Page 1

MON TUES WED THUR

62˚- 49˚ 60˚- 51˚ 60˚- 53˚ 61˚- 53˚

ESTABLISHED 1921 March 26, 2012 Volume 90, Issue 38 Your Home. Your Voice. Your News.

Loyola Marymount University

www.laloyolan.com

Loyola Law adresses allegations of fraud

Loyola Law School is on a list of institutions that lawyers plan to sue by Memorial Day weekend. By Laura Riparbelli Senior Editor

Liana Bandziulis | Loyolan

Collegefest showcases The Hush Sound and Gym Class Heroes Approximately 3,700 people attended Collegefest 2012 yesterday in Gersten Pavilion, according to ASLMU. In addition to listening to the bands, students could engage in a variety of activities, including getting their faces painted, buying items from food trucks outside and posing for pictures in a photobooth. For more photos of Collegefest, see Page 9.

LMU hosts Urban Economic Forum Earvin “Magic” Johnson and the U.S. Secretary of Labor are two of the speakers at the White House event. By Zaneta Pereira News Editor

As a five-time NBA champion, Earvin “Magic” Johnson may not be the first name one thinks of in connection with urban entrepreneurship. However, after basketball, Johnson commited himself to developing businesses in urban communities. His successes and business acumen led to his selection to participate in a panel discussion about urban

entrepreneurship at last Thursday’s White House Urban Economic Forum. The event, which saw a flood of local business owners, government officials and students stream into Gersten Pavilion, was the third in a series being hosted in cities around the country and was presented in collaboration by the White House Business Council, the U.S. Small Business Administration and L.A. Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa. The former basketball star, along with U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis, spoke as part of the event’s opening panel, which was loosely centered on the idea of building a profile of the urban entrepreneur. Johnson drew heavily on his personal experience of

leveraging his “brand in sports” to build his brand in business. Specifically, Johnson stressed the importance of understanding one’s customer, providing concrete examples from his own experiences of opening movie theaters and Starbucks coffee shops in predominantly black urban areas of L.A. “I didn’t build a business and say, ‘Oh I hope they come,’” he said. “Instead, I built a business where I asked the community what they needed and brought it to them.” Johnson also provided practical advice for the many small business owners attending the forum, and said, “If you want retention,

See Forum | Page 5

Community collaborates to serve less fortunate FIRST-PERSON FEATURE

A student details her varied experiences during the Centennial National Day of Service. By Whitney Wozniak Contributor

In continuation of a year packed with celebrations and traditions, this Saturday marked LMU’s Centennial National Day of Service, providing students, faculty, staff and alumni with opportunities to not only serve together in four locations across Los Angeles, but in cities across the country as well. (For photos from the Centennial National Day of Service, see

Page 2) My Saturday began at 7 a.m. at the Midnight Mission in Los Angeles, a support center that provides resources and daily meals for the homeless men, women, and children that currently live on Skid Row. As a member of the committee for the Centennial National Day of Service, I was prepared for the expected activities of the day: serving meals, assembling toiletry kits for the inhabitants of Skid Row and providing the community with live music, courtesy of Mane Entertainment. I expected a busy day, but what I hadn’t expected was the community and collaboration that I witnessed amongst my peers and colleagues with the

See Service | Page 4

IS YOUR TATTOO RINGING?

See Law | Page 3

Kenzie O’Keefe | Loyolan

Students gather to honor Trayvon Martin LMU community members pause to reflect on the murder of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old boy whose killer, George Zimmerman, has yet to be charged. To read the Loyolan’s Board Editorial on this issue, see Page 6.

Index

Classifieds.............................5 Opinion Intern Amanda Kotch Opinion...............................6 Coffee Break.........................8 argues that Nokia's new A&E..................................9 patent is too “Big Sports..............................16

Opinion, Page 7

Loyola Law School has been named as one of 20 law schools that a group of lawyers are planning to sue for fraud based on allegations that the institutions fabricate their postgraduation employment success rates. The lawsuits claim that law schools collect and report inaccurate information regarding post-graduation employment rates by including both law-related and non-law related jobs in their statistics. This, according to the plaintiffs, gives students false hope and leads law school graduates to erroneously believe the job market will be highly favorable to them come graduation time when, in reality, this is not the case, according to plaintiffs. Fourteen class action lawsuits have been filed to date, one of which was thrown out of a New York court on March 21. The lawyers plan to sue multiple law schools every few months, and Loyola Law School is on the list of the next 20 that the litigators plan to go after, which lawyers announced earlier this month. David Anziska is one of the lawyers spearheading the motions, along with a consortium of other litigators and law firms. “We’re hoping to sue 20 law schools throughout the country by hopefully Memorial Day weekend, and Loyola is one of the schools,” he told the Loyolan. “Hopefully in the next few months we will have sued 35 law schools throughout the country.” Anziska said that the targeted law schools were chosen for a variety of reasons including location, the area’s saturation of law students and the marks that the schools claimed. Loyola Law School reports on their website that 94.07 percent of graduates are employed following graduation either in full-time or

Brother.”

The next issue of the Loyolan will be printed on March 29, 2012.

SOPHOMORE SETS SIGHTS HIGH Men's basketball guard Anthony Ireland looks to build off a successful season.

Sports, Page 16


N ews LMU honors Centennial National Day of Service March 26, 2012 Page 2

Sophomore communication studies major Aili Watanabe (left) and sophomore English major Erin Callier serve food as a part of Midnight Mission during the Centennial National Day of Service.

www.laloyolan.com

One of the major events taking place during this year’s Centennial National Day of Service is Community Day, an event that brings LMU students together with children and adults from El Espejo.

Children from El Espejo are treated to cotton candy, balloon animals, soccer games, face painting and inflatable bounce houses on Hannon Field.

Junior sociology and African American studies double major Michelle Brown joins other members of the LMU community to serve hot dogs, hamburgers and other foods to the inhabitants of Skid Row.

Senior communication studies major Hilary Khoury hands out food and care packages at the Midnight Mission cookout.

Relay for Life, held this past weekend at Lawton Plaza, is part of a national 24-hour fundraiser supporting victims of cancer. The annual event helps to raise awareness and money through walking.

Candles, known as luminaria bags, light up the night of Relay for Life in honor of the victims of cancer. Students light candles for their friends and family affected by the disease. The candles are arranged in the form of the breast cancer awareness symbol, and all students participating are invited to light them.

For Community Day, LMU students, including members of Underwings Praxis, make fresh popcorn for El Espejo children. Photos: Leah Hubbard, Kellie Rowan | Loyolan

Relay for Life raises money and awareness

Stations line the walking path to give participants somewhere to rest while walking. Greek Life and other on-campus organizations, including Delta Sigma Pi (above), represent their organizations both at their camps and as part of the group walk.

To keep up their energy for the duration of the walk, participants join teams so they can take turns walking and resting during the event. Photos: Abbey Nelson | Loyolan


www.laloyolan.com

News

March 26, 2012 Page 3

Students are asked to look for alternative weekend activites Student Affairs challenges students to take a weekend off from drinking alcohol.

By Brigette Scobas Human Resources Coordinator | Asst. News Editor

This upcoming weekend will include a first for LMU. Students are being asked by the Division of Student Affairs to partake in a sober or binge-free weekend called “Take the Challenge” from Thursday, March 29 through Sunday, April 1. “It’s teaching our students to drink responsibly and that there are other alternatives to campus life that are not alcohol-related,” said Anthony Garrison-Engbrecht, the director of LGBT and off-campus student life and one of the planners of the weekend. This is not the first time other universities have partaken in similar weekends. According to Garrison-Engbrecht the University of Colorado and UC Berkeley, among other colleges, have also participated in sober weekends. Students, staff and faculty may sign up and pledge to be sober or binge-free for the weekend and will receive a wristband at Convo on Thursday that shows they have pledged. Student organizations had the opportunity to sign up as a group until last Friday, according Garrison-Engbrecht. They do not expect everyone to join, even if an individual is part of an organization that signed up. But, according to AJ LaPan, cofounder of and planner for FirstYear Experience, “It could be a good conversation starter like, ‘Why

aren’t you doing it?’” According to the Pilotcatholicnews. com article by Marylynn G. Hewitt, “Campus programs tackling issues of alcohol abuse, binge drinking,” which featured Loyola Marymount University, in 2002, 26 students were hospitalized for alcohol abuse after a Charter Ball, an event which no longer occurs. Along with a request from the Division of Student Affairs, Garrison-Engbrecht said that past incident is one of the things that has propelled the weekend. In the online article from Pilotcatholicnews.com, Justin Hummer, the assistant director of Heads UP Research Lab at LMU is quoted as saying “The fact of the matter is young people drink, and people under 21 drink and with the college lifestyle, I don’t think that will change anytime soon.” Garrison-Engbrecht and LaPan, along with the other planner of the weekend, Josie Ahlquist, associate director of Campus Recreation, are hoping students will realize there are more things to do on campus during the weekends than drink and if one chooses to drink, they do so responsibly. “It’s not making it an artificial weekend,” said LaPan. “There’s the assumption or status quo that the weekend is for drinking, but [there] are other alternatives.” “It’s not a crazy idea to not drink for a weekend or just have one drink,” said Ahlquist. The weekend is comprised of various activities across campus, some of which include, a “Fear Factor” challenge in Sullivan Lounge put on by the Housing

Program Assistants, a movie in the DejaView Movie Lounge on Friday as well as a comedy show with Mission Improbable in the Living Room at 8 p.m., various sports games on Saturday and Mass and a closing ceremony on Sunday. Organizations that sign up also have the chance to receive grants to put on their own events during that weekend. “I think it’s a good idea, but I think it’s hard for groups to put on events [and] I think [“Take the Challenge”] should have put on more events,” said sophomore business major Hannah Hauserman. “But, it’s something our school needs because a lot of people think there’s nothing to do unless you’re drunk, but I think there should be another reason why people should want to go out and do it … like a weekend that was alcohol-free to raise money for drug abuse victims.” Hauserman also posed the idea to have no Greek organizations throw parties as a way to get more people to be involved. However, Hauserman does not think enough people know enough about the event to get involved. “I think it would be fun but I’d have to talk to people to see who would do it with me because I don’t want to do it by myself,” said Hauserman. LaPan hopes students like Hauserman will hold one other accountable and sign up together. “Maybe giving it up for a weekend can be a start of a new positive habit for students,” said LaPan. For more information on the event, visit the Facebook page at Facebook.com/TTCLMU.

