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VOLUME 4 | ISSUE 1

FOR THE PEOPLE, FROM THE PEOPLE

LAKE SUPERIOR

Folk

Brewery Har vest 9

PRINT + ONLINE

Reso rt + town BE ST OF MN

READ ER’S CHOIC E 2018


Seasons change. Our commitment to our community stays the same. Find peace of mind from your local, trusted bank — since 1920. Come experience The Woodland Way.


SHOULD YOU TAKE

YES!

GLENSHEEN’S CHRISTMAS TOURS?

Do you have young kids?

Oh, yes!

A GUIDE

Do you like things that glitter and sparkle?

START

Do you like Christmas? Not really… Yeah, sure.

Nope.

Eh.

Do you like history? Why? What ’d history ever do to you?

Who doesn’t? Obviously!

Have you been before? Do you love Glensheen?

Show me the way!

Yes, but it can be cold.

So, you’d like an “indoor Bentleyville?”

I guess I don’t know

No.

YES! At Christmas?

Do you want to see 25 lit Christmas Trees in one mansion?

Yes, I go every year!

I would LOVE it!

Do you like Bentleyville?

What’s Bentleyville?

Lights. Lots of Christmas lights. bentley villeusa.org

It’s boring

That just sounds odd

You’re not the life of the party, are you?

Do you like sharkwatching?

That sounds less boring

That’s OK, we can help!


What about scavenger hunts?

Sure do.

Do you or your kids find mischievous elves entertaining?

YES! They’re amazing!

They’re the best! Have you ever seen a unicorn-reindeer?

Yeah, we haven’t either, but wouldn’t that be awesome?!

Does a warm mansion on a cold, snowy day sound amazing? I… I… don’t know…

Are abominable snowmen your friends?

It really does! Meh. What else you got?

Who doesn’t love those?

Really? Where? We should talk.

No, but I want to!

Seriously, what is going on at Glensheen??

Wouldn’t you like to know…

Do you like shortbread cookies?

Yummm!

There’s only one way to find out!

LOOKS LIKE We get along great!

YOU DEFINITELY NEED TO TAKE

A GLENSHEEN CHRISTMAS TOUR! Buy tickets at GLENSHEEN.ORG or by calling 218.726.8910


PUBLISHER Megan Kellin

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Christina Monson

DIRECTOR OF RETAIL Kelly Kabotoff

ART DIRECTOR Mary Jones-Snell

I recently listened to a NPR interview with Paul Simon regarding his latest album, “In The Blue Light.” It is a

GRAPHIC AND AD DESIGN

compilation of some of Simon’s most popular songs spanning

Mary Jones-Snell, Ken Nyberg of Lost 40, Taylor Anderson

his career. Unsatisfied with lyrics and/or composition, Simon has reworked and rerecorded these songs. When asked why

CONTRIBUTORS

listener who is the final composer…” then later stated, “It’s

Kelly Allard, Erin Blegen, Marah Evans, Kari Hedlund, Jeremy Kershaw, Kerry O’Leary, Brian Peterson, Avessa Rockwell, Julia Ruelle, Elizabeth Thompson

the listener who is in charge… They write in their heads what

ADVERTISING Terri Pylka, Kelly Kabotoff, Adessa Nelson, Allison Schwindeman

EVENT PRODUCTION Allison Schwindeman

PODCAST Leah Lemm

he is so critical of his older work, Simon replied, “It’s the

they like.” The listener in Simon’s story is obvious, it’s you and it’s me; our ears and our interpretation. The listener in our case here at Lake + Co. is you, our audience - the reader AND the writer. We are “for the people, from the people,” and every bit of our mission is to be your voice and to publish what you desire and what your life creates. Every issue is full of your stories, your missions, your struggles, and your dreams. Everyday people. Everyday stories. Written by you. This particular “Best Of” issue showcases the businesses and individuals that make up our Minnesota communities –

SUBSCRIBE

those who have taken a dream and ran with it. Those who

Visit us at www.laketimemagazine.com to subscribe to our quarterly publications and digital magazine.

have encountered doubt and adversity, and those who have faced the music and conquered all odds to do what they love

PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS

flavor, culture, and passion.

CONTACT our office or request a Media Kit EMAIL: hello@laketimemagazine.com OFFICE: 218-481-8200

FEATURES If you would like us to consider you, your product, or your business for a feature, please contact us at 218-481-8200 or email us at submissions@laketimemagazine.com 2018 Lake Time Magazine. All rights reserved. No portion may be duplicated, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the publisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, however, the publisher assumes no responsibility for accuracy of information or omissions from the material provided. Lake Time Magazine cannot be held liable for the quality or performance of goods and services rendered by the advertisers published in the magazine.

and help make this state full of adventure, wonder, diversity,

In business and in life, you must always be pushing onward and upward and we strive to be the very best representation of you, our listener, and ourselves. You have a voice and you have a story to tell. Your composition makes up the fiber of our culture and is the reason we wake up every day and do what we do. We’re honored to provide a platform for everyone to compose their own narrative and we dedicate this issue to all of you!

Christina Monson

CREATED IN THE GREAT 218 PrintReleaf guarantees every sheet of paper a customer consumes will be reforested. Lake Time Magazine has reforested 5,842,674 sheets of copy paper.

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

7


NORTHWOODS REALTY

FANTASTIC ISLAND LAKE HOME

3BR/2BA KING LAKE HAVEN

GORGEOUS HORSESHOE LAKE HOME

3BR/3BA, Gazebo, 2 Garages, 124’ lkshr #9932253 $247,000 UP NORTH TEAM 218-244-8462

Custom home on 6 Acres w/270 FF #9931033 $375,000 KAREN 218-244-0795/BRETT 218-360-1595

367 FF, 5 Acres, 3 stall attached garage #9931345 $450,000 JIM 218-244-1604

UNIQUE POKEGAMA LAKE OPPORTUNITY!

BEAUTIFUL LAWRENCE LAKE HOME

BALSAM LAKE’S MAGNIFICENT PENINSULA

5BR/3BA with breathtaking 291’ sand lkshr #9931997 $579,900 MITCH 218-398-1821/MIKE 218-259-0286

Quality 3BR/2+BA, 2.5 Ac, Gar & Airplane Hangar #9932249 $299,900 UP NORTH TEAM 218-244-8462

Multi-tiered home, 3338 ft lkshr, Regal Pines #9930543 $450,000 CHARLOTTE 218-259-9696

ADORABLE POKEGAMA LAKE COTTAGE

CLASSIC, TRADITIONAL 4+BR ON MCKINNEY LAKE

GORGEOUS PRAIRIE LAKE HOME

Charming 1BR/1BA, 4 Season Room, 2 car gar #9931860 $234,900 UP NORTH TEAM 218-244-8462

Magnificent kitchen, 1.15 Ac & 170 feet lkshr #9931090 $439,000 CHARLOTTE 218-259-9696

One level, 3BR/2BA, 4 stalls garage, 242’ lkshr #9931931 $449,900 UP NORTH TEAM 218-244-8462


Serving Itasca County for over 70 Years.

SYLVAN BAY WATERFRONT HOME

WEST FACING SUNSETS ON DEER LAKE

CUSTOM BUILT ON 4.66 WOODED ACRES

4BR/2BA, walkout bsmt, 100 FF, Dbl att gar #9931676 $290,000 KAREN 218-244-0795

4BR/2BA, limitless potential, hard sand lkshr #9932219 $209,900 BRETT 218-360-1595

4BR/3BA with 2BR/1BA apartment above gar #9931763 $299,500 MIKE 218-259-0286

PRIME LOCATION AND GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY!! Live in the City of Grand Rapids and on Prestigious Lake Pokegama without the taxes! 6 large lots set in the mature pines all with ownership in shared lake lot. Lake lot has large pier and excavated waterway. 3 lots with frontage, 3 lots off lake, all 1.25 Acres or larger. Across the street from new elementary school, blocks from hospital and near golf course.

$99,900 EACH

MITCH 218-398-1821 OR MIKE 218-259-0286

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1-800-450-3455 812 Pokegama Ave. South NICE 3BR CABIN ON GRAVE LAKE Clean, hard lkshr, dead end road, great fishing! #9930610 $149,900 MIKE 218-259-0286

Grand Rapids, MN 55744

CHARMING HILL LAKE HOME 2BR, 2 car gar, guest cottage, 4 Ac, 300’ lkshr #9932327 $304,900 UP NORTH TEAM 218-244-8462


HELLO

THE BIG PUSH “To achieve great things, two things are needed: a plan, and not quite enough time.” -Leonard Bernstein

V

olume 4 has arrived which means we’re on to a new year in the journey of business and we’re celebrating these little victories with you, our devoted supporters and readers. With this issue, we’re proud to feature Reader’s Choice, where we highlight today’s visionaries, foundation-shaking luminaries, and transformative ideas that are crafting a better future for our great state. We do this by recognizing their establishments, their initiatives, and their presence.

Behind these places are people, dreamers who have stepped things up to a whole new level and we’re proud to be on the journey alongside them. Lake Time Magazine, and everyone here, is a testament to living the dream and that anything’s possible when you have a clear vision and focus. Furthermore, it’s become evident to me through my own journeys, and is something all too real in publishing, that there are a few key components that bring us to the next level in business, and in life. The one single underlier that I always come back to is the ability to recognize a sense of urgency. Action!... always over perfection. Making a push to see it through. Getting to the finish line, while giving it your all. Oftentimes I like to compare business ventures or creative projects to the likes of running a marathon. However, given my current state, as I mentally and physically prepare to welcome our third child into the world, using babies as an analogy feels relevant. Babies and business, apples to apples, right!

HELLO

As I’m sure it stands true for anyone fueled with passion for what they do, your personal world is your professional world and everything you do is derived from a source of inspiration, excitement, purpose, and intrinsic motivation. Work/life balance lines get blurred and choosingly so. In fact, just the other day I referred to my due date as a deadline. Oops.

10

If you’re familiar with the pregnancy book "What To Expect When You’re Expecting" you’ll understand what I mean when I say I bet I could write the "What To Expect When You’re Entrepreneuring" version. At least a couple chapters. Dual purposed self-help. Yes, there are too many similarities between running a startup/business and having a baby – sleepless nights, indigestion, crying for no apparent reason. Of course, the end result – your miracle creation – is worth the emotional upheaval. And there will be times, mainly during the gestation period, when you’ll wish

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

you could go back to the night you’d come up with your great idea, and say “what the hell were we thinking?!” Pregnancy is the marathon, the sprint is the push that brings the idea to life. Both require infinite patience and constant reevaluation for optimal performance. And when that due date or deadline is in sight, of course all of those doubts you pushed aside tend to creep back up. It takes grit and courage. It takes digging deep and pushing through the moments of wanting to quit. Your stress levels go through the roof, you feel like you could be physically ill… you know that finally this is the time where everything is either going to unhinge completely or come together in all its glory. But that deadline was also the thing that pushed you to throw away all of your doubts and just get it done. That’s where the magic happens. It’s where the kind of snap decisions that you have to make when a deadline begins propel you without thought – suddenly you’re more in tune with your taste and gut instincts than you’ve ever been. When you don’t have time to second guess yourself, you’re forced to go with what your brain is handing you that day, and you wind up with something you would have never created if given more time. And at the end of the day, after that immense feeling of accomplishment settles in, you know that every tantrum, every hiccup and bad smell was worth it and that your life will never be the same again, but you’d never want it to be. We pivot, we evolve, we grow, we learn. The moral of the story:

Real accomplishments… anything that’s worth doing, requireS really hard pushes. We applaud these efforts! We are beyond honored to be in the company of the people who have jumped the hurdle, made the push, felt the victory. These are businesses with real people and great stories behind them that make our culture and lifestyle what it is here. I hope this issue – which touches on everything from the best of the service industry and our organizations to the history and science of our lakes and landscapes – helps get your wheels turning. We love your feedback. We’d love to see you continue to tell us what businesses are making your community a better place (check out the Hotdish on page 76); and continue to give some love to the folks who go above and beyond. And most of all, keep sharing your story.

Megan Kellin PUBLISHER


YOUR INVITATION TO

AWAY

Visit us at any of these convenient locations. 5375 LANDMARK DR. BRAINERD, MN • 218.829.1111

3825 MAIN AVE. W. FARGO, ND • 701.282.9000

15219 FELLER ST. N.E. FOREST LAKE, MN • 651.464.3135

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Photos may show optional or special edition equipment available at an additional cost. Details in pricing, savings, features and promotions may vary by location and are subject to change without notice. Void where prohibited by law. Best efforts are used to ensure the accuracy of our advertising, however, errors may sometimes occur. Applicable tariffs may affect final price. See your local dealer for complete information. F.O.B. Springfield, MO, USA. © 2018 White River Marine Group, LLC TR181521

12720 DEM CON DR. SHAKOPEE, MN • 952.233.3434


20 RECIPES: PASTIES

50

SCIENCE

Scientists look to our Great Lake for answers to the origin of Earth.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: MENTAL HEALTH

62 ENTREPRENEUR

So much more than an ordinary T-shirt, this business goes beyond the basic threads to tell the story of artist and inspiration.

48 BWCA PARENT-FREE

Four high school friends embark on a trip of a lifetime.

83

24 CRANBERRIES

HOT DISH

Your reader’s choice in every issue. DISH IT OUT!

76

66 BEST OF MN Ballots were cast, votes were calculated... now we bring you the results of our reader's choice "BEST OF MINNESOTA!"

12


Get Social #itslaketime #astateofmind follow us at laketimemagazine

90 FALL FOLIAGE

30 36 MUSIC

Hot music is happenin' all over the state . Tune in each month for amazing performances curated by KAXE/KBXE and The Reif Center.

FOLK SCHOOLS

Preserving traditional crafts and forging life-long relationships, three folkehojskolers are celebrating northern culture.

40

SUPERIOR HIKING TRAIL

FOR THE PEOPLE, FROM THE PEOPLE

Take a trip to explore the bold, bright colors of the North Shore.

21 days. 140 miles. 50 pounds of gear. Still photos. Video. Virtual realty. Time-lapse. Drone. Camp stove. Hammock tent. Sleeping bag. Food and water. Follow one photographer's journey on the SHT.

57 MARKETPLACE

As the weather turns cooler and the trees lose their leaves, we start to think about the upcoming holiday season. Check out this assortment of inspired makers and their products - just in time for holiday shopping!

Want to see your favorite hot spot or most traveled trail featured? Send us your photos, stories, and ideas to: submissions@laketimemagazine.com

13


At Lake + Co. we believe we are as good as the company we keep. We are an

Are you interested in writing for Lake Time Magazine? We’re interested in you! Write to us at submissions@laketimemagazine.com or submit your writing online at www.laketimemagazine.com/submissions/

independent, bootstrapped, community-driven, women-owned company built on hard work, enthusiasm, and a whole lot of grit. When you become a member, you support the culture and stories of which Minnesota's very foundation is built. We are a socially conscious magazine and shop, carefully curated to give back to those who are local, authentic, and inspired. We are... for the people, from the people. And we thank each and every one of you for your support! Are you our people? Then join us!

THE COMPANY WE KEEP

Megan Kellin (Publisher) Captain at the Lake + Co. helm, Megan has a zest for big ideas but knows the difference is in the details. Driven by vision and obsessed with the journey, she believes in the power of enthusiasm, grit, and family. Her every mission is to align people and places around purpose, create connection, and inspire action.

Adessa Nelson (Marketing Coordinator + Social Media) With roots dug deep in the Finland, MN soil, Adessa, has grown up with an adoration for the North. From working at a boy scout camp to running a photography business of her own, she brings fresh perspectives to the team and greets each day with grit and enthusiasm.

Samantha Martin Photography

14

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

Taylor Anderson (Marketing Coordinator + Design) is a recent college graduate taking a dive head first into the real world of design. A MN native, Taylor takes on any challenge thrown at her and is eager to bring her fresh ideas and knowledge of current design trends to the company.

Allison Schwindeman (Contributing Editor Lake Bride Magazine + Event Producer) has nearly 10 years of experience creating inspired events for Fortune 100 Companies, non-profits, and high net-worth clients from coast to coast. Her work has graced the pages of numerous national and regional publications and she is excited to use her design and execution skills to further Lake + Co.’s mission of telling stories.

TEAM

Christina Monson (Editor-in-chief) is a self-proclaimed slave to the English language and loves every second of it. A perfectionist-intraining and with her red pen in hand, you'll find her obsessing over the use of the Oxford comma and catching grammatical faux pas that never (fingers crossed) make it onto these pages.

Kelly Kabotoff (Director of Retail) is a visionary when it comes to Lake + Co. and all things business. She's passionate about growing the North through entrepreneurship and community collaboration and actively applies her past marketing, retail, and franchise development expertise.

Mary Jones-Snell (Art Direction & Graphic Design) is a multidisciplinary designer who specializes in branding, packaging, and illustration. She loves using strategy and design as tools to solve problems and help others. Mary stays inspired by the beauty of nature, art, painting, photography, fashion, and music.


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and other, nd, e, m a a wif her husb is n, n nd Blege childre he a e S re Erin r. h t rais de ir a a e M te h t s d n with home in Gra f their along farm uch o mall Josh, row m nas g nsible o o d p e n res ea , resid y rais race e b ating h e t m e il -ta ey where se-to d. Th , and o s o n d , fo o y r own meth sband u can ning al hu le. Yo garde anim lifesty family at lture u h c a tc -scra perm d her . a from in an m.com living p with Er byfar b u o h h h c ir catc b w .yello www

...Tell your story + become a member + subscribe today. www.thelakeandco.com... IN THIS ISSUE LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

15


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C HECK IT O UT

ENHANCING THE CABIN EXPERIENCE THROUGH DESIGN

VOL UME 3 | ISS UE

4

mak e an impa

:LIFESTYL

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TY e e c t uworrld a r c h ini at mo dern ES

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U R L I F Ets D E S I G Nct,YVisiOona ry Con cep at home

SPAC IORS & D INTER INSPIRE

vote

BEST MN

BY DALE MULFINGER in case you missed it Sto r y tellin g is b est s er ved f ro m t h o s e m o st p a ss io n ate a b out thei r top i c or t ra d e. S u c h is t h e c a s e w it h esteem ed a rc h itec t , Da le Mul f i ng er. Featured in t h e s u m m er iss u e, Da le s h a red w it h u s h is ex p er t is e on how d esi g n elem en t s c a n en h a n ce yo u r c a b in ex p er ien ce. E m b ra c i ng nature, b ri ng i ng

At The Lake

LE CU RT IS W IT H NI CO

9

p eo p le to g et h er, a n d u t iliz in g in n ovat ive a n d in s p ir in g tec hni q ues b ri ng to lig h t t h e im p o r t a n ce o f h o m e a n d d es ig n , w h ic h we bel i eve enha nces your ow n life' s sto r y.

ONLINE PRINT +

G i v i n g c re di t w h e re cre di t i s du e i s at the very core of this publication. We m issed Da le’s byline in his ar t ic le, " Enhanc ing t h e C abi n Expe ri e n ce Thro ugh D e si gn" so do yourself a favor a nd check it out in the sum m er issue. You won’t re g re t it ! F i n d it o n l i ne at www.l ake ti me magazine.com

Corey Gaffer

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

17


(218) 326-3458 • 680 EAST US HWY 2, GRAND RAPIDS, MN 55744

A historic boutique hotel - BRAND NEW remodeled rooms, lobby, and event yurt!


Golf. Gather. Get Away. Thumper Pond is a new kind of Golf Resort, one that

event spaces of all sizes, and our on-site restaurant,

everyone can enjoy, even if you don’t play golf. The

Willy T’s Tavern & Grille. With 78 spacious suites,

resort is located in the heart of Central Minnesota lakes

our resort has ample room for your family reunion,

country and nestled among 250 acres of pine forest.

golf outing, wedding, or meeting. Nearby Otter Tail

Our guests enjoy a championship 18-hole golf course

Lake offers swimming, boating, fishing, and more.

– which features traditional, fling, and foot golf, a new

The premiere vacation destination in Otter Tail lakes

12,000 square-foot indoor waterpark, meeting and

country, Thumper Pond provides fun for the whole family.

218-367-2000 | 1-877-294-7981 www.thumperpond.com

300 Thumper Lodge Road | Ottertail, Minnesota 56571

Thumper Pond

@thumperpond


RECIPE

IRO N R A NGE

PASTIE S by Kelly Allard

When discussing pasties, the first thing that should be addressed is the pronunciation; otherwise we might be having completely different conversations which could result in a very embarrassing (but possibly hilarious) miscommunication. Pasty is pronounced by saying the words pass and tea. Pasty. Now that we have that covered we can get to the meaty details. Pasties have been a mainstay of Iron Range culture for many generations. During the 1800’s and early 1900’s, the mines were thriving and attracting workers from all around the world. Hibbing and the surrounding area became a confluence of culture; immigrants brought their recipes and traditions, but were also at the mercy of the weather and the seasonality of what was available. Pasties, which had come across the Atlantic with workers from Cornwall, were an ideal way to use the crops that thrive in northern Minnesota as well as a convenient lunch for the Iron Range workers to bring to work. Since these meat and veggie pies are also pretty darn delicious, they found their way to the dinner tables in the region and eventually beyond, as families moved from the Iron Range, bringing the tradition of the pasty with them.

RECIPE

My Finnish and Polish ancestors on the Range made pasties, and pasties have always been a mainstay in my home. My mom makes them, my grandma made them, my great grandmothers made them, you get the picture. I was fortunate to meet up with my great-uncle a few weeks back, and he gave me the pasty recipe from his mom (my great-grandmother). I was honored to learn this recipe that I’ll share with you now.

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Note: I was told that using organic was an important part of the process, so try to get organic produce and meat if you can!

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018


RECIPE

Kelly Allard

Mary Manninen's recipe (as told by Hank Manninen) Chop potatoes, rutabaga, onion, and carrots into ¼ inch to ½ inch cubes. Place vegetables (and grated garlic clove if using) in a bowl with the beef and pork. Mix well, adding salt and pepper to taste. Roll out your dough into a circle and put ⅙ of the meat and vegetable mixture on the bottom half of the dough. Fold the top half of the crust over the filling, and crimp the edges. Pierce the top of the pasty with a fork three times, so the steam can escape. Repeat with the other five crusts.

Makes 6 3 boxes of pie crust or six of your favorite homemade crusts ¾ lb cubed or ground beef ½ lb cubed or ground pork ¾ lb red potatoes ¾ lb rutabaga ½ lb onion ½ lb carrots 2-3 cloves of garlic (optional) Salt and pepper

Place the pasties on a greased or parchment-lined cookie sheet and bake at 405⁰ for 50 minutes or until golden brown and cooked through. Let cool slightly and enjoy!

Like the recipe, the method of eating a pasty differs from person to person and family to family. Some people love them smothered in ketchup (guilty!), some in gravy, and some cut the pasty in half lengthwise and let a knob of butter melt into it. How do you eat your pasties? Since pasties at their core and in their essence, were originally about convenience, another fantastic way to enjoy pasties is in pie form. Buy some pre-made crust, pack in the pasty filling, and top with a second crust. Bake the same time and temp as the recipe above. You can slice and serve it right away or freeze for another day!

RECIPE

p.s. If you are looking to really rile up a room full of Iron Rangers, start a discussion about how to make pasties. You’ll get a lively debate about what should go inside (butter, rutabaga, celery, etc.), but overall, they’ll typically agree on who makes the best ones: Mom

Mary Jones-Snell

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HARVEST

CRA N B E R R IE S : IT’ S A FA M ILY A F FA IR by Kerry O'Leary

T H E FA R M E R S

HARVEST

As you head north along Highway 65 you can’t help but take notice of the transforming terrain. Densely populated neighborhoods and tall buildings quickly turn into desolate winding backroads surrounded by marshy wetlands, lined with weathered pines and roaming wildlife. Just two hours north of the Twin Cities' Lakes & Legends taproom, nestled in the northern wetlands along the banks of the mighty Mississippi you’ll find the Minnesota Cranberry Company, the state’s only commercial cranberry farm. Owned and operated by Randy Forester and his family, the farm has grown significantly since its humble beginning in 2001.

