__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

THE CITY OF LAKES LIFESTYLE