Law school says suit is ‘meritless’ Law from Page 1

part-time legal positions or nonlegal jobs. “Loyola has very high ranks and we just feel that that just cannot be possible,” said Anziska. Some Loyola Law students remain skeptical that plaintiffs will emerge victorious if and when the case goes to court. One recent Loyola Law School graduate, who asked to remain anonymous, received his degree almost a year ago and is still looking for a permanent job in entertainment law. He currently fills his time doing contract work and pro bono projects on the side. However, he said that he’s not surprised to still be out of work and blames the difficulty of breaking into the entertainment law industry, as well as the economy, claiming that friends who went to higher-ranked law schools have also come up dry in their job searches. “I wouldn’t be surprised if Loyola Law School is doing things to increase their standings in the community. I personally don’t see any indication that that’s been done. The woman that runs postcareer counseling seems very on top of her game. But, I wouldn’t be shocked, because I know how the law school bureaucracy is,” he said. Loyola Law School vehemently

denies allegations that their numbers misreport the facts and claims that the suit, should it be filed, will have no merit. “The threatened suit against Loyola is meritless. Loyola has not, and obviously could not, guarantee anyone a job. All data Loyola reported concerning employment of its graduates has been in compliance with the standards of the American Bar Association (ABA), the accrediting agency for U.S. law schools,” read an official statement from Loyola Law School emailed to the Loyolan. Another recent graduate of Loyola Law School, who also asked to remain anonymous, received his diploma in May of 2011 and told the Loyolan he has passed the bar, but is still looking for a job. He’s currently working through a temp agency, which has placed him at a government agency doing legal work, but he does not operate as an attorney. He said the problem lies within the ABA. “The ABA rules are just too broad, and the ABA should be held responsible. I don’t fault the schools when the definition of ‘employment’ is far too wide,” he said. California state Senator Barbara Boxer has been fairly vocal on the topic, urging the ABA to rethink their guidelines for job placement rates. She sent

several letters to ABA President Stephen Zack last year asking for transparency, and the association responded by tightening up some of the guidelines for collecting data. But the recent graduate who works via a temp agency said it shouldn’t be California lawmakers working to solve the problem. “People within the industry should have a vested interest in this. That’s the state bars. They shouldn’t want people going to law school when they shouldn’t be and they shouldn’t be saying the job market is great when it’s not. The stats need to be more accurate,” he said. The other recent grad searching for a job in entertainment law points out that the economic downturn, which is currently enduring an 8.3 percent unemployment rate as of February of this year, isn’t going to be exclusive to law students. “I’m not entirely surprised right now with what I’m going through. It’s generally more difficult to get into entertainment law, and I knew that going into it. … I know the economy was better three or four years ago at the time I entered law school, so I’m sure post-grad employment stats were different then. I think some of it was bad timing on my part,” he said. Loyola Law School maintains that it works to provide for its graduates. “While Loyola has not guaranteed anyone a job, it works hard to prepare its students to pass the bar exam and pursue successful careers. For more than 90 years, thousands of Loyola graduates have done exactly that,” said the official statement from Loyola Law School. “The recent economic recession hit the job market for lawyers hard, as it did the entire economy. Loyola will continue to do all it can to help its graduates and current students succeed.”

Ricky Randle

Ricky Randle (right), talks with “Today Show” anchor Natalie Morales about the benefits for parents in staying updated on modern technological trends.

11 Burning Questions with a ‘Today Show’ guest

This issue, News Intern Audrey Valli sits down with senior communication studies major and “Today Show’”guest Ricky Randle to talk about his experience working with social media and technology. 1. For those who haven’t seen your “Today Show” debut, on which segment were you featured? I was featured on the “Teen Talk: Social Media” segment of the “Today Show,” explaining how adults and anyone who is not familiar with new technology can get in the know about the latest apps and games for Apple and Android products. 2. Do you feel the “Teen Talk” segment is beneficial for parents in search of advice on connecting to teens? I definitely think that the segment is beneficial for parents, because it is a chance for them to get into the minds of young adults and understand what teens are dealing with in this generation. This will help lead to stronger relationships with [parents] and also help them with their communication. 3. Why were you initially asked to be on the “Today Show” and what was the selection process like? I had the opportunity to be selected for the “Today Show” because Collin Hinds of LMU connected me to alumni Renata and Ken Simril. They were able to get me an interview with the producer of the “Today Show,” who selected me to be a part of the Teen Talk segment because of the experience I have acquired working with social media and technology. 4. Did you have any personal motivation to promote the apps you chose to talk about? I decided to talk about Voxer, because not only is it a great application to use, it was not fully known by everyone. It was a chance for people to learn about a great new application that can be beneficial and create a fun new way to communicate with others. 5. How do you find new apps? I am always looking for new apps to download on my phone and finding new ways to connect with my friends. It’s interesting to see how different apps can change the way we communicate with others. 6. Do you use Voxer to talk to your friends? I use Voxer all the time to talk to my friends. It’s a great new way to chat and stay updated with everyone that I know. It is faster and provides a way to eliminate the miscommunication that can sometimes arise through text messaging. 7. How do you plan to apply your familiarity with apps once you graduate? I want to go into broadcasting, and dealing with that, you deal with all types of technology. Dealing with social media and apps are very important in the entertainment field, to keeping connections with people and being on the frontlines of the status quo’s new trends. 8. How would you describe your experience as a “Today Show” guest? The experience on the “Today Show” was one of the highlights of my college career. I had the chance not only to be on national television, but to learn more about how news shows are produced on a bigger platform. I also had the opportunity to meet Trayvon Martin’s parents. This was great because of the universal bond [his death] brought to our society, [how we’ve] come together and stand for justice. 9. Have you received a lot of recognition on campus for you appearance on the show? Many of the faculty members and students were able to view the show, so it was great to know I had much support from the LMU community. It was a way to bring awareness to the great programs I am a part of: the communication studies department, African-American Alumni Association and Senior Class Gift Committee. 10. Are there any other apps you would recommend to LMU students? There are many apps that are popular and are being used by everyone – I would definitely recommend Instagram, or a game that people are becoming addicted to called Draw Something. 11. And last but not least – who did you mention received 20 million points on Temple Run? One of my friends from back home has been determined to get the highest score he could for two weeks straight. He could only get around six or seven million, then one day he got on a roll and racked up 20 million points! Guess that’s why the game can be addicting to some people. Once you start, you just can’t stop.


News

2012

March 26, 2012 Page 4

12

UNDERGRADUATE

RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

10

40 35 30 25

8

15

4

10

2

5

0

0

AB C D E F GH I J K L MNO P Q R A B C D E F G H I J K

English classics sociology economics history psychology liberal studies political science film

L M N O P Q R

music business natural science athletic training computer science biology physics

PRESENTERS’ MAJORS communication studies animation

By Jacob Stone News Intern

A B C D E F G H Graphic Design A graphic design B C D E F G

I J K L

political science | economics center for the study of Los Angeles international affairs health psychology

sociology | education | urban studies | enviornmental sustainability H natural science | physics I biology J chemistry | biochemistry K mathematics L engineering

POSTERS BY TOPIC

Graphic: Joanie Payne | Loyolan

Students present at Undergraduate Research Symposium Nearly 300 students from all five undergraduate colleges delivered both oral and poster presentations at the fourth annual Undergraduate Research Symposium last Friday in U-Hall. The graphic above displays the various disciplines that were represented by student presentations.

Student immerses herself in Skid Row culture

Service from Page 1

Midnight Mission staff and community as a whole. I began the day with approximately 15 other LMU volunteers, who worked laboriously in an assembly line opening up packages of lip balm, shampoo, toothbrushes and other essential toiletries, to create kits for the Skid Row population. I asked a Midnight Mission staff member how many people he expected to show up to pick up the hygiene products and a meal consisting of hamburgers and hot dogs. As the other volunteers and I opened numerous boxes of toiletries, the staff member expressed a deep excitement for the nearly 2,000 inhabitants he expected to arrive that day. For me, the number 2,000, speaking in terms of homelessness, served as fuel to work even faster. I watched as my fellow volunteers worked quickly and tirelessly to assure that every person would receive their share of the amenities. Serving on the committee allowed me to view the day from two perspectives. I witnessed the first half of the day with the set-up crew in the morning, where the toiletry bags were assembled. A balloon arch was created by LMU students for the stage and where President and CEO of Midnight Mission, Larry Adamson, spoke to the crowd about the existing relationship between Midnight Mission and LMU volunteers. The second half of the day saw the serving of meals outside for the event attendees, the distribution of the toiletry kits and, to my surprise, a dance party where LMU volunteers, Skid Row inhabitants and Midnight Mission staff joined together on 6th Street to show off their moves. When the live performances were finished,

Event showcases Filipino culture Student-run Isang Bansa presents “Through the Lens” soap opera presentation.

20

6

www.laloyolan.com

Mane Entertainment staff served as DJs for the dancers in front of the stage where everyone came together to dance to The Jackson 5, Usher and various other upbeat artists. In a reflection that took place with members of the LMU community after the event, Director of Government and Community Affairs at the Midnight Mission Mai Lee told LMU volunteers that a woman known as the meanest and grumpiest woman on Skid Row spent this Saturday dancing and actually smiling because of the festivities that occurred that day. Having participated in the dance party myself, I could never guess which woman she was talking about. The reflection, given by Center for Service and Action Director Pam Rector, and Lee’s comments after the event brought LMU volunteers together to think a little more deeply about the experience. Rector asked everyone in the room to close their eyes and think about an image or an experience they had during the day of service. Hundreds of images flashed through my mind. I immediately pictured a pregnant woman with her two children collecting toiletry kits, a man mourning the loss of his stolen possessions, LMU community members hugging men and women on the streets of Skid Row, a man encouraging LMU volunteers to join him as he danced to Michael Jackson, and finally, a Midnight Mission staff member and recovering addict choking up at the sight of smiles, diversity, collaboration and community in one of the largest homeless areas in the United States. The Midnight Mission functions as a symbol of hope for many individuals living on the streets of Skid Row. LMU’s participation in a day of

service within this incredible environment reassures me yet again that LMU is a pretty fantastic community to be a part of. To conclude our reflection, Pam Rector asked us to hold on to the images that we witnessed that day and keep them forever in our hearts. In my heart, I will keep this day as a reminder of what our school represented that day: A symbol of hope and community that spread smiles across hundreds of faces, proving the existence of a reciprocal nature created by touching the heart of another human being – even if that individual happens to live on the streets in Los Angeles.

Hundreds gathered in Burns Back Court Saturday, March 24 at 6:30 p.m. for the annual Pilipino Cultural Night. Presented by LMU’s Isang Bansa, a Filipino and FilipinoAmerican student group, the night is in its 21st year. This year’s production was titled “Through the Lens” and was entirely student-run by Isang Bansa. “Through the Lens” was presented in four acts, focusing on the lives of those involved in a Filipino teleserye, or soap opera. Each character faces the struggles of finding oneself, identifying and fitting in with one’s heritage and the values of self-worth. “The theme of our play is about being true to your own identity and with this experience, we have grown more into the people we want to be,” sophomore studio art major Sara Layon and sophomore film production major Sarah Bush, both directors and co-writers of the production, stated in the show’s program. But “Through the Lens” offered more than a play; rather, an allencompassing look at Filipino culture. Intermittent dance numbers were arranged throughout. A thirtyminute pre-show came before the production, featuring modern and traditional Filipino dance and song. “All of us do it to share our culture with you,” said Cassey Gatchalian, president of Isang Bansa and a junior physics major. “Through the Lens” centers around a heartthrob teleserye star, Piolo Pascual (played by sophomore natural science major Steven Munassi), a shy scriptwriter from America named Bea (played by freshman liberal studies major Ruby-Ann Manalaysay) who struggles to fit in, a lonely cameraman, Eric (played by senior marketing major Bao Duong), a hasbeen actress named Gloria (played by sophomore English major Kelly Kawaguchi) and a wisdomdispensing janitor who serves as the moral center of the play, Mang Bert (played by freshman civil engineering major Michael Mookie Manalli). The show consists of the trials and tribulations of the five

main characters and the search to find a true self. Isang Bansa is a Filipino and Filipino-American organization at LMU, and was established in 1990. Through six focus areas of nationalism, social, art, spirituality, academia and social justice, Isang Bansa seeks to “allow its members to immerse themselves into the Filipino and Filipino-American culture,” according to the event program. “Isang Bansa is more than a Filipino club, it’s a family,” said junior marketing major and vice president of the organization Joseph Villarosa. During the evening Isang Bansa talked of their partnership with the Search to Involve FilipinoAmericans (SIPA). Ten percent of the ticket sales from the “Through the Lens” were donated to SIPA, helping to “provide health and human services as well as community economic development and arts/cultural programs to … Filipino Americans all over Los Angeles County,” the show’s program stated. Towards the end of the show, the characters seem lost. But, Mang Bert reassures them, echoing the theme of the entire night: “You all have something beautiful to offer the world, and that is simply yourself.”