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LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

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Loon Lake Portraits


HARVEST

HARVEST

Randy, the storyteller, as he’s fondly referred to amongst the brewery staff, shares stories of days long since passed. You’ll find remnants of his former lives working in the Arctic Circle building towns along the ice roads to his days deconstructing the Minnesota railways proudly displayed throughout the farm. Nowadays, Randy spends most of his time working as the only full-time family member on the farm. Wife, Billie Jo, joins her husband on the farm when she isn’t working at her own business in town, Aitkin Quilts & Fabrics. Randy and Billie Jo have truly made the farm a family affair. Not only have they passed down the trade of their craft to their children but also their self-starting and entrepreneurial spirits. Although cranberries and their Ocean Spray partnership is the farm’s main revenue source, a portion of their land is reserved for wild rice and soybean crops as well as raising livestock. LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

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HARVEST

Kerry O'Leary

The Forester’s four children have not only taken on the family business in stride but have happily taken it upon themselves to expand the farm’s offerings: Samantha - 19, is currently serving in the National Guard; Amanda - 17, a PSEO junior and crowned Beef Princess, has begun raising a small herd of cattle; Shannon - 16, spends her days between school competing in rodeos and being groomed to be her dad’s right hand woman in the family business; and Nathan - 10, not only helps out at the farm but is something of a green thumb himself as he’s grown and sold his own produce.

THE PROCESS

HARVEST

Cranberry farming is no simple task. Cranberries require a very specific environment in order for the vines to mature and bear fruit year after year. Natural bogs predominantly found in northern North America have evolved from what’s known as kettle holes lined with clay and other organic remnants left behind from the receding glaciers.

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The Foresters, amongst the majority of cranberry farmers, use a technique called the Wet Harvest method. With this method farmers flood the fields to collect the buoyant berries as they rise to the surface. Bumpers are then set in place to corral the cranberries so that a pumping system can sort the berries and load them into trucks. A popular misconception of cranberry farming is that the beds are flooded year-round, however this is only true during and post harvest season. The majority of the year the beds sit in no more than a foot and a half of water. To protect the crops from frosts during the late fall, an intricate sprinkler system is set in place to keep the berries from freezing. After the harvest season has come to completion, the bogs are prepped for the winter months. As the temperatures begin to drop the farmers once again flood the field to create a protective layer of ice to shield the dormant vines from the harsh northern winter months.

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018


HARVEST LAKES & LEGENDS BREWING COMPANY’S CRANBERRY SAISON As we near the final days of summer and slowly transition into fall, Lakes & Legends Brewing Company co-founder Derrick Taylor and his team head north to check in on this year’s harvest for their annual Cranberry Saison, sourced directly from the Minnesota Cranberry Company. “At Lakes & Legends, we pride ourselves on building lasting relationships with local farmers so that we can continue developing flavor-forward beers to celebrate our region.” said Taylor. “We’re extremely fortunate to live in a state that has such an abundance of terrains, produce, and people which allow us to continuously develop our Farm Series of craft beers - featuring locally-sourced ingredients. This fall we will release the fourth edition of our Cranberry Saison, a refreshingly tart ale with a bright and clean finish. Perfectly paired with your Thanksgiving meal.”

THE TAPROOM The Cranberry Saison is just one example of the Lakes & Legends Farm Series mission. You can find this ale along with several other styles in the Twin Cities taproom located in the foothills of the downtown Minneapolis skyline, just blocks away from the Convention Center and on the edge of Loring Park proper. As the first and only Minnesota Grown brewery member, Lakes & Legends is dedicated to sourcing the highest quality ingredients, supporting their community by being an active member in it, and celebrating the great outdoors the North region has to offer. Their family and dog-friendly taproom features an “indoor lawn” (turf) paired with adirondack chairs and lawn games, a big screen for adventure films, and a sidewalk patio. Come check out one of the largest taprooms in the state and see why they’re known for specializing in seasonal releases and handcrafted beers of the North.

Loon Lake Portraits Kerry O'Leary

HARVEST

CRANBERRY FARMING IS NO SIMPLE TASK. CRANBERRIES REQUIRE A VERY SPECIFIC ENVIRONMENT IN ORDER FOR THE VINES TO MATURE AND BEAR FRUIT YEAR AFTER YEAR.

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Craft Beer Of The North, Brewed In The Foothills Of The Downtown Minneapolis Skyline. 1368 LaSalle Ave Mpls, MN www.lakesandlegends.com 612.999.6020


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While the tools they use are made of metal and not stone, their design mimics what natives have used for centuries.


MAKING NEW SCHOOLS OLD SCHOOL by Avesa Rockwell

When half of downtown Grand Marais closes for the off-season, the North House Folk School campus continues to bustle with activity. Program Director Jessa Frost says their fall and winter offerings “give people who love the North Shore a reason to visit during the colder months. They can sit by a woodstove with a view of Lake Superior, craft with friends, and learn something new.” The Danes call this cozy feeling “hygge” (pronounced “hueguh”). It might explain why studies have rated Denmark the happiest country on earth. Their wealth of warm fuzzies might also owe to another Danish invention: the folkehøjskoler, or folk school. In the 1830s, Lutheran Bishop, writer, and philosopher Nickolai Fredrik Grundtvig

Jeremy Kershaw

founded the first folk schools to preserve traditional crafts and to provide higher education to the masses. Many Danes credit Grundtvig for creating their national identify and for founding their democracy. The first folkehøjskoler in the U.S. was built in Tyler, Minnesota in 1888, and the structure now serves as Parish Hall for the Danebrod congregation. Northern Minnesota’s contemporary folk schools are nondenominational and invite people of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities to learn how to make beautiful and useful things from traditions around the globe - not just Scandinavia. Founded in 1997, the North House in Grand Marais is devoted to “teaching traditional northern crafts,” which, as Frost clarifies, “is any craft where winter affects what is available.”

Ely’s three-year-old folk school “celebrates the wilderness heritage, art, history, culture, and craft of the people of northern Minnesota.” This includes Slavic, Finnish, and Anishinabe traditions. Meanwhile, the Duluth Folk School’s new main campus in the burgeoning Craft District in Lincoln Park provides a variety of classes, affordable workspace to local artisans, and a venue for events. It also houses Dovetail Café that serves Almanac coffee and local brews on tap. Even with different missions and structures, these three organizations share a love for tradition, community, and fun.

RESPECT FOR TRADITIONS AND NATURAL RESOURCES North House’s forgery looks and sounds like the depths of Hades. Flames

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Hike MILES OF VARIETY

With over 375 miles of hiking trails, your path and destinations are endless.

Find midweek lodging specials and trail maps at VisitCookCounty.com


flare from four ovens by handcranked blowers. Hammers pound sparks out of glowing rods on anvils. But this inferno has purpose: everyone has a job and the soothing voice of Marvin Gaye plays over the din. Frost of North House says, “What makes us human is our ability to make things with our hands. Craft speaks directly to that… in the age of IKEA you can be disconnected from that process and it can be fundamentally unfulfilling.” Instructor and blacksmith Cody Myers of Superior, WI agrees: “Now tools are accessible and cheap. People want deals, not quality.” He says he loves seeing the joy people get from practicing the ancient art of blacksmithing: “People don’t understand it until they try it themselves.” In their 2017 book, The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone, cognitive scientists Steven Sloman and Phillip Fernbach describe their Yale study that asked participants to rate how well they understood how everyday objects (like toilets and zippers) function. The participants thought they knew more than they actually did, a phenomenon Sloman and Fernbach call the “Illusion of Explanatory Depth.” The most interesting part of the study was how participants reacted when they realized their ignorance: they became more open-minded and interested in their surroundings. Basket making instructor Emily Dierke of central Minnesota starts her classes by teaching students how to responsibly harvest willow birchbark. Then they take the pieces back to North House and sort by size and purpose. Nine years ago, Dierke was a potter without a kiln. Then she realized she could make baskets from what grew nearby. Canoe builder Erik Simula of the Ely Folk School also harvests his own materials. He often works with loggers to access birch, ash, and cedar from areas that are already being cleared. He instructs his building team to gently pull black

spruce roots so they will grow back. Simula learned to build birchbark canoes from an Ojibwe elder, and he has devoted his life to preserving this almost-lost Anishinabe tradition. He says that when he brings his sixperson canoes to the White Earth Boys Fort Band on the Vermilion reservation and Lac LeCroix on the First Nations Reserve in Canada, the native community has responded in “awe, wonder, and embarrassment.” He says their embarrassment comes from not knowing their own traditions. So much knowledge was lost after 1891 when the U.S. Congress required native children to attend boarding schools. North House’s Jessa Frost recognizes that non-native populations lose traditions, too: “The objects from our grandparents carry stories—like recipes… now what are we going to pass on to our kids?” Mary Louise Icenhour teaches six of the Ely Folk School’s regular volunteers how to make her family’s potica (pronounced “po-teet-sa”) bread. Her recipe came from her Slovenian grandparents who settled in Ely in 1890. It takes almost a day and many hands to make. Icenhour explains that there are a hundred different varieties of potica. For the filling, her Slovenian family used honey and walnuts, while Serbians further south prefer dates and poppy seeds. As they roll out the dough to cover the 6 x 4 foot work table, a student asks, “Are wrinkles OK?”

WHAT MAKES US HUMAN IS OUR ABILITY TO MAKE THINGS WITH OUR HANDS. CRAFT SPEAKS DIRECTLY TO THAT

Student Jesse Schutt builds 16 x 10 structure that he will take home to Wasau, WI. He thinks he might turn it into an office. Other students are making a 13 x 13 sauna.

Rowan Allaire and Mark Nadir practice teamwork in the North House Forgery.

Icenhour laughs, and says, “Oh, yes, we expect wrinkles! Wrinkles are good!” Duluth Folk School’s co-founder Bryan French says that even practical tasks, like fixing a latch or repairing a leaky faucet, are difficult for a lot of people nowadays. He says, “This might be simple stuff, but if you don’t have the tools or the skills, what do you do?” To fill this gap, the folk school has created a tool lending library and a class called “Homeowner 101.” A testament to teamwork: this dough started out as a 12 x 14 inch rectangle.

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Simula splits stripped black spruce root he harvested from nearby bogs. The strips will serve as flat-lying ties to pull the whole structure together, and they need a lot of ties!

COMMUNITY “Community” is an overused word, and building one means different things to different people. To Frost, folk schools have the potential to mend a divided nation. “I’m not saying that making a basket is going to give peace, love, and harmony, but it’s a start.” In a town like Ely, where tensions between supporters of mining and defenders of the Boundary Waters are at an all-time high, the folk school can serve as neutral ground to preserve traditions that both locals and newcomers hold dear. According to several devoted volunteers, the folk school in the Fisherman’s Headquarters building on Sheridan Street has become a vital community center. Ely resident and folk school volunteer Jodi Chaffin says, “there are no politics here.”

COMMUNITY IS ALSO A MATTER OF SCALE In any given week over the summer, Simula’s birchbark canoe project brings together more than 8-12 core builders. Some are long-time residents and others are new arrivals, like Julie Nester, who recently moved from the Twin Cities to be near the Boundary Waters. She credits the Tuesday night canoe building sessions for structuring her social life. Ely Folk School Executive Director Betty Firth likes how their classes allow people to work together. Sometimes their students take classes in groups as part of a friend or family reunion. She says that if a group wants to learn a particular craft she can find an instructor to teach it. Companies also send their employees to the folk schools for professional development experiences. Last year a group of woman architects visited North House to build objects together. Classes also make excellent gifts. Last June, Jesse Schutt of Wausau, WI received a nine-day timber framing class at North House from his wife for Father’s Day. He was lucky to get a spot: that class can have waitlists of 100 people, so early registration is a must. Frost of North House says, “People come here thinking ‘I want to make a basket,’ but the experience is much richer than the end product. They meet interesting people and have interesting conversations. Our instructors are fascinating people.” 34

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SPIRIT In the “Fish House” overlooking the Grand Marais harbor, Mayor Jay Arrowsmith DeCoux teaches students how to make sausage. No, it’s not about how the town’s laws get made, as the old saying goes. It’s really about sausage. DeCoux, a millennial with an ample red beard and infectious enthusiasm, shows his students three kinds of casings. He says that natural casings are sold by weight, so packages sold by number are probably made with collagen. Then he shows students how to cleanse the casings under a faucet and attach them to the meat schnozzle. He rolls a clean casing onto the metal tube like pantyhose onto a leg. He says, “This is where high school students can’t keep it together.” His students are only slightly more mature. One asks a serious question: “How do you avoid air bubbles?”

IT’S ESSENTIAL TO INFUSE JOY, WHIMSY, AND DELIGHT IN EVERYTHING WE DO

“Just make sure the schnozzle meets the meat!” Duluth’s Bryan French insists that even with practical objectives, “it’s essential to infuse joy, whimsy, and delight in everything we do.” Talk about hygge.

IF YOU GO: The North House Folk School’s Annual Family Weekend runs Thursday, Oct. 18 to Sunday, Oct. 21 and the Winterer’s Gathering is Friday, Nov. 16 to Sunday, Nov. 18. Learn more at https://northhouse.org The Ely Folk School in Ely will offer fall courses in wild rice harvesting on Sept. 1 and 2, and Autumn nature writing on Saturday, Oct. 6. For details, visit https://elyfolkschool.org The Duluth Folk School posts course offerings two months in advance. Watch for ukulele playing, rug braiding, and kombucha brewing classes at https://duluthfolkschool.com


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MUSIC

CenterStage

by Kari Hedlund

Supporting the arts has a long established history in Grand Rapids, and a lot of that has to do with The Reif Center and Northern Community Radio KAXE/KBXE. The two organizations have partnered for a monthly concert series bringing high quality Minnesota musicians to the stage in Grand Rapids. The CenterStage Minnesota Concert Series is in its third season, starting September 20th with jeremy messersmith. Make your trek to Grand Rapids the third Thursday of every month from September to May!

Jeremy Messersmith A chameleon in the indie world, jeremy messersmith’s latest album "Late Stage Capitalism" shares some big orchestral pop sounds, while his 2017 release, "11 Obscenely Optimistic Songs for Ukulele: A Micro Folk Record for the 21st Century and Beyond" was, well, just as the title suggests. He’ll bring his band with to share the new songs, older catalogue, and maybe we’ll get a ukulele tune or two.

J a c k K la t t Starting his career in Minnesota by collaborating with one of the state’s elusive legends, Spider John Koerner, Jack Klatt has a style all his own. Working with his band on a new album, they’ll be ready to showcase their countrified retro rhythm and blues with a little early rock and roll thrown in.

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER Da rin

Ka mn e

tz

SEPTEMBER

Zo e

Pr

ind

s

OCTOBER

Bad Bad Hats

MUSIC

B r o t h e r s B u r n M ou n t a i n

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Actual brothers, Jesse and Ryan Dermody have made a name for themselves in northern Minnesota as drumming machines. The two trade places around the drum kits consistently throughout a show, moving onto all the surfaces in any room they play; whether it’s bar tops, corrugated siding, cement floors, you name it. They’ll be out with a new album, "Blue Spruce" in October which features lots of familiar names in Minnesota music: Colleen Myhre, Ryan Young (Trampled By Turtles), Matt Wasmund and Dave Adams (Big Wave Dave and the Ripples), and Lee Martin (Feeding Leroy, Trampled By Turtles, Dead Horses). It’s an album with a varied vibe, as Jesse says, “from feathery-touch love ballads to violin concerto near-lullabies, to all-out sweat-it-out fiery rocking, to heart-breaking bitter euphoria out in the country, to wild brass on bluesy wings.” Come see it to understand.

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

After making a splash in the music world with their debut album, "Psychic Reader," the indie rock trio are out with a new album, "Lightning Round," on Minneapolis label, Afternoon Records. Kerry Alexander’s voice cuts through right to the heart of the matter, evoking vulnerability while giving a takeme-as-I-am attitude. The band is on tour throughout the country this year with Grand Rapids as a great stopping point.


MUSIC

Prolific, young, and passionate about the art of music, John Mark Nelson has made quite a name for himself in the music community in Minnesota and beyond. The thoughtful folk musician is currently working on his 6th album (to be released next year), and will be joined by bandmates for the first show of 2019.

R e d P la n e t with special guest Sam Miltich The Red Planet trio and top jazz musicians in Minnesota: Dean Magraw, Chris Bates, and Jay Epstein, play original jazz as well as distinct interpretations of legends in the genre, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, even Jimi Hendrix. Epstein made his first appearance at the CenterStage Concerts playing with Sam Miltich during the first season, thus it made perfect sense to ask his frequent collaborator and Grand Rapids local to join them for the March show.

JANUARY

Communist D a ugh t e r Communist Daughter songs depict stories of frontman Johnny Solomon’s struggles with mental illness, addiction, and life’s questions. After releasing their excellent sophomore album in 2016, "The Cracks That Built the Wall," the band took a hiatus to take care of Solomon’s mother in California. They’re slowing dipping their toes back into the music scene and will be closing out the 2018-2019 series in May.

MAY

MARCH

APRIL W olf s

ku ll

FEBRUARY

Cr ea tiv e

J o h n M ar k Nelson

P e r t N e ar S a n d s t o n e Founders of the Blue Ox Festival, this band is often showcased in festival forms; this is no festival, however, the intimate theater venue will expose top notch musicianship from the bluegrass band. Pert Near Sandstone has created a following across the country over the past 14 years and will be making their first appearance in Grand Rapids this February!

Led by Laura Sellner, Superior Siren creates haunting, beautiful, and pure folk music from the shores of Lake Superior. Out with their debut self-titled album earlier this year, the band seems focused on making great music, while lifting each other up in the process. The intimate venue will make for a perfect setting to hear the quiet resounding power of these women.

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

MUSIC

Superior Siren

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Live @ The Reif Oct. 4 - Oct. 19

Visit ReifCenter.org for a complete list of shows.

RichaRd

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An EvEning with

October

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Jim Brickman: Share the Love Tour

October 1 3

Takin’ it to the Limit

E ag l E s TribuTe

October 19

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Tickets

October 14

218 327 5780

ReifCenter.org


outdoor adventure s for a l l s e a s on s exc lusive-use group va ca t ion re n t a l Bluewater Lake | Chippewa National Forest

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SU PE RIOR HIK IN G The Superior Hiking Trail is unique in that it offers the experienced hiker the challenges they seek and the natural beauty and accessibility of the day hiker who is just looking for a relaxing walk in the woods.

DAY 17

Melanie McManus hikes across the open rock face of Pincushion Mountain near Grand Marais. The outcrop rewards the hiker with spectacular views of Grand Marais, 5 mile rock in Lake Superior, and the inland wilderness. Grand Marais to Lakewalk

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Brian Peterson


TR A I L

by Brian Peterson

A

ssignments like this don’t come along that often. I was approached by my editors at the Star Tribune about the possibility of spending three weeks on the North Shore of Lake Superior. No brainer right? There was a catch! You will be following thru-hiker Melanie McManus as she navigates the 310 mile Superior Hiking Trail from start to finish in 20 days. One more thing. We would like you to shoot still photos, video, virtual reality, time-lapse, and drone footage. No problem I said, without giving the alternatives much thought. I have a habit of committing to assignments with little thought about the degree of difficulty or physical demands. This was an assignment that was going to demand advanced planning, and an acute awareness of my physical limitations. I’ve had a history of an arthritic knee and a recent broken knee cap. My main goal as a photographer was to capture the essence of the spectacular beauty and degree of difficulty of the SHT, from the top of Pincushion Mountain to the 400 foot boardwalk along a beaver dam spanning Saw Mill Creek. Record the majesty of the night sky and the delicate details of the Yellow Lady Slipper on the ground below your feet. The Superior Hiking Trail is unique in that it offers the experienced hiker the challenges they seek and the natural beauty and accessibility of the day hiker who is just looking for a relaxing walk in the woods. The challenges proved true, but like all great hikes, the rewards were many. So get unplugged from the daily chase and get outside and take a walk. Check out www.startribune.com/feelingsuperior for the full experience. Find more of Brian's work showcasing the natural wonders of Minnesota at: www.stateofwonders.com

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10 Q/A

AN INTERVIEW WITH STAR TRIBUNE PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN PETERSON by Christina Monson

Q: How many miles did you hike? How many days? A

: I hiked every day for 21 days for a total of about 140 miles. I had a visual plan for every day, either hiking in to meet Melanie at a specific spot, or hiking in with her in the morning to a specific location and then hiking back out.

Q

: How much gear did you have to haul? How many pounds? How many cameras at a time?

The trail is often rocky, muddy, and bumpy with exposed roots. Don’t plan to hike more than 10-15 miles per day. You want to build in time to stop and enjoy the view.

A

: Every day was different. Some days only carrying camera gear and snacks and water if I was planning to hike out for the evening. On days when I was camping on the trail, I was carrying about 30 pounds of camera gear (including a still camera with two or three lenses, video camera with stabilizer, a drone, and batteries for all. On top of that I was packing in a hammock tent, sleeping bag, cook stove, food, and water, for a total of over 50 lbs.

Q

: How long did it take for you to prepare for this assignment? (taking into consideration things like: strategizing routes and meet-up points with Melanie, preparing for the weather and insects, predicting battery power and downloading images, etc.)

DAY 9

The Milky Way glows above the shore of Lake Superior near Silver Bay. Dark skies full of stars are just one of the thrills of camping out on the Superior Hiking Trail.

A

: The trip involved about three months of planning. From getting approval to fly my drone in the Superior National Forest (state parks are off limits), to packing and planning food. I started with visual research. Figuring out where the most beautiful or challenging parts of the trail were and how I would get there when Melanie was hiking. I watched many YouTube videos of others hiking the trail and took note of places that were most impressive. I then talked with map artist Keith Myrmel, (https:// kjmyrmel.webs.com/) who is an avid hiker and familiar with every inch of the trail, and made sure I wasn’t missing anything. Packing only the gear that I needed, for both stills, video, and drone footage. I planned to spend nights on the trail in my hammock tent, in state parks in my roof-top tent, and a few hotels to recharge the batteries and download and edit photos and video.

Q

: What advice would you give a hiker thinking about hiking the Superior Hiking Trail? How about as a photographer?

A

: I would suggest doing it in sections, maybe a different section every year for multiple years. I think that way you will enjoy the trail the most and you won’t have to give up three weeks of vacation to complete the trail in one shot. I would also prepare for the difficult terrain. The trail is often rocky, muddy, and bumpy with exposed roots. Don’t plan to hike more than 10-15 miles per day. You want to build in time to stop and enjoy the view. For photographers: travel light. You don’t really need a long lens as most of the photo opportunities are sweeping landscapes. Hike in the morning or late afternoon for the best light. Bring a waterproof camera or rain cover for your gear.

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DAY 7

One of the most stunning vistas along the Superior Hiking Trail is the overlook at Bean Lake north of Silver Bay. Here, father and son hikers, Tom and Ross Perigo enjoyed the evening view high above Bean Lake.


DAY 2

Melanie McManus takes a moment to enjoy the old growth forest of Magney Snively Natural Area near Spirit Mountain in Duluth.

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Q

: How would you describe your relationship with nature during or after this assignment? (Did you feel inspired? Lonely? Challenged? Recharged? Etc.)

A

: It’s always inspiring to get up to the North Shore. I find I work best when I have a focus, like this story on the SHT. Normally I work with the weather and only shoot when the weather if favorable but this story was evolving every day, some days despite the weather. Our first day was 40 degrees and pouring rain - not a great way to start, but it only got better after that. I always feel refreshed, despite the workload, just getting out and away from the city distractions is cathartic.

Q: What was the most significant thing that happened that

you didn’t expect?

A

: I’m an old boy scout, and you know their motto, “Be Prepared.” I feel that my advanced planning and knowing

DAY 11

what my visual targets were before I began, really helped me pace myself. But, this trail is a butt kicker, a lot of elevation changes, rocks, roots, bugs, and mud (if you have rain). For some reason, I thought it was going to be a walk in the woods, but it was a HIKE!

