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I I

I llus t rat ing

Indian folktales

Classroom project 2 documentation by Lalith Prasad PG Graphics ’10 | Sem 3 | Guided by Chakradhar Saswade


I I

I llus t rat ing

Indian folktales

Classroom project 2 documentation by Lalith Prasad PG Graphics 10 | Sem 3 | Guided by Chakradhar Saswade

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I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it

Pablo Picasso

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056

014

Introduction

Story 1

Story 2

Data collection

014 Buffalo into Rooster

056 If God is Everywhere

(Marathi folktale)

(Bengali folktale)

004 (b) Visiting book shops

016 character explorations

058 character explorations

004 (c) Reading illustration books

035 selected characters

060 selected characters

006 (d) Inspiration, Illustrators

042 tools used

060 tools used

044 layout explorations

062 layout explorations

Project proposal

046 final layout

068 final layout

049 prototype

069 prototype

050 design feedback

070 design feedback

001 (a) Vidya Dehejia’s Narrative structures

009 Project title, Objective, Learning

Selected stories 010 Why I chose these stories ?

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Content s 102

074

112 Story 3

Story 4

074 A Qazi with a Long Beard

102 Walking on the Water

(Marathi folktale)

(Bengali folktale)

112

User testing and feedback

(Childrens)

076 character explorations

104 character explorations

116 Design decisions for stories

088 selected characters

104 layout explorations

088 tools used

104 tools used

118 Costing for offset printing

090 layout explorations

106 selected characters

126 Explored other illustrations

096 final layout

108 final layout

097 prototype

108 prototype

134 Learning and conclusion

098 design feedback

110 design feedback

135 Acknowledgements

(Format, typeface, color, medium)

in the process

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Int roduct ion What is this document all about? This document is a record of my Studio two, which is based on illustrating Indian folk tales.

Why did I choose Illustration project? In Introduction to specialization course I decided to work more on Illustration projects and this is a nice opportunity to explore my skills and know about illustration.

Why did I chose Indian folk tales? India has a rich culture of folktales and mythological legends. While epics like Ramayana and the Mahabharata have been extensively explored in the visual medium, oral tales that are passed on from generation to generation remain largely untapped. I found A K Ramanujan’s retellings of these folktales very interesting and had an urge to explore them visually. 

What is my concerns while developing a visual language for a story? I’ve decided my visual language should be contemporary, tools and mediums should be explored.

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Data Collect ion (a) Vidya Dehejia’s “On modes of Visual narration in early Buddhist art” The following is a brief introduction to the seven modes of narrative structures in the Buddhist Indian Art as identified by her. ( I ) Monoscenic narrative: Themes of action: Single episode from a story, usually neither the first nor last, but one that introduces a theme of action.

Monoscenic narrative, Vessantara jataka. Bharhut coping, ca. 100-80 B. C. (photo: author)

(2) Monoscenic narrative: Being in state versus being in action: Single episode from a story, usually showing protagonist in a culminating episode of a life scene.

Monoscenic narrative, Asilakhana jataka. Bharhut coping. (photo: American Institute of Indian Studies [AIIS])

Data Collection

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(3) Sequential / linear narrative: Multiple episodes of a story with the protagonist repeated, depicted in separate frames in a linear order.

Linear narrative, Story of Nanda. Nagarjunakonda, 3rd century A. D. (after Schilngloff)

(4) Continuous narrative: Multiple episodes of a story with the protagonist repeated, depicted within a single frame.

Continuous narrative, Vessantara jataka, both faces of lowest achitrave, east gateway, Sanchi stupa (after Schilngloff)

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Illustrating Indian folktales


(5) Synoptic narrative: Multiple episodes of a story with protagonist repeated, depicted within a single frame but without attempt to indicate any chronological sequence.

Synoptic narrative, Chaddanta jataka. Amaravati, 2nd century A. D (photo: ASI)

(6) Conflated narrative: The same as synoptic, but rather than having multiple protagonists depicted, the protagonist is conflated into one figure.