Kellie Rowan | Loyolan

Senior business major Sandra Mercado choreographed and performed in the Kasingkil dance in Pilipino Cultural Night on Saturday.

details


www.laloyolan.com

Employment

Classifieds

SUMMER DAY CAMPS Counselors, Instructors for swimming, horses, beach activities, sports, arts & crafts, nature, ropes courses, archery and much more. Camps located throughout greater Los Angeles Area. www.daycampjobs.com Personal Assistant needed to organize and help. Basic computer skills needed, good with organization. We are ready to pay $850 per week. Interested person should work fleible hours with the potential to earn six figures. Clean driving record, drug test required, Email your resume for consideration: dawsoneterpriselimiteds@gmail.com SUMMER JOBS: FUN & FRIENDS! Get paid to spend your summer playing outdoors! Enthusiastic, motivated, and reliable Day Camp Staff & Swim Instructors needed for summer 2012. Visit www.pbcstaff.com Childcare Providers Babysitting Service seeks experienced reliable on-call childcare providers. Must be energetic & fun-loving. Must speak fluent English, have CPR/First-Aid card. Own car and insurance a must. ECE units preferred. $12-13/hr. Call or email Kerri @ 310.545.5181 Boomlet@cs.com

News

On Campus NA KOLEA LU`AU. March 31. 4:00 PM. Lawton Plaza. Tickets on sale at Convo 3/22, 27, 29 and at Lawton Plaza 3/30 afternoon and 3/31. Good food. Great Entertainment. Unforgettable fun.

RATES

March 26, 2012 Page 5

Speakers hail L.A.’s diversity and entrepreneurial spirit Forum from Page 1 the only way you’re going to get it is to over deliver.” In his introduction, the event’s emcee and Executive Director of the White House Business Council, Ari Matusiak, described entrepreneurship as “the engine that’s driving growth in this country” and both Solis and

Johnson also stressed the role ethnic minorities played as part of the entrepreneurial engine. “We have a lot of jobs for people in urban America. We have to get our people trained to be ready for those jobs,” Solis said. Johnson reflected that the difficulties he faced starting his business because of the unwillingness of institutional

1-35 words: $10 36-50 words: $15 Additional words: $40

First line bolded: $1 All bolded: $2 visit www.laloyolan.com

and select ‘Classifieds’ from the Advertising Tab to set up your account

TODAY!

Kenzie O’Keefe | Loyolan

Five-time NBA champion and former-Laker Earvin “Magic” Johnson speaks about the importance of investing in urban America.

capital to invest in urban America, stating that “the door is open for us, so we’ve got to take advantage of it and we’ve got to put people of color to work.” This discussion built off the event’s opening remarks, which were delivered by LMU President David W. Burcham and Villaraigosa. Villaraigosa hailed the forum as “thwe perfect opportunity for us to leverage our assets” and stressed that these assets included L.A.’s diverse ethnic background. This point was echoed by Burcham, who highlighted LMU’s commitment to reflect the city’s diversity in the University’s student body and to ensure that “academic excellence and diversity are not two different aspects of higher education.” Apart from the panel featuring Johnson and Solis, the event also included panels with successful entrepreneurs such as healthcare pioneer and philanthropist Patrick Soon-Shiong and Roberto Barragan, the president of Valley Economic Development Center, the largest small, nonprofit business development in Metropolitan L.A. Additionally, action workshops and a business expo were also open to attendees. Villaraigosa described L.A. as “the center of small business, … the entrepreneurial city” and the men and women who responded enthusiastically to Johnson’s account of building his successful business testified to the entrepreneurial spirit that’s flourishing in the city.


Opinion Student Editorials and Perspectives

March 26, 2012 Page 6

Board Editorial

Rule of Thumb

Board Editorials represent the voice of the Loyolan. They are written in collaboration by the Executive Editorial Board. Michael Goldsholl Managing Editor

Adrien Jarvis Editor in Chief

The Loyolan’s Executive Editorial Board weighs in on current topics of discussion.

Collegefest 2012: Lots of hoops, little payoff This year’s Collegefest, featuring Gym Class Heroes and The Hush Sound, finally came together yesterday afternoon in Gersten Pavilion. Inclement weather forced the show inside, and opening act scheduling troubles plagued organizers throughout the past week. The Loyolan commends ASLMU for pulling the show off despite the hurdles, but unfortunately, the show itself was lacking. Considering the long wait to find out which acts would be playing thanks to ASLMU’s “2,012 Likes” plan, Collegefest needed to be a truly showstopping occasion, and it simply fell short due to the low, disjointed energy of the headliner’s performance and an opening act that performed for less than half an hour. Thumbs sideways for a well-intentioned accomplishment that never quite came together as desired.

Kevin O’Keeffe Managing Editor

Brigette Scobas Human Resources Coordinator | Asst. News Editor

Skin color should not determine status

It’s nearly impossible to read the news right now and not see a story about Trayvon Martin. Martin was a 17-year-old black, teenage male who, while walking home on Feb. 26 from a local 7-Eleven in Sanford, Fla., was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, a self-appointed neighborhood watch captain (See “Off the Bluff: Martin murder becomes national issue” on the Loyolan’s News Blog). Zimmerman, who claimed self-defense even though Martin was not armed, has yet to be charged in the case. Martin’s slaying has captured national attention, sparking outcry and protests across the country – including on LMU’s campus – because many speculate the killing was racially motivated. Last Thursday, students were invited by the Office of Black Student Services to “Black Out Convo,” which meant showing up in Alumni Mall dressed in all black to take a stand against the injustice in Martin’s death. President Barack Obama also recognized the injustice in his first public comments regarding the issue on March 23 by saying: “If I had a son, he would look like Trayvon. … I can only imagine what these parents are going through. And when I think about this boy, I think about my own kids.” The reaction to Martin’s death only highlights how prevalent racial stereotyping is in today’s society. That’s why it is critical for the betterment and progression of the nation that everyone takes action to spread awareness about the injustices associated with stereotyping. As the March 24 ABC News article “Trayvon Martin: African American moms warn teen sons”

www.laloyolan.com

articulates, racial profiling occurs even when it is not making national headlines. According to the article, “A Justice Department study found that black males were three to four times more likely to have police threaten or use force against them than their white counterparts.” This isn’t something just relegated to the suburbs of Florida – it’s a timeless issue that is present in Southern California too, with some members of the LMU community being subjected to such treatment. “I have been pulled over, unfortunately, too many times. I can’t give you a number. And they have always been for no reason – except for, I think, the color of my skin, or the clothes I was wearing that day. … I always question myself. Is my seatbelt on? Are one of my headlights out? But that’s never the case,” said now-senior communication studies major Ajaya Ram in the Oct. 11, 2010 Loyolan article “Panel to address racial profiling.” Although Zimmerman has not admitted to being motivated by racial bias to pursue and kill Martin, the Loyolan believes it’s vital that Zimmerman goes to trial for Martin’s death to uncover the truth. The LMU community should take the time to sign the petition calling for justice and Zimmerman’s prosecution – which can be found at Change.org. And regardless, it’s necessary that we capitalize on the national attention given to racial profiling to help combat it. The time is past due that we, as a community, prove that skin color should not determine one’s status in society by insisting that justice is served for the seemingly senseless murder of Trayvon Martin.

Stereotyping insult to Black History Month The Western Union Elementary School in North Carolina’s Union County sent home a letter that suggested students wear “animal print” clothing in celebration of Black History Month. According to Wsoctv.com,the letter reads,“We are encouraging students to dress in ‘African-American attire.’ If you do not have this,students could wear animal print clothing or shirts with animals native to Africa.” Black History Month is a celebration of black American citizens who struggled against racism and discrimination to gain equality in America. Wearing animal print as a way to celebrate Black History Month is truly uninformed. Thumbs down to Western Union Elementary School’s ignorance and its inability to admit its wrongdoing, as they simply wrote the letter off as “poorly worded.”

Employers want in on your Facebook The next time you’re applying for a job, don’t be surprised if you’re asked in your interview for your Facebook login information. That’s what happened to Justin Bassett, a statistician from New York City who withdrew his application after a potential employer wanted the key to his social media kingdom, according to the March 21 Associated Press article “What’s on your Facebook page? Employers want to know,” by Manuel Valdes and Shannon McFarland. A debate has broken out about the legality of this practice, with some like George Washington University law professor Orin Kerr calling it “an egregious privacy violation.” Legal or not, the idea of employers having open access to your Facebook account is more than a little unethical and opens the door for dozens of potential forms of hiring discrimination. Thumbs down to a job market that expects you to expose your personal life for a professional opportunity.

Life is not G-rated forever

A

rizona has managed to amaze once again. The old “let’s-act-without-thinking” mentality has struck again, and its victims this time are public school students. Arizona is attempting to pass a bill that will make profanity in all public classrooms illegal. T h e “G-rated” bill was introduced by Republican State Senator Run ‘n Tell Dat Lori Klein after a parent comBy Kim Tran plained about Opinion Editor a high school teacher using profanity in the presence of her child. Klein then decided that the best way to deal with the situation was to outlaw any explicit language in any public classroom. You might think this is a bit rash, and you would be correct. Senate Bill 1476 states that, “If a person who provides classroom instruction in a public school engages in speech or conduct that would violate the standards adopted by the federal communications commission concerning obscenity, indecency and profanity if that speech or conduct were broadcast on television or radio,” and three offenses would lead to termination. Public educational institutions, including universities, would fall under this jurisdiction in the state of Arizona. First of all, the language of the bill doesn’t distinguish between obscenities in the classroom and actions elsewhere. A teacher can be punished for swearing outside of the classroom and theoretically in his or her own home.