Q: What was the most challenging aspect of this assignment? A

: My biggest challenge was managing all my equipment and editing still and video images along the way. I had to manage my batteries and on many days pack in my camping gear and food along with my camera gear.

Q: Do you have a favorite highlight or section of the trail? A

: There were many spectacular sections of the trail, but aside from the beautiful state parks that the trail travels through, I would have to say Pincushion Mountain overlook near Grand Marais was the biggest surprise. The open bedrock overlook

The wilderness sprawl of the Superior Hiking Trail can be isolating and challenging for a solo thru hiker like Melanie McManus, shown here crossing a 440 foot boardwalk across a beaver dam spanning Saw Mill Creek. County Rd. 6 to Crosby Manitou State Park #4. 44

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018


with clear views to Lake Superior and the surrounding forest were spectacular. Great place for a day hike if you’re up near Grand Marais. Bean and Bear Lake overlooks near Silver Bay were also breathtaking.

Q: What is your biggest takeaway from this experience? A

: I would imagine most Minnesotans are like me. We think of ourselves as lake people. We swim, we paddle, we bike, but we don’t often think of hiking as our first choice of outdoor recreation. The Superior Hiking Trail offers some of the best views along the North Shore and I would encourage everyone to pick a section and explore.

Q: Would you do it again? A

It’s always inspiring to get up to the North Shore. I find I work best when I have a focus, like this story on the SHT. Normally I work with the weather and only shoot when the weather if favorable but this story was evolving every day, some days despite the weather.

: I would most definitely do it again, maybe in the fall. Now I know all the great spots to visit. ;)

DAY 18

The 1.6 mile Lakewalk north of Grand Marais is the only section of trail that runs along the shore of Lake Superior outside of the Duluth Lakewalk. Here, Melanie McManus hikes the rocky shore of Lake Superior past the Tombolo Island. Grand Marais to Lakewalk

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

45


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YOUTH

BECAUSE WE WERE DISCONNECTED FROM THE INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA, WE WERE FORCED TO BE CREATIVE IN MANY WAYS, INCLUDING FINDING SOLUTIONS WITH FEW RESOURCES AND FINDING HUMOR IN LITTLE THINGS. See the issue of Spring 2018 agazine Lake Time M s to read Julia' ! winning essay

In a way, this adventure all started when I was diagnosed with a rare brain cancer in December, after suffering from extreme headaches and nausea. Chemo treatments began almost right away and were concluded in February. Following chemo, I received daily radiation treatments two hours from my house, which we drove each day so that I could remain in school. Still, throughout much of this struggle, I had something to keep my spirits up and to look forward to: my parent-free trip to the Boundary Waters. In February, I had read in the newspaper that Ely Outfitting Company was giving an essay contest, with a grand prize of a completely outfitted, parent-free trip to the Boundary Waters. Giddy with excitement, I wrote all weekend about my love of the outdoors and the way it has helped me cope with adversity. While in an elevator at the Mayo Clinic, I received a call from Jason, the owner of Ely Outfitting Company, notifying me that I had won the contest. I spent the remainder of the school year dreaming of the Boundary Waters, especially while laying completely still getting radiation treatments. The task of choosing just three friends to take with me to my absolute favorite place was both exciting and daunting. Shockingly, the friends whose parents I thought would surely forbid them from going were somehow allowed to come; perhaps the “cancer card” may have played a part in their decisions. Before long the dates, general route, and menu had been selected while permits were purchased and transportation arranged. We were ready. Upon our arrival, Jason walked us through a meticulous orientation. We spent hours reviewing the gear, food, and map to ensure we would know what to do once we were let loose in the wilderness. Sleeping in the bunkhouse the night before launching, I felt some anxiety about the next morning, questions running through my mind - What if one of us gets hurt? What if we get lost? What if we get in an argument and don’t talk to each other the whole trip? Of course, when we pushed off the shore and paddled into the wilderness, I knew at once that we would be alright. As we got the hang of steering, navigating, and communicating between the two canoes, it was clear that we would learn a lot on this trip while having a lot of fun. During our five days in the Boundary Waters, we developed a loose routine. We each adopted jobs, making setting up and tearing down camp faster each time. Each day, we’d arrive at our campsite before lunch, leaving the rest of the

YOUTH 48

F

inals week at high school is painful. Though summer is so close you can taste it, we are compelled to put in one more surge of cramming and memorization to prove we have learned something during the past nine months. And as these tests can sometimes tilt the scales for grades, they bring a lot of tension into the building. When the bell rings after the last test, the relief is palpable; the tension lifts and smiles creep onto our faces. The cherry on the top for three friends and me was that we would get to distance ourselves from everything-high-school just a bit more. We would soon drive up to Ely and paddle away in two canoes without parents, drama, or assignments to cause stress.

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018


YOUTH

Navigating the Wilds of the BWC A

PARENT-FREE by Julia Ruelle

Even though the trip was nearly perfect, it wasn’t all easy. After just one portage, Anna’s hiking boots had taken a major beating: the sole had almost completely fallen off of both boots. Luckily, my dad had given me a first aid kit stocked with three different types of heavy duty tape and after trying all three, we found that the “Tenacious Tape” was the winner. Already mentioned as a challenge were the bugs. In inviting my friend Madeline, a notorious mosquito-hater, I knew there would be some anxiety with the bugs, but to my surprise, she was probably the most accepting of their presence. This was likely due to her bringing a bug suit, complete with a mesh coat, all-encompassing hood, and mittens. As for the rest of us, we doused ourselves in bug spray and retreated to the tent when it got too intense. On one incredibly buggy portage, we assigned a person to be the bug spray runner for the canoe-carriers. Still, we overcame such challenges with laughter and creativity and made them seem more like games than problems. Because we were disconnected from the internet and social media, we were forced to be creative in many ways, including finding solutions with few resources and finding humor in little things. If you asked me what we did most on our trip, I would probably say we laughed. It was incredible how much better it feels to be paddling in the rain when you’re laughing so hard your chest hurts. It’s also a lot easier to forget about the bugs tormenting your ankles when you’re laughing. On our last night, it was as if the wilderness knew and wanted to say goodbye, quite literally, with a bang. Just as we were wrapping up our nightly duties before snuggling into our sleeping bags, we heard a

distant rumble and felt a few scattered raindrops as the wind started to pick up. Glancing at each other, we picked up the pace, tucked our bags beneath the tarp, and sped into the tent just as the rain started in full force. That night, we drifted in and out of sleep as a relentless thunderstorm raged outside. Even when we awoke in the morning, we had to wait for the storm to fizzle out before venturing out of the tents. Storms like these remind me of how powerful the natural world is. Of course, we didn’t let the storm damper our impression of the trip. Though we arrived at the entry point a little soggy, tired, and covered in mud, we were beaming at our accomplishment. We did it! A quick, but fitting turnaround awaited me. After just one day of unpacking and packing, I departed for Washington D.C. with seven other kids for the launch of Kids for the Boundary Waters, a project of the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters. Through the essay contest, I had been connected with Joseph, another teen cancer survivor with a love and passion for the Boundary Waters. Wanting to do more to fight the proposed copper sulfide mine on the wilderness edge, he launched Kids with the mission “to build and sustain a powerful community of young people who will work relentlessly to protect and defend the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness; to outfit them with the facts and analysis in science, economics, and policy so they may become unconquerable advocates for this unique and priceless wilderness.” Our trip to D.C. included our first board meeting, a press event with the conclusion of Dave and Amy Freeman’s Bike to DC, and about 13 meetings with members of Congress, senators, and department heads. During this trip, I made countless new relationships with people who inspire me, both kids and adults, and, more importantly, advocated for the protection of a truly breathtaking, life-changing place. This November, the Kids will return to D.C. and we are hoping to bring more kids along this time to strengthen our voices. If you would like to join us in November, would like more information on other ways to advocate for the protection of the Boundary Waters, or would like to support us with a donation, visit www.kidsfortheboundarywaters.org. LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

YOUTH

day to set up camp, eat, chat, swim, read, make friendship bracelets, and lounge in hammocks. Unfortunately, we missed out on stargazing due to the combined forces of relentless mosquitoes, cloudy nights, and tiring days, but that didn’t keep us from enjoying our evenings in the tents. There, we would talk about anything and everything and I realized how many little things I didn’t know about their lives, thanks to the flurry of stress and the many distractions of social media. Because we didn’t see the stars, I guess we’ll have to come back again next year.

49


JOIN THE CONVERSATION DEVOTED HUSBAND, FATHER OF TWO, ACCOMPLISHED JAZZ MUSICIAN, MEDITATOR, MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATOR, ADVOCATE, PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL, GARDENER, JOKE TELLER, SCHIZOPHRENIC, GRAND RAPIDS NATIVE. SAM MILTICH AND I SAT DOWN TO CHAT ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, TREATMENT, HURDLES HE FACES (AND HAS FACED), COPING SKILLS, AND

MENTA L IL L N E SS

An interview with Sam Miltich, by Marah Evans

HOW HE APPROACHES THE TOPIC WHEN IT IS NEW TO PEOPLE. WE MET AT ONE OF SAM’S FREQUENT STOPS, BREWED AWAKENINGS, IN DOWNTOWN GRAND RAPIDS.

Marah: How did/does your illness manifest itself? Sam: I was 22 years old when my mental illness first manifested itself in full blown psychosis. When first I say to people that I have schizophrenia, many times I am asked, “So what does that mean? What happened to you when you experienced psychosis?” It began by intense crying for hours sometimes. As things progressed in the psychosis I began feeling paranoid. Things, people, places I trusted in the past, I felt I could no longer trust. Thoughts followed the feelings. I came to the conclusion that I was the antichrist and that there was a web of connection, that all the world’s horrific experiences connected back to me somehow. One example is: I was psychotic when the 35W bridge collapsed. I had just moved to the Twin Cities that year and I was convinced I was responsible for the bridge collapse. I began to feel as though people could look into my eyes and hear my thoughts. My

J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

thoughts were so disturbing to me that I felt if

50

an outsider could read my thoughts, surely they would alert law enforcement. I felt as though the CIA was coming to arrest me. I would lock myself in a closet for hours on end, with all the lights turned out, to practice what it would be like in solitary confinement. Surely I would be arrested if I was the antichrist. I eventually came to the conclusion that I would have to end my own life, not because I wanted to die or to harm those that I loved, but because I was doing so for the salvation of humanity. Eventually, I was brought back home to Itasca LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018


JOIN THE CONVERSATION County. I have mixed memories of that time. I remember being at a family cabin and hearing four wheelers going by on the road, convinced that this time the CIA had come and I would be taken away from those I loved.

Marah: What does your treatment look like? Sam: I take both an antipsychotic and mood stabilizer. When I fully accepted my diagnosis, and fully accepted the need to treat it, which for me is use of antipsychotic medication as

Simply, my mental health concerns have rarely been treated on par with how people with a physical illness are treated. My experience has been that many people simply feared me when I was ill.

I slept as much as I could to escape my

well as regular therapy sessions, I really began

I also feel that there is a kind of backwards

waking hours because now it had flipped, the

to recover much more quickly.

stigma, where mental illness is romanticized,

nightmares were during my waking hours,

and I think that especially happens within

instead of in my sleep. Sleep became my only

the arts. There should be a distinction

refuge from the intense fear, confusion, and

between eccentricity and what is true

paranoia I experienced. Throughout this time

mental illness. There is nothing romantic

period, I began to hear voices. I experienced

or fascinating about true mental illness.

very intense auditory hallucinations. The best

It is painful and debilitating. We shouldn’t

way I can describe it was that there was an

confuse eccentricity and mental illness.

internal monologue in my mind, relaying

Eccentricity does not automatically lead

terrible messages. That I was evil, that I

to suffering, but mental illness does.

was harming my family, and other things I will simply keep to myself. That monologue became so loud and distorted that it seemed as though I was hearing a voice outside of my head. I began to see things in my bedroom at night. I once saw two men standing over me with a knife. I would see cats running around room, watching me as I lay in bed. I struggled deeply with religious delusions for years. I felt as though I was either a shamanic messiah or some incarnation of an evil force. I would vacillate back and forth wildly throughout a day. There were times when I couldn’t even walk past a church without feeling a fire burning deeply somewhere inside my

J Wesley Bailey

Now, I still have some ongoing symptoms, but nothing close to what I experienced while in psychosis. My primary struggles with ongoing symptoms are cognitive struggles, which include racing thoughts, rumination, and confusion. This makes it challenging to work

Marah: How do you cope with your mental

consistently. I struggle with what I would call

illness?

glimmers of paranoia. Every now and then I seem to be thrust into a bizarre world, where everything seems cruelly ironic, and all events

I AM A VERY FORTUNATE PERSON, WHO HAS A VERY UNFORTUNATE ILLNESS.

brain. Even the routes I would walk through Grand Rapids had to change so I could avoid

seem to have a negative double meaning. However, that is not a frequent occurrence. I struggle with some paranoia, which manifests

the culture that I was raised in, is hunting, fishing, and gardening. Outdoors stuff. My

emotionally harmful towards me, when in fact,

ability to procure my own food makes me feel

it may be the opposite.

really whole; it’s a holistic approach. Cooking

of my psychosis were so traumatic that

But I mean it’s been ten years of working on this stuff.

don’t hear voices as intensely or as much, but I still do some. Like I’m not right now but I was at like 1 o'clock last night. Marah: Is it still very negative? Sam: You know it’s not as negative as it was. It’s like a combination of it sounding like numerous people talking at once and music playing, so it’s distracting. It prevents me from falling asleep.

in the moment.

signs, and feeling as though people’s intent is

it’s happening and know that it’s not real.

Fortunately the antipsychotics do help, so I

meditation. I find myself completely immersed

Another one that is big for me, and this is just

go to the Twin Cities, because the memories

would be pushed back into psychosis.

voices. Music has simply become my form of

people think of me, or misinterpreting social

I am able to recognize a hallucination when

would bring on such strong symptoms, that I

When I’m playing music I’m not hearing

itself in being overly concerned with what

that experience. For years I was unable to

encountering familiar places from that time

Sam: Well obviously the biggest one is music.

Marah: What hurdles have you faced in dealing with your mental illness? Sam: I’ve had doctors dismiss my medical

is another coping skill. The vast majority of the meals that I cook come out of my garden or out of my freezer. So music, hunting, fishing, gardening. Those are my big coping skills. Marah: How do you approach this topic when it is new to people?

concerns, stating that my concerns were

Sam: People don’t know until they know.

simply delusions and I wasn’t to be taken

And it usually takes a close friend or family

seriously. I was unable to get care because my

member [suffering from mental health issues]

mental health issues would not be covered by

for people to know. I can’t be upset at people

insurance. I’ve been chastised in the back of

for not knowing something. You can’t blame

a squad car as I was being taken to the ER

anyone for that.

for psychosis. And ultimately when I went to the hospital for a mental health concern, in the words of Elyn R. Saks (legal scholar, mental health policy advocate, and schizophrenic), “No one ever brought me flowers.”

By and large most people have been very good about it and not afraid, though at first when you talk about it there’s a lot of fear associated with it.

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

and shadowy figures standing in corners of my

MENTAL ILLNESS IS SUFFERING AND PAIN. IT IS DEBILITATING AND WHEN MY SYMPTOMS ARE AT THEIR WORST MY ABILITY TO BE CREATIVE IS HAMPERED BY CONFUSION, PAIN, AND SORROW.

51


JOIN THE CONVERSATION MY EXPERIEN CE HAS B EEN THAT MA N Y PEOPLE S IM PLY FEA RED ME WHEN I WAS I L L

Marah: Fear from the other person? Sam: Yeah, and fear from me too. I don’t know how they are going to react. I don’t know how it’s going to be received. I don’t know what

where I have always

their background is or what they know. I feel like we are sort of in the

wanted to be, and I

beginning phases of kind of talking about this stuff. I think we have

have a career as a jazz

a long way to go. Even ten years ago, it was different for me. From

musician. My life has

the time I was diagnosed when I was 22 to now, it’s improved a lot.

never been easy, but

And hopefully in ten years it will be better yet. Time will tell. But

it’s always been good.

that’s why we do these things, that’s why we do interviews. Talk about it. Share the experience. I seem to have found a way to live in the world throughout all this. I am a very fortunate person, who has a very unfortunate illness. I truly feel my calling in life is to play music, in particular jazz and improvised music. The art has allowed a certain degree of flexibility in my life, that suits my needs in terms of managing my illness.

Simply, I have schizophrenia

and

I

have a beautiful life. If you’d like to learn more

about

Sam

Miltich and his music, you

can his

check

I believe that I get to create my own version of recovery. When I first

out

website

at

became ill with schizophrenia, my ability to work, to travel, to book

sammiltichmusic.com. Sam’s latest tour directly relates to this topic

gigs, to even sit on stage and play, was taken from me. Even my

and will be traveling to different cities in Minnesota over the course

ability to care for myself was lost.

of the year. It is called "The Improvised Life."

In spite of living with a major mental illness, which presents varying

If you or someone you know is struggling with a mental health issue,

degrees of symptoms on a daily basis, I am living the life I always

you can visit the National Alliance on Mental Illness website to find

dreamt of. I am married, I have children, I live in northern Minnesota

help. (NAMI.org).

Jeff Peabody


S I N C E 19 7 0

B U I L D

B E T T E R.

L I V E

B E T T E R.

D I C K I N S O N H O M E S . C O M 8 0 0 . 4 3 8 . 4 6 8 7


SHOP

BEST SELLERS vs BUYER’S PICKS:

by Kelly Kabotoff

In the spirit of this ‘Best Of’ issue, I decided to see how our shoppers voted with their wallets over the last year and bring you our ‘Best Sellers.’ But I just couldn’t stop at that because there is always something new inspiring me, so I’ve also selected my ‘Buyer’s Picks’ for you and everyone on your list this holiday season.

BEST SELLERS

Well, I can’t argue with our

($8 each or $27 for a 4-pack)

shoppers. The perfect pint

are perfect for everything

glass is hard to beat. But, it

from coffee to beer. With a

can be upgraded for cooler

variety of designs to choose

weather with these amazing

from, our shop visitors always

Coffee/Pint Sleeves from

seem to find a few favorites.

Faribault Woolen Mill ($10).

Added bonus: For every pint

Made from wool blanket

glass sold, Minnesota-based

ends, they will keep your

Northern

hands toasty and are a

Glasses

will

donate 7% to charity:

perfect little gift for the

Water,

holiday season.

a

non-profit bringing

Step up your sweatshirt

clean and safe drinking water

to

people

game with the amazingly

in

Women’s

soft

developing nations. That

Hoodie

means for every glass

from

Burney Tentree

($72). It can be dressed

sold they give a gallon to those in need.

up

or

The masses have spoken

made

layered

down easily

and

and

sustainably

is

and

and the Paddle Hoodie

ethically from cork,

from

Clothing

organic cotton, and

($59) is our #1 selling

recycled polyester.

apparel item. Our current

Bonus: ten trees are

staff favorite is the Afton

planted for every

Striped Sweatshirt (shown

item purchased.

Sota

here). But take your pick- it’s a top seller in any color for men, women, and

the

earrings perfect

love

statement

earrings, but don’t how

heavy

they can be. The Screen-printed

Black Sheep Druzy Stud

I

love

kiddos alike.

SHOP

BUYER'S PICKS

Northern Glasses Pint Glasses

organization

54

VS

($15) gift

and

are fit

Leather Earrings from MBMB/Made

any style. Available in a variety of colors and at a

By Michelle Brusgaard ($15) are the perfect

great price point, they are always a crowd pleaser.

stylish solution and an absolute bargain!

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018


SHOP Shake up your game night with Storyology® Travel Size ($15), a fast, fun, and friendly

Card games on a chilly night

family brain game for all ages, made right

by the fire in the cabin is a

here in Minnesota. Spin the wooden disc

favorite weekend activity and

like a top and stop it with your finger, think

the Hagen & Oats Cribbage

fast, and tell a quick story about your life

Board ($30) allows you to do

based on the topic you selected

it in state-pride style. This was

with your finger. But make sure

a top gift item last holiday,

you pay attention and win by

and is sure to be a repeat

proving who is the best listener

again this year.

during the final Memory Show

The adorable Tiny Camper Shirt

Down. This fun and easy off-line

from

($22)

game refreshes memory skills

has our customers singing their

to challenge both introverts and

praises… and Elton John songs.

extroverts alike, at home or on

In

the go.

Adventure

addition

to

North

being

cute

and

clever, this tee also gives back. The company’s mission is to protect the nature you love by donating 10% to

of

every

item

environmental

purchased

organizations

in Minnesota.

Bring your tiny camper inside for some snuggles with the amazingly soft Camping Cuddle Blanket from Abbey’s House ($75). It is the perfect print for any outdoorsloving baby and has a very soft gray minky fabric on the back that will make you wish you had one in an adult size.

Am I missing some of your favorites? Contact me at kelly@thelakeandco.com and tell me what you’d like to see in the shop!

All products can be found at The Lake + Co. Shop – www.thelakeandcoshop.com

Subscribe

THE WILD ACORN

MINNESOTA’S MAGAZINE Inspired by the stories of people doing exceptional things in the North.

LAKETIMEMAGAZINE.COM

RETAIL AND COMMERCIAL DESIGN CUSTOM FURNITURE & DECOR www.thewildacorn.com • thewildacorn@gmail.com


GIFTS WITH A STORY GOODS FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST Choose one of our curated gift boxes or create your own - we'll package them for you! *Available individually or in large quantities for corporate gifting

scription, add a sub ry tell the sto

Order online at: www.thelakeandcoshop.com Grand Rapids, MN – Crosslake, MN

lf


MARKETPLACE Everything we do at Lake + Co. is inspired by the stories of people doing exceptional things. We celebrate that in the pages of this magazine, as well as in our shop, The Lake + Co. Shop. This marketplace brings you our top picks from these inspiring makers. Makers from right here in the Northwoods, as well as from around the world creating goods that support a larger cause. Meet our makers and shop these goods online at thelakeandcoshop.com

CINNAMON SPREADABLE HONEY Honey and cinnamon provide a perfectly warm flavor combination, whipped together into a spreadable honey that is perfect for dipping apples, whipping into heavy cream (skip the sugar), melting into oatmeal, or spreading onto buttered toast. For centuries, cinnamon and honey have been used as a natural remedy for countless ailments, so it is natural that they pair together for one of our best, fall season honeys.

SHOVELING NATIONAL CHAMPION WINTER HAT This fleece lined hat is made for the heavy lifters, the backbreakers, the do-it-yourselfers, and especially for the “ran out of gas in the snowblower-ers.� 5% of all Wild North Co. purchases are donated to support the Save The Boundary Waters campaign.

Wild North Co. @wildnorthco

MACKINAC QUARTER ZIP Northern Drift is an apparel company developed by a Minnesota husband and wife team, and inspired by the nautical side of the land of 10,000 lakes. Made of cotton and detailed with a wide snap placket and zipper, the Mackinac Quarter Zip is an ideal layering piece, perfect for a cool evening on the boat or warming up by the fire.

Northern Drift @northern_drift

Bare Honey @barehoneymn

-Available at The Lake + Co. Shop www.thelakeandcoshop.com-

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

MARKETPLACE

MARKET PLACE

GOODS FROM THE WOODS

57


MARKETPLACE

NORTH TRIBLEND SWEATSHIRT Cozy up in the new North Collection. This Triblend sweatshirt will become your go-to this winter. Designed and printed in Minneapolis.

Live & Love MN @liveandlovemn

BLACK DISTRESSED GYPSY BANDANA Selvage edge. Comfortable fit. Fully adjustable. Simple. Powerful. Edgy.

Gypsy Bandanas @gypsybandanas

CRAPOLA! GRANOLA This infamous brand of granola from Ely, Minnesota has been "making even weird people regular" since 2007. The marketing is clever, the packages are fun, and the granola is wholesome and delicious. Made by hand in a family-operated bakery at the edge of Minnesota's Northwoods wilderness.