Conflated narrative, Dipankara jataka. Gandhara, 2nd/ 3rd century A.D. (photo: author)

Data Collection

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(b) Visiting book shops and NID KMC to understand the visual language of existing illustration books I have visited few book stores

I found illustration books in

in Ahmedabad, found most of

NID KMC but could not find

the illustrators are fallowing

children books in specific.

traditional visual language

Liked Bob Gill drawings.

(c) Reading mythologies, contemporary stories and Indian folktales I read about Indian super he-

When i was a kid I used to

roes, if it’s real now there will

read Balamitra and Chan-

be a remake of fantastic four

damama books. This book reminded me those days

Water colour illustrations are good in this book, more of western kind of style. Details are well painted.

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Data Collection

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(d) Inspiration

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Pablo Picasso

Oliver Jeffers

My all time guru, diversity of works

Mediums, pencil handlettering, picture books

Vincent van Gogh

Eric Carle

Mad genius, sunflowers are still alive

Painting, collage technique and picture books

Illustrating Indian folktales


Steve Simpson Colour palates, details in photoshop

Mattias Adolfsson Smaller and detailed drawings in a larger compositions

Vladimir Stankovic

Nate Williams

Colours, monster illustrator

X object + Y object = Z object with concept

Data Collection

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Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration

Thomas Edison

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Proposal

Revised proposal: Title: Illustrating Indian folktales Target: School children, 7-15 years and general audience

Proposal

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Selected s tories Why I chose these stories ?

Story 1

Story 2

The text of this story seeks to engage the interest of both

This tale is a tragic-comic account of a man who gets badly

children as well as adults. The relationship and under-

injured by an elephant because he believed it won’t hurt

standing shared by the poor man and his eager wife in the

him, as according to his guru, God dwells in everything.

story really appealed to me. Apart from that, the variety

This story indirectly yet effectively urges us to reflect on

of animals that are a part of the story gave me ample

what we are taught rather than accepting it blindly and

opportunity for form and character exploration. I could

looking deeper instead of taking it too literally. I thought

explore the form of each animal individually as well as try

this was something worth sharing with people. Besides

to maintain a common visual language for all of them.

that, the particular scene involving the mad elephant held

Buffalo into Roos ter

I f God is Everywhere

a lot of interest for me from an illustrator’s point of view. It brought vivid images to my mind which I intended to capture through my illustration.

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story 3

Story 4

I found this story amusing because of its light hearted

This folktale is, in a way, a lesson in humility. It emphasizes

humour. The foolishness of the Qazi who yearns to be

being humble as a more important virtue as compared to being

known for his wisdom was quite entertaining and would

highly learned. I wished to represent the contrast between

appeal to the readers. Also, I felt that the long beard was

the attitudes of the two holy men and their approach to life

a strong visual element that could be used interestingly

through my illustrations.

A Qazi wit h a Long Beard

Walking on t he Water

to lead the reader through the images from start to end of the poster.

Selected stories

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One

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Buffalo into Roos ter (Marathi folktale)

P

atil was a poor man, but he had a wife who loved him

you take it and give me the horse? I can use a horse.’ Patil

and they had two buffaloes to their name. As they

looked at the cow and liked the looks of it. Moreover, a

grew older and poorer, the woman said to her husband,

cow is less work than a horse. So he changed the cow for

‘Why don’t you take one of our buffaloes and sell it in the

the horse, but it didn’t take him long to find out that the

market? We could do with some extra money.’

cow was lame in one leg. He then met a man with a shegoat. When the man asked where he was going, Patil told

Next morning, when Patil was on his way to the market in

him: ‘I wanted to sell my old buffalo in the market. On the

the next village, he met a man who was leading his horse

way, I exchanged it for a blind horse. Now I have this lame

to the same place. Patil told him that he was taking the

cow in place of the horse. I’ll have to sell it.’ ‘Oh, why do

old buffalo to sell it. The stranger seemed to take a fancy

you want to sell it? I can use a cow. Take my she-goat and

to the buffalo. He said, ‘Why do you want to take it that

give me the cow,’ said the stranger.

far? Give it to me and I’ll give you my horse.’ When Patil started to walk the she-goat, he found it was Patil thought, ‘Why not? A horse is less trouble, and what’s

quite sick. Just as he reached the market, he met a man

more, fun for the children.’ So he said, ‘All right, give me

with a rooster under his arm, and managed to exchange

the horse.’ When he tried to ride the horse to the market,

the goat for therooster.