Second, I can see how this law would serve a purpose in preschool and elementary classrooms where profanities shouldn’t be used. Kids are impressionable, and at an age where life is dandy and there are no worries, G-rated language is appropriate. But life is not G-rated forever. Not for adults and for young adults, 75 percent of whom, according to an Associated Press-Ipsos poll, encounter profanity in public constantly and 64 percent of whom use the F-word. The bill would also ban anything obscene or indecent that could not be said on television or radio. A multitude of terms fall under this umbrella, but that doesn’t mean the language doesn’t hold merit in college classrooms. What about medical classes in which sexual behavior must be discussed? There is a bounty of things that would be considered obscene and not allowed on prime-time television that are essential to higher learning. In the Feb. 10 Inside Higher Ed article by Mitch Smith, “WTF, Arizona” (but really, WTF?), Timothy Secomb, a University of Arizona physiology professor, said, “If I was talking about the spread of sexually transmitted disease … then one has to talk about the ways people have sex. There’s no way around that. Basically, these rules would interfere with normal and necessary education of our students.” The bill would also punish teachers and professors who use books or films in the classroom that contain any profanity. If I recall correctly, almost every book I read in high school contained some profanity, including classics such as “The Catcher in the Rye” and “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” Are we not all adults in the higher education system? If most col-

lege students are allowed to watch R-rated movies, have sex and buy lottery tickets, cigarettes and alcohol, I highly doubt profanity in the classroom is going to lead to any detrimental corruption. It seems that all Sen. Klein is trying to do is shield students from the real world they are inevitably going to be exposed to, while also limiting teachers’ abilities to instruct what they want and need to teach. This is all quite ironic as another bill under debate, House Bill 2675, would require all Arizona undergraduate students at the three state universities to contribute at least $2,000 to the cost of their education, unless they are athletes. So now, students have to up their debt to get a higher education, the quality of which could be diminished by the G-rated bill in order to have thicker skin? State Rep. Michelle Ugenti (R-Scottsdale) responded: “Welcome to life.” Perhaps these lawmakers and representatives ought to take a look at real life. These two bills are first of all contradictory, and secondly, are poorly thought out to the point where they would only cause more trouble. Issues cannot simply be solved by ambiguous laws such as these. Banning profanity and obscenity in any classroom because of a complaint against foul language is not a viable solution. Forcing students to pay extra for their tuition in order to “appreciate it more” will keep more students from receiving an education. Arizona officials need to step up and stop using simple-minded proposals to address issues they seem to believe are deep. This is the opinion of Kim Tran, a sophomore marketing and communication studies double major from San Jose, Calif. Please send comments to ktran@theloyolan.com.

Loyola Marymount University

Loyolan Staff

Adrien Jarvis Michael Goldsholl Kevin O’Keeffe Brigette Scobas Margo Jasukaitis Kenzie O’Keefe Laura Riparbelli John Wilkinson Zaneta Pereira Casey Kidwell Jay Lee Brigette Scobas Jacob Stone Audrey Valli Kim Tran Joseph Demes Anna-Michelle Escher Amanda Kotch Tierney Finster Luisa Barron Christopher James Jackson Souza Nathan Dines Dan Raffety Hailey Hannan Lexi Jackson Emma Movsesian Chanel Mucci Lucy Olson Emily Rome Emily Wallace Jenny Yu Dol-Anne Asiru Alberto Gonzalez Nadine Jenson Joanie Payne Jackson Turcotte Kellie Rowan Parker Stateman Devin Sixt Leslie Irwin Weston Finfer Andrew Bentley Ian Lecklitner Kasey Eggert Kirsten Dornbush Jennifer Bruner Michael Giuntini Harrison Geron Amber Yin Isabella Cunningham Brianna Schachtell Anthony Peres Olivia Casper Andrew Sabatine Tom Nelson

Loyolan Editorial Policy

Editor in Chief The Los Angeles Loyolan, a studentManaging Editor run campus organization, publishes Managing Editor a twice weekly newspaper for the Human Resources Coordinator greater LMU community. The first copy Senior Editor is free of charge. Additional copies are Senior Editor $1 each. Paid, mailed subscriptions can Senior Editor Senior Editor be purchased through the Business News Editor department. Assistant News Editor The Loyolan accepts unsolicited Assistant News Editor letters from students, faculty, staff and Assistant News Editor alumni, and press releases from onNews Intern campus and off-campus organizations, News Intern Opinion Editor but cannot guarantee publication. Assistant Opinion Editor The Loyolan reserves the right to edit Assistant Opinion Editor or reject all submissions, including Opinion Intern advertisements, articles or other A&E Editor contributions it deems objectionable. Assistant A&E Editor The Loyolan does not print consecutive Assistant A&E Editor A&E Intern articles by the same author that Sports Editor repeat/refute the initial arguments. Assistant Sports Editor Opinions and ideas expressed in the Copy Editor Loyolan are those of individual authors, Copy Editor artists and student editors and are not Copy Editor those of Loyola Marymount University, Copy Editor Copy Editor its Board of Trustees, its student body Copy Editor or of newspaper advertisers. Board Copy Editor Editorials are unsigned and reflect Copy Editor the opinions of the Executive Editorial Design Editor Board. Guest editorials are by invitation Designer of the Executive Editorial Board and Designer Designer reflect the views of the author. Cartoon Editor All advertisements are subject to Photo Editor the current rates and policies in the Incoming Photo Editor most recent Advertising Rates and Assistant Photo Editor Information materials. Photo Intern Web Editor Assistant Web Editor Web Intern Multimedia Intern Business Director Assistant Business Director Assistant Business Director Business Intern Director of Marketing Ad Sales Representative Ad Sales Representative Ad Intern Ad Designer Senior Advertising Consultant Director of Student Media

The Los Angeles Loyolan is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press and the California College Media Association.


www.laloyolan.com

Opinion

March 26, 2012 Page 7

Technologic tattoos: Too user-friendly

O

h, technology. With you it is a love-hate relationship. I am frustrated when my iPhone battery dies too quickly and forgetful of the fact that at one point in time, having 20 applications open on a touch screen device was never a possibility. I am fascinated by innovations such as the eyewritOver a Glass er, enabling By Amanda Kotch artists diagnosed with Opinion Intern paralysis, such as L.A.based Tony Quan, to continue to create and draw using a eyemotion tracking system. But now, I’m getting freaked out: Nokia has applied for a U.S. patent for a tattoo that would alert users when their phones are ringing. Word just got out that the Finnish mobile company filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office in September of last year, with the goal of developing a tattoo that would pulse or vibrate on one’s skin whenever someone tried to contact the user’s phone. According to the March 19 Dvice article “Nokia seeks patent for ‘tattoos’ to tell you who’s calling,” by Eileen Marable, “The

idea is that a demagnetized ink would be imprinted on your skin and then re-magnetized. At that point it would be receptive to magnetic changes or signals sent from your phone and cause a ‘stimulus’ to your skin.” So basically, your wrist, shoulder or any body part you choose for that matter, would vibrate each time you received a call or text. The tattoo would even alert you to a near-dead battery. Nokia’s plan does include being permanently inked, but a second option, a type of removable badge, is also in the works. The report states that users could also set different vibration patterns for specific contacts, much like personalized ringtones. Now, I can think of about a thousand reasons why this seems like a bad idea, but let’s just name a few. For starters, no one needs to be this attached to their phone 24/7, not even the tech-crazed teens from MTV’s “True Life: I’m A Textaholic.” Albeit, there

will likely be a tattoo “on-off” switch, like for when people need to sleep and such, but what if there’s a flub in the programming? Anyone with a cell phone, which means just about everyone at LMU, can

vouch for the fact that they can be quite unreliable. They break, they die, they freeze, they don’t shut up and they may even dial your mother at the most inappropriate times. Clearly, technology has its flaws. And if the “onoff” switch decides to become “on” only, you are in for a very uncomfortable sleep. T h e n there is the health factor. Granted, I am no medical expert, but ferromag-

Jackson Turcotte | Loyolan

netic ink making my skin pulse doesn’t sound too safe. Short term, I think of possible pain and discomfort, maybe affecting other parts of the body. Try getting this cool new Nokia tat, discover later down the line you have to get an MRI, and tell me how

comfortable that feels. Unless you’re the type who happens to love a good burning sensation. Long term, it seems like a recipe for a strange form of cancer. According to the March 20 L.A. Times editorial “Excuse me, my tattoo is ringing” by Paul Whitefield, “the phone would communicate with the tattoo through magnetic waves … and the tattoo would act as a receiver.” Paying for the possibility of radiation poisoning? I’ll pass. These technology-driven tattoos seem like a step in the wrong direction. It’s impressive that it’s even possible, sure, but having a mark imprinted on your skin that can track and trace you is a terrifying prospect. While Nokia may be using it for “good,” I can envision this technology turning ugly, with certain people finding a way to contact you whom you may not even know. The merging of tech and skin could become a huge invasion of privacy. At this rate, the future will see every citizen micro-chipped and checked as if it’s the norm, while the mainstream media reports how “cool” and “innovative” it is to be living as branded cattle controlled by a few top spies. We are well on our way to a world where Big Brother isn’t just watching. Now he has, literally, gotten under our skin. This is the opinion of Amanda Kotch, a sophomore art history major from Huntington Beach, Calif. Please send comments to akotch@theloyolan.com.

Nine health tips every college girl should know

D

uring my years at LMU, and throughout my many fitness-enthused journeys, I’ve observed some of the key issues women of all ages tend to have with healthy-living basics. Here, I’ve listed some of the most common misconceptions, and how to go about building the body you’ve always wanted. 1. The elliptical should not be your By Liz Spanos best friend. Contributor Casually gliding on this beloved machine is usually not a productive use of your time in the gym, yet it’s the default for most girls. Ben Greenfield, National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) trainer and owner of the website Getfitguy.quickanddirtytips.com, states that most elliptical machines overestimate the amount of calories you burn, and that you will burn far more calories running on the treadmill or stepping on the StairMaster until your shirt is soaked in sweat. 2. You will not turn into the Incredible Hulk if you lift weights. “But I just don’t wanna look like a man.” The fact of the matter is you don’t have enough testosterone to ever look like a man, and lifting your two-pound weights isn’t doing much for you. You should lift a weight heavy enough to only allow for eight to 12 reps with good form. Heavier weights means more muscle, which

Alberto Gonzalez | Loyolan

means you burn more calories and get a sleek, toned body. 3. The “guys section” of the gym really isn’t that intimidating. Don’t be afraid to get into the weights section and really do some damage. Not sure what to lift? Bodybuilding.com has great beginner workouts, or you can hire a personal trainer at the FitWell Center for as low as $18 per session to give you a few pointers until you get the hang of it. Go ahead, slap on a pair of gloves and show the big boys what’s up. 4. Think fro-yo is a good late-

night snack? Think again. Surprise! Frozen yogurt has calories and carbs. Non-fat does not translate to non-fattening. It’s packed with sugar, which loads on the dreaded pounds more than you realize. According to Nature.com, sugar is “toxic” and “poisonous.” A small Pinkberry has 32 grams of sugar – about the amount in a donut and a half. 5. The rest of your ‘healthy’ diet could probably use a makeover. Look up the sugar, sodium and added fats in the things you think are healthy, and you may be sur-

prised. That granola and Jamba Juice just supplied you with enough sugar for the entire day, and your PowerBar is more like a Snickers. Even your Lean Cuisine has enough sodium to bloat you like a balloon. 6. Abs are built in the kitchen. While I’m talking about nutrition, do understand that doing a thousand crunches will never get you visible abs unless you burn the fat on top of them. To do that, your diet needs to be clean. This means fresh produce, lean protein, healthy fats and complex carbohydrates. Googling “Eat Clean 101” will get you more information on that than

Arnold Schwarzenegger himself would know what to do with. 7. Not eating is not cool. It pains me to hear girls talking about how they haven’t eaten anything all day as if it is some kind of fashion statement. Starving your body is ridiculously unhealthy, slows down your metabolism and actually triggers your body to store fat. If you want a lean physique, you must eat, and you should be eating many small meals throughout the day to keep your metabolism on fire. 8. Your partying habits are taking a bigger toll than you think. It’s not just the fact that each shot of vodka has 90 calories (yes, that’s right). It’s not just the sugar in your chaser. It’s not even that your pastmidnight munchies include greasy food and other high-calorie fare. It’s all that, plus the fact that alcohol decreases testosterone (the hormone that helps you build sexy muscle) and increases estrogen (the one that makes you store more fat). On top of it all, it will impair your workouts for days to come. Need I say more? 9. You can sleep your way to a better body. Getting enough sleep is crucial for building muscle, keeping your appetite at bay and making sure you stay healthy. But who’s got enough time for sleep? I know we are all busy, and I’m probably the worst offender, but it’s vital to your health to sleep well as often as you can. You will feel better, look better, think better and your body will thank you. This is the opinion of Liz Spanos, a senior finance major from Alisa Viejo, Calif. Please send comments to ktran@theloyolan.com.