Crapola! @crapola_granola_youbetcha

MINNESOTA CUT-OUT

COMIN’ IN HOT PONTOON T-SHIRT

DELUXE BOOK BAG

One of a kind Minnesota cut-out to adorn any space and show off your state pride. They are hand drawn and cut out of MDF. 49 states available, in a variety of colors.

Pontoon captains will tell ya they move fast. So watch out on the dock, we're comin' in hot! At Northmade we are T-shirt makers and more than your typical flannel-wearers. Creating tees and good goods for people both near and far. Printed on a unisex American Apparel heather lake blue T-shirt. Poly-cotton (50% polyester / 50% combed-cotton) construction. Designed and printed in Minnesota.

Whether on your way to the University of Minnesota Duluth, Yale, or the mall, this is the ideal book bag and carryall. Heavy-duty 15-ounce canvas construction. Thick premium leather bottom and flap trim. Adjustable cotton web shoulder strap with leather pad. Interior full length divider with pen and calculator pockets. Leather straps and high quality roller buckles secure fold-over flap. Guaranteed for life. Made in U.S.A.

MARKETPLACE

Pink Linen Designs @pinklinendesigns

58

Northmade @northmadeco

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

Duluth Pack @duluthpack

-Available at The Lake + Co. Shop www.thelakeandcoshop.com-


MARKETPLACE

BABY GIFT SET

LARGE WRIST ZIP

Experience a Northwoods favorite without ever leaving your couch. Your passport to a superior state of bliss. Hand-poured in small batches, these travel tin candles come perfectly proportioned for travel or gift giving. Made in Minnesota from renewable soy wax and wood wick.

Minnesotan babies have state pride from birth! So share some state pride... on your babe! Delight expecting parents with these Minnesota baby gifts - sweet reminders of this place we call home. Made in St. Paul, each piece is hand-cut and sewn featuring a variety of charming themed fabrics. Dozens of fabrics and other states available.

Excelsior Candle Co. @excelsior_candle

Kate Pearce Studio @katepearcestudio

Made by a skilled team of Minnesotabased craftsmen, Leather Works Minnesota is always striving to create the perfect piece that will last you a lifetime. Their large wrist zip featuring a 4" x 5 1/2" exterior pocket suitable for phone (with case) or keys, nickel zipper, and 1/2 vegetable tan straps is a must have. Shown here in Pebble black but available in a variety of colors.

MINNESOTA HORIZON ECO CREW SWEATSHIRT Your ideal tri-blend sweatshirt with a classic fit and perfect for any season. This Eco crew sweatshirt is crafted responsibly using sustainable materials and processes. Made from recycled water bottles and contains organic and recycled materials. What makes this design so special is the hidden images within the horizon line. If you look closely, you will see the horizon line is a mix of the St. Croix River and Lake Superior. Minnesota Made is dedicated to unique and thoughtful design, quality clothing on premium fabrics, and giving Minnesotan’s apparel they can wear with pride.

MINNESOTA WOOD BAR SOAP It's been said that charcoal, the ingredient that gives this soap its black coloring, helps to eliminate toxins and impurities. So not only will this bar leave you clean as a whistle, but it'll save you a trip to the confessional. Handcrafted in Fosston, MN, Dirty Knees Soap Co.'s lineup also includes body wash, lotion, body butter, beard oil, gifts, and accessories. Simple products, limited ingredients.

Dirty Knees Soap Co. @dirtykneessoap

Leather Works Minnesota @leatherworksmn

FLANNEL WOOL BLEND SNAPBACK HAT Designed to coordinate with your flannel shirt collection, this classic six-panel flat bill baseball cap is made from a flannel wool blend. Featuring a snapback closure so you can customize the fit. This hat is designed for exploring the outdoors—and looking good in the process.

Adventure North @adventurenorthmn

Minnesota Made @minnesotamadeapparel

-Available at The Lake + Co. Shop www.thelakeandcoshop.com-

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

MARKETPLACE

SCENTED 4 OZ. TRAVEL TIN CANDLE IN LAKE SUPERIOR MIST

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MARKETPLACE

Coloring Contest

Last fall we partnered with Emily Krueger Illustration to give our readers a coloring contest inspired by Minnesota’s nature. We saw artwork come in from all ages and all places.

Here are your winners!

Keep an eye out for the next contest and see the finalists online at laketimemagazine.com

40 - 70 AGE GROUP PAT ROLES

CLASSIC KEY NECKLACE Embrace your word, then Pay It Forward to a person you feel needs the message more than you. Available in a variety of options, the necklaces are stamped and assembled in downtown Los Angeles by people transitioning out of homelessness. 27" chain, finished with a lobster clasp.

The Giving Keys @thegivingkeys

NORTH AMERICAN WILDLIFE: AN ADULT COLORING BOOK

& LAURIE KESS

The untamed wilds of North America create a sense of awe and wonder. Experience it for yourself as each turn of the page pulls your imagination into the woods, lakes, and skies to see timber wolves, owls, trout, and much more. North American Wildlife offers intricate animal designs for more complex coloring to challenge the artist. Each piece is designed to promote relaxation and ignite creativity. Illustrations by Shaun Chosa.

Curious Cat Books @curious_cat_books

20-35 AGE GROUP JENNIFER PETERSON & LENA MAUDE WILSON

9-12 AGE GROUP

MINNESOTA STATE CUT-OUT ORNAMENT

MARKETPLACE

Add a bit of Minnesota to your festivities this year with this intricately designed Minnesota state ornament. 1/4" thick cherry wood. Approx. 5.5" x 5". Made in the U.S.A.

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The Vintage Studio @thevintagestudiomn

REVERSIBLE TRANSFER TOP Pack a lighter bag with this reversible travel basic and get multiple looks in one. A luxurious bamboo blend feels like cashmere against the skin and is layered with an ultra-light silky wicking base, custom dyed with a one-of-a-kind embossing. Bamboo is odor-resistant, breathable, warm, anti-static, made for sensitive skin, and holds its shape. Wear this top every day of your trip, all year long, and stay fresh and polished.

Anywhere Apparel @anywhereapparel

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

-Available at The Lake + Co. Shop www.thelakeandcoshop.com-

Aiyana B. & McKenna Noble


Cozy up, up North.

*Right on the Soo Line Trail + 100s of acres to x-country ski or snowmobile

HOLIDAY RETREATS • WEDDINGS • WINTER GETAWAY LittleLazyLodge.com Boy River, MN

Pick up the latest issue or go online to VOTE for your favorite wedding professionals!

WWW.LAKEBRIDEMAGAZINE.COM


ENTREPRENEUR

An interview with owner Ian Scherber by Kelly Kabotoff

A STORY WITH EVERY TEE An interview with owner Ian Scherber by Kelly Kabotoff

Tell m e a lit t l e a bout how D ul ut h Scre e n P r i n t i n g got st ar ted. It always starts with the same thing: biting off more than you can chew. During my freshman year of high school, in 2009, I was looking to make a little cash…. like all high school kids are. It started with a conversation with my high school librarian, Lowell Harnell. The Harnell family owns and operates Proctor Builders, a local hardware store and lumber yard. I asked him for a job and he kindly directed me to the store to talk to his brother, Lee. Halfway through that conversation (which I knew was going nowhere because I was 100 pounds and moving lumber wasn’t really a good fit for me) a few of Lee’s employees were unloading some equipment behind him. This sparked some curiosity and I asked him what the equipment was. He explained that it was screen printing equipment that he had bid on from a local auction site. I remember his words “custom T-shirts” and that pretty much got me hooked. I left Proctor Builders without a job that day but my mind was hooked on that printing equipment.

ENTREPRENEUR 62

After gaining some confidence in the business realm, I decided that college and business were an actual possibility. So I took off to St. John’s University to study global business leadership and sold some shirts in my free time to help with college expenses. While at St. John’s, I linked up with the campus print shop called The T-Spot which was a screen printing organization ran by students. I found myself printing tees for campus organizations and the sporting teams. It was there that I met Mary and the idea of Duluth Screen Printing started, kind of… LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

Guytano Magno (www.switchboardadvertising.com) "Cold aF" designed by Matt Olin (@oh_matt)

It was football season and practice was well underway. After one of our first practices, I heard the football coach chatting about ordering T-shirts. For some reason, I decided to pipe in… enter me biting off more than I could chew. I told our coach that I could print the tees. He chuckled and looked at me with confusion… (I’m sure most of which had to do with the fact that I was even talking to him). Either way, he heard me out. So, I raced to figure out how I could pull it off. Google, YouTube, and a few online free quote/ invoice forms later… and I had a solution. I brought him a quote for a few hundred tees and he accepted it. With the PO in hand, I struck up another conversation with Lee and I spent the next three years of my life dedicated to printing, designing, and meeting with people. I loved it then, and I love it now.

do you recognize this guy?


ENTREPRENEUR Mary and I hit it off and soon became an item. I convinced her to join me on a new business called Neverest, making backpacks out of up-cycled material like billboards, deadstock canvas, and sails. We launched a Kickstarter campaign, raised $15,000, and bought a bunch of equipment to continue the venture. After a few months, our sales were strong and we couldn’t keep up with the demand. I wanted to drop out of school and pursue Neverest full time. Mary on the other hand, gave me an ultimatum. If we had a future, completing school was a requirement. So, she settled with me halfway and came up with a plan to graduate early, signing us up for a summer term in Europe.

T-shirts are meant to be T-shirts, not rags. Quality garments and topnotch service. That is what we strive for. At the end of the day, we are a bunch of individuals that genuinely care about the products we produce. Over the next six months, we drove home to Duluth from St. Joseph in between classes, on the weekends, and anytime that was needed to print tees. When we graduated in December, we decided to pursue DSP full time. Things with Neverest slowed as DSP ramped up. We made the decision to sell Neverest and use the funds to purchase more equipment for printing. The rest, as they say, is history.

Our flights were booked and our plans were set. Then, the school Wi t h a t h r i v i n g sc re e n p r i n t i n g b us iness , what was notified us that all of our Neverest production equipment had to be t h e p u sh to exp a n d t h e b u si n e ss into a b ric k-and relocated off campus. We had twenty days to move the equipment to mo r t a r a n d o n l i n e sto re l i ke F l a g ship? a new facility and continue the production packs to meet the supply At the end of the day, it’s about giving back to artists. We found that over the summer months while we were gone. We had bills to pay and a lot of young, talented artists were not given the platform or job packs was the only way to do it, opportunities to showcase or so we thought. A few weeks their work. In many cases, before we left, The T-Spot (especially in ones that we notified me that they would be FLAGSHIP WAS A WAY TO MAKE had direct work with through selling their equipment. I knew Duluth Screen Printing) we a few people in the industry A TRADITIONAL TEE INTO SOMETHING found that artists’ works were and quickly lined up a buyer. GREAT. WE OPENED A RETAIL STORE TO overshadowed by the dayIt fell through and The T-Spot to-day hustle of business. CREATE T-SHIRTS THAT TELL A STORY. was left in a hard spot to get This really hit home and was rid of the equipment. With the apparent when we had a group little money we had saved for of talented interns from UMD the trip… I made an offer on join our staff. They expressed the need for more creative-driven jobs the equipment. They accepted and I now had to relocate our Neverest in Duluth and how difficult it was because of their age. As a result, equipment, this new screen printing equipment, and tell Mary that I many ended up leaving our city to find work elsewhere. Our goal with spent our savings on a print shop. Again, Mary gave me a ultimatum: Flagship was to fashion a work environment where we could keep I would be on that flight with her or it was over. This is when Duluth a healthy staff of talented creative minds on board and pay them a Screen Printing really was born. livable wage. Flagship is a moral boost to our entire Duluth Screen Printing staff, especially when the hours get long and the shirt stacks I took an SEO class that spring and began purchasing domains. are high… It’s a great reminder that we are producing product for I just so happened to pick up the Duluth Screen Printing domain people on a local scale and forging local jobs. and putting it to use became the perfect way to get back on that plane with Mary. We moved everything into a facility in Duluth and Yo u r t a g l i n e i s "A sto r y w i t h eve ry tee." What ’s the we started printing and sewing packs. We scraped up enough cash sto r y b e h i n d t h at ? within those few weeks to continue our education, pay our bills for I’m a firm believer in giving credit where it is due. Far too often, the summer, and took off to Europe for two months. Upon our return, artists and designers aren’t showcased for the work they produce, we found the print shop still intact and we continued to refine Duluth and sometimes… apparel is just boring. Flagship was a way to make Screen Printing as a premier provider in apparel. Our goal was simple,

ENTREPRENEUR

Paul Lavold (www.twincitiesvisuals.com)

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ENTREPRENEUR Mark Fitzgibbons (www.fitzphoto.com)

by Ian

IT’S A GREAT REMINDER THAT WE ARE PRODUCING PRODUCT FOR PEOPLE ON A LOCAL SCALE AND FORGING LOCAL JOBS.

FLAGSHIP IS THE BRAINCHILD OF DULUTH SCREEN PRINTING.

a traditional tee into something great. We opened a retail store to create T-shirts that tell a story. Bringing together these artists and designers, and our passion for all of the things the Northland offers gave us the canvas to create some fun tees that are smart, witty, and represent our home in a unique way. For example, apparel from our Heritage Collection pays tribute to Duluth’s history and iconography by breathing life into vintage Duluth companies and landmarks. The idea is to slow down the process of how consumers buy shirts. Flagship allows you to experience it all; from the printing process which takes place in store and by hand, to our hang tags that let you get to know the artist behind the design you are purchasing. It’s an immersive experience that helps put pride behind the clothes in your closet.

You collaborate wi t h l oca l a r t i st s . How d o e s t h at wo r k ? Wh e re d o yo u f i n d t h e m? The process is different for everyone. If you are a designer or artist who thinks that your work would do well here at Flagship, reach out to us via email and provide us with a sample of your work. You can also apply in-store on our Featured Artist pillar iPad. Occasionally, we’ll reach out to designers that inspire us to see if they want to collaborate on new concepts. Designers make a percentage of sales on every shirt we sell and gain access to a massive audience here in Canal Park. It’s a win-win for everyone involved.

Is anyt h in g s cre e n pr i nte d r i ght on-s i te? It sure is. About 90% of our apparel sold in-store and online is printed by hand right here at Flagship. The rest of it is done at our production facility at Duluth Screen Printing. Screen printing is, after all, a craft and an art and we are proud to share that process with those who visit our store. There’s nothing better than wearing a shirt you had the opportunity to see printed right in front of you. Ask our print staff and chances are they’ll let you try out the process for yourself!

Wh at ’s n ext for F l a gs hi p? For D ul ut h S c re e n P r i n t i n g ? We’re going to continue to produce and print apparel in-store and focus on collaborating with new artists, coming up with new designs and pushing ourselves to try new things. We want to continue to collaborate with local businesses and environmental initiatives to give back to our community in whatever way we can. Flagship is meant to be a fun representation of our area and we continue to work hard and push ourselves to find unique ways to interact with and learn from our customers. Duluth Screen Printing will continue to work with all the clientele that we can, whether the order is just a few shirts or 10,000. We are pushing our customer service and ensuring that our clients get the best experience possible when they print with us. We have new equipment coming that will drive our printing capabilities forward and… dare I say… Embroidery.

ENTREPRENEUR

Wh at words of wi s dom do you have fo r yo u n g en t repren eu r s l i ke your s e l f ? Try. Simply, try. Give it all you got. Go for it. Be positive and surround yourself with people that either believe in the cause, the mission, or the mantra. Be yourself, be honest, work hard, and be fearless; and always, try.

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LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

For more info visit https://www.flagshipduluth.com

FALL 2018


Seas

BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES + WEDDINGS

Join@thejoyridebus.com / 218.326.3457

Y ou r H istoric B aseca m p o n t He n ortH s H o r e

Listen to the stories of people in the North doing exceptional things and creating positive change in the world.

Rustic & Modern Cabins • Historic Main Lodge • Restaurant & Pub • Direct Trail Access

800.322.9543 www.cascadelodgemn.com

3719 W Hwy 61 • lutsen • mn 55612

Tune in

January 2019 for the Season 2 premier with your new podcast host, Leah Lemm, and the makers of Lake Time Magazine, Lake Bride Magazine and The Lake + Co. Shop. Find us on iTunes and SoundCloud.

on 2!


#BEST OF MINNESOTA Your votes are in!

We wanted to know your all-time favorite spots in Minnesota. The best of the best. The bee’s knees. The top dogs. The cats meow. The jim-dandys. The knockouts. The ultimate standouts.

And YOU delivered! We’re proud to present to you the best of our great state, as decided by you – the readers. Your votes were collected and tallied and we are excited to bring you the results! These people, businesses, and communities are the risk takers; the dreamers; the dedicated. Those who embrace what they do and excel in every way. Those iconic places in Minnesota and resonate “home.”

This is the BEST OF MINNESOTA

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A RT S & C U LT U R E Trampled By Turtles BAND OR PERFORMING ARTIST Trampled By Turtles CONCERT/THEATER VENUE First Avenue | Minneapolis MUSEUM (ART, HISTORY, SCIENCE, CULTURE, ETC.) MIA | Minneapolis HISTORICAL SOCIETY Cook County Historical Society | Grand Marais

GALLERY

MACROSTIE ART CENTER In business and life… what inspires you? We are motivated by the artists who are committed to making art in rural places. From emerging artists to established professionals, our creative community is a big part of what makes northern Minnesota a great place to live.

LIBRARY Detroit Lakes Public Library | Detroit Lakes VISUAL ARTIST Betsy Bowen | Grand Marais

In one word, describe your story: Inspired www.macrostieartcenter.org | Grand Rapids

n @MacRostieArt f @MacRostieArtCenter MacRostie Art Center

First Avenue

MOVIE THEATER

LONG DRIVE-INN THEATER

In business and life… what inspires you? Preserving history for future generations. As one of only two MN drive-ins continuously operating since the 50’s, we take extreme pride in maintaining The Long's authentic 1956 charm. Our philosophy has always been that this drive-in belongs to the community. We consider ourselves only its current caretakers and, through our many events, we do everything we can to highlight what makes this rare gem so genuinely unique. In one word, describe your story: Dedication http://thelongdrivein.com/ | Long Prairie

n The Long Drive In f @longprairie/ Long Drive-Inn Theater

James Sewell Ballet

THEATER GROUP

BALLET WORKS, INC. DBA JAMES SEWELL BALLET In business and life… what inspires you? Being in nature inspires us. When we travel to northern Minnesota we find that we can relax a little and let nature feed creativity. In one word, describe your story: Explorative jsballet.org | Duluth

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BOOKSTORE

DRURY LANE BOOKS

In business and life… what inspires you? When a customer spies a favorite book on the shelf and clutches it to their chest, breathing a sign of contentment. When a grandparent joyfully helps each grandchild pick out a book. When two strangers find they share similar tastes in books, and swap titles, each leaving with new finds.

GIFT STORE

In one word, describe your story: Reading

THE BIG LAKE

In business and life… what inspires you? Growing up on the Shore I have always found inspiration, energy, and comfort in our Northwoods. Currently, with two wild young children, my world of wonder is ever expanding! Kindness, in general, is super empowering and inspiring to be around. I'm also inspired by the strong, wise, and creative community here in Cook County. In one word, describe your story: Empowered www.thebiglakelife.com | Grand Marais

drurylanebooks.com | Grand Marais @drurylanebooks

f

SHOPPING

SPORTING GOODS/OUTDOOR STORE Reed's Sporting Goods | Walker

& SELF

f thebiglakelife n @thebiglakelife

SHOE STORE Steger Mukluks | Ely SPA Glacial Waters Spa | Nisswa CAR DEALER (USED OR NEW) Luther Westside VW | Minneapolis

The Big Lake

Center Yoga, Pilates, & Fitness Studio Minnesota Made

MINNESOTA BRAND MINNESOTA MADE

In business and life… what inspires you? Adventures + music. Every day is an adventure. Some more grand than others, but it is what’s of value that I take out of those days. Music is then the connection between what I see visually, to what I create and design. In one word, describe your story: Positive http://www.minnesotamadeapparel.com/ | Stillwater #minnesotamade #minnesotamadeapparel

8 GYM/FITNESS CENTER

CENTER YOGA, PILATES, & FITNESS STUDIO In business and life… what inspires you? The idea that we each have unlimited potential is fascinating and it is the fuel that inspires me every day. I believe success is a gift to celebrate, challenges are opportunities to develop your character, and loving who you are now is a necessary foundation to becoming the next best version of yourself. In one word, describe your story: Possibility center-mn.com | Grand Rapids

f @centeryogapilates n center_at_sukha

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EDUCATION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Southwest Elementary | Grand Rapids SECONDARY SCHOOL Minnetonka High School | Minnetonka COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY UMD | Duluth


REVIVE

REFRESH

NOPO COFFEE CO. 218.999.7771

WWW.NOPOCOFFEECO.COM

SALON BRAD

SUKHA SPACES

218.327.9000

WWW.SALONBRAD.COM

GRAND RAPIDS, MN

REFOCUS CENTER FITNESS 218.259.8955

WWW.CENTER-MN.COM

RELAX

BALA MED SPA & DAY SPA 218.910.5755

WWW.BALA-MN.COM


&

F O OD DRINK F O O D

&

Glam Dolls

DRINK

COFFEE ROASTER OR COFFEE SHOP

CANDY SHOP

FIKA COFFEE

THE CHOCOLATE OX In business and life... what inspires you? The Chocolate Ox stores are home to the largest selection of ice cream, candies, chocolates, and lots of other cool stuff in the Brainerd Lakes Area. Bringing generations of family and friends together to laugh, reminisce, and make new memories is our business inspiration. Not only is 'The Ox' known for outstanding selection, but good old fashioned friendly service since 2003. Take time to visit both locations: Main Street in downtown Nisswa, and the beautiful, quaint cottage next to the Main Lodge at Grand View Lodge Resort on Gull Lake. Locals and tourists alike agree that 'The Ox' is one tradition that everyone in the family enjoys! Remember, vegetables are sooo overrated! In one word, describe your story: Sweetness

In business and life… what inspires you? People and their stories inspire my life and it’s what drives Fika Coffee. Getting to know people and to discover how our stories intertwine with each other as we all continue to discover our role in life. In one word, describe your story: Genuine www.fikacoffee.com | Lutsen

8 #fika #fikacoffee #fikacoffeeroasters

Matt's Bar

thechocolateox.com | Nisswa

World's Best Donuts

BAKERY

WORLD'S BEST DONUTS In business and life… what inspires you? People who work hard to build something from little or nothing and because of their hard work they accomplish their goals. My grandma had very little when she started to make donuts. She worked hard to grow this business and would be amazed and proud to see where it is today.

ORCHARD/FARM Aamodt's Apple Farm | Stillwater BREAKFAST/BRUNCH Naniboujou | Grand Marais

In one word, describe your story: Fortunate

BURGER Matt's Bar | Minneapolis

worldsbestdonutsmn.com | Grand Marais grandmaraismn, worldsbestdonuts, worldsbestdonutsgrandmarais

DONUT Glam Dolls | Minneapolis

8

ICE CREAM Sebastian Joe's | Minneapolis FARMERS MARKET St. Paul Lowertown | St. Paul FOOD CO-OP Cook County Whole Foods Co-op | Grand Marais

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DISTILLERY Vikre Distillery | Duluth

Tattersall

KOMBUCHA BAR Snooty Fox Tea Shop | Duluth

COCKTAIL BAR 

TATTERSALL DISTILLING

In business and life… what inspires you? We're inspired by good taste and great company. Whether it's a new spirit neat or an old favorite in a fresh cocktail, nothing is better than sharing drinks, stories, and big ideas with the people we love. In one word, describe your story: Uncompromising tattersalldistilling.com | Minneapolis

f facebook.com/tattersalldistilling n @tattersalldistilling 8 #tattersalldistilling

BREWERY

WINERY

CIDER

KLOCKOW BREWING COMPANY

CANNON RIVER WINERY & VINEYARD

SOCIABLE CIDER WERKS

In business and life… what inspires you?