he found that it was blind. Soon he met a man with a cow. It was noon. He was hungry and he didn’t have a penny on

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‘Where are you going, old man, with that horse?’ ‘I was

him. All he had was a rooster in his hand. He took it to the

on my way to the market to sell my old buffalo. But I

market and all he could get for it was a single rupee. With

exchanged it for this horse, and it’s blind.’ ‘Is that what

it he bought some food, washed his hands and feet in a

happened? This cow of mine is a fine animal. Why don’t

pond, and sat down under a pipal tree with his food on a

Illustrating Indian folktales


leaf. Just as he was about to put a morsel in his mouth, a

‘Listen, I don’t have the rooster. I got hungry, so I sold

beggarman in tatters appeared from nowhere and said, I

the rooster for a rupee and bought something to eat.’

haven’t eaten for days. Give me some food.’ Patil couldn’t

‘That’s all right. What could we have done with a rooster?

bear to see the beggar starve while he ate his fill, so he

I’m grad you ate something for lunch. You shouldn’t go

gave him the whole leaf full of food and left for home.

hungry after all that work you did,’ said the good wife.

His wife was waiting for him. She had cooked and cleaned

‘Wait till I tell you everything, please. I was about to eat

and fed the children by the time he arrived. She asked him

when a starving beggar appeared. So I gave him all the

how the day went and why he looked so beaten. He said,

food and walked home.’ ‘And you went hungry? Poor man!

‘I’ll tell you everything. Give me a glass of water first.’

But what you did was right. You should never turn away

After cooling himself off with a drink of water, he began

a beggar at mealtime. Now, if you’ll wash up, I’ll get you

to tell her what had happened.

something to eat. You must be famished,’ said the wife, and served him a proper meal.

‘I did not sell the buffalo. I exchanged it for a horse.’ ‘Oh, fine!’ said his wife. ‘Where is it? Children, Daddy has

Next morning, when Patil woke up and opened the door

brought a horse!’ ‘Wait. I don’t have the horse. I exchanged

of his hut, he was amazed by what he saw. He called his

it for a horse.’ ‘Oh, lovely! I always wanted a cow. The chil-

wife to come quickly. Right in front of their door stood a

dren can have some cow’s milk at last. Children, go look

collection of animals: a buffalo that was not old, a horse

outside. Daddy has brought a cow,’ said the wife.

that was not blind, a cow that was not lame, a she-goat that was well and frisky, and a splendid rooster. Right next

‘Wait, wait, I wanted to bring the cow home, but I ex-

to them was a leaf, with a shining rupee on it. As they

changed it for a she-goat.’ ‘A she-goat is even better.

wondered at what they saw, the wife whispered in awe,

Goat’s milk makes children strong. And a goat takes care

‘ Who in the world could have done this? That beggar you

of itself. Children, go see the new goat!’ ‘Don’t be in such

fed yesterday?’ The man said, ‘Yes, That beggar! He must

a hurry. I exchanged the goat for a rooster,’ said the poor

have been God, who else?’

man. ‘That’s fine. It’ll wake us up every morning. Where is it? Let’s all go see it,’ said the eager wife.

Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Buffalo and Cow Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Horse

Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Goat

Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Roos ter Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Pat il and his wife Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Beggar Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Selected Characters Buffaloes

Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Selected Patil and his wife

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Selected Beggar

Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Selected Horse

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Selected Cow

Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Selected Goat

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Selected Rooster

Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Tools

Used for illustrations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Scanned image

Curves

42 X 14.5 cm Spread

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Illustrating Indian folktales

Sharpen


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Book layout

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Prototype

8.25’’ X 5.5’’ Buffalo into rooster (BIR) book (Digital print)