March 26, 2012 Page 8

www.laloyolan.com

REDHEADS

By Jackson Turcotte, cartoon editor

Spiritual Enlightenment

Undercover Wizards

Irrational Fears

By Georgianne Henderson, staff cartoonist

By Ian Zell, staff cartoonist

By Stephanie Troncoso, staff cartoonist


Arts & Entertainment Film, Literature, Music, Restaurants and Theatre

www.laloyolan.com

March 26, 2012 Page 9

Students pack Gersten for Collegefest

Students filled Gersten Pavilion early Sunday evening to take part in ASLMU’s Collegefest. The annual event showcased performances by The Hush Sound and Gym Class Heroes, and LMU student Kyle Anderson, a senior business major, DJed before the acts. Additionally, there were food trucks, photo booths, free tank tops and towels and a beer garden. Originally scheduled to be in Sunken Garden, inclement weather conditions forced ASLMU to host the event inside. For more Collegefest photos, visit laloyolan.com or the Loyolan’s Facebook page. Photos: Devin Sixt, Liana Bandziulis, Stewart Tomassian | Loyolan


March 26, 2012 Page 10

Arts & Entertainment

www.laloyolan.com

Symposium examines ‘disruptors’ in new media Event Coverage By Christopher James Asst. A&E Editor

C

hanging technological advancements are consistently molding the film, television and media industries. Disruptors, individuals who take large risks in utilizing shifting technology to change the structure of their industry, bring about these changes. With this in mind, the School of Film and Television (SFTV) chose disruptors as the subject for their seventh annual Steed Symposium, sponsored by Michael Steed, which took place on Thursday, March 22. The panel discussion that night, “The New Disruptors: Content, Devices & Distribution,” gathered both old and new disruptors in the Ray Kurtzman Theater at Central Artists Agency to tackle key issues in the entertainment business. Moderated by Paula Wagner, a film, theater and television producer, as well as professor at LMU, the range of relevant topics included technology within the next five years, storytelling in new me-

dia and feuds between Silicon Valley technicians and Hollywood creative types. With so many people generating millions of views on YouTube for videos of cute kittens playing and pandas sneezing, the panel addressed whether amateur content at the viral level would replace professional writers. In response to this query, Ross Levinsohn, Executive Vice President for Yahoo!, said, “There is a very big distinction between context and premium content.” Sara Pollack, YouTube’s senior marketing manager, said, “People love movies and TV, but they also love babies laughing and dogs on skateboards, so we give them it all.” In catering to the diverse tastes of the viewing public, YouTube has been able to amass four billion video views per day. The first event of the Steed Symposium was “The Original Disruptor: Michael Fuchs in Conversation,” where Fuchs, former chairman and CEO of HBO, prefaced his panel appearance by speaking at the SFTV sound stage about the strength of cable. While cable does average less view-

School of Film and Television

Michael Fuchs, former CEO and chairman of HBO, was the subject of “The Original Disruptor,” as well as a panelist for “The New Disruptors.”

School of Film and Television

“The New Disruptors: Content, Devices & Distribution” panelists included (left to right) Ross Levinsohn, Lance Weiler, Sara Pollack, Moderator Paula Wagner, Michael Fuchs, Warren Lieberfarb and Rick Allen. ers than network TV, cable is more profitable because, according to Fuchs, “what has contributed to the success of cable is a financial network that is superior to networks. [Cable] has dual revenues – subscriber fees and advertising.” The profitability of cable is even further emphasized in sports cable channels. “Sports are disproportionally powerful and is not eroded by technological advancements,” said Fuchs. “ESPN has more money than Portugal and Greece.” Fuchs also spoke on the longevity of television, despite the rise in disruptors and technological advancements. “The TV business is so vital creatively and financially, that it won’t change in the near future,” said Fuchs. A disruptor can be categorized through the avenues and approaches he or she takes. According to Rick Allen, CEO of SnagFilms, “Clay Christensen, from Harvard Busi-

Compiled by: Tierney Finster | Loyolan

Graphic by: Alberto Gonzalez | Loyolan

ness School, said the way to ‘disrupt’ are in the content of product, technology that delivers faster, better and cheaper content and in creating a new business model. Hollywood looks to disrupt through the first way; Silicon Valley looks towards the second.” With such a divisive relationship in terms of technique, the panelists devised a solution to the tension between the two entities. Warren Lieberfarb, known as “The Father of DVD,” said, “If you are going to engage technologists, you need to have someone just as well versed. The problem is they aren’t coming to Hollywood to work for film and TV, and we aren’t going to Silicon Valley to work for Microsoft.” Shifting their focus to how the role of writers will change with the innovations, the speakers emphasized that the art of storytelling will be different, yet prevalent. According to Lance Weiler, an alumnus of Sundance Screen-

writers Lab who works as a screenwriter and entrepreneur, “The story part isn’t changing, the telling part is.” Weiler went on to describe one of his latest ways to blend story and technology with the formation of “Pandemic 1.0” at Sundance. “It took place over five days, people stood in what it would be like to stand in a pandemic. How does morality change over place and time? We built something with social relevance [and] we had a contextual story with it,” says Weiler. “Technology strengthens the development process. As a writer, I want to test the level of engagement.” Even with technology changing and disrupting the entertainment industry, the basic formula for making a successful product in the entertainment industry stays the same. Levinsohn admitted, “If you marry the power of marketing and quality of product, then you’ve got a hit.”

Graphic by: Alberto Gonzalez | Loyolan

Leave your winter coats and thermal gear at home - spring has arrived.The flowers are in bloom and the sun is out to greet us with the exception of a few visits from the sprinkling rain. It is time to brighten up your wardrobe with the bold and the beautiful spring color trends and prints. Get started by visiting Missselfridge.com for a wide selection of hot picks for the season. Miss Selfridge is a retail store based in the UK that provides additional online retail services for greater accessibility for shoppers around the world.This online store has everything from playsuits to swimwear. Don’t forget about those white skinny jeans packed away in your closet. Pair it with the store’s orange pussybow blouse priced around $61. For work-appropriate attire, play up a neutral outfit with a pop of bright accents.With the addition of online promotion and discounts, Miss Selfridges makes online shopping easy and affordable. Although you cannot physically try on clothes, the store does have a return policy.This online store delivers to 110 countries worldwide. Keep track of your orders and refunds online by registering to the website. You can refer to their website to see accepted payment methods. For more information about shipping policies and returns, visit the store’s online website at Missselfridge.com. – Dol-Anne Asiru, Design Editor


www.laloyolan.com

Arts & Entertainment

March 26, 2012 Page 11

Alumna to discuss her novel Auto-Tune is death to music Alumna Q&A

T

he music industry has been taken over by Auto-Tune. Musicians seem to rely more heavily on the software to alter their pitch and tone and less so on natural talent. The progression of auto-synthesized voices has steadily become more mainstream in popular music. Rapper and singer T-Pain has openly admitted to using Auto-Tune, claiming to Time MagaAll Things zine in 2003, “It Written just worked for By Erica Lopez my voice.” Staff Writer There is definitely opposition to the Auto-Tune technology. Music critic Neil McCormick, who writes for the Daily Telegraph, wrote in 2004 that Auto-Tune is a “particularly sinister invention that has been putting extra shine on pop vocals since the 1990s.” At the 51st GRAMMY Awards, Death Cab for Cutie wore blue ribbons during a live performance to raise awareness about artists’ abuse of Auto-Tune. Death Cab’s frontman Ben Gibbard was quoted about the band’s movement saying, “I think over the last 10 years, we’ve seen a lot of good musicians being affected by this newfound digital manipulation of the human voice, and we feel enough is enough.” Jay-Z took a clear stance on the issue with the first single of his 2009 album “The Blueprint 3,” by naming its first single “D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune).” Still, thanks to the loyalty of Britney Spears fans – who continue to listen to her auto-synthesized songs, as featured on her latest album, “Femme Fatale” – it is clear that the general majority accepts Auto-Tune. Even Kanye West is open about his use of the technology and was quoted in 2008 saying, “What it does for me, if I sing off-key, it really points that out. It points out the bad notes. So what I have to do is sing more perfect.” The music industry is now facing an even larger threat, one that rivals all previous notions of what is artificial. Her name is Hatsune Miku. Hatsune Miku is a synthesizer application developed by Crypton Future Media, a company that produces and sells products for music. Her name, Hatsune Miku, fuses the Japanese words for “first,” “sound” and “future,” as she is the first of Crypton’s “Character Vocal Series.” This Vocaloid technology, from which Hatsune Miku is produced,

has become a lot more than Crypton’s latest electronic instrument software – Hatsune Miku is selling out concerts. Japan has spawned the latest contribution to the music industry, using holographic technology to create an avatar for the Hatsune Miku synthesizer. The hologram is the virtual embodiment of Crypton’s software, which they have used to invert the live performance experience. The holographic singer, that has kept the name of the software, performs onstage alongside a live band to crowds of thousands of adoring fans. Auto-Tune is nothing compared to the surely perilous future that this virtual diva presents for musicians. Not only are voices being transposed, but performances as a whole can be constructed without performers themselves. Based on the reception of this latest technology, I understand the dwindling value of natural ability as this degradation is sure to spread to other industries. Hatsune Miku is gaining scores of fans eager to see her perform. The cultish following of Hatsune Miku is eery to witness, but her appeal is undeniable (though haunting and difficult to understand), as she has sold out several concerts in Tokyo, including two live performances only a few weeks ago in the Tokyo Dome City Hall. While I admit that I can’t help but find the concert footage strangely intriguing, I cannot justify this as a genuine representation of musical talent. If anything, Hatsune Miku forces me to value even more the raw talent of a select group of musicians, though the fact remains that natural ability is becoming a rare pastime of the music industry. Hatsune Miku is a computer program that has come to life, but her ability to perform is not based on talent. Rather, it is part of her makeup and her construction. Though it seems unbelievable that something this artificial can have this kind of unprecedented success in the music industry, the truth remains that the merit for what is considered quality within the music industry has been ignored, starting with the acceptance of Auto-Tune. The sheer existence of Hatsune Miku stands to reason that music industry standards have declined. Anyone can be “made” into a singer nowadays. Unless we rethink the grade to which we commoditize music, Hatsune Miku will be the end of the music industry as we know it.

This is the opinion of Erica Lopez, a junior communication studies major from Orange County, Calif. Please send comments to tfinster@theloyolan.com.

Staff writer Brandon Cudequest highlights indie bands The Big Pink and Neon Indian in his latest “Trust Me, I’m From N.J.” column. Go to laloyolan.com to read it today.