In business and life… what inspires you? Living “good” inspires us. Whether that’s sustainable sourcing practices, making Sociable a great place to work, or creating a quality product that demands we take the time to share one with a friend.

In one word, describe your story: Passionate

In business and life… what inspires you? For me, striving for excellence. Everyone's idea of perfection is different. Events, especially weddings, are a living, breathing thing. Sometimes you need to live in the moment. A quote I have always held dear is by Vince Lombardi: "The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor." It may not be everything you thought it was going to be, but in the end it's perfection at its best.

klockowbrewing.com | Grand Rapids

In one word, describe your story: Amazing!

In one word, describe your story: Shared

www.cannonriverwinery.com | Cannon Falls

sociablecider.com | Minneapolis

We’re inspired by the goodness of people. We think good people deserve a nice space to get together with other good people and have a wonderful time in one another’s company. Making great beer and bringing live music and other free events to the community has been a humbling and joyous experience for us.

f n klockowbrewing

f

Cannon River Weddings

n

@Cannonriverweddings

f n @SociableCider

Sociable Cider Werks MARKET Midtown Global Market | Minneapolis

NEW RESTAURANT (opened in the last 12 months) HUB 41

In business and life… what inspires you? Community. We are inspired by good citizens who contribute to their communities. One person, one action, can have a ripple effect that can make a difference. Be the people to make a difference in a community. Everyone has the ability to engage in a meaningful way that enriches our community.

Cannon River Winery & Vineyard

In one word, describe your story: Rollercoaster hub41.com | Detroit Lakes @ hub41detroitlakes

f

t n @hub41dl LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

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FURNITURE STORE THE ARTISAN MARKETS MINNESOTA

HOME & GARDEN

In business and life, what inspires you? We are inspired by each other. We are a collective of 40 independent Furniture Artisans that have come together to create, share, and sell. Working together has helped each of us to grow our artistic and business skills. We believe that when we combine our efforts we can accomplish more than on our own. One word that describes our story: Synergy www.facebook.com/TheArtisanMarketsMinnesota | Minneapolis

8 #TAMMN, #theartisanmarketsminnesota, #TAMQ HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE Menards NURSERY Bachman's | Minneapolis

Glensheen

HISTORIC HOUSE/LANDMARK 

GLENSHEEN

In business and life… what inspires you? The story behind the lakeside Glensheen mansion inspires us! Every piece of our early 1900s collection, from artisan glass to personal diaries, informs us of the artistry, style, and adventure of this bygone time. And watching visitors discover it motivates all we do at the historic Congdon estate. In one word, describe your story: Splendor glensheen.org | Duluth

8 #glensheen

LOCAL

TV SHOW

RON SCHARA PRODUCTIONS/ MINNESOTA BOUND

MEDIA

In business and life… what inspires you? First, to simply try- then to try my best. To do the best I can, at whatever I may be doing. It is not always perfect, and it shouldn’t be - but if I did the best I could, I am ok with that! RADIO STATION

89.3 The Current | Minneapolis NEWSPAPER St. Paul Pioneer Press | St. Paul PHOTOGRAPHER Bryan Hansel | Grand Marais VIDEOGRAPHER Matt Jasper | Minneapolis METEOROLOGIST Ian Leonard | Minneapolis

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Aaron J. Brown

mnbound.com | Minneapolis @MinnesotaBound

f

WRITER & BLOG

Aaron J. Brown | Minnesota Brown In business and life… what inspires you? People and what they can do, nature and its ways, the power of love, the invincibility of the truth, and the fact that I can be paid for saying things like this. In one word, describe your story: Typing MinnesotaBrown.com | Hibbing

t @minnesotabrown f @ironrange n @aaronjamesbrown


BUILDER/GENERAL CONTRACTOR LANDS END DEVELOPMENT

In business and life… what inspires you? Kids. Kindness. Architecture. Community. Charity. Walt Disney. A good book. Volunteers. Faith. Friends. Entrepreneurs. Traveling. Perseverance. Teachers. Happiness. Nature. Hope. And not knowing what’s around the next corner…..!! In one word, describe your story: Exhilarating www.landsenddev.com | Crosslake

f and Houzz @Lands End Development

Lands End Development

ARCHITECT

WES HANSON BUILDERS, INC. In business and life… what inspires you? Our clients inspire us. We believe their homes should reflect them, their style, and how they live. We take the time to get to know their one-of-a-kind needs and stories, and bring that unique character and individuality to every square inch of their new home. In one word, describe your story: Dedicated www.weshansonbuilders.com | Crosslake

Wes Hanson Builders

f @weshansonbuilders n weshansonbuilders


Elizabeth Thompson

Lake Superior

ON NEWS S TA N D S N E A R YO U ! We love collaborating with inspired retailers across the state and are happy to introduce you to our handpicked collection of Lake Time Magazine stockists. Be sure to check out these locations to find truly unique products and to pick up the latest copy of Lake Time Magazine. ADVENTURE NORTH

T R AV E L & LODGING

AIRPORT MSP | St. Paul BOAT CRUISE/EXCURSION Big Pelican Cruises | Detroit Lakes B&B/INN Art House B&B | Grand Marais SKI MOUNTAIN Lutsen Mountain | Lutsen

ASKOV FINLAYSON

FESTIVAL/EVENT MN State Fair | St. Paul

DULUTH PACK ELEVEN 71

STATE PARK Itasca State Park

FIKA COFFEE FLAGSHIP

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It comes as no surprise to us that Grand Marais wins best town, and they are certainly no stranger to such accolades. This uber friendly community boasts a quaint downtown full of shops, restaurants, art, and nature. Situated at the base of the Sawtooth Mountains and only a hop, skip, and a jump from the BWCA, Gunflint Trail, and Canada, Grand Marais is a mecca for every adventurer, explorer, local, and casual vacationer.

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Are you interested in becoming a stockist? Reach out to us at hello@thelakeandco.com to find out more. 74

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Grand Marais


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GRAND VIEW LODGE SPA & GOLF RESORT In business and life… what inspires you? Our teams strive on a daily basis to create memories and experiences for our guests and each other. Whether we are talking about families, wedding guests, adventurers, or honeymooners, our impression must be a lasting one – a positive experience never to be forgotten. That keeps people coming back and continues our long tradition.

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Lake + Co. 403 NW 1st Ave, Grand Rapids, MN 55744


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SU S TAINAB L E SYS T E MS | E XQU IS ITE E S TAT E

By Lisa Janisch

Secluded on the Moccasin Point peninsula of iconic Lake Vermilion in northern Minnesota, you’ll find an exquisite half log sided home on south facing sandy shoreline, hosting every amenity one hopes to find in a premier lakefront home. What is not apparent is how inexpensive this property is to maintain due to the reliable energy efficient systems running quietly in the background. Step inside the log trussed covered entry and you will find a vaulted great room with a two story tall stone fireplace and floor to ceiling glass showcasing an island studded view across Daisy Bay and the tip of Birch Point, out into Big Bay. There’s a magnificent kitchen with custom hickory cabinets, granite counters, and stainless appliances. The main floor is home to the luxurious lakeside master suite with its spacious granite master bath, walkin closet, and glass door to the lakeside deck. Up the log stairs is a loft overlooking the lake. Downstairs, the family room features a full bar and is open to the lakeside stone patio. There are two more spacious bedrooms and another large bathroom. Among its numerous first class amenities, the home offers in-floor heat on all three floors, central air conditioning, central vac, and whole house sound including outside speakers. Also on this property are two heated garages with guest quarters above and a boathouse with an electric double rail system and three docks. The three car garage has in-floor heat both in the garage and in the apartment above, which has its own full bathroom and granite kitchen. The 26 x 46 garage has propane heat in the garage and electric heat in the rec room above. The total electricity and propane gas bills for one year for all this? $2,300 for electricity and $1,400 for propane gas!

STAT S • 3,546 SF, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 54 ft lakefront deck, 54 ft lakefront patio • 3 car garage with guest apartment above • 26x46 garage with rec room above • Boathouse with double rail system • 3 docks

The owners, Jim and Judy, did not specifically set out to build an energy efficient home. They fell in love with a piece of property they were told they couldn’t build on. “We loved the location. South facing road accessible property on Lake Vermilion is rare and wind is never an issue here. The location in this sandy cove protects you from big waves. It’s a great place to entertain the family. The swimming and boating is great because you are out of the main traffic on the lake. The kids love it because they can swim without having to worry about boats going by. “The turning point was when we were told we couldn’t build on this land. We were determined that there had to be a way.” What followed was much research, discussions with various contractors, and careful thinking through how to do things more efficiently and effectively with regard to long term reliability. “Everything had to be done top notch. We didn’t cut corners on anything. This was going to be our retirement home.” They took into account that in northern Minnesota it is not unusual for traditional drilled well water lines and septic systems to freeze during hard winters and they wanted systems that could not freeze.


WATER

HEATING & COOLING

They decided upon a whole-house rainwater system for the main home drinking and domestic water. Although not yet common on Lake Vermilion, rainwater systems are used in other areas such as the Caribbean, where rain water is the water supply source for the island of Bermuda. “I wanted the best water I could get up here, especially having kids, and after talking to experts, rainwater seemed to be the best.”

An inconspicuous bank of solar panels tucked into the landscape to the west of the home provides most of the electricity needed to heat the in-floor system. The solar panels bring the in-floor system up to 66 degrees. The propane boiler then only has to heat the system a few degrees to get the in-floor heat from 66 degrees up to 70 degrees. When the owners are not going to be home in the winter, they set this system at 45 degrees.

The whole-house rainwater system provides the water needed for the entire house and can be drank from any tap. In addition, the system provides the water needed for the in-floor heat system installed on all three floors.

There is also a high efficiency propane forced air furnace neatly tucked into the utility room. When the owners have been away, they use the thermostats to turn up both the in-floor heat and the propane forced air furnace as soon as they arrive. The propane forced air furnace quickly heats the whole house to 68 degrees and keeps it toasty warm until the in-floor heat catches up.

Have they ever run out of rainwater? No. In over a decade of heavy use, including hosting friends and family groups as large as 38 people, they have never run out of water. Should the area ever experience an extended dry period, the house could simply be tapped into the year round lake water system that supports the guest quarters above the garage or a groundwater well could be drilled; however, they have never had to consider this as they have always had plenty of water. Maintenance on the rainwater system is simply cleaning one of the three filters every five years, changing one of the filters every year, and changing the third filter every month or two.

Every room in the house has its own in-floor heat zone so it is easy to adjust the temperature in every room with the thermostat on the wall of each room. Maintenance on the propane boiler, forced air furnace, and central air is just the usual routine servicing recommended for these units. Maintenance on the solar panels has been minimal. They built their dream retreat and have enjoyed years of making family memories as their children and now growing number of grandchildren learned to trap shoot, snowmobile, fish, and even zip line from the upper garage down to the house. “All the stuff you can do with the kids is just phenomenal up here and you don’t have to deal with crowds. The kids are all up on Memorial Day, the 4th, and Labor Day. “Some of our best memories are boating to restaurants on the lake. You do have the big water if you want to go out on Big Bay but it is also easy to get to scenic places where the water is not so big.” Other favorites are being so close to one of the best golf courses in the state, shopping in Ely, and good fishing right off the dock in Daisy Bay. “The fishing and the energy savings have been phenomenal.”

SEWER They decided upon a two-holding-tank system for the waste water from the home, one in the utility room and one buried in the yard, and another holding tank buried in the yard for waste water from the apartment above the garage. With this system, they never have to worry about the septic freezing. Maintenance is simply having the tanks pumped once or twice a year, depending upon amount of use.

Jim and Judy desire to pass this cherished retreat on to someone who will love this place as much as they have and begin making their own memories on Lake Vermilion. Please contact Lisa Janisch, Janisch Realty 218-780-6644 Lisa@JanischRealty.com


TOWER, MN A secluded one owner Lake Vermilion estate with a S.-facing sand beach and island studded views of Daisy Bay. Close to town, golf,

dining. 3BR+loft main home with in-floor heat all 3 floors. There is also a 3 car garage with an apartment including a granite kitchen. A 2nd garage features a rec room above including a bathroom and a lakeside deck. The home features a prow front great room with a 2 story stone fireplace and floor to ceiling glass open to the 54 ft lakefront deck. A huge granite and hickory kitchen opens to OFFERED AT $998,500 DETAILS 4 BD/3 BTH 3,708 SF the lakeside dining room. Lakeside main floor master. Walkout lower level w/2BR, and a family 250 ft shoreline 1.38 acres room w/full bar. Open yard to the sandy shore. 2 stall boathouse with double rails and 3 docks.

Connect with Janisch Realty!

www.JanischRealty.com


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SCIENCE

FA I L E D R I F T S A N D TECTONIC SHIFTS

DIGGING INTO LAKE SUPERIOR’S PAST SHEDS NEW LIGHT ON EARTH’S HISTORY By Elizabeth Thompson

A fissure eruption in Iceland, 2014. Around a billion years ago, a much larger fissure eruption stretched across the land that would become North America, oozing pools of lava and nearly splitting the early continent in half.

A

bout 1.1 billion years ago, after millennia of straining and twisting as it migrated across the globe, the landmass that would become North America finally fractured. An enormous rift opened, a two-thousand-mile-long wound across the desolate plain at the continent’s core. No grass or trees softened the barren, broken rock surface—multicellular life had not even evolved yet.

SCIENCE

The earth shook; the rocky crust along the rift’s edges crumbled and fell into the chasm. Once the rift had opened, plumes of molten rock spewed from the gash, arcing through the air in orange fans and splattering onto the rock. Curtains of smoke billowed into the sky. Erupted lava pooled and spread toward the horizons, slowly blackening as it crept to a halt, only to be overtaken by the next red-hot wave. The heart of North America was tearing apart, bleeding red lava, and its violent gushing continued for 24 million years.

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FOR GEOLOGISTS, A CLOSER LOOK AT THE EXPOSED VOLCANIC ROCK AROUND LAKE SUPERIOR, AND THE HIDDEN BELTS OF DENSE ROCK BENEATH, OPENS A WINDOW INTO THE PAST AND THE FUTURE.

Every August of my childhood my family piled into our big red van and drove up north to the scar of that ancient disaster—Lake Superior. My two brothers and I would burst from the van and run along the shore, clambering up and down the blocks of black rock between frosty green pines and cool blue water. When our bare feet were worn out on the hot rocks, we waded into the icy water of the lake until our toes went numb, usually after only a few minutes. The first one to retreat to the warm rocks lost. The Ojibwe Indians who first settled Lake Superior’s shores called the lake gichi-gami, or “Great Sea.” It is the largest freshwater lake on Earth in terms of surface area. At its deepest, it reaches down 1,332 feet—deep enough to submerge the Empire State Building. To increase that depth by a single inch would take 551 billion gallons of water. In total, Superior holds three quadrillion gallons within its shores, enough to sustain the entire world’s population on half a gallon of water per day for 2,300 years. As a child I was adamant that Lake Superior really was superior to all the Great Lakes. But I really had no idea why Superior was so different, or that its roots stretched across the breadth of the United States.

SCIENCE

As it turns out, neither did scientists. In the 1950s and 60s, scientists mapping the magnetic and gravitational signature of North America noticed that the Lake Superior area sent unusually high signals compared to the rest of the country. The ancient lava that had burst from the prehistoric crack had solidified into rock that was high in iron and denser

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Basalt rock chunks, Grand Marais

SCIENCE

than the surrounding rocks, and though most of it was buried deep underground, it showed up loud and clear on their magnetic and gravity sensors. “Geologists are taught to think that everything we see on the surface of the Earth is there for a reason,” geologist Seth Stein said to me. “It’s telling us something. It’s a record of what the world is.” For geologists, a closer look at the exposed volcanic rock around Lake Superior, and the hidden belts of dense rock beneath, opens a window into the past and the future. Seth and Carol Stein are a husband-and-wife geologist team who decided to take a closer look. They, along with a crew of other geologists, founded a project called EarthScope, which focuses on better understanding the geology of North America. They knew that the strange pattern of rocks in the ground didn’t appear out of nowhere—it tells a story. In 2004, the National Science Foundation-funded program planted a swath of 400 seismic sensors along the West Coast. These seismic sensors show more than just magnetic strength or the pull of gravity, they create a 3D, underground image. The seismometers gather soundwaves from distant storms or earthquakes and record how they bounce through Earth’s interior: slowly through loose, sedimentary rock, and quickly through hard, dense rock. It’s like taking an ultrasound of the planet. Field scientists bury seismic sensors a couple meters below the surface in a protective container, then wire them up to what looks like a cooler full of scientific equipment, and finally connect the whole apparatus to a solar panel for power. The sensors are silver


SCIENCE

In high school I took my first parent-free camping trip at Lake Superior with my friend Alison, who had never seen the lake. We started driving at four in the morning, and by the time we reached Duluth, the city at Lake Superior’s eastern tip, the sun had risen and was glimmering brilliantly over Lake Superior’s flat expanse of blue. I pulled over, turned off CD number three of the nine-hour playlist Alison had put together for our drive, and shook her awake for her first glimpse. I swept my arm out over the nodding yellow wildflowers and dark, haggard pines that framed the scene and urged her to admire “the ocean.” I knew it was a lake; I’ve always known it was a lake. But as I looked out at the vast expanse of water that stretched to the horizon, the ten-foot waves crashing against the breakers, the enormous cargo ships carrying taconite iron out to distant ports, my brain told me it was an ocean. Alison started calling it the ocean, too. It turns out we weren’t far off. The rifting process that formed Lake Superior is the same process that formed oceans like the Atlantic. The continents are mostly made up of granite, a rock exposed in, for example, Yosemite Valley in California, Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, Acadia National Park in Maine, and kitchen counters across the country. It’s flecked with different colors and relatively lightweight, as rock goes. Because they are so light, granite-based continents float in thick slabs on top of Earth’s magma. Magma, or molten rock inside Earth, heats up close to the high-pressure core and rises toward the surface. When it rises, it cools, and so it sinks back to the bottom like the wax in a lava lamp. This circular motion shuffles the floating slabs on the surface in a process called plate tectonics. On a map of Earth, continents look like puzzle pieces that could fit together. In fact, every 400 or 500 million years, the continents crowd together in a supercontinent, then break apart again in new ways. This breaking up is called rifting. The most recent supercontinent was named Pangaea. Then, 180 million years ago, plate tectonics pulled Pangaea apart again. The rift that would become the Atlantic Ocean cracked open, and lava that flowed out of the crack became a dark, dense, high-iron rock

called basalt. The floating fragments of granite-like rock that made up the supercontinent drifted apart, and heavier basalt-like rock sagged low between them. “Rifting is like what happens if you pull a candy bar that has an outer chocolate shell and a nougat interior,” explains Carol Stein in the video The Billion Year Story. “The chocolate layer breaks, and the inside stretches and bends downward.” Eventually, the heavy basalt floor sank so low that ocean water flowed in above it, and the Atlantic Ocean was born.

An estimation of where Laurentia and other land masses were about 1.1 billion years ago, with an outline of North America for reference. Scientists suspect that Amazonia moving along Laurentia's coast played a part in opening the Midcontinent Rift (MCR), shown here in orange. Some time after the MCR stopped opening, all these landmasses collided into the supercontinent Rodinia, sealing the rift in at the center of the supercontinent. They would separate, combine into another supercontinent called Pangaea, and separate again before glaciers carved out the remains of the gash to form Lake Superior. Credit: Elizabeth Thompson

A little over a billion years ago, long before Pangaea, a mass of crust called Laurentia was cruising the globe when it, too, started to break apart. Laurentia would one day make up the central part of North America, but back then we would not have recognized its shape—the coastlines that give North America its distinctive silhouette had not yet been stuck onto the sides. Imagine the North America we know, but turned on its side, the equator running from Canada to Texas. Now imagine that Mexico and the continent’s coastlines have dissolved away, leaving only the core of the continent—what geologists call the craton. A couple other cratons float nearby— land that will become Antarctica and Australia hovers above, land that will become Brazil scrapes by below. “Right about this time, what is now the Amazon Basin of South America—we called it at that point Amazonia—was sliding past the southern part of what is now the United States,” Wysession said. The continents were rearranging themselves faster than they would at any other time in Earth’s history. As Amazonia struggled to break away from Laurentia, straining the continent’s interior, a “hot spot” of rising magma was centered right under the straining crust (a similar hot spot built the Hawaiian Islands). Under the added pressure, the rock finally gave way and lava poured out, solidifying into basalt.

SCIENCE

cylinders designed to record vibrations in three directions. “There are three components because we live in a three-dimensional spatial universe,” said geologist Michael Wysession in a talk for Public Radio International’s Science Friday. “So there’s up-down, left-right, and front-back.” The sensors will detect earthquakes as far away as Asia or New Zealand—or tiny earthquakes from scientists jumping nearby— during their two years in the ground. By looking at how an earthquake signal hits seismometers across the array, scientists can decode where the signal originated and what rock it had traveled through to reach the sensors. By the time the seismometer’s two years are up, scientists have a whole new picture of the ground beneath their feet.

And more lava poured out, solidifying into more rock. Layer after layer spread out in a molten sea and solidified, only to be covered over by a newer flow of magma. The pool of heavy basalt sank into LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

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SCIENCE

Vertical shot of basalt on the shore of Lake Superior near Cascade River State Park

put such a huge crack in the continent—and why that crack had suddenly frozen rather than opening into a Midcontinent Ocean.

the ground, 15 miles deep in some places, and still more poured out. So much new rock formed along the rift that the crust at its edges tipped downward beneath the weight. Still more lava poured out. The entire system, which geologists call the Midcontinent Rift, contains enough volcanic rock to fill all five Great Lakes 44 times over, now mostly hidden beneath Superior’s iconic scenery.

EarthScope and SPREE were attacking the mystery of North America’s history with an army of data. Tests in the 1980s had used boat-based seismometers to map the 18-mile-deep slab of volcanic rocks and sediment beneath the lake. SPREE added new, underground pictures of the rift around the Lake. At the same time, scientists used GPS sensors to trace how Earth’s crust was drifting. They used gravity sensors, fragile white boxes a little bigger than a car battery, to detect whether the pull of gravity might be stronger in some areas, indicating a dense rock like basalt deep below the surface. They measured magnetic data to more carefully map the iron-rich basalt. Then they combined all these results into a detailed, 3D map of Earth’s interior. Suddenly the snippets from isolated projects completed decades ago broadened into a full picture.

When I was fourteen, my family stayed at Gooseberry Falls State Park, a park about halfway up Minnesota’s North Shore that’s known for its waterfalls. A small, unmarked trail curled out of the end of our campground loop. We followed it, of course, and it let out onto a little section of river with a couple of short waterfalls. White water trickled over chocolatecolored blocks, cascading like a slinky down stony stairs and landing in a shallow, swirling pool before trailing off down the next cascade. We kicked off our shoes and were in the water in a heartbeat. I handed off my camera. “Mom! Take my picture!” Dad, my brothers, and I climbed up and down the little waterfalls, each only a bit taller than Dad. The falls seemed made for climbing. We scaled the step-like falls over and over until our tie-dye shirts stained our skin. We had no idea that each step had been a flow of lava a billion years ago. Flow after flow had spread and solidified in sheets, which this river gradually wore down into a chunky pile of blocks, perfect for climbing on an August afternoon. The magma had piled up so deep in one spot, layer after layer, because the rift failed. That is, the massive crevice never widened into an ocean basin. And until Earthscope’s march of seismometers arrived, the full story of its failure remained a mystery. In the summer of 2010, Earthscope reached the Midwest. Graduate students from Washington University in St. Louis drove around Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, and southern Canada knocking on doors. They were asking permission from local landowners to plant seismometers on land along and across the rift. Fortunately, people were eager to help unearth the science under the lake.

