . . . . . . . . . . 138 J Jacobsen, Arne. . . . . . . . 142 Johns, Jasper. . . . 58, 1008 Johnson, Lester . . . . . 77-78 Johnston, Ynez. . . . . . 79-81 K Kagan, Vladimir. . . . 129-130 Kelly, Ellsworth. . . . . . . . 94 Kuhn, Mona . . . . . . . . . 15-16 L Lama, Omar. . . . . . . . . . . 87 LaVerne. . . . . . . . . . . 44-45 Levy, Hilda D.. . . . . . . . 69-70 Lichtenstein, Roy . . . . . 1013 Longo, Robert. . . . . . . . 1014 Lundeberg, Helen. . . 99-101 M Maloof, Sam. . . . . . . . 39-43 McCracken, John . . . . . 1015 McMakin, Roy . . . . . . 89-90 Mies van der Rohe . . . 111-112 Montenegro, Robert. . . . 149 Moore, Henry. . . . . . 74, 1016 Morley, Ivan. . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Moses, Ed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Motherwell, Robert. . . . 1017 N Nakashima, George. . . 71-73 Natzler, Gertrud & Otto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1018 Nelson, George. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118, 1019-1021 Neri, Manuel . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Neutra, Richard. . . . . . . . 113 Nevelson, Louise. . . . . 1022 Noll, Alexandre. . . . . . . . . 61 O Oldenburg, Claes. . . . . . . 52 Onslow-Ford, Gordon . . 1023 P Panton, Verner . . . . . . . . 127 Pettibon, Raymond.17, 1024 Pettibone, Richard. . 47-49

Peyton, Elizabeth. . . . . 1027 Ponti, Gio. . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Price, Ken. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Prouvé, Jean. . . . . . . 59-60 R Rivera, Diego. . . . . . 143-144 Ruppersberg, Allen. . . . 1026 Ruscha, Ed. . . . . . . . . 23-25 S Saar, Alison. . . . . . . . . . . 85 Saar, Betye. . . . . . . . . 82-84 Sampler, Marion . . . . . . . 68 Santiago, Paula. . . . . . . . 145 Shapiro, Joel. . . . . . . . . . 132 Shoemaker, Don . . . . . 1028 Siqueiros, David . . . 146-147 Soldner, Paul. . . . . . . . . 1029 Sottsass, Ettore . . . . . 1030 Sturtevant, . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Suggs, Don. . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Sultan, Donald. . . . . . . . 1031 T Teske, Edmund . . . . . . . . 110 V van Keppel, Hendrik. . . . 114 van Leyden, Karin. . . . . . 46 Vasa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 W Warhol, Andy. . 53-54, 1032 Weatherford, Mary. . . . . . . 6 Wegner, Hans . . . . . . . 139-140, 1033-1034 Wilke, Hannah. . . . . . . . . . 12 Woelffer, Emerson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65-67, 1035 Wood, Jonas . . . . . . . . . . . . 5


INFORMATION

DIRECTIONS TO LAMA AUCTION & PREVIEW

Auction

STAFF Peter Loughrey

Sunday, February 16, 2020

From Hollywood

Director,

12pm (PT)

• Make your way to the 101 Freeway

Art & Design

Proceed North on the 101 Preview

• Merge onto the 405 Freeway,

Shannon Loughrey

February 7 - 15, 2020

north

President

10am–6pm (PT)

• Take the 4th exit onto “Sherman Way, west”

Carolina Ivey

Address

• Proceed west on Sherman Way

Managing Director

16145 Hart Street

• Turn left at the 3rd light onto

Van Nuys, CA 91406

“Woodley”

Clo Pazera

• Take the first right onto “Hart”

Specialist

Telephone

street, which is a side street

323.904.1950

Joe Alascano From the Westside

Jose Ramirez

Website

• Take the 405 Freeway, north

Shipping

LAModern.com

Continue past the Getty Museum and the 101 Interchange

Jamie Shi

• Exit onto “Sherman Way,

Cataloguer

west” (this is 4 exits North of the 101)

Codie Lyons

• Proceed west on Sherman

Consignor Services

Way • Turn left at the 3rd light

Kimberly Megowan

onto “Woodley”

Client Services

• Take the first right onto “Hart” street, which is a side

Rachel Jones

street

Marketing & Communications Susan Einstein

LAMA MAP

Robert Wedemeyer Photographers

VAN NUYS AIRPORT

Kathryn Hanlon-Hall

HART ST

SEPULVEDA BLVD

405 FREEWAY

LAMA

Writer

WOODLEY AVE

VALJEAN AVE

SHERMAN WAY

101 FREEWAY WOODLAND HILLS HOLLYWOOD

N

GETTY MUSEUM


$35.00 ISBN 978-0-9987036-2-6

53500

9 780998 703626 16145 HART STREET, VAN NUYS, CA 91406 | T 323-904-1950 | F 323-904-1954 | LAMODERN.COM

PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES

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