By Raeesah Reese Staff Writer

A

s an alumna as well as Professor Emeritus here at LMU, Graciela Limón will be sharing her considerable experience with writing at an event at William H. Hannon Library. She will be the latest guest speaker for the library’s Alumni Authors series on Wednesday, March 28 at 6 p.m. The event, which is sponsored by the Department of Chicana/o Studies and Sigma Lambda Gamma, “is going to be a unique opportunity to see a world class author speak about her life and writing,” said Jaime Hazlitt, the outreach librarian for the event. Limón, a ’65 alumna of Marymount College, received a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish Literature from Marymount College, a Master of Arts in the same subject from the University of the Americas in Mexico City, as well as a Ph.D. in Latin American Literature from the University of California at Los Angeles. In addition to teaching here at LMU, she is an Adjunct Professor at UCLA and UC Santa Barbara. Staff Writer Raeesah Reese sat down to ask her about her background and how it relates to her writing. Raeesah Reese (R.R.): How did you transition from teaching to writing? Graciela Limón (G.L.): The transition to fictional writing was smooth for me since I had spent all of my career teaching fiction. I suppose it can be said that my teachers were the master writers of the literature that I taught in my classroom. It was from that world that I drew my inspiration to write novels. R.R.: How does your Mexican heritage influence your work as a writer of fiction? G.L.: I am a Chicana, born and raised in East Los Angeles to Mexican immigrants. My culture has truly influenced my work, because anyone that reads my novels will see that the issues, the themes and the characters are all influenced by the U.S. Chicana and Latino experience, as well as the cross-border experience. R.R.: What types of themes does your work explore? G.L.: The themes that I write about range from gender issues to

Graciela Limón

LMU Professor Emeritus Graciela Limón will be the next guest at the Alumni Authors series. the immigration experience. I am also very interested in the mystical side of my Latina/Chicana culture that involves topics of spirits and witchcraft. R.R.: Out of the eight novels you have written, which is your most personal and why? G.L.: This is a difficult question for me to answer since each of my works has a very special part of me deep inside them. I suppose that the two for which I feel most affection are the ones that portray a flawed yet strong woman: “The Memories of Ana Calderón” and “The Madness of Mamá Carlota.” R.R.: What does your creative process for writing a novel entail? G.L.: Once I select a topic, I begin to focus on research for the story. I usually travel to the place that I am writing about. For my eighth and latest novel, “The Madness of Mamá Carlota,” I traveled to Belgium where I was able to tour the medieval castle that my main character lived in. It was a very inspirational and unique experience that allowed me to immediately begin writing once I returned home to the States. R.R.: How would you describe your latest novel, “The Madness of Mama Carlota”? G.L.: “The Madness of Mama Carlota” is about the historical figure Empress Carlota of Mexico. She came to power in the year of 1864

at the age of 24 years old, and lost her mind at the age of 27 when she was thrown out of power and locked away in a castle in Belgium for 60 years. Not much has been written about such an important historical woman, so I really wanted to explore the idea of how she was able to survive for all of those years. As a writer, I faced the challenge of bridging the gap between the historical and fictional elements of the story. Those who read the book will see that I have fictionalized the character of Carlota and have introduced other key fictional characters that serve as a metaphor for her connection to Mexico. R.R.: How has your educational experience at LMU influenced your work? G.L.: LMU’s Jesuit tradition and mission of the promotion of social justice and the service of faith has inspired me to incorporate what I call voices of the silenced into my writing. It has had as much of an impact on my literary career as my cultural heritage has. R.R.: What advice do you have for aspiring writers? G.L.: Write! Write! Write! Do not get discouraged when you get those inevitable rejections. Have an indestructible faith in your talent.

Graciela Limón

In Limón’s recent novel, “The Madness of Mamá Carlota,” she bridges the historical and fictional elements of Empress Carlota’s story of power and madness.


March 26, 2012 Page 10

Arts & Entertainment

www.laloyolan.com

Symposium examines ‘disruptors’ in new media Event Coverage By Christopher James Asst. A&E Editor

C

hanging technological advancements are consistently molding the film, television and media industries. Disruptors, individuals who take large risks in utilizing shifting technology to change the structure of their industry, bring about these changes. With this in mind, the School of Film and Television (SFTV) chose disruptors as the subject for their seventh annual Steed Symposium, sponsored by Michael Steed, which took place on Thursday, March 22. The panel discussion that night, “The New Disruptors: Content, Devices & Distribution,” gathered both old and new disruptors in the Ray Kurtzman Theater at Central Artists Agency to tackle key issues in the entertainment business. Moderated by Paula Wagner, a film, theater and television producer, as well as professor at LMU, the range of relevant topics included technology within the next five

years, storytelling in new media and feuds between Silicon Valley technicians and Hollywood creative types. With so many people generating millions of views on YouTube for videos of cute kittens playing and pandas sneezing, the panel addressed whether amateur content at the viral level would replace professional writers. In response to this query, Ross Levinsohn, Executive Vice President for Yahoo!, said, “There is a very big distinction between context and premium content.” Sara Pollack, YouTube’s senior marketing manager, said, “People love movies and TV, but they also love babies laughing and dogs on skateboards, so we give them it all.” In catering to the diverse tastes of the viewing public, YouTube has been able to amass four billion video views per day. The first event of the Steed Symposium was “The Original Disruptor: Michael Fuchs in Conversation,” where Fuchs, former chairman and CEO of HBO, prefaced his panel appearance by speaking at the SFTV sound stage about the strength of cable. While cable does average less view-

School of Film and Television

Michael Fuchs, former CEO and chairman of HBO, was the subject of “The Original Disruptor,” as well as a panelist for “The New Disruptors.”

School of Film and Television

“The New Disruptors: Content, Devices & Distribution” panelists included (left to right) Ross Levinsohn, Lance Weiler, Sara Pollack, Moderator Paula Wagner, Michael Fuchs, Warren Lieberfarb and Rick Allen. ers than network TV, cable is more profitable because, according to Fuchs, “what has contributed to the success of cable is a financial network that is superior to networks. [Cable] has dual revenues – subscriber fees and advertising.” The profitability of cable is even further emphasized in sports cable channels. “Sports are disproportionally powerful and is not eroded by technological advancements,” said Fuchs. “ESPN has more money than Portugal and Greece.” Fuchs also spoke on the longevity of television, despite the rise in disruptors and technological advancements. “The TV business is so vital creatively and financially, that it won’t change in the near future,” said Fuchs. A disruptor can be categorized through the avenues and approaches he or she takes. According to Rick Allen, CEO of SnagFilms, “Clay Christensen, from Harvard Busi-

Compiled by: Tierney Finster | Loyolan

Graphic by: Alberto Gonzalez | Loyolan

ness School, said the way to ‘disrupt’ are in the content of product, technology that delivers faster, better and cheaper content and in creating a new business model. Hollywood looks to disrupt through the first way; Silicon Valley looks towards the second.” With such a divisive relationship in terms of technique, the panelists devised a solution to the tension between the two entities. Warren Lieberfarb, known as “The Father of DVD,” said, “If you are going to engage technologists, you need to have someone just as well versed. The problem is they aren’t coming to Hollywood to work for film and TV, and we aren’t going to Silicon Valley to work for Microsoft.” Shifting their focus to how the role of writers will change with the innovations, the speakers emphasized that the art of storytelling will be different, yet prevalent. According to Lance Weiler, an alumnus of Sundance Screen-

writers Lab who works as a screenwriter and entrepreneur, “The story part isn’t changing, the telling part is.” Weiler went on to describe one of his latest ways to blend story and technology with the formation of “Pandemic 1.0” at Sundance. “It took place over five days, people stood in what it would be like to stand in a pandemic. How does morality change over place and time? We built something with social relevance [and] we had a contextual story with it,” says Weiler. “Technology strengthens the development process. As a writer, I want to test the level of engagement.” Even with technology changing and disrupting the entertainment industry, the basic formula for making a successful product in the entertainment industry stays the same. Levinsohn admitted, “If you marry the power of marketing and quality of product, then you’ve got a hit.”

Graphic by: Alberto Gonzalez | Loyolan

Leave your winter coats and thermal gear at home - spring has arrived.The flowers are in bloom and the sun is out to greet us with the exception of a few visits from the sprinkling rain. It is time to brighten up your wardrobe with the bold and the beautiful spring color trends and prints. Get started by visiting Missselfridge.com for a wide selection of hot picks for the season. Miss Selfridge is a retail store based in the UK that provides additional online retail services for greater accessibility for shoppers around the world.This online store has everything from playsuits to swimwear. Don’t forget about those white skinny jeans packed away in your closet. Pair it with the store’s orange pussybow blouse priced around $61. For work-appropriate attire, play up a neutral outfit with a pop of bright accents.With the addition of online promotion and discounts, Miss Selfridges makes online shopping easy and affordable. Although you cannot physically try on clothes, the store does have a return policy.This online store delivers to 110 countries worldwide. Keep track of your orders and refunds online by registering to the website. You can refer to their website to see accepted payment methods. For more information about shipping policies and returns, visit the store’s online website at Missselfridge.com. – Dol-Anne Asiru, Design Editor


www.laloyolan.com

Sports

LMU loses two straight Baseball from Page 16 down the left field line, giving the Wolf Pack life in the bottom of the ninth with LMU junior reliever Aaron Griffin on the mound. Klein delivered a big hit, sending a triple over the centerfielder Zac Fugimoto’s head to get the Wolf Pack’s tying run on third base. Closer Bret Dahlson then came into pitch, still clinging to a one run lead. However, he could not hold it as he let Brett Jones single over the shortstop’s head, tying the game at two a piece. Dahlson stayed in the game to finish the ninth inning and did not give up any runs in that frame, but could not hold the tie game in place any longer. In the bottom of the 12th inning, the Wolf Pack rallied again off Dahlson as Jay Anderson doubled into centerfield to set up the eventual

winning run. After a failed pickoff attempt at second base, which advanced Anderson to third base, the last hitter in the lineup, Joe Kohan, delivered the winning run on a bloop single over the shortstop. This started the Nevada celebration and sent the Lions to three games below .500 on the season, heading into Sunday. “We will live and die [this season] by our pitching and defense,” said Head Coach Jason Gill. Prior to the Lions late-game meltdown, the team cruised to a 2-0 lead in the last inning. Freshman starting pitcher Trevor Megill built upon his last start, in which he gave up two earned runs in six innings against Indiana University, throwing six scoreless innings of two hit baseball and striking out a career-high of seven Wolf Pack batters. Dahlson would earn the loss, throwing three-and-a-third innings

Devin Sixt | Loyolan

The LMU baseball team faces St. Mary’s in the firstWest Coast Conference series on March 30. LMU was picked to finish fourth in the preseason conference poll.

but allowing the unearned run to end the game. Griffin also pitched two innings of relief, surrendering the hit that started the rally in the ninth inning. “I like the role I have on this team in coming out of the bullpen,” said Dahlson. “Every outing I try and make adjustments to get better everyday, but I enjoy the guys in the bullpen and I am glad to accept any role the team gives me in order to help the team win.” The Lions offense was nearly absent on Saturday, only scoring two runs, but did provide a cushion of run support the bullpen could not keep. Junior left fielder Matt Lowenstein led the Lions in the leadoff spot going three for four, including a double which scored both LMU runs. Junior transfer Cullen Mahoney, who played his freshman baseball at the University of Nevada, Reno, delivered the first RBI of the game, driving in Lowenstein with a single in the bottom of the sixth inning off the Wolf Pack starter Tyler Wells, who only gave up one run in his six innings of work. The Lions, however, did not leave Reno empty handed, as they crushed the Wolf Pack in their first game of the series behind freshman starter Colin Welmon, who pitched seven scoreless innings, striking out five batters and not allowing a walk. This outing brings Welmon to 23 consecutive scoreless innings, dating back to his start at UC Santa Barbara on March 2. “I feel very comfortable on the mound,” said Welmon. “I have the support of my teammates, and I just have to keep throwing strikes to be successful.” The Lions will begin WCC action on Friday, March 30 at 3 p.m. at Page Stadium.