SCIENCE

The next spring, the students buried 83 seismometers along and across the Lake Superior area in the “Superior Province Rifting EarthScope Experiment,” or SPREE. They wanted to open a window into the rift to see just what happened all those years ago to

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A rough outline of the Midcontinent Rift over a gravity map of the Midwest. By combining data from a variety of sources, including seismic, magnetic, and gravity sensors, scientists now estimate that the Midcontinent Rift stretches all the way from Oklahoma, up through Lake Superior, and back down to Alabama - the edge of the continent 1.1 billion years ago. Credit: Elizabeth Thompson with gravity map from USGS

Scientists can use all that data on the Midcontinent Rift to better understand the processes that make Earth the way it is today. “If you want to look at when the Atlantic opened—let’s say you want to see the East Coast,” Stein explained, “the geologic structures are buried very deep under all the sediment, and so we can’t actually see them.” Around Lake Superior, the process of ocean formation is exposed and frozen at the point just before the water rushed in and a basin formed. This fossilized attempt at an ocean is so well preserved you can still see some of the ripples where the spreading lava slowed and solidified. After the rift scarred the landscape of North America, it was sealed in as the rock that now forms America’s coastlines attached to the craton core. The continents separated, then collided again in a few more cycles, but by then the rift was nestled in the heart of North America and mostly buried, so the structure was kept safe for a billion years. Scientists use Superior’s frozen rift as a model of how oceans form—but the lake I visited as a child never developed into an ocean like the Atlantic. It advertises itself as “unsalted and shark-free.” So why did this rift stop expanding?


For many years, the eastern arm of the Midcontinent Rift confused scientists. They thought the streak on the gravity map was the zone where Laurentia had crunched into neighboring cratons in an ancient supercontinent called Rodinia. SPREE data shows that this underground ripple of rock came from the rift—from a pulling apart, not a pushing together. “It leads to a whole different picture of how North America got assembled,” Stein said. For much of its history, the Midcontinent Rift— and the past events it recorded—was hidden under sediments that rivers dumped into it. The weight of the sediments made the already heavy trench burrow deeper into the Earth. It was hidden while North America slammed again into Pangaea, forming the Appalachians, which scientists believe to be the oldest mountains

Then, heavy ice sheets scraped across North America. The ice couldn’t sculpt the hard volcanic rock that now forms Lake Superior’s shores, and the glaciers were instead channeled through the middle of the rift, scraping out the sediment that filled it. When the last glaciers receded about 10,000 years ago, they left the deep, broad, blue-green Lake Superior I used to heft rocks into to see how far the ripples would go. It was three years ago this summer that I last stood on the rocks along Duluth Harbor, at the easternmost tip of Lake Superior. The bell of the lift bridge sounded across the lake. The water was calm that day, and the beach full of red and gray stones, smoothed for skipping. I remembered all those years ago sitting on these rocks with a peanut butter sandwich, throwing my crusts to the gulls and planning with my brothers to swim out to some ruins of old buildings that poked through the water just offshore. Mom never let us, of course, and this day was too cold for that. Lake Superior, formed when Earth was young, brings me back to my own childhood adventures of agate hunting and waterfall climbing. Of squinting through the fog at Split Rock Point. Of climbing to the top of the Palisade cliffs, trying to get an edge on Earth’s curve to maybe—just maybe—see the far side of the lake. We never could, and it was all the more tantalizing for staying just out of reach. Somehow it doesn’t surprise me that a place like this holds together North America’s heart.

Scientists can use all that data on the Midcontinent Rift to better understand the processes that make Earth the way it is today.

SCIENCE

Scientists now posit that as the proto-South American chunk of land, Amazonia, pulled away, the straining continent fractured into a spider web of three arms at 120° to one another, as often happens when continents break. Over the course of the breakup, two arms of the rift continued spreading and filled with water to become an ocean (not the Atlantic—keep in mind that this all happened several supercontinent cycles before the Atlantic opened up). This relieved the pressure and the third arm, the Midcontinent Rift, failed, or stopped pulling apart.

still visible in the world. At some point, collisions at the edge of the continent compressed the whole landmass, and some of the rift’s volcanic rock was pushed back to the surface. The scar was beginning to reveal itself.

Shore near Cascade River State Park, sunrise

EarthScope, SPREE, and other geological experiments revealed that the Midcontinent Rift extends much farther than scientists thought. Its arms stretch from beneath Oklahoma, up in a crazed, backward question mark to its deepest point beneath Lake Superior, then back down through Michigan and all the way to Alabama—to what was the edge of the continent 1.1 billion years ago.

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YOUR GUIDE TO EXPERIENCING THE PERFECT FOLIAGE THIS FALL

All seasons along the North Shore are breathtaking but one season that really stands out is fall. There’s just nothing like the warm sunshine, crisp air, and colored leaves that illuminate the shoreline. Fall is a great season to get outside, be active, and really take in all of those colors that LUTSEN

decorate the shore. Bottom line: the North Shore is the definition of the

OBERG MT.

perfect fall foliage. Whether it’s a quick trip to Duluth to get a piece of it or a longer venture up the shore, there is something for everyone looking to get their fall fix.

GOOSEBERRY FALLS STATE PARK RUSTIC INN CAFE TWO HARBORS

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DULUTH


DULUTH If you enjoy biking, you will love the trails in Duluth during the fall season. The Lakewalk is great and allows you to experience Duluth beside the water, but the trail systems in Duluth’s parks are a great way to ride beneath the colored trees and get a bird’s eye view of Duluth’s fall foliage. A few parks and trails to note: -Lester/Amity Park System: This system will take you all the way up the hill to Hawks Ridge for incredible views. -Hartley Park System: A flatter trail than Lester, but this trail will have large pine trees mixed in with the reds and oranges of fall. -Enger Park Trails: Right on the edge of the ridge, this trail system will allow you to look down on Duluth and the colorful hillside. -Spirit Mountain Trails: A plus to this trail is that the ski lift will give you a ride up and bikers can take their bikes down. These trails are recommended for more experienced bikers due to how steep they can get. Want to come check it out but need a place to stay? Beacon Pointe Resort is a great option for you as it is right on the water and has direct access to the Lakewalk. This means that if you want to check out some of the trails on the hillside, you will also get the experience of being lakeside too. And better yet, Beacon Pointe can set you up with fun-filled experiences that you can do through the Duluth Experience. Think: mountain biking tours, brewery tours, kayak tours, and more!

TWO HARBORS

CANOEING In addition to the big lake – Lake Superior – Minnesota’s North Shore has hundreds of inland lakes and rivers. And a great way to explore them is by canoe. Paddle along fall colored shorelines, take a midday swim, bird watch, and maybe even spot a moose.

RIDE THE LUTSEN GONDOLA AT LUTSEN MOUNTAINS

Driving along Highway 61 up the North Shore during fall is by far a fan favorite. Places you don’t want to miss when taking the trip up to Two Harbors is Gooseberry Falls State Park and the Rustic Inn Café.

Head right up Ski Hill Road and board the tram to the top of Moose Mountain. Take in panoramic views of Lake Superior, Moose Mountain, and the maple-covered Sawtooth Mountain Range. Grab a picnic lunch and walk the pathways at the top of Moose Mountain, or pick up the Superior Hiking Trail and hike the 3.6-mile trail through the maple forest down to Poplar River.

GOOSEBERRY FALLS STATE PARK

HIKE OBERG MOUNTAIN

Fall at Gooseberry is breathtaking. Viewing the fall colors that surround the rushing waterfalls that flow into Lake Superior is like no other during prime fall foliage season. The fresh air, crunching of leaves beneath your feet, and impeccable views will have you leaving wanting more. Insider tip: take a look at the Minnesota DNR’s Fall Color Finders current review of Gooseberry Falls fall foliage before making your way there for the day.

This trail is the best to explore during fall colors. Hike through maple hillsides to a loop with seven stunning overlooks of Lake Superior, the Sawtooth Mountains, Teal Lake, and LeVeaux Mountain. Bring your camera!

RUSTIC INN CAFÉ It’s hard to get through the fall season without eating your weight in pie – it’s a staple this time of year. One of our favorite spots to grab a slice of pie along the North Shore is the Rustic Inn Café, which is just down the road from Grand Superior Lodge. Most people think of Betty’s Pies as the only place to grab a slice of pie when traveling along the shore but the Rustic Inn has some legendary recipes as well. And what better way to end a day of hiking and adventuring along the shore than by sharing a slice of pie or maybe two? As mentioned before, Grand Superior Lodge is near the Rustic Inn but it is also in prime location for all major stops in this area of the shore. Not only that, but it is right on the shore of Lake Superior. And it sure is hard to beat those views.

LUTSEN Lutsen is the ultimate location for all things fall. From hiking to canoeing to Lake Superior views, there’s an array of activities for everyone to do. You’ll see leaves along the hillside with splashes of orange, yellow, red, and maroon during every activity.

If you’re looking for a place to stay for the weekend in between all of your exploring, Caribou Highlands Lodge is the perfect spot to rest your head. Right in the middle of all the action, Caribou Highlands is just down the road from the gondola, has access to all the nearby hiking trails, has a pool for everyone to enjoy, and offers a number of different room types to fit your needs while on vacation. This charming shore side town that’s located two hours away from Duluth and roughly 40 minutes away from the Canadian border is the perfect getaway during fall. The beautiful drive up the North Shore alone will make the trip worth your time. While there, you will definitely want to spend time walking Artists’ Point and you won’t want to leave without grabbing a donut from The World’s Best Donuts (it’s true). But to really embrace the fall season, you will want to take a drive up the Gunflint Trail. There is a good chance you will see a variety of wildlife, including moose, eagles, bear, and lynx as you drive between hiking trails. And if you feel like getting out of the car for some fresh air, take a hike on one of the trails too - you will not regret it. To add to your trip, stay at East Bay Suites in Grand Marais. With the whole hillside acting as a backdrop of reds, oranges, greens, and yellows and then stunning views of Lake Superior, what else could you want? By staying at East Bay Suites, you’ll have the convenience of restaurants in walking distance too! No matter where you decide to visit along the North Shore, you are bound to have an amazing time with incredible fall foliage. It truly is only in northern Minnesota. LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

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Outdoor Adventure. Comforts of Home.

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Bear Hunting by Erin Blegen, Yellow Birch Hobby Farm

Controversial baiting is safer for hunter and bear I will never forget following my brother into the woods for my first experience with bear baiting. Despite having grown up in a hunting family and being a hunter myself, born and raised in the Northwoods, I had no idea what you would bait a bear with. Steak? Fish? Honey? Much to my surprise, candy and marshmallows were on the menu, with a side of fruity-scented spray adorning the bait sites surrounding trees. Apparently, honey was not too far off a guess. Now, mid-August bear baiting marks the beginning of fall for us, a sign of the busy season to come. My husband joined my brother eight years ago and started working as a guide for North Shore Outdoors, a long-standing local guide service in Grand Marais. Since then, bear season has become a muchanticipated time of the year for the whole family. In an age where kids are drawn to the indoors and the lure of electronic entertainment, our kids are out hauling bait buckets into the thick brush, dragging ladder stands, and swatting greedy yellow jackets. For us, bear season is a time to teach the younger generation an appreciation for the outdoors before it is lost on them. That being said, bear baiting and hunting is widely criticized and misunderstood. While we see the opportunity to feed our families, provide a successful and safe experience for fellow hunters, as well as much-needed population management, others see an unfair sport. I thought I would invite Kyle Anderson, full time guide since 2007 and new owner of North Shore Outdoors to address some of these questions that tend to weigh on the minds of those unfamiliar with the workings of bear hunting in general. First of all, what is a common misconception regarding baited bear hunts? “That it’s easy. There seems to be this idea that you put food in the woods, a bear eats it, you shoot it. If it were that easy, everyone would do it,” Kyle says. Guides know the woods they are putting their hunters in. They know where the bear activity is. They know how and where to place bait, what type of bait is effective, and even how often a spot

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should be baited. They also take the time to learn the bear’s activity, routine, and what time of day they are coming in. They also know what other types of wildlife are coming to the bait.


Countless hours are spent mentally logging this data, adjusting, and making last minute decisions on how a site should be managed. But even with all of this attention, “the statewide success rate is only 25%,” Kyle notes but then adds, “we are hitting at about 80%. We take pride in giving every hunter an opportunity for a shot.” What some neglect to consider is the fact that it’s safer for both the hunter and the bear (bear with me, no pun intended) to hunt over bait in our area.

before. Book a guide.” Keeping in mind that bear hunting is a carefully managed lottery with only a limited number of licenses offered each year. “Unless you are really confident in your skills as an outdoors person and you have a lot of time on your hands, try out a guide for your first time. See what their program is all about.” And while you do, we will continue to look forward to this exciting time of year - those first days out in the woods clearing trails, hanging signs that claim the sites, observing the manner in which the bait was taken. Sweating in the late summer humidity, mosquitos buzzing, the kids’ voices lifting on the

“For us, bear season

is a time to teach the younger generation an appreciation for the outdoors before it is lost on them.

The woods and brush are so thick and unruly that (1) you cannot glass for bears and (2) one could easily take a bad shot and injure the bear rather than execute a swift kill. And a wounded bear is, well, “bad news bears” as my husband would say. So for those who are wanting to learn more about bear hunting, are interested in a hunt, or would like more information, “contact your local DNR,” Kyle suggests. “Check the harvest rate in that area from last year. Study the area you will be hunting in. Talk to people who have been on a bear hunt

air in the deep woods. Getting each site prepped and looking forward to the first bears taken as the phone begins to ring at just about dark. “That’s my favorite part. When I get that call from a hunter that they just harvested a bear. The excitement in their voice is one of a kind,” Kyle shares. While hunting as a sport is often the target of criticism and debate, those who love it take tremendous care in making sure that every area of what they do is covered appropriately. Choosing a guide as an inexperienced bear hunter is one such gesture. They will be sure to provide the safest experience for both the hunter and the hunted.

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Your Up North Real Estate Connection 218-244-8462

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Experience

As the only region of the state where active iron mining still exists, the Mesabi has long drawn those interested in state and national history to its mine overlooks and museums. But woven into these rugged minelands are lakes, forests and trails that set the stage for experiences you won’t find anywhere else in the country. Plan a fall adventure to this legendary neck of the woods, and you’ll see why.

Mesabi

Action-Packed Giant Adventure With two new purpose-built, lift-served gravity trails at Giants Ridge in Biwabik, the region is poised to become a destination for mountain bikers, with its very own vibe and feel. Both trails are free-ride trails - Leapfrog is an intermediate, flowy ride and a good introduction to gravity trails, while Sector 12 is an advanced thrill ride for even the most experienced bikers. Leave the ground if you want, or really push yourself on the challenging B-lines, with rock drops and a gap jump. These trails (with 20+ miles of cross country trails and up to eight more gravity trails on the way at Giants Ridge in the next two-three years) join existing Iron Range Off Road Cyclists’ trails at the Laurentian Divide north of Virginia and Maple Hill Park in Hibbing.

hike up the mountain the old-fashioned way, wind through the woods and emerge atop a 360-degree view of the surrounding woods, or you can ride the new high-speed chairlift to the summit and take it all in. When you’re back at base, grab a seasonal brew and a bite at the Burnt Onion Kitchen & Brews in the Giants Ridge Chalet. Another favorite option is just north of Virginia on Highway 53, where multi-use trails intersect the Laurentian Divide, the continent’s north/south watershed and a geological point of interest in the Superior National Forest. A fitness trail studded with picnic areas is perfect for little feet to explore, or take the full hike out to the top of Lookout Mountain for a serene and sweeping view of the forest.

Mining for History You can learn a lot in just a few hours. The trails might be calling, but you can’t come all the way to the Mesabi and not take some time to learn about mining. Or hockey. Fortunately, Mesabi museums cover both. Swing in to the US Hockey Hall of Fame Museum and Hockey Plaza, both in Eveleth, for unique perspectives on the sport that even non-fans can appreciate. In Chisholm, there’s a trolley calling, and a scenic ride along a mine lake to a mining ghost town, plus award-winning museum exhibits, all at Minnesota Discovery Center. In Mountain Iron, Locomotive Park offers a peek at an active mine, plus some great interpretive signage about modern and historical taconite mining. Just 30 minutes north, get a deeper appreciation for the industry at the Soudan Underground Mine State Park. These must-see attractions have varied hours of operation, so check on line for details.

The Flavor of Mesabi All the Views

Start Planning Fall is an excellent time to explore the Mesabi. Find information about attractions, lodging, trails and itineraries through the

Iron Range Tourism Bureau

218-749-8161 or www.ironrange.org

Giants Ridge

Heading west, there’s a whole new way to see the sights at Giants Ridge. Sure, you can

+

Adventure: Mountain Biking Hiking Scenic Chairlift Rides Climbing Wall Fall Golf

+

+

From Hoyt Lakes in the east to Hibbing in the west, there are plenty of places to soak up fall color, but the very best views – in no particular order – are: Skibo Vista. You’ll look northwest over the Superior National Forest at this rustic rest stop along a scenic byway with the same name, just outside of Hoyt Lakes. Bring a picnic and plan to explore the nearby Bird Lake and Colby Lake trails.

www.giantsridge.com

+

From the butcher block at Koshar’s Sausage Kitchen in Gilbert to the candy counter at Canelake’s Candies in Virginia, there’s no shortage of ways to taste the region. Bakeries in Virginia, Chisholm and Hibbing bring you poticas, pasties and much more, and the Natural Harvest Food Co-op, also in Virginia, gives you the kind of healthy and delicious choices that will make you feel good about the “hot air” you bought earlier at Canelake’s. Grab a wood-fired pizza at the Shop Coffeehouse in Virginia or picnic sandwiches from The Hive in Aurora. At the end of the day, wash it all down with the BoomTown Double IPA, Smokin’ Scotch, Peanut Butter Porter or any of the tasty assorted craft beers at BoomTown Brewery in Hibbing.

Mesabi is an Ojibwe word that means ‘giant’ or ‘giant man.’ The Mesabi Iron Range refers to the largest of Minnesota’s three Iron Ranges, extending approximately 110 miles east to west, and including the cities of Hibbing, Chisholm, Mountain Iron, Eveleth, Virginia, Gilbert, Biwabik, Aurora and Hoyt Lakes.


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ON THE RADAR + RESOURCE GUIDE

Your Guide to the North

SHOP

PLAY

STAY

DINE

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SHOP

Sep 22 - Oct 28

Twin Cities Harvest Festival & Maze, Brooklyn Park

OCTOBER Oct 2 Oct 2 Oct 3 Oct 3 Oct 3 Oct 4 Oct 4 Oct 5 Oct 5 Oct 5-Nov 4 Oct 5-6 Oct 5-7 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6-7 Oct 7 Oct 11-21 Oct 12-13 Oct 12-14 Oct 12-14 Oct 13 Oct 13 Oct 13 Oct 18 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 26 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 31

Cathedral of Saint Paul Tour, St. Paul Running Aces Tuesday Night Bingo, Minneapolis An Evening with Notorious RBG, Minneapolis Lunch and Paint, St. Paul James J. Hill House Guided Tours, St. Paul Historic Cave Tour, St. Paul Cluster Cluck Cabaret, St. Paul Gasthof's Oktoberfest, Minneapolis Lucielle's Vintage Market, Minneapolis Mary Poppins, Bloomington Twin Cities Oktoberfest, St. Paul Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon Weekend, St. Paul HocktoberFest on West 7th, St. Paul Fused Glass Project Class, Minneapolis The Dinner Detective, Minneapolis Hocktoberfest on West 7th, St. Paul Little Mekong Parking Lot Pop Up Night Market, St. Paul Picnic the River Gorge, St. Paul Waconia Scarecrow Tour, Waconia Hyland Hills Fall Chairlift Rides, Bloomington Rocktoberfest, Blaine Saint Paul Art Crawl, St. Paul Fall On the Farm, Brooklyn Park Brain Tumor Alliance 5k, Minneapolis Zombie Pub Crawl, Minneapolis Laugh Your Ace Off Comedy Club, Minneapolis Home Improvement & Design Expo, Minneapolis Anoka Halloween Light Up the Night Parade, Anoka Red Hot Rascals, St. Paul Murder Mystery Dinner Event, Minneapolis Zombie Adult Camp-In, St. Paul Wayzata's Boo Blast & Boo Bash Dash, Wayzata Big Woods Halloween at Eastman Nature Center, Maple Grove Annual Lake Monster Bash: Halloween Music Fest, St. Paul Halloween Candle Light Mystery Painting, St. Paul

NOVEMBER Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 8 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov 15 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 23 Nov 23 Nov 23 Nov 23 Nov 23-25 Nov 24 Nov 24 Nov 24 Nov 29-Dec 1 Nov 30 Nov 30-Dec 2 Nov 30-Dec 9

Scout It Out (D.E.A.R. Preview Event), Waconia D.E.A.R. Divas Enjoying Awesome Retail, Waconia Release Your Creative Spirit with Paint, St. Paul Chocoholic Frolic 5k & 10k, Minneapolis Shop by Candlelight, St. Paul Girls on the Run 5k, Minneapolis Minnesota Opera "Silent Night", St. Paul Elvis Costello & The Imposters, Minneapolis Landmark Live: Landmark Center Fall Concert Series, St. Paul USWCA All American Bonspiel, Blaine Healthy Life Expo, Minneapolis Fused Glass Project Class, Minneapolis Chimera Creation, St. Paul Grand Opening of Wells Fargo Winter Skate Rink & Rice Park, St. Paul Community Tree Lighting, Waconia Light up the Lake Celebration, Wayzata Black Friday OMNI Brewing Pop-Up Taproom, Maple Grove Marie and Rosetta, St. Paul Minnesota Hmong New Year, St. Paul U of M School of Music, Minneapolis Adventures in Cardboard, St. Paul Every Day Plant Medicine: Making an Herbal Tincture, St. Paul 40th Annual Old Fashioned Holiday Bazaar, St. Paul Black Nativity, St. Paul St. Paul Ice Fishing & Winter Sports Show, St. Paul St. Paul European Christmas Market, St. Paul

DECEMBER Dec 1 Dec 1-9 Dec 4 Dec 7 Dec 7 Dec 8 Dec 8 Dec 9 Dec 23 Dec 23 Dec 31

A Norwegian Christmas, Brooklyn Park Continental Balley Co.'s Nutcracker, Bloomington Nathan Laube in Concert, Minneapolis Disney on Ice - 100 Years of Magic, St. Paul It's a Wonderful Life, A Live Radio Play 2018, St. Paul Minnesota Nordic Ski Opener, Maple Grove Winter Wonderland, Maple Grove Ugly Sweater Run 5k, Minneapolis Game Night: Feel the Hygge, St. Paul Trivia Mafia, St. Paul Spring Forest Qigong for Health, St. Paul

THINGS TO DO SEA LIFE MINNESOTA AQUARIUM

A wonder for all ages, the aquarium is home to more than 10,000 sea creatures in 1.3 million gallons of water. Explore 30 displays including interactive touch pools, walk through a 300-foot tunnel, and see a blacktip reef shark swimming with graceful rays overhead.

URBAN ADVENTURE QUEST

Embark on an interactive experience of Minneapolis as you explore the city while following clues and completing unique challenges. See and learn about landmarks and landscapes like US Bank Stadium, Saint Anthony Falls, and City Hall, solving fun and fascinating puzzles along the way.

SAINT ANTHONY FALLS

TAKE A NORTHEAST BREWERY TOUR

They make some great beer in the Twin Cities. Head to Northeast for the brewery trio of 612 Brew, Indeed Brewing Company, and Dangerous Man Brewing Co.

SEE A SHOW AT THE GAY 90'S

If you can manage to make your way through the bachelorette parties, a show at the Gay 90's is just about the most fun a person can have in downtown Minneapolis. Each night a number of performers take to the stage, performing in drag as such icons as Whitney Houston, Dolly Parton, Madonna, and Lady Gaga.

HIT UP A MEAT RAFFLE Hey! Local flavor!

Overlook the falls from Guthrie’s Endless Bridge that jets over the Mississippi. Be sure to walk to the base. There are 108 stairs, but the view and trails at the bottom are definitely worth the trek back up.