Story One: Buffalo into Rooster

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Design

Feedback How do you arrive at design solutions to convey message? how can you represent a blind horse? try to remove the horse eye. When you draw human figures try to maintain the thin lines to go with other visuals. – Chakradhar Saswade

ng s si mi ry re , t s a cy er n t te ac si s ar on .. ch c i s. l w th ua fe s e i v ok li k e in bo m ta ar he n ur i t ak o a h y e m k T In o sh ma t t aje to ou R –

ne

Sce w

Co gar

Beg il

Pat

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Illustrating Indian folktales


ritated at times ir t u b , k o led lo phy used nd scribb f typogra cratchy a ri s e e s s th n d a e s I lik ssed xt and odern/ glo king the te m a e re b th s is a . here me w mposition his somew ties of co ti dy copy. T n o e b id e te th r ra fo two sepa n part into Baidya s illustratio e k – Ra h

, e for this book ustration mad ill le ng si y er d I like ev look simple an goat. They may h us especially the rce of the br e grace and fo nced playful. But th ires an experie achieved requ gs stroke that is e drawin . is evident in th at th d an nd ha – Dhwani Shah

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Two

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I f God is Everywhere (Bengali folktale)

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Illustrating Indian folktales


A

sage had a number of disciples. He taught them his

You’ll be hurt!’ But the disciple did not move an inch. The

deepest belief: ‘God is everywhere and dwells in

mad elephant picked him up with its trunk, swung him

everything. So you should treat all things as God and bow

around, and threw him in the gutter. The poor fellow lay

before them.’ One day when a disciple was out on errands,

there, bruised, bleeding, but above all, disillusioned that

a mad elephant was rushing through the marketplace, and

God should do this to him. When his guru and the other

the elephant driver was shouting, `Get out of the way! Get

disciples came to help him and take him home, he said,

out of the way! This is a mad elephant!’ The disciple remem- ‘You said God is in everything! Look what the elephant did bered his guru’s teachings and refused to run. ‘God is in

to me!’ The guru said, ‘It’s true that God is in everything.

this elephant as He is in me. How can God hurt God?’ he

The elephant is certainly God. But so was the elephant

thought, and just stood there full of love and devotion. The driver, telling you to get out of the way. Why didn’t you driver was frantic and shouted at him, `Get out of the way!

listen to him?’

Story Two: If God is Everywhere

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Elephant Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Layout

One

1 2 3

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Illustrating Indian folktales

A3 Poster cover


Story Two: If God is Everywhere

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Layout

Two

5 fold accordian Poster cover

1 Possible Reading Formats Book + Pos ter

n 1

i 1

2 3

1 2

4

3

5

4 5

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Illustrating Indian folktales


1

2

3

4

Story Two: If God is Everywhere

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Phase 1

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Illustrating Indian folktales

Phase 2


Phase 3

Phase 4

Story Two: If God is Everywhere

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Final

Pos ter

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Prototype

10.5’’ X 27.5’’ If God is Everywhere (IGIE) poster (Digital print)

Story Two: If God is Everywhere

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Design

Feedback Add little red on top guru to balance red, need to reduce red colour intensity at elephant background. Increse the font little. Bottom drawing is good. Down elephant trunk should be little darker to show both elephants are the same. – Chakradhar Saswade

d p an trict o t res y on gre . Dont stead e l litt place e in dd t blu A x . k e r r t a te gd tom pos ng ey bot ry usin it? o l d gr d, t cre ke a Ma d little k n re esign en lac the d ext r to b u re is rdher colo . Whe i k ep G blac un De ar –T

I really like th e way the e lephant is c action in th aptured in is poster. Th e treatment o boxes in the f the text 3rd and 4th section cou much bette ld have been r. Also the ro ugh sketch the part of y treatment ‘get out of in the way’ co slightly more uld have be refined. en – Dhwani S hah

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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story T hree

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A Qazi wit h a

Long Beard (Marathi folktale)

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Illustrating Indian folktales


O

ne evening, a qazi was reading an old book by the light

beard in his fist and lighted the end of it, so that he could

of an oil lamp. when he came across the sentence, Men

have a shorter beard. The beard was long, fine, and silky. It

with long beards are usually quite stupid.’ He had always

caught fire and burned in a blaze. When his fingers began

wanted to be respected for his wisdom, and here he was with

to get burned, the qazi let go of his beard, and the flame

the longest beard in town! Everybody must think him utterly

leaped up and burned off his mustache and his eyebrows,

stupid. He couldn’t bear the thought of it. His eyes fell on

and spread to the hair on his head and burned it all off.

the oil lamp. Without any further hesitation, he gathered his

Now he knew that men with long beards were really stupid.

Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Qazi

Character explorations

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Selected Character

Tools used: Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter

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Illustrating Indian folktales


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Layout

One Book

Cover Page Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 4

Initially i tried quick rough thumbnail drawings to design a book for this story. Later i thought poster works better.

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Inside spreads

1

2

3

4

5

6

Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Layout

Two

5 fold accordian Poster cover

1 Possible Reading Formats Book + Pos ter

n 1

i 1

2 3

1 2

4

3

5

4 5

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Illustrating Indian folktales


1

2

3

4

Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Phase 1

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Illustrating Indian folktales

Phase 2


Phase 3

Phase 4

Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Final pos ter

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Prototype

10.5’’ X 27.5’’ Qazi poster (Digital print)

Story Three: A Qazi with a Long Beard

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Design

Feedback

e th

zi Qa

..

i s. te th ra ge ke i g l a re ex n mo re ca n e ka U a ev d Th ar be sh

aje – R

The illustrations are charmingly humorous and the tragic comic moment comes out really well. Also, the beard is interestingly used as a narrative element that leads us along the story. – Dhwani Shah

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Illustrating Indian folktales


open up the whole thing as My concern is that when you ty. What one can do is use emp little look poster it might ornment of Qazi’s home/ envi of supporting elements like 2 things..it will show your workplace with lamp, it will do ng like how set designgini ima and capability of creating create set for a movie, to ers and cinematographer will ndly will add texture to the seco and . real of give a glimpse e it non empty. I really mak will h large scale graphics whic characters, but to me it feels liked the explorations of the re the factors which drives whe s, like exploration of skill ing. this character to be like it is miss

– Rakesh Baidya

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Four

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Walking on t he

Water (Bengali folktale)

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Illustrating Indian folktales


A

holy man was once meditating on the bank of a river,

water. Where did you learn that?’ ‘I practiced yoga and

when another holy man wanted to impress him with

penances for twelve years in the foothills of the Himalayas,

the extraordinary powers he had achieved through his

standing on one leg, fasting six days of the week. And so I

ascetic practices. So he came towards him, walking on the

acquired this power.’ ‘Really?’ said the first holy man. ‘Why

water. When he reached the place where the first holy man

did you go to all that trouble to do this? Our ferryman here

was quietly sitting, he said, ‘Did you see what I just did?’

will ferry you across any day for two pennies.’

‘Oh yes, I saw you come across the river, walking on the

Story Four: Walking on the water

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Holy man

Character explorations

Tools used: Adobe Photoshop and Corel Painter

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Four: Walking on the water

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Holy man

selected characters

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Four: Walking on the water

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final layout

& Prototype

10.5’’ X 16.5’’ Digital print poster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Story Four: Walking on the water

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Design

Feedback

nd rs a e bdu atur le su he n a T p . f d way se o roun the ckg he u n t a i l b e l k e e te li f th ts w Qui nt o f lec e e r m t ers trea ract the cha o w ed. he t trat of t s u l il are they hah ni S a w h –D olo ed c

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Illustrating Indian folktales


ut age) layo d (105 p re ye racters a one with yout cha la l a n fi I feel the the eeded. Because t really n rk better. o o n w is ll ld a u wo en s at tongu er his lip ressive th p x e r e t lips cov v u o h it very o w adhu pecially sitting s sions, es ow that s h re s p n x a e c U with good. ite good plicity is U are qu im . s t rd u a e o y b ll la with t. Over a eaks a lo p s t a th the eyes keluskar – Rohit kgroun llow bac

guing A simple story expressed in a very intri would manner with vivid facial expressions ut what compel the reader to read it and findo oach of the story is all about. I like your appr ration using a serious yet a little funny illust style to execute this story. – Abhisek Behera

ing, terest

gh the n. stratio ular illu

althou

ry in are ve s r e rtic t c ara his pa e The ch ull in t d get th ly t sligh y and r e o r t a s s r g he colou foldin port t ns sup rategic t io s t a e r h t s .T The illu diately imme s s o r c ce a essen alive. terest in e h t keeps h han Is – Aks

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User Tes t ing I had been sharing my work with my guide, visiting faculties, friends etc throughout the process. But later, I thought of getting some inputs from children themselves who are my real target audience. So I decided to interact with the kids of the faculties living on campus who usually come out to play in the evenings.