March 26, 2012 Page 13

Softball

Starting pitcher Dana Waldusky records wins for both games aginst CSU Northridge on Saturday.

Devin Sixt | Loyolan

The LMU softball team defeated CSU Northridge on Saturday in a doubleheader that featured potent offense and stellar pitching to improve the Lions (22-11) to eleven games above .500 in the Lions’ final non-conference series before conference play begins. The Lions cruised to a 9-0 victory in the first game behind starting pitcher junior Dana Waldulsky (pictured above), who pitched a complete game, only gave up one hit, walked one and struck out two CSU Northridge batters. Senior shortstop Sam Fischer recorded her 15th homerun of the season, which ranks her second in the nation. The second game of the doubleheader featured a pitchers’ duel between CSU Northridge’s starting pitcher Mia Pagano and the combination of sophomore Stevie Goldstein and Waldusky, who eventually recorded the win. Freshman second baseman Sterling Shuster had the game-winning hit, a hard ground ball that went past the third baseman into left field to score the winning run and complete the sweep of CSU Northridge. The Lions will play next on Saturday, March 31, beginning a fourgame series against Santa Clara University at 10 a.m. at Smith Field to begin conference play.

Compiled by Dan Raffety | Loyolan


March 26, 2012 Page 14

Sports

www.laloyolan.com

Teammates place ultimate trust in Ireland Ireland from Page 16 five-foot-10 sophomore from Waterbury, Conn. gladly took the keys to LMU’s offense and revved the engine. The Lions were 14-0 when scoring more than 70 points in the 2011-12 season. Rarely did a possession start in any way other than a teammate feeding the ball to Ireland. Every LMU defensive rebound was quickly passed on to Ireland, often already streaking up the court. There are not enough words to express the amount of trust that teammates and coaches have in Ireland. “Ultimately,” said LMU Head Coach Max Good. “One-hundred and fifty percent,” said Associate Head Coach Myke Scholl. “One-hundred percent, 1,000 percent, whatever the maximum trust is,” said Viney. “Whenever we’re in trouble, whenever there is any situation where we need to break a press, we need a good shot, we need a play to happen, we get the ball to Ant and say, ‘Ant, make something happen.’” Developing that trust was something Ireland knew he needed to do coming into his second season. “I felt like I needed my teammates’ trust,” he said. “I feel like with my play on the court and how I work in the offseason, they’re able to know how bad I want it, how bad I want to win.” Each game presents the unique challenge Ireland constantly faces in toeing the fine line of what Good calls being a “points guard” – a facilitating point guard but also one who can put up points in bunches. Ireland is capable of creating opportunities and slinging passes, but he is also one of the team’s better 3-point shooters.

“He has a little bit of where you tell him you want him to pass the ball, that’s all he’ll do. If you tell him you want him to shoot the ball, then that’s all he’ll do,” Good said. “He’s got to be able to blend the two. He’s got to know when to shoot and when to pass.” Only twice this season did Ireland have a game where he recorded double digits in both points and assists. “Its definitely tough. You have to switch it game to game, play by play,” Ireland said. Talking about the All-Conference award, Ireland is surprisingly unenthusiastic. Not that he doesn’t like personal accolades, but Ireland’s confidence and fierce competitiveness drive him to be more than just one of the 10 best players in the conference. “I mean, it’s a good accomplishment, but I felt like I knew it was going to happen. Not to be big-headed or anything, but I felt like I put that much work in, I deserve it,” Ireland said. “So it wasn’t really nothing, I just wanted that Player of the Year.” A naturally quiet person, Ireland points to his vocal leadership as an area where he needs work. “They already respect me, I just have to be more vocal and help them make the right play,” Ireland said. His teammates and coaches, however, have already seen improvement during the 2011-12 season. “His vocal leadership, it was a 180-degree turn around [from his freshman year],” Viney said. The senior noted that in big games when Ireland did raise his voice in the huddle it struck a strong chord with teammates. Good agreed, calling Ireland a silent leader who “became a little more vocal as the year went on.”

Viney and Ireland roomed together on the road – A chance for two All-conference team leaders to share knowledge, goals and motivation. Viney brings up a goal that Ireland shared for next season: developing freshman point guard Bruce English. With Ireland logging almost 37 minutes per game this year, there was not much time to be had in the backup point guard role. English appeared in 19 games this season, averaging just 1.5 points per game in around seven minutes per contest. “He wants to learn and Ant’s going to take him under his wing,” Viney said. “As a leader, [and] as a guy that’s leaving, for the next leader to come in and want to help somebody else in his same position – most guys want to beat out the guy in their position, but he’s that type of person that whoever is going to be with him … he wants to get them better everyday,” Viney said. “That’s the type of person Ant is. To hear that, it’s just a refreshing thing.” When his standout sophomore season ended, the first thing that Ireland did was hug Diederichs at center court of Utah State University’s Dee Glen Smith Spectrum. Instead of sulking in an ugly loss, he sought out the seniors who had built up the program. He embraced those who had taught him so much and made his stellar season possible. “I just wanted to establish myself. … I wanted to establish myself as being one of the best guards, not only on the West Coast, but in the country,” Ireland said about his preseason focus. “That was my main motivation. Just making everybody be familiar with my name.” If anyone didn’t know the kid on the banners, they should by now.

Kevin Laughlin | Loyolan

As a point guard, one of the biggest challenges each game for sophomore Anthony Ireland is balancing his scoring and facilitating roles.

Tebow takes talents to Ryan, Jets in New York Ferrari’s Finest from Page 16 Outdoing Miami, Tennessee and Arizona, among a few others, were the Broncos, the only of the former teams who actually made the playoffs the previous season. The man that led them there? A little-known guy by the name of Tim Tebow. Despite winning seven of his first eight games as a starter, winning the AFC West division after inheriting a 1-4 team and winning a playoff game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Tebow still did not earn the respect of his critics. He caught the American sports world by storm, coming in second in jersey sales behind Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers. His highlight reels infiltrated ESPN’s

“SportsCenter” on a daily basis. But when it comes down to it, Tebow is still a run-heavy quarterback with a long release who completes less than 50 percent of his passes. Apparently, that does not cut it. Miraculously winning games is fun, exciting and great for sports television. But his inconsistancy as a passer through four quarters has earned him extensive criticism from nearly everyone associated with the NFL. The biggest of his critics? Not himself, but his boss, Mr. John Elway. NFL franchises want Super Bowl victories. The last quarterback to bring rings to Denver was Elway. His position in the Broncos’ organization forces Elway to seek the play-

ers who will better his chances of hoisting the Lombardi trophy once again. Because of his unorthodox play, Tebow does not remind Elway enough of himself to keep his job as the starting quarterback. Peyton Manning, on the other hand, does. As a Broncos fan myself, this situation has eaten me up. Denver has defined the word bittersweet in the past week. Just six short months ago, millions of fans boarded the bandwagon of Tebow-mania. Now they’re welcoming his replacement with open arms. Part of me wants to bring up words like ‘disrespect’ and ‘abandonment.’ Part of me wants to drop Denver and start rooting for New York (Tebow has since been traded to the Jets). Part of me wants to curse out the entire administra-

tion. But then again, it is Peyton Manning. Tim Tebow first caught my eye in 2006 while playing backup quarterback to Chris Leak at the University of Florida when he would be put in the game mainly for red zone situations. He scrambled for touchdowns, bulldozed the goal line and made the jump pass famous. He helped Florida win two national championships, earned the Heisman trophy in 2007 and established himself as a leader for his team and community. Tebow is also quite well known for his faith and philanthropic work. Born in the Philippines to Baptist missionaries, Tebow has always been surrounded by Christianity and service. As a famous and successful athlete, he has been able to proclaim his devout beliefs to the world. Some see this as rubbing religious views into people’s faces, while others see him as a role model and stand-up guy because of its accompaniment with his kindness and generosity. The kid has more character than a Disney cartoon series. Tebow built a children’s hospital in the Philippines and has developed his own charitable foundation, the “Tim Tebow Foundation.” His constant placement of Bible verses on his eye black strips led the NCAA to ban such messages on the field in

what is known as “The Tebow Rule.” He brings child cancer patients to his games and takes them out to dinner. It’s just hard to root against the guy. However, in the end, football is a business. He can go on dinner dates with Taylor Swift. He can inspire an ESPN debate series between Skip Bayless and Stephen A. Smith. He can be the topic of SNL skits and Late Night musical parodies. He can even make ‘Tebowing’ an official word in the English language. But he can’t consistently make the throws on every down in every quarter. Just like I understood the Colts’ business move of releasing Manning for the future of the team with a promising rookie, I understand the Broncos’ move in ditching Tebow for the services of Manning. It does say something that the Jets traded for him so quickly. Maybe it’s just another New York publicity stunt and revenue builder, or maybe it’s Head Coach Rex Ryan trying to restore some sort of order in his locker room after the controversy of the Jet’s offseason, but look out, Mark Sanchez, because Tebow is coming for you. This is the opinion of Ray Ferrari, a freshman communication studies major from Eugene, Ore. Please send comments to: ndines@theloyolan.com.

INTERESTED IN TAKING PICTURES FOR

SPORTS

?

Contact the Loyolan at: Associated Press

Because Peyton Manning (18) chose to join Denver, now former Broncos’ quarterback Tim Tebow was traded to the New York Jets on Saturday, prompting mixed reviews from players and new competitor Mark Sanchez.

jobs@theloyolan.com


www.laloyolan.com

Conversation

Sports

March 26, 2012 Page 15

with

Walton

What sorts of memories does this month and the frenzy of March Madness bring back for you? Spring. A new beginning. Blossoms. Dancing girls. Flower dresses. Championships. The top of the pyramid. Be at your best when your best is needed. The spring. Ready to go for it all. Basketball is so great, you play it indoors during the bad months. So when it’s nice outside in late spring, summer, fall, you’re out riding your bike, you’re on tour with the Grateful Dead, enjoying California and the beauty.

My favorite day of the year is the day we put the clocks forward. I love daylight savings. And the championship moments – while you live for the championships, the greatest lessons are from your defeats. Those are the longest lasting.

With the trend of players attending one year of college and then leaving, would that ever have crossed a player’s mind in your day? I wish I was still at UCLA. I became the highest-paid player in the history of sports when I joined the NBA. The quality of my life went down. That’s how great it was to play at UCLA for John Wooden.

NCAA Title or NBA Finals Championship. Which meant more to you? Never rank, rate or compare coaches, concerts, championships, children or congratulations. Just enjoy them all.

One last question for you: To put it simply, your life has been fascinating. But with all the ups and downs, greatness and hardships, is there one piece of advice you would give to someone in their 20s? Chase your dream. Quit your job, chase your dream and make your dream your job. And as soon as anybody tells you, “That’ll never work,” you know that guy’s not looking out for you.

To read the entire interview, go to laloyolan.com/sports.