BRING YOUR KIDS TO WILD RUMPUS BOOKSTORE

Scenic walk through the "Central Park" of downtown Minneapolis.

A 20-year-old Linden Hills bookstore that keeps some special furry friends around to greet young readers. With roaming and caged pets including a ferret, chicken, and tarantula, as well as a few cats, the playful store is a huge hit among animal-loving children.

MALL OF AMERICA

SEE A PLAY. ANY PLAY!

LORING PARK

Boasting more than 500 stores and many bars that attract locals and tourists alike. Take the Light Rail to avoid traffic.

THE CRAYOLA EXPERIENCE

Offering over 25 artistic attractions to encourage creative family fun.

NICKELODEON UNIVERSE

Minneapolis is the third largest theater market in the nation, with venues ranging from big players like the Guthrie and the Ordway to smaller venues like the Southern, Brave New Workshop, and Mixed Blood. There are festivals and performances for any age and price range, making the theater scene diverse and entertaining enough to please even the most theater-averse.

Ride a rollercoaster or cross the park on a zip line at the largest indoor theme park in the nation.

CHANHASSEN DINNER THEATRE

CELEBRATE FASHION IN MINNESOTA

WATCH A LOCAL ACT HEADLINE FIRST AVENUE

While we are far away from New York Fashion Week, there are still a number of talented designers who reside in the Twin Cities. The University of Minnesota continues to host its Senior Fashion Show, and resale shops like b. resale frequently partner with local designers to put on smaller-scale fashion and trunk shows. Shop the boutiques in the newly revitalized North Loop neighborhood.

BROWSE THE VINTAGE STORES OF ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS

At the intersection of Selby and Snelling in St. Paul, you will find a pair of vintage shops that stock affordable as well as higher-end pieces. Up Six, Lula Vintage, and Hunt & Gather are just a few.

THE SHOUT HOUSE

Drama at the dining table at the country's largest dinner theater.

First Avenue may get some major talent through its doors, but watching a local band headline the star-covered venue for the first time is always a special treat.

RIDE THE FERRIS WHEEL AT BETTY DANGER’S

This kooky “country club” features a giant Ferris wheel overlooking Northeast Minneapolis.

WHIP UP YOUR OWN DINNER AT A COOKS CLASS

Classes are taught by local chefs from popular restaurants and range from make-your-own sushi to pasta and pizza.

SHOP LOCAL AT THE MILL CITY MARKET

Sing along with the dueling pianos.

Whether you’re searching for produce or one-of-a-kind gifts, the market at Mill City Museum is a must-visit.

UPSTAIRS CIRCUS

GO WILD AT THE COMO PARK ZOO

Create, drink, and be merry with friends, family, and co-workers at a DIY project bar.

THE BASILICA OF SAINT MARY

Where else can you see giraffes, tigers, and polar bears in Minnesota?

HIKE FORT SNELLING STATE PARK

Visit the oldest Basilica in the country.

Not just for historical reenactments, Fort Snelling is also home to Pike Island, which makes for a scenic day trek.

THE FOSHAY TOWER

LAUGH AT ACME COMEDY CLUB

PAISLEY PARK

AAMODT'S HOT AIR BALLOON

Get a birds-eye view of downtown Minneapolis from the observation deck on top.

Get a rare glimpse of Prince's 65,000-square foot home, studio, and rehearsal spaces. Throughout the experience, visitors will see artifacts from Prince’s personal archives, including iconic concert wardrobe, awards, musical instruments, artwork, rare music, and video recordings and motorcycles.

The open mic night is the best place to heckle stand-up hopefuls, but they do get some really great talent in here.

Committed to providing the most intimate and romantic balloon excursions, with smaller sized groups and the most beautiful setting.

JOSEPH WOLF BREWERY CAVE TOURS - LUNA ROSA WINE BAR

The Joseph Wolf Brewery Cave Tour is a walking tour that lasts about 30 minutes while learning the historical details of how the cave was built, what it was used for and how it relates to the history of Stillwater.

DAKOTA JAZZ CLUB

See the biggest names in local, national, and int'l jazz.

WEISMAN ART MUSEUM

Explore the 25,000 art pieces dating from the early twentieth century to contemporary America – even the building is a modern American art piece.

WALKER ART CENTER (AND SCULPTURE GARDEN) Capturing the visual, performing, and media arts.

MORE MUSEUMS!

Top picks for the greater Metro area KIMPTON GRAND HOTEL, MINNEAPOLIS HOTEL IVY, A LUXURY COLLECTION HOTEL, MINNEAPOLIS

The American Swedish Institute gives guests a glimpse into a 1900s Minneapolis mansion, and the intimate Museum of Russian Art showcases decades' worth of artifacts. If you're looking for something with more local roots, the Bell Museum at the University of Minnesota has quite the collection of taxidermy.

HEWING HOTEL, NORTH LOOP, MINNEAPOLIS

RIVERVIEW THEATRE

AC HOTEL BY MARRIOTT, MINNEAPOLIS

Watch an indie film or recent blockbuster at the 1950s style theatre – tix are $3!

IN THE HEART MASK THEATRE

OF

THE

BEAST

PUPPET

AND

JANUARY

Take the kids to a Saturday morning puppet show - each show tells a different children’s story from around the world.

Jan 10-13

CANDYLAND!

The Big Spiel, Blaine

DINE

Feel the nostalgia of childhood in the candy shop that’s been in the Twin Cities for over 70 years.

THE FREEHOUSE

Pair beer with breakfast, each brew is crafted to complement a full menu of inventive grub.

LOEWS MINNEAPOLIS HOTEL, MINNEAPOLIS W MINNEAPOLIS – THE FOSHAY, MINNEAPOLIS

ALOFT, MINNEAPOLIS RADISSON BLU, MINNEAPOLIS THE SAINT PAUL HOTEL, ST. PAUL HOTEL LANDING, WAYZATA LAFAYETTE CLUB, MINNETONKA

METRO

SEPTEMBER

STAY

Your Guide to the North

METRO ON THE RADAR

PLAY

WATER STREET INN, STILLWATER *Check out one of the many Bed + Breakfasts in Stillwater!

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SHOP

SEPTEMBER Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 15-30 Sep 21 Sep 22 Sep 22 Sep 22 Sep 22-23 Sep 27 Sep 29 Sep 30

Rotary Extravaganza, Walker North Country Marathon, Walker Fall Has It All, Walker Faith in action/Booya Fundraiser, Walker area Headwaters 100 Bike Ride, Park Rapids Great American Story, Park Rapids Save Summer Bik and Brew Fest, Walker area Art Leap, Park Rapids/Walker The Revolution, Detroit Lakes Harvest Moon Fall Festival, Walker Oktoberfest at FireFly, Event Barn, Nevis

OCTOBER Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 18-20 Oct 26 Oct 31

ARRIVAL from Sweden, Detroit Lakes 4th Annual Harvest Moon, Walker Paul Bunyan Power Sports Expo, Akeley The Game's Afoot, Detroit Lakes "Pinocchio," Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes Trick or Treat Downtown, Park Rapids

NOVEMBER Nov 6 Nov 9 Nov 15 Nov 15-17 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 22 Nov 22-25 Nov 23 Nov 23 Nov 23 Nov 23-30 Nov 24 Nov 24 Nov 26 Nov 29

Classical Music Night (piano & cello), Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes "Ishmael" (play), Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes Looney Lutherans "Hold the Lutefisk," Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes Holmes Art Show, Detroit Lakes The Frontmen of Country Concert, Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes Lakes Area Comm. Concert Band, Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes 40 & 8 Turkey Bingo Legion, Walker Turkey Trot, Park Rapids Parade of Trees, LP American Legion, Lake Park Community Tree Lighting, Park Rapids Festival of Lights Parade, Walker Detroit Mountain opens for the season, Detroit Lakes Night Before Christmas Walker Bay Theater, Walker Reindeer Ramble, Walker Children's Party - Legion, Walker Grand Parade of Lights, Detroit Lakes Rhythmic Circus Holiday Shuffle, Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes

DECEMBER Dec 1-2 Dec 7 Dec 8 Dec 14 Dec 15 Dec 15 Dec 20

Night Before Christmas Walker Bay Theater, Walker REO Speedwagon, Shooting Star Casino, Mahnomen "Good Lovelies" Christmas Show, Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes "Simple Gifts" Christmas Show, Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes Live Reindeer Event, Washington Square Mall parking lot, Detroit Lakes Lakes Area Comm. Concert Band Concert, First Lutheran Church, Detroit Lakes Rock & Roll Christmas, Holmes Theatre, Detroit Lakes

STAY

RESOURCE GUIDE DETROIT LAKES AREA

PARK RAPIDS/NEVIS

HUB-41

THE GOOD LIFE CAFÉ

104 W Lake Dr., Detroit Lakes

A comfortable, contemporary café with a full bar and

ROASTED PUB & EATERY + BAKED IN DL

a modern take on classic American comfort food with

815 Washington Ave, Detroit Lakes

unforgettable signature dishes.

ZORBAZ

220 Main Ave S, Park Rapids

402 W Lake Dr., Detroit Lakes

NECCE’S ITALIANO RISTORANTE 311 Main Ave S, Park Rapids

MAIN STREAM BOUTIQUE 833 Washington Ave, Detroit Lakes

MOLLY POPPIN’S GOURMET SNACKS

RED WILLOW

Fun popcorn flavors, infused balsamic vinegar and olive

1160 Washington Ave, Detroit Lakes

oils, jerky and other treats, as well as local gifts!

THE NINES

201 Main Ave S, Park Rapids

917 Washington Ave, Detroit Lakes

ITASCA LEATHERGOODS

L&M FLEET SUPPLY

Handmade, exquisite moccasins and other unique

1100 US 59

leather gifts. Factory Store. 37144 US Hwy 71, Lake George

HISTORIC HOLMS THEATRE 806 Summit Ave., Detroit Lakes

L&M FLEET SUPPLY Your one stop shop for sporting goods, apparel, home

DETROIT MOUNTAIN

improvement, power equip., farming and more!

29409 170th St, Detroit Lakes

1307 1st Street East

THE LODGE ON LAKE DETROIT

ITASCA STATE PARK

1200 E Shore Dr., Detroit Lakes

36750 Main Park Dr.

FIVE LAKES RESORT 34665 Camp Cherith Rd, Frazee

WALTER’S RESORT

MAPLELAG RESORT

20035 Grouse Rd, Park Rapids

30501 Maplelag Rd., Callaway

TWO INLETS RESORT 32240 County Hwy 50, Park Rapids

BEMIDJI

SLEEPING FAWN RESORT 20097 County Hwy 24, Park Rapids

BEMIDJI BREWING Serving up fresh, award-winning beer and delicious food with a fun and active atmosphere.

WALKER AREA

211 America Ave NW

GREEN SCENE ORGANIC MARKET

TUTTO BENE

617 Michigan Ave W, Walker

300 Beltrami Ave NW

BENSON’S EATING & DRINKING EMPORIUM

TURTLE RIVER CHOPHOUSE

400 Minnesota Ave, Walker

468 Bemidji Rd

PORTAGE BREWING A full service brewery and taproom located off the

218 + GIFTS

banks of Leech Lake. Founded with a simple mission

223 3rd St. NW

- to take beer outside while making our craft more

LUCETTE BOUTIQUE

accessible.

208 3rd St NW

107 S 5th St., Walker

BEMIDJI WOOLEN MILLS 301 Irvine Ave NW

LITTLE LAZY LODGE

L&M FLEET SUPPLY Your one stop shop for sporting goods, apparel, home

New lodge and event venue tucked away in the

improvement, power equip., farming and more!

2018-2020. Boy River

2740 Paul Bunyan Drive Northwest

TRAPPER’S LANDING

beautiful northern pines. Accepting reservations for

1812 Merit Rd NW, Walker WATERMARK ART CENTER New

state-of-the-art

facility

ANDERSONS HORSESHOE BAY LODGE showcases

national,

8098 Hawthorn Trl NW, Walker

regional, and local art plus classes and more!

CHASE ON THE LAKE

505 Bemidji Ave N.

502 Cleveland Blvd., Walker

PAUL BUNYAN PLAYHOUSE Catch a show at Minnesota’s oldest professional

REED’S SPORTING GOODS

summer stock company, drawing actors from across

522 Minnesota Ave W, Walker

the state, region, and country.

LUNDRIGANS CLOTHING

314 Beltrami Ave

501 Minnesota Ave W, Walker

HEADWATERS SCIENCE CENTER

CHRISTMAS POINT WILD RICE CO.

A hands-on science center featuring exhibits, live

523 Minnesota Ave W, Walker

animals, and a unique gift shop. 413 Beltrami Ave.

CASS COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM

NORTHWEST

205 Minnesota Ave. W, Walker

104

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

DINE

Your Guide to the North

NORTHWEST ON THE RADAR

PLAY

RUTTGERS BIRCHMONT LODGE

FORESTEDGE WINERY

7598 Bemidji Rd. NE

35295 State 64, Laporte


Available throughout the Headwaters Region

Wow, look at the tree colors! Staying out here is lit! Can I come, too? On my way!

VisitDetroitLakes.com 218-847-9202 Ext 180


SHOP

PLAY

STAY

Your Guide to the North

NORTHEAST ON THE RADAR SEPTEMBER Sep 18 Sep 18 Sep 19-26 Sep 20 Sep 20 Sep 21-22, 28-29 Sep 22 Sep 22 Sep 22 Sep 24 Sep 27 Sep 28 Sep 28-Oct 7 Sep 29-30 Sep 29 Sep 29 Sep 30

Modest Mouse in Concert, Duluth Wine and Weave, Duluth Chef in the Garden at Glensheen, Duluth Bands, Brews, & BBQ, Chisholm Member Guided Tours with DAI Curator, Duluth Elegant Dinner Train, Duluth Dorothy's Root Beer Run (pre-register), Ely UDAC Walk a Mile in our Shoes, Duluth Fall Phenology Day, Forest History Center, Grand Rapids Full Moon Plein Air Painting with Karen Savage, Duluth Bands, Brews, & BBQ, Chisholm Downtown Duluth Arts Walk, Duluth Art Along the Lake: Fall Studio Tour, All Over Cook County NMBA Showcase of Homes, Grand Rapids Holistic Healing & Spiritual Wellness Expo, Grand Rapids Klocktober Fest, Grand Rapids Alabama in Concert, Duluth

OCTOBER Oct 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Oct 4 Oct 4 Oct 4-5 Oct 6-7 Oct 13 Oct 18 Oct 18-20 Oct 18-21 Oct 19 Oct 19-20 Oct 19-21 Oct 20 Oct 20 Oct 23 Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 25-27 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 27-28 Oct 29 Oct 31 Oct 31

Whiskey Wednesdays at Glensheen, Duluth Night at the Museum at Glensheen, Duluth Emila Amper Workshop, Chisholm Chholing Taha Art Exhibit, Big Fork Vava! Veve! Studio presents: Weaving Linen Hand Towels, Duluth The Avett Brothers in Concert, DECC, Duluth Northland Senior Expo, DECC, Duluth Field of Screams, Chisholm Pumpkin Patch Train, Duluth Creatures of the Night in the Northwoods, Marcell MN Ballet performs: The Rite of Spring, Duluth Moose Madness, Grand Marais Family Discovery Day: International Archaeology Day, Chisholm Sawtooth Mountain Bike Challenge, Grand Marais Diana Krall in Concert, Duluth Bingo, Books & Bowling, Big Fork Genealogy Genie, Chisholm Field of Screams, Chisholm Downtown Duluth Arts Walk, Duluth "Felt It" Autumn Foliage, , Grand Rapids Discover Flavors, Chisholm Spooky Timbers, Forest History Center, Grand Rapids Fall Harvest Fun, Grand Rapids Halloween Bash, Marcell Marcell Family Center Annual Haloween Bash, Marcell

NOVEMBER Nov 1-4 Nov 2-3 Nov 2-3 Nov 3 Nov 7 Nov 7, 14, 21, 28 Nov 8 Nov 8 Nov 8 Nov 9-11 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov 10-11 Nov 17 Nov 17 - Dec 26 Nov 18 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 29

North Shore Illustrator's Gathering, Grand Marais Gales of November, Duluth Duluth Junk Hunt, DECC, Duluth Duluth Art Institute Gala, 5pm, Duluth Concert: Alabama, DECC, Duluth Secrets of Glensheen, Duluth Comedian Brian Regan, DECC, Duluth Exceptionally Ordinary by Patrick Lubar, Duluth Darren Houser, Opening Reception and Artist Talk, Duluth Storm Festival, All Over Cook County Lumberjack Cooking for Kids, Forest History Center, Grand Rapids Discover Flavors, Chisholm Genealogy Genie, Chisholm Junior League Festival of Trees, DECC, Duluth Artisan Market: Crafts to Crops, Chisholm Bentleyville Tour of Lights, Duluth A Charlie Brown Christmas- Live, DECC, Duluth Thanksgiving Day Buffet, DECC, Duluth Oh Ole Night, Grand Marais Peppa Pig Live, DECC, Duluth

NORTHEAST

DECEMBER

106

Dec 1 Dec 1 Dec 1 Dec 4, 6 Dec 7 Dec 7-9 Dec 7-9 Dec 8 Dec 13

Christmas in the Logging Camp, Forest History Center, Grand Rapids Discover Flavors: Winter Spirits, Chisholm Holiday Shopping Expo, DECC, Duluth Family Craft Time-Christmas Ornaments, Grand Rapids Santa Lights the Lights at Old Central School, Grand Rapids MN Ballet performs The Nutcracker, Duluth Arrowhead Ice Fishing Winter Show, DECC, Duluth Ho Ho Ho Country Christmas, Grand Rapids Let's Make Lefse, Chisholm

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

DINE

Dec 14-15 Dec 15 Dec 15 Dec 15-16 Dec 20 Dec 20 Dec 22 Dec 29 Dec 31

Dark Sky Festival, All Over Cook County Old Dominion in Concert, DECC, Duluth Winter Reading Program Kick-Off, Grand Rapids Duluth Gun Show, DECC, Duluth Let's Make Lefse, Chisholm Genealogy Genie, Chisholm Christmas Party @ the Ground Floor, Grand Rapids Northwoods Holiday Fest, Forest History Center, Grand Rapids Sober New Years Eve party @ the Ground Floor, Grand Rapids

JANUARY Jan 25 Jan 26

Family Sock Hop at the YMCA, Grand Rapids Marcell Family Center Winter Frolic, Marcell

RESOURCE GUIDE DULUTH CANAL PARK SILOS RESTAURANT 800 West Railroad St NORTHERN WATERS SMOKEHAUS 394 S Lake Ave #106 GRANDMA’S SALOON BAR AND GRILL 522 S Lake Ave CANAL PARK BREWING 300 Canal Park Dr. HOOPS BREWING 325 S Lake Ave. GREAT LAKES AQUARIUM 353 Harbor Dr. LAKE SUPERIOR MARITIME MUSEUM 600 S Lake Ave. PIER B RESORT 800 W Railroad St CANAL PARK LODGE 250 Canal Park Drive INN ON LAKE SUPERIOR 350 Canal Park Drive WATERS OF SUPERIOR Carrying a variety of hand-selected regional crafts by people making captivating art and jewelry inspired by the area. 395 S Lake Ave DULUTH PACK 365 Canal Park Dr DEWITT SEITZ MARKETPLACE 394 S Lake Ave

DULUTH DOWNTOWN (WEST SIDE) BENT PADDLE BREWING CO 1832 W Michigan St., Floor 1 BLACKWATER LOUNGE & MARTINI BAR 231 E Superior St. OMC SMOKEHOUSE 1909 W Superior St SPIRIT MOUNTAIN 9540 West Skyline Parkway LAKE SUPERIOR ZOO 7210 Fremont St LIZZARDS ART AND FRAMING Unique downtown Duluth Art Gallery featuring the work of more than 100 local and regional artists, as well as custom museum quality framing. 11 W Superior St. DULUTH TRADING COMPANY 300 E Superior St.

UP THE SHORELINE FROM DULUTH'S CANAL PARK VALENTINI’S VICINO LAGO A family owned Italian restaurant whose family traditions and homemade recipes came to Duluth from the legendary Valentini’s Supper Club in Chisholm, MN. 1400 London Rd FITGER’S RESTAURANT 600 E Superior St THE BOAT CLUB 600 E. Superior St. BLACKWOODS GRILL AND BAR 2525 London Rd GLENSHEEN MANSION TOUR 12-acre estate features gardens, bridges, and the famous 39-room mansion built with remarkable 20th century craftsmanship, telling the story of the Duluth region. 3300 London Rd BEACON POINTE Enjoy this hotel on the waterfront with a wonderful view of the lift bridge from up the north shore. 2100 E Water St FITGER’S INN 600 E Superior St

UP THE NORTH SHORE FROM DULUTH NORTH SHORE WINERY Quaint winery on Lutsen Mountain with an experience to remember! 202 Ski Hill Rd, Lutsen FIKA COFFEE Unforgettable lattes served with love and passion for the bean. 5327 W Hwy 61, Lutsen BETTY'S PIES 1633 MN-61, Two Harbors LARSMONT COTTAGES Enjoy 40 acres of private woods and 1,300 feet of Lake Superior beachfront shoreline. 596 Larsmont Way, Two Harbors GRAND SUPERIOR LODGE Grand, authentic log resort hugs the shore of this inland sea amongst aged pines and mature birch and aspen. 2826 MN-61, Two Harbors BREEZY POINT CABINS ON LAKE SUPERIOR Twelve pristine cabins. Timeless setting. Conceived in the 1930s’ and perched on the famously picturesque outcropping of Precambrian rock. Total rennovation in 2016 with all the modern amenities. 540 Old North Shore Rd., Two Harbors AMERICINN SILVER BAY Comfortable lodging on Lake Superior with amazing views of the lake and access to Black Beach. 150 Mensing Dr., Silver Bay LUTSEN RESORT Historic charm, modern comforts and a classic resort experience. 5700 W Highway 61, Lutsen CARIBOU HIGHLANDS An all-season resort nestled in the heart of the Sawtooth Mountains in Lutsen. 371 Ski Hill Rd, Lutsen CASCADE LODGE Your historic basecamp on the North Shore. 3719 West Hwy 61 Lutsen, MN GOOSEBERRY FALLS 3206 US Hwy 61, Two Harbors SPLIT ROCK LIGHTHOUSE TOUR 3713 Split Rock Lighthouse Rd., Two Harbors

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JAVA MOOSE Must stop for great North Shore coffee. 218 W Highway 61 VOYAGEUR BREWING 233 W Highway 61 STONE HARBOR WILDERNESS SUPPLY Quality outdoor sporting goods, clothing, tours, partial outfitting, and more. 22 E 1st St JOYNE’S BEN FRANKLIN “Everyone’s favorite store on the shore, celebrating over 75 years.” 105 W Wisconsin St


SHOP

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DINE

Your Guide to the North

NORTHEAST RESOURCE GUIDE GRAND MARAIS (CONT.)

MESABI IRON RANGE (CONT.)