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User Testing

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User Feedback

Here are some of the responses I got from them,

Abonti Mukherjee

Divyansh Girdher

Abonti is an 8 years old girl studying in the 2nd standard. She

Divyansh, who is studying in the fifth standard likes reading

likes reading classical ghost stories, especially the character of

books like Diary of a Wimpy Kid and also vampire stories. Illus-

Dracula with big teeth and at times also reads small illustrated

tration wise, he liked the story of ‘If God is everywhere’ whereas

books in Bengali, her mother tongue. She could recognize all the

story wise he preferred ‘Walking on water.’ He enjoyed these

visual elements correctly and also read the text. She liked the

two stories more than the ‘Buffalo into rooster’ story because

Buffalo into rooster story among others because she enjoyed the

he found them funnier. In ‘If God is everywhere, he liked the

illustrations of the animals in the book, especially the form of

depiction of the scene where the disciple is held by the elephant

the cow. However she commented that the form of the rooster

with his trunk and he liked the character of the first holy man in

in the book was not correct and resembled the form of the goat

the story of ‘Walking on water.’ His younger brother, Prathyush,

in the book. From the story of ‘walking on water,’ she liked the

however, liked the small boat in the background rather than the

character of the second holy man. She got a little confused with

images of the two holy men in the poster.

identifying the form of the guru and the disciple in the story ‘If God is everywhere.’

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Sara Nahar

Some inferences from this conversation

Sara is a 9 years old girl studying in the 4th standard. She likes

The reading choices, to some extent, were influenced by the

reading young fiction, especially by Thea Stilton. She patiently

gender of the protagonist in the books. While the adventures

read through the story of ‘Buffalo into rooster’ which is the

of the Theo sisters really appealed to Sara, Divyansh preferred

longest of all four folk tales. But she liked the story of the qazi

Diary of a Wimpy Kid.

better than ‘Buffalo into rooster’ because it was funny. She observed that the size of the text was larger in the books she

Abonti’s comment about the rooster not looking like a rooster

read at home than the size I have used.

made me realize that maintaining the physical characteristic and personality was more important than character and style

Ms. Vinita Nahar, Sara’s mother, who was also present there at

continuity. I should remain close to real proportions of animals

the time, also shared about her daughter’s reading habits. She

even while simplifying the form. Also, while attempting abstrac-

commented that they get a lot of books from NBT (National

tion of form, I should maintain some characters that help in

Book Trust) for her that have realistic characters and situations

identification of animals.

that children can relate to in their daily lives. They also encourage her to read a little in Hindi which she does with some reluctance.

Kids were responding better to stories with some element of

Sara often rereads some of her favourite stories and tries to draw

humour. Besides the illustrations of the main characters, they

some characters she likes. She drew out for me the character of

were also noticing other tinier details like the boat in

a pony from the book ‘Rainbow dash and the hot day’ which she

the background.

quite liked when she was a little younger.

User Testing

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Design

decisions for

s tories

Title:

Buffalo into Rooster

Title:

If God is Everywhere

Size:

8.25’’ X 5.5’’

Size:

10.5’’ X 27.5’’

Format:

Book (20 pages)

Format:

Poster (4 folds)

Medium:

Hand drawn

Medium:

Digital

Tools:

Ink and brush

Tools:

Adobe Photoshop

Font used: Adobe Caslon Pro

Font used: Sweetness

Colours:

Colours:

C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=0 M=9 Y=41 K=0

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C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=0 M=100 Y=100 K=0


Title:

Walking on the Water

Title:

A Qazi with a Long Beard

Size:

15.5’’ X 10.5’’

Size:

10.5’’ X 27.5’’

Format:

Poster (2 folds)

Format:

Poster (4 folds)

Medium:

Hand drawn, Digital

Medium: Digital

Tools:

Photoshop, Corel Painter

Tools:

Photoshop, Corel Painter

Font used: Noteworthy

Font used: Sketchy

Colours:

Colours:

C=12 M=5 Y=16 K=0

C=85 M=79 Y=81 K=7

C=35 M=28 Y=25 K=21

C=1 M=28 Y=81 K=0

C=2 M=20 Y=25 K=0

C=0 M=60 Y=48 K=0

C=75 M=70 Y=70 K=90

C=65 M=17 Y=57 K=1

C=0 M=9 Y=41 K=0

C=0 M=23 Y=49 K=0

Design Decisions

117


Cos t ing for O ffset Print ing

BIR Story Book

+

+

8.25’’ X 5.5’’ Buffalo into rooster (BIR) book

4’’ X 5.5’’ Character cards (5)

2’’ X 5.5’’ Book marks (10)

27.5’’ 5.5’’

16.5’’

16.5’’

1

20.5’’

2

4

5

6

20.5’’

7

4’’

4’’ 22’’ X 30’’ Cartridge

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Illustrating Indian folktales

22’’ X 30’’ Cartridge

8

9

10


Job name:

BIR story book

Total

=A+B+C

+ book marks (10)

= 4394 + 2000 + 2000

+ character cards (5)

= 8400 rupees

Quantity:

1000

1000 books

= 8394 rupees

Actual size:

8.25’’ X 5.5’’

1 book

= 8394/ 1000

Paper:

149 gsm Cartridge 22’’ X 30’’

= 8.40 rupees

No. of colours: 1 colour two sides No. of pages: 20 (10 spreads) Finishing:

centrestaple book

A. Paper cost: 20 pages on 1 sheet (front and back) 20 pages/ book

= 1 sheet/ book

1book + 5 character cards + 10 boomarks = 8.40 rupees

therefore, 1000 books = 1000 sheets 1 ream (500 sheets)

= 2197 rupees

2 reams(1000 sheets)

= 4394 rupees

B. CtP + Printing: 1 colour/ plate1000 sheets = 1000 rupees 2 plates X 1000 sheets

= 2000 rupees

C. Finishing: cutting, gathering, folding, centrestaple per book 2 rupees 1000 books = 2000 rupees

Costing

119


Qazi Poster & IGIE Poster

27.5’’

10.5’’

Qazi poster

21’’ 10.5’’

IGIE poster

22’’ X 30’’ Cartridge

10.5’’ X 27.5’’ Qazi poster + 10.5’’ X 27.5’’ If God is Everywhere (IGIE) poster

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Job name:

(Qazi + IGIE) posters

Total

=A+B+C

Quantity:

1000

= 4394 + 4000 + 2000

Actual size:

10.5’’ X 27.5’’

= 10394 rupees

Paper:

149 gsm Cartridge 22’’ X 30’’

No. of colours: 4 colour one side

1000 (Qazi + IGIE) posters = 10394 rupees

No. of pages: 1 page

1 (Qazi + IGIE) poster

= 10394/ 1000

Finishing:

= 10.40 rupees

Qazi poster

= 10.40/ 2 = 5.20 rupees

IGIE poster

= 10.40/ 2 = 5.20 rupees

= 5.20 rupees

cutting, folding

A. Paper cost: (1 Qazi + 1 IGIE) poster on 1 sheet therefore, 1000 posters = 1000 sheets 1 ream (500 sheets)

= 2197 rupees

Qazi poster

2 reams(1000 sheets)

= 4394 rupees

IGIE poster

= 5.20 rupees

B. CtP + Printing: 1 colour/ plate1000 sheets = 1000 rupees 4 plates X 1000 sheets

= 4000 rupees

C. Finishing: cutting, folding, per poster 1 rupee 2 posters X 1000 = 2000 rupees 1000 books = 2000 rupees

Costing

121


Wow Poster

33’’ 16.5’’

16.5’’

10.5’’ 21’’ 10.5’’

10.5’’ X 16.5’’ Walking on the water (Wow) poster

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Illustrating Indian folktales

23’’ X 36’’ Royal art paper (matt)


Job name:

Wow poster

Total

=A+B+C

Quantity:

1000

= 1376 + 4000 + 1000

Actual size:

10.5’’ X 16.5’’

= 6376 rupees

Paper:

170 gsm Royal art paper (matt) 23” x 36”

No. of colours: 4 colour one side

1000 posters = 6376 rupees

No. of pages: 1 page

1 poster

= 6376/ 1000

Finishing:

= 6.40 rupees

cutting, folding

A. Paper cost: 4 posters on 1 sheet therefore, 1000 posters = 1000/4 = 250 sheets 1 ream (500 sheets)

= 2752 rupees

250 sheets

= 2752/ 2 = 1376 rupees

1 Wow poster = 6.40 rupees

B. CtP + Printing: 1 colour/ plate upto 1000 sheets= 1000 rupees 4 colour/plates X 1000 sheets

= 4000 rupees

C. Finishing: cutting, folding, per poster 1 rupee 1000 posters = 1000 rupees

Costing

123


Package (BIR book + 10 bookmarks + 5 character cards) + Qazi poster + IGIE poster + Wow poster = 8.40 + 5.20 + 5.20 + 6.40 = 25.20 rupees

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Pack of six outcomes offset printing cost

` 25.20

Package

125


Explored ot her

illus t rat ions in t he

process

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Explored Other Illustrations

127


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Illustrating Indian folktales


129


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Illustrating Indian folktales


Explored Other Illustrations

131


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Illustrating Indian folktales


133


Learning & Conclusion

This project gave me an opportunity to develop a better understanding of storytelling using illustrations. I worked on traditional hand drawn illustrations using brush and ink as well as tried digital illustrations using a pen tablet. I explored corel painter while developing the character of Qazi for the story ‘A Qazi with a long beard’. In the course of getting feedback on my artwork, I realized

Experimented with a few offset printing techniques in

that most designers will have their own taste and pref-

digital printing while making prototypes especially for

erence of style hence their opinions on illustrations may

the story of ‘If God is everywhere.’ I also got a clearer

differ; at times it may be completely opposite. Also when

knowledge about making cost effective art works for

every individual is different, choosing a specific target

offset printing.

audience is difficult and developing something especially for them based on an assumption might not work.

I had to approach this project both as an artist and a designer. While my aesthetic choices were largely influenced by my fine art background, many decisions regarding the format and structure were dictated by my understanding of design. I can conclude by saying that this project was, in a way, a bridge of sorts between my art background and graphic design education.

After working on this project, I feel more confident of my illustration skills. I will be able to develop various visual styles to suit different subjects.

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Acknowledgement s

I would like to thank my guide Chakradhar Saswade for spending some time with me to discuss interesting insights even though he was busy with his schedule while visiting the main campus. I thank him for accepting my project even though I took too a long time to finish I’m very glad that I have my friends here, Dhwani, Siddharth, I discussed with other professors and my seniors, Rajesh Sandeep, Amrit, Rahul, Sujatha, Gargee, Abhisek, Mrinalini,

Thakare, Isabel Herguera, Prateek thomas (manta ray),

Akash, Deeksha, Poshika, Pallavi Apte, who were always

Ajay tiwari, Rakesh baidya, Boopathy, Navneet, Rohit, Sai,

there to give me feedback on my works and listened with

Meera. I extend my deep gratitude to them.

patience while I was eating their brains. And finally Chamspa Rinchen Dorje for teaching me IndeI would like to thank my professors, Rupesh Vyas for giving

sign to make this document, giving suggestions when i

me support, a 27’’ iMac and bamboo tablet to develop

was struggling to make design decisions.

illustrations, Immanuel suresh for discussing about my document, Tarun Deep for design feedback in the process.

Thank you all whose names i could not mention here, Some times my hard drive does mess with my important data.

Learning

135


There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning.

Louis L’Amour

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Illustrating Indian folktales


Profile for Lalith Prasad

Illustrating Indian folktales_classroom project documentation  

Process documentation of a classroom project at National Institute of Design, which is based on illustrating Indian folktales. I have illust...

Illustrating Indian folktales_classroom project documentation  

Process documentation of a classroom project at National Institute of Design, which is based on illustrating Indian folktales. I have illust...

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