The life and times of Bill Walton B ill Walton exudes charisma. The large crowd in Hilton 100 on March 21 hung on each and every word of Walton’s speech, laughing at all the jokes, riding the highs and lows of Walton’s emotional life roller c o a s t e r. E v e r y one felt the same connection with his injuries, the Droppin’ Dines Grateful By Nathan Dines Dead and, Sports Editor most importantly, legendary UCLA Coach John Wooden. It didn’t matter how far Walton strayed from the title of the speech (“Conversation with Coach Wooden and the Pyramid of Success”), Wooden’s influence on Walton’s life is as apparent today as ever. “John Wooden is the single most important and influential person in my life,” Walton said. Some may argue that Walton’s speech was disjointed; others may say it was too self-referential. I, however, have to say it was fascinating to learn so much about one man’s life in less than two hours. For such a big man, Walton’s presence on the stage was not overpowering. During introductions, Walton sat on a chair on the side of the stage, wearing a red LMU polo, black slacks and a pair of Nikes. He did not appear to be in the 7-foot range until my interview after the speech. And with the conclusion of the intro, Walton was given the floor (an outcome the moderator may have begun to dread an hour and a half later when the speech was already in overtime). I cannot begin to explain every element of Walton’s speech, I can only suggest seeking out his next stop and hearing him speak for yourself. I can only craft a portrayal from bits and pieces of the speech – a speech honed with 20 plus years of public speaking and 59 years of life experience. The Voice of Reason Walton’s voice has a certain allure to it, an allure I can’t quite put my finger on. It is calm, cool and collected, with the whispers of a debilitating stammer flaring ever so slightly in his ‘S’s and ‘F’s. This is the voice of reason, experience, the voice of a basketball icon as much as that of a tortured soul. His speech was heavy on his crippling pains, yet he approached the delicate subject with a sense of composure that would have

been petrifying coming out of Diego outfit who performed anybody else’s mouth. But in- his surgery on Feb. 8, 2009, stead it came from Walton’s an eight and a half hour, mouth, a mouth that took 28 all-inclusive fixer-upper the years to develop before com- explanation of which sent pleting stutter-free speech. chills down my spine. But to “There was little Billy grow- Walton, it was just another of ing up, with his red hair, with life’s inevitabilities. As Walhis freckles, with his big nose, ton shared, it led to “the long, and his goofy looking face and hard climb back into the game his horrendous speech imped- of life.” iment. I’m a life-long stutterThe Humor in it All er, couldn’t say a word until I It wouldn’t be Waltonwas 28 years of age. Couldn’t esque to only give a speech say hello, couldn’t say thank about the problems and tough you – English was my first times in his life. As soon as he language after stuttering, broke from a somber tale, his stumbling, stammering and Cheshire cat grin lit up the spitting,” Walton explained lecture hall. He interspersed n e a r his hardships the bewith laughs, ginning the results of of the years in pubspeech. lic speaking B u t and commenthat may tating. not have The hue v e n mor never been the stopped, in toughest fitting Waladversity ton fashion. Wa l t o n On UCLA f a c e d away games: through“Why can’t out his the cheerlife to leaders be date. in my hotel “I’ve room on the had 36 road trips?” orthopeOn overdic opercoming adon Coach John Wooden’s life lessons ations. I versity: “Now have two that I’ve fused anlearned how kles. My to speak, knees, I hope you hands and wrists don’t work. have comfortable chairs and I have a fused spine. Other they’ve brought a clock.” than that, everything is fanOn a letter to Richard Nixtastic,” Walton said. on, in response to Wooden’s The man behind the voice stance on public protest: “I has dealt with more pain than demanded Nixon’s resignaI can ever imagine. But Wal- tion and thanked him in adton wants no sympathy; he vance for his resignation.” simply chalks it up to another Random Facts of life’s cruel yet crucial life For those of you who were lessons. unable, unaware of or simOn the scene leading up to ply forgot to attend Walton’s his 36th and final orthopedic speech, he shared some fasoperation five years ago: cinating nuggets of informa“After 40-plus years on the tion, including: road, 200 nights a year in While Walton’s love of music awful hotels, furniture built is apparent (he quoted such for pre-school children, cars songs as Bob Dylan’s “When that you can’t fit in, mind- I Paint My Masterpiece” and less, numbing airplane rides Neil Young’s “Fork in the everywhere all the time, my Road”), I had no idea that spine collapsed. It failed me. he had been to 832 Grateful And I spent two years on the Dead concerts. Yes, 832. That ground in unrelenting, debili- is not a typo. No wonder he is tating, excruciating pain. I in the Dead Hall of Honor. could only describe it as being The recruiters started submerged into a vat of scald- knocking on his door when ing acid that had an electrify- he was 15. The first? Pasaing current running through dena City College’s Jerry Tarit, and I could never get out. kanian, one of the winningest My life was over. If I had a coaches in college basketball gun, I would have used it. I history. The winner? UCLA’s was standing on the bridge John Wooden of course, delivknowing full well it was bet- ering the hook Walton could ter to jump than go back to not pass up: “The only thing that pitiful, helpless, hapless, I can offer you is a chance, a non-existent life. Fortunately, chance to do well.” I was saved.” Biking is Walton’s curHe was saved by the San rent passion. “My bike’s my

“Basketball is like life. It’s not a game of size and strength, it’s a game of skill, timing and position.” Bill Walton

gym, my wheelchair and my church, all in one.” The John Wooden Experience John Wooden played such a large role in Walton’s life. It is so apparent. It is apparent from the ease with which he explains Wooden’s prized possession: The Pyramid of Success. He recalled the 7-point Creed and the two sets of three. Walton reeled off maxim after maxim: “Be quick, but don’t hurry. Failing to prepare is preparing to fail. Happiness begins when selfishness ends.” The biggest lesson Walton may have learned from Wooden, however, deals with the coach’s explanation of the game of life: “Basketball is like life. It’s not a game of size and strength, it’s a game of skill, timing and position. It’s not how big you are, it’s how big you play. It’s not how high you jump, it’s where you are and when you jump,” Walton recalled. Wooden and Walton had their ups and downs throughout Walton’s time at UCLA. Wooden called him “the slowest learner he ever had,” yet Walton called his coach on the telephone every day for 43 years. They may have had their differences, politically, musically and every other way imaginable, but Walton was there at Wooden’s side in the hospital when the outcome was inevitable. Much to the chagrin of each party for many years, Wooden and Walton shared a connection that will forever be fused. And finally, a story from the end of John Wooden’s life. Nearing death, Wooden received yet another award: he was named the Greatest Coach Ever by Sporting News. In an effort of humility, the ceremony was, under Wooden’s request, only to be attended by friends, family and former players. Everyone gathered at the San Fernando Valley Inn for the presentation of the award and Wooden took the stage, addressing his players with the last words he ever spoke publicly. “I want to say I’m sorry. I’m sorry that I wasn’t able to help you more,” Wooden said. No matter what he says in any speech, Bill Walton is influencing everyone John Wooden did not get the chance to help. In the picture above, Bill Walton (left) talks to now-deceased UCLA Bruins Head Coach John Wooden. Photo: Associated Press. This is the opinion of Nathan Dines, a junior communication studies major from Medford, Ore. Please send comments to ndines@theloyolan.com.


www.laloyolan.com

Lion Sports

March 26, 2012 Page 16

Ireland set to lead after sophomore surge SPORTS FEATURE

Anthony Ireland looks to build off an All-Conference season in 2012-13. By John Wilkinson Senior Editor

Even before he played a minute of his sophomore season, LMU hung banners with Anthony Ireland’s face on them. As a part of the ‘LMU at 100’ campaign, a photo from Ireland’s freshman season adorned some of the banners hanging along light posts on campus and down Lincoln Boulevard. His reaction the first time he saw the banners? “It was crazy, it felt like a dream come true,” Ireland said. “You only see that in movies or hear about it.” Making the moment even more surreal, Ireland’s mother was in town when they first went up, so the two saw them for the first time together. And that was before this season, one in which Ireland garnered All-Conference honors by averaging 16.1 points and 4.9 assists per game on LMU’s first 20-plus win team in more than two decades. With the graduation of senior leaders like redshirt seniors Drew Viney and Tim Diederichs as well as senior LaRon Armstead, the leadership role will fall increasingly on Ireland’s shoulders next season. It is a responsibility that Ireland looks forward to having. “I just want to be more of a leader than I was this year,” Ireland said. “I kind of took a back seat sometimes because [we had] upperclassmen like Drew. Next year I feel like it will be my team, and I just don’t feel like we’re going to lose next year.” It is a hyperbolic prediction, but he says it very matter-of-factly. Plenty was expected of Ireland coming into the 2011-12 season. After starting 26 games and averaging a shade over 10 points per game during his freshman year, Ireland was named to the West Coast Conference (WCC) All-Freshman team in his first collegiate season. The departure of Vernon Teel following that season, however, placed almost all of the ball-handling duties in Ireland’s control. The

See Ireland | Page 14

Kevin Laughlin | Loyolan

With the departure of senior leaders, sophomore point guard Anthony Ireland is preparing to take on an additional leadership role next season. In his sophomore season, Ireland led the Lions in scoring with 16.1 points and 4.9 assists per game.

Lions unlucky in Reno Say ‘bye’ to Mile High

After a game one win, the LMU baseball team loses two straight to the University of Nevada, Reno. By Dan Raffety

Asst. Sports Editor

With the Denver Broncos’ recent pickup of Peyton Manning, Tim Tebow is now a New York Jet.

The men’s baseball team (8-12) let yet another series slip away as the University of Nevada, Reno Wolf Pack (12-10) defeated the Lions in the final two games of the three game series. In the rubber game of the series, the Lions’ offense struggled in the first seven innings, getting shut out by Wolf Pack pitching. The Lions, however, rebounded for three runs in the final two innings to cut the lead in half, but ultimately could not overcome the six-run deficit as the Lions lost the final game of the series 6-3. The Wolf Pack scored early and often as junior outfielder Brooks Klein hit a two-run homerun in the first inning against LMU senior starting pitcher John Lally, who gave up five runs in six-and-one-third innings. Lally struck out five Nevada Wolf Pack batters, while walking one hitter. In the bottom of the fourth, infielder Garrett Yrigoyen scored off Austin Blyler’s RBI double. The Wolf Pack added runs in the fifth and seventh inning to bolster the lead. The Lions had a chance to make this third game of the series a sweep opportunity, but could not hold onto the lead in game two. The Wolf Pack stunned the Lions in a 12th inning 3-2 loss of game two, allowing two runs in the Wolf Pack’s final at-bats before ending the game in the bottom of the 12th inning with a walk-off hit. The Lions were leading 2-0 heading into the final frame, when Garret Yrigoyen doubled

Devin Sixt | Loyolan

See Baseball | Page 13

Junior leftfielder Matt Lowenstein went six for eleven in the first two games of the series against the University of Nevada, Reno recording two runs scored and three RBIs.

D

espite the madness of the NCAA Tournament or NFL pre-draft news and notes, the news from the NFL still takes priority. When a Super Bowl champion quarterback and four-time MVP is released from his team of 14 seasons, things change. Despite all the accolades, playoff runs, Gatorade endorsements and “Saturday Night Live” appearances, Peyton Manning was cut from the Indianapolis Colts on March 8, 2012. Ferrari’s Finest Whoa, never thought I By Ray Ferrari would say that. Staff Writer The release would lead to a handful of teams pursuing and courting the biggest name in the free agent pool this spring. The deliberation process ended last Monday morning when Manning called Denver Broncos Vice President of Football Operations John Elway, informing him of his decision to move to the mile-high city. Last Tuesday, a press conference was held, introducing Manning and showing off his new orange jersey, number 18.

See Ferrari’s Finest | Page 14


March 26, 2012  

Los Angeles Loyolan / March 26, 2012 / Volume 90, Issue 38

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you