INTERNATIONAL FALLS

LAKE SUPERIOR TRADING POST A Grand Marais tradition since 1974. Award-winning shopping experience for all. Open year round. 10 S 1st Ave W

MOXIE Unique, high-quality apparel, and accessories 2123 1st Ave, Hibbing BENDER'S SHOES Shoes, sportswear, women’s fashion & accessories 405 E Howard St, Hibbing L&M FLEET SUPPLY Your one stop shop for sporting goods, apparel, home improvement, power equip., farming and more! Hibbing, Chisolm, Mountain Iron/Virginia

ELEVEN-71 344 3rd Street

EAST BAY SUITES The perfect blend of outdoor recreation, unique shopping and culture, East Bay Suites has something for everyone. 21 E Wisconsin St

ELY NORTHERN GROUNDS Unique, chic atmosphere serving coffee, wine, craft beer, and delicious baked goods and other treats. 2 W. Sheridan St. INSULA This popular downtown dining spot serves locally sourced ingredients for its New American cuisine. Breakfast to dinner dining. Specialty cocktails, beer and wine. 145 E. Sheridan St. CRAPOLA! GRANOLA Keeping even weird people regular with small batch granola. 16 N 1st Ave E WINTERGREEN NORTHERN WEAR Inspired by the premier canoe country and America’s “dogsledding capital,” Wintergreen clothing exudes quality, distinction, performance, and “Made in the USA” pride. 205 E Sheridan St. PIRAGIS NORTHWOODS COMPANY Since 1979, Piragis Northwoods Company has offered canoes, canoe camping gear, and men’s and women’s clothing. A must stop shop! 105 N. Central Ave. ART & SOUL GALLERY Creative artwork by local artists including paintings, jewelry, pottery, glass, weaving, metal work, sculpture, wood working, prints, and greeting cards. 417 E Sheridan St. BRANDENBURG GALLERY 11 E Sheridan St. GRAND ELY LODGE Located in the scenic Up North wilderness, our four-season resort boasts comfortable, spacious lodgings and stunning panoramic views of Shagawa Lake. 400 N Pioneer Rd. STAY INN ELY Cozy and classy lodging with rustic charm for a comfortable stay in downtown Ely. 112 W Sheridan St. NORTHERN GROUNDS SOCIETY HALL 2 W. Sheridan St. NORTH AMERICAN BEAR CENTER Mission to advance the long-term survival of bears worldwide by replacing misconceptions with scientific facts about bears, their role in ecosystems, and their relations with humans. 1926 Hwy 169 DOROTHY MOLTER MUSEUM Cabins and museum of the last non-indigenous resident of the BWCAW, Dorothy Molter. Step back in time. 2002 E Sheridan St. LISTENING POINT FOUNDATION Dedicated to preserving Listening Point & advancing Sigurd Olson's legacy of wilderness education. 218-365-8889 ELY FOLK SCHOOL 209 E Sheridan St. BOUNDARY WATERS CANOE AREA

MESABI IRON RANGE SAMMY'S PIZZA 106 E Howard St , Hibbing MINNESOTA DISCOVERY CENTER Museum, Research Center, and Park. Encompasses 660 acres and tells the story of the Iron Range through exhibits, interpretation, programming, and research materials. 1005 Discovery Drive, Chisolm UNITED STATES HOCKEY HALL OF FAME 801 Hat Trick Avenue, Eveleth GIANTS RIDGE 6329 Wynne Creek Drive, Biwabik

AMERICINN 1500 Hwy 71 EBEL’S VOYAGEUR HOUSEBOATS 10326 Ash River Trail

GREEN GATE GUESTHOUSES 5748 County Road 138, Biwabik

GRAND RAPIDS TIMBERLAKE LODGE Grand Rapids’ premier full service hotel including Grand Splash waterpark. 144 SE 17th St. HOTEL RAPIDS A historic boutique motel with 30 newly renovated rooms. 680 US Hwy 2 E BOWEN LODGE Family owned since 1982, the atmosphere is friendly, sincere, and accommodating, with an emphasis on customer satisfaction and family traditions. 58485 Bowen’s Rd, Deer River 17TH STREET GRILL An upscale dining experience with a casual and relaxing feel. 144 SE 17th St PICKLED LOON SALOON Known for great food and exceptional service. 20184 Us Hwy 169 KLOCKOW BREWING Lagers, ambers, IPAs, and stouts, but also some more adventurous beers such as barrel aged, smoked, and sour beers! 36 SE 10th St. NOPO COFFEE COMPANY 320 SE 21st Street, Grand Rapids REIF PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Hosts over 40 national and international touring performances, representing a diverse range of artistic disciplines each year. 720 NW Conifer Dr. MACROSTIE ART CENTER 405 1st Avenue NW CENTER FITNESS & BALA MED SPA 320 SE 21st Street FOREST HISTORY CENTER 2609 Co Rd 76 JUDY GARLAND & CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM 2727 Pokegama Ave. S

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THE LAKE + CO. SHOP Featuring products from MN makers and other inspired companies. Food, jewelry, home décor and accents, clothing, kids toys, books, and more! 403 NW 1st Ave. LAKE COUNTRY FURNITURE Fine furniture, gifts, and home décor. 1001 S Pokegama Ave. BENDER’S SHOES Bender's Shoes offers the areas largest selection of quality shoes for the entire family. 409 NW 1st Ave. L&M FLEET SUPPLY Your one stop shop for sporting goods, apparel, home improvement, power equip., farming and more! 1400 S. Pokegama Ave. RAY’S SPORT & CYCLE Locally-owned/operated retail power sports dealership providing top brands in power sports vehicles and accessories, and service department for all your needs. 20890 US Hwy 169 FRAME UP Custom framing and art gallery. 208 NW 1st Ave FIREPLACE LIFESTYLES Northern Minnesota’s premiere fireplace, stove, stone, and Viking Appliance dealer with extensive showroom. 1114 NW 4th St MOXIE Unique, high-quality apparel, and accessories 350 NW 1st Ave, Suite D

NORTHEAST

NORTH HOUSE FOLK SCHOOL To enrich lives and build community by teaching traditional northern crafts in a student-centered learning environment. 500 W Hwy 61

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

107


SHOP

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Your Guide to the North

CENTRAL ON THE RADAR SEPTEMBER Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 15 Sep 20-22 Sep 20-23 Sep 21-23 Sep 22 Sep 22-23 Sep 23 Sep 27-29 Sep 27-29 Sep 27-30 Sep 28 Sep 29-30 Sep 29 Sep 29 Sep 29

Nisswa Fall Festival & Smokin' Hot BBQ Challenge, Nisswa Run for Hope, Nisswa Wild Rice Processing Demo, Onamia Celebrate Art! Celebrate Coffee!, Willmar 8th Annual Out of the Darkness Willmar Community Walk, Willmar Nisswa Fire Department Pancake Breakfast, Nisswa Bridges of Hope Run for Hope 5k/10k, Nisswa Alexandria Downtown Fall Festival, Alexandria The Barn Theatre Presents "Mothers and Sons," Willmar Wet & Wild Weekend 2.0, Brainerd 8th Annual Walk A Mile In Her Shoes March, Baxter Apple Pie Days, Alexandria Harvest Fest Family Fun Day, Spicer 2018 Crosslake Days, Crosslake Crosslake Days, Crosslake The Barn Theatre Presents "Mothers and Sons," Willmar Dusty Heart Concert, Live Well Nightclub & Coffee Bar, Journey Church, Nisswa Hoffin' It for Mounted Eagles Trail Ride, Motley Art Walk In The Arb, Baxter Walk to End Alzheimer's of West Central MN, Willmar Historical Cider & Candlelight Tour, Crosslake

OCTOBER Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6-7 Oct 6-7 Oct 7 Oct 9 Oct 11-13 Oct 11-13 Oct 11-13 Oct 11-14 Oct 12 Oct 18-20 Oct 18-21 Oct 19 Oct 19-20 Oct 19-21 Oct 20 Oct 26 Oct 26 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 27-28 Oct 28 Oct 31

6th Annual - Fishing to End Hunger Walleye Tournament, Lake Shore Grand View Lodge's GOLFtoberfest Party, Nisswa 8th Annual Oktoberfest Pub Crawl, Brainerd Kid Crafts: Corn Husk Doll, Onamia Family Day, Onamia Fishing to End Hunger, Gull Lake Gull Lake Oktoberfest & Pub Crawl, Gull Lake Fall Festival, Carlos Pumpkin Mania, Alexandria Harvest Hike 3K, Spicer Nisswa Fire Department Open House, Nisswa Market Under Glass Renovated, Willmar New London Little Theatre Presents "Never Too Late," New London Market Under Glass Renovated, Willmar The Boy Next Door Comedy, Willmar James Keelaghan, Live Well Nightclub & Coffee Bar, Journey Church, Nisswa Lakes Area Food Shelf Home Tour, Nisswa New London Little Theatre Presents "Never Too Late," New London Ruttger's 33rd Annual Oktoberfest, Deerwood Northland Arboretum Haunted Trail, Brainerd The Haunted Hallows of Crosslake, Crosslake Carlos Creek Winery Applefest, Alexandria Gurf Morlix Concert, Live Well Nightclub & Coffee Bar, Journey Church, Nisswa Haunted History Night, Alexandria Halloween Haunt at Prairie Woods ELC, Spicer Nisswa Fire Department Haunted Barn & Hay Rides, Nisswa "Mazinaakizige: Teen Photography Project" Exhibit Closing, Onamia Nisswa Fire Department Haunted Barn, Nisswa Beading 101 2-Day Workshop, Onamia Nisswa American Legion Children's Halloween Party, Nisswa Trick or Treating Downtown Alexandria, Alexandria

C C EE N N TT R RA A LL

NOVEMBER

108 108

Nov 1-2 Nov 1-3 Nov 3 Nov 9 Nov 9 Nov 16

Arts & Crafters Tour, Alexandria Shoppers on the Hunt, Alexandria Murder Mystery Dinner at Glacial Ridge Winery, Spicer Pushing Chain, Live Well Nightclub & Coffee Bar, Journey Church, Nisswa Kinship Partners Taste of the Lakes, Nisswa Kinship Partners Taste of the Lakes, Nisswa

LAKE 2018 2018 LAKETIME TIMEMAGAZINE MAGAZINE FALL SPRING

Nov 17 Nov 17 Nov 17-18 Nov 22-Dec 31 Nov 22-Dec 31 Nov 22 Nov 23 Nov 23 Nov 23 - Dec 2 Nov 26 - Dec 24 Nov 30 Nov 30

Sprout Growers & Makers Marketplace, Little Falls Holidaze Parade, Willmar Ojibwe Moccasin 2-Day Workshop, Onamia Northland Arboretums Setoma Winter Wonderland, Brainerd Sertoma Winter Wonderland, Brainerd Turkey Leg 5K, Willmar Christmas in the Fort, Alexandria Nisswa City of Lights Festival, Nisswa Christmas Tours, Little Falls A Hometown Christmas Experience, Alexandria Brianna Lane, Live Well Nightclub & Coffee Bar, Journey Church, Nisswa Philip Westfall, Little Falls

DECEMBER Dec 2 Dec 6 Dec 7 Dec 8 Dec 8 Dec 8 Dec 8 Dec 31

Nisswa American Legion Children's Christmas Party, Nisswa Taste of the Holidays at Schaefer's Foods, Nisswa Ethnic Bake Sale, Alexandria Jingle Bells Telethon, Alexandria Sprout Growers & Makers Marketplace, Little Falls Birch Bark Ornament Workshop, Onamia Gull Lake Ugly Sweater Pub Crawl, Gull Lake Candlelight Snow Shoe & Hike, Little Falls

JANUARY Jan 11-13 Jan 24-25

I.C.E. Fest: Ice Carousel, Little Falls Church of Cash, Little Falls

RESOURCE GUIDE OTTER TAIL COUNTY UNION PIZZA AND BREWING COMPANY 114 S Union Ave, Fergus Falls CAFÉ 116 116 South Union Ave, Fergus Falls STUMBEANO’S COFFEE ROASTERS 1221 North Union Ave, Fergus Falls FALL’S BAKING 1217 North Union Ave, Fergus Falls OTTERTAIL COUNTY MUSEUM 1110 Linoln Ave. W, Fergus Falls PRAIRIE WETLANDS LEARNING E 602 MN Hwy 210, Fergus Falls NEW YORK MILLS CULTURAL CENTER 24 N Main Avenue, New York Mills THUMPER POND Comfortable accommodations and a host of onsite activites such as championship golf and and indoor water entertainment center. 300 Thumper Lodge Road, Ottertail THE BRIC 215 W Lincoln Ave., Fergus Falls HD BOUTIQUE 216 W Lincoln Ave., Fergus Falls

MILLE LACS AREA REEDS SPORTING GOODS 38556 US-169, Onamia

GRAND CASINO MILLE LACS 777 Grand Avenue, Onamia

EDDY’S RESORT & THE LAUNCH BAR & GRILL Modern décor with a hint of history hosts an unforgettable dining experience. 41334 Shakopee Lake Rd, Onamia

BRAINERD LAKES AREA THE LAKE + CO. SHOP Featuring products from MN makers and other inspired companies. Food, jewelry, home décor and accents, clothing, kids toys, books, and so much more! 14287 Gould St, Crosslake CHRISTMAS POINT WILD RICE CO. 14803 Edgewood Drive, Baxter LUNDRIGANS CLOTHING 35732 Allen Ave, Crosslake

NORTHLAND ARBORETUM 14250 Conservation Drive, Brainerd PAUL BUNYAN LAND AND THIS OLD FARM PIONEER VILLAGE 17553 State Hwy 18, Brainerd SAFARI NORTH WILDLIFE PARK 8493 State Hwy 371, Brainerd NORTHERN TRACKERS RAILROAD 35170 Co Rd 3, Crosslake CROSSLAKE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 35404 Co Rd 3, Crosslake PAUL BUNYAN TRAIL PAUL BUNYAN SCENIC BYWAY ARROWWOOD LODGE AT BRAINERD LAKES Come for the night or stay for the week! 30,000 square foot indoor water park. On-site grill and bar. Meeting/ banquet rooms. 6967 Lake Forest Road, Baxter CRAGUN'S RESORT ON GULL LAKE 11000 Cragun's Drive, Brainerd GRAND VIEW LODGE 23521 Nokomis Ave., Nisswa MADDENS ON GULL LAKE 11266 Pine Beach Peninsula Rd, Brainerd WHITEFISH LODGE & SUITES 14150 Swann Dr, Crosslake MANHATTAN BEACH LODGE 39051 Co Rd 66, Manhattan Beach BREEZY POINT RESORT 9252 Breezy Point Dr., Breezy Point

MCGREGOR BIG SANDY LODGE & RESORT Eat, play, & stay! Enjoy the restaurant, golf course, or recreational rentals all in one location. 20534 487th St.

AITKIN ADVENTURE NORTH Inspired by the rugged beauty of Northern Minnesota, Adventure North MN gear is designed for exploring the outdoors—and looking good in the process. 210 Minnesota Ave N, Aitkin

ALEXANDRIA AREA PIKE AND PINT GRILL 110 30th Ave. W, Alexandria COPPER TRAIL BREWING 410 30th Ave E, #103, Alexandria PANTHER DISTILLERY 300 E Pike St., Osakis KINDRED PEOPLE A classy women’s boutique accessories, shoes, and gifts. 111 6th Ave E, Alexandria

featuring

clothing,

ARROWWOOD RESORT AND CONFERENCE CENTER 2100 Arrowwood Ln, Alexandria

RUNESTONE MUSEUM The world famous and controversial Kensington Rune Stone was the Runestone Museum’s only artifact when it opened its doors in 1958. 206 Broadway St., Alexandria


Sands ballroom accommodates up to 300 people On-site pergola and courtyard for ceremonies Complimentary king whirlpool suite for bride & groom Full-service food & beverage catering and staff by Arrowwood Lodge Hotel rooms for guests at group rates Rehearsal dinner and gift opening rooms available 6967 Lake Forest Road / Baxter, MN / 218.822.5573 www.arrowwoodbrainerd.com


SHOP

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Your Guide to the North

SOUTH

ON THE RADAR SEPTEMBER Sep 14-Oct 14

Gather in the GreenSeam, Mankato

OCTOBER Oct 1-14 Terrace View Fall Festival, Mankato Oct 2-31 Children's Museum of Southern Minesota's Harvest Festival, Mankato Oct 5-6, 12-13 Oktoberfest, New Ulm Oct 6 STOMP New Ulm!, New Ulm Oct 6 Hwy 61 Concert Series, Abbasolutely Fab – ABBA tribute, Winona Oct 7 Smaczne Jablka (Polish Apple) Festival, Winona Oct 10-13 History Fest, Mankato Oct 19-20, 26-27, 31 ScaritageFest, New Ulm Oct 20-21 Mankato Marathon, Mankato Oct 26, 27, 31 Turner Hall Haunted House, New Ulm Oct 27 Caravan du Nord, Austin

NOVEMBER Nov 2-4 Nov 16 Nov 17 Nov 23 Nov 23-Dec 31 Nov 24 Nov 24

Shopping Opener, New Ulm Hormel Historic Home Holiday Tea, Austin Winona Art Walk, Winona Parade of Lights, New Ulm Kiwanis Holiday Lights, Mankato Shop Small, Mankato Hwy. 61 Concert Series: Home for the Holidays – A Kat Perkins Christmas, Winona

DECEMBER Dec 2 Dec 10 Dec 18

Rhythmic Circus: Holiday Shuffle, Austin Lorie Line and Her Pop Chamber Orchestra: Lord of Lords, Austin Billy McLaughlin and SimpleGifts, Austin

RESOURCE GUIDE ALBERT LEA ASIAN MARKET & FOOD DELI 726 Marshall St., Albert Lea B&B CAFE 321 Sibley St., Albert Lea BIG ISLAND GRILLE 2306 E. Main St., Albert Lea CABIN COFFEE CO. 152 Bridge Avenue, Albert Lea BEST WESTERN PLUS 821 E. Plaza St., Albert Lea CZECH INN BED & BREAKFAST RETREAT 19158 800th Avenue, Hayward VALHALLA RETREAT Rural Albert Lea ADAM’S ORIGINALS 238 S. Broadway Ave., Albert Lea BETWEEN FRIENDS 144 S. Broadway, Albert Lea ALMC GIFT SHOP 404 Fountain St., Albert Lea BROADWAY BIKE CO. 114 S. Broadway, Albert Lea

MANKATO 101 MAIN RESTAURANT 101 Main St, Mankato BERRY BLENDZ - ADAMS STREET River Hills Mall, Mankato BLUE BRICKS 424 S. Front Street, Mankato OLIVES 20 Civic Center Plaza, Mankato

SOUTH

COUNTRY INN & SUITES BY CARLSON MANKATO HOTEL AND CONFERENCE CENTER 1900 Premier Drive, Mankato COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT HOTEL & EVENT CENTER 901 Raintree Road, Mankato SUMMER BREEZE RESORT 45872 Summer Breeze Lane, Mankato

110

ARIZONA OLIVE OIL CO. 521 N. Riverfront Drive, Mankato DESIGN & WINE, LLC Mankato ENCORE! IN OLD TOWN 311 N. Riverfront Drive, Mankato SALVAGE SISTERS 613 North Riverfront Drive, Mankato

LAKE TIME MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

LANESBORO

RED WING

AROMA PIE SHOPPE 618 Main St, Whalan OLD VILLAGE HALL RESTAURANT & PUB 111 Coffee St E, Lanesboro OLD BARN RESORT & RIVERS BEND GOLF 24461 Heron Road, Preston PEDAL PUSHERS CAFE 121 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro LULU'S FUNHOUSE - TEAHOUSE & CAFE 115 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro

ST. JAMES HOTEL 406 Main Street, Red Wing

O'LEARY'S BED & BREAKFAST 707 Parkway Ave S, Lanesboro GRANDMA'S INN 100 Elmwood St E, Lanesboro THE CROSSING B&B 427 Prospect, Peterson SCANDINAVIAN INN BED AND BREAKFAST 701 Kenilworth Ave S, Lanesboro THE BLACK CROW GALLERY 110 Coffee St E, Lanesboro WINDY MESA 102 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro LANESBORO CUT AND SHOOT STAGE LINE, LLC 12771 Sayles Rd, Spring Grove AMISH TOURS BY R&M 105 Coffee St. Located at Little River General Store, Lanesboro LANESBORO ARTS 103 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro LANESBORO GOLF CLUB 900 Parkway Ave S, Lanesboro ST. MANE THEATRE 206 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro

NEW ULM LAMPLIGHTER FAMILY SPORTS BAR & GRILL 214 N Minnesota, New Ulm JONI'S RESTAURANT & CATERING 24 N Minnesota, New Ulm VEIGEL'S KAISERHOFF 221 N Minnesota, New Ulm AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY Schells Park, New Ulm MORGAN CREEK VINEYARDS 23707 478th Ave, New Ulm COLONIAL INN 1315 N Broadway, New Ulm BEST WESTERN PLUS 2101 S Broadway, New Ulm BINGHAM HALL BED & BREAKFAST 500 South German, New Ulm THE THIMBLE BOX 10 N Minnesota, New Ulm SPINNING SPOOLS QUILT SHOP 106 S Minnesota, New Ulm BAILEY CREEK BOUTIQUE 103 N Minnesota, New Ulm

ROCHESTER GRAND ROUNDS BREW PUB Historic 3rd Street, Rochester THE TAP HOUSE Historic 3rd Street, Rochester THE LOOP Historic 3rd Street, Rochester BLEU DUCK KITCHEN 14 4th St SW, Rochester ASPEN SUITES 1211 2nd Street SW, Rochester DOUBLETREE BY HILTON ROCHESTER MAYO CLINIC AREA 150 S Broadway, Rochester HILTON GARDEN INN 225 S Broadway, Rochester ROCHESTER MARRIOTT MAYO CLINIC AREA 101 1st Avenue SW, Rochester PESCARA 150 S Broadway, Rochester ROCHESTER TROLLEY & TOUR COMPANY 101 1st Ave, Rochester THE ESCAPE CHALLENGE 20 6th St NW, Rochester POSH BOUTIQUE 123 16th Ave SW, Rochester HERS/KAHLER-PEACE PLACE 107 1st St SW, Rochester A BEAUTIFUL SOUL 619 6th Avenue NW, Rochester APACHE MALL 52 US 14, Rochester

WINONA ACOUSTIC CAFÉ 77 Lafayette Street, Winona BLACK HORSE BAR AND GRILL 34648 Old Homer Road, Winona BLUE HERON COFFEE HOUSE 162 West Second St., Winona ISLAND CITY BREWING COMPANY 65 East Front Street, Winona ALEXANDER MANSION BED & BREAKFAST 274 E Broadway Street, Winona BRIGGS FARM 27171 County Road 9, Winona CARRIAGE HOUSE BED & BREAKFAST 420 Main Street, Winona MERRIMACK CANOE COMPANY Since 1954 we've built each Merrimack canoe with more quality, style and detail than any other canoe on the market. 460 W 3rd St., Winona A-Z COLLECTABLES 152 Main Street, Winona ADVENTURE CYCLE & SKI 178 Center St., Winona HEART’S DESIRE 51 E. 3rd St., Winona

FARIBAULT BLUEBIRD CAKERY 318 Central Ave N #101, Faribault CHANNEL INN 23219 Farwell Ave, Faribault COFFEE SHOP & CHOCOLATE HAVEN 313 Central Ave N, Faribault F-TOWN BREWING COMPANY 22 4th St NE, Faribault BE MY GUEST LOFT 112 3rd St NE, Faribault GRANDSTAY RESIDENTIAL SUITES HOTEL 1500 20th St NW, Faribault HISTORIC HUTCHINSON HOUSE 305 2nd St NW, Faribault ANADELAS NOVEDADES 230 Central Ave N, Faribault FARIBAULT WOODEN MILL RETAIL STORE 1500 2nd Ave NW, Faribault CHEESE CAVE 318 Central Ave N #6, Faribault

AUSTIN BARLEY’S 1207 N. Main St., Austin PIGGY BLUES BBQ 323 North Main, Austin THE OLD MILL 54446 244th St., Austin HOOT AND OLE'S 105 11th St SE, Austin COFFEE HOUSE ON MAIN 329 N Main St., Austin HOLIDAY INN & CONFERENCE CENTER 1701 4th St NW, Austin FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOME/ELAM HOUSE 309 21st St SW, Austin FRANK W. BRIDGES SPAM MUSEUM HORMEL HISTORIC HOME ARTIST ARTIST SERIES CEDAR RIVER CANOE/KAYAK RENTAL CHATEAU RACEWAY


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FloydCabinLakeTimeMag4-18.indd 1

4/20/18 7:56 AM


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Lake Time Magazine - Issue 13 (Fall 2018)  

Lake Time Magazine - Issue 13 (Fall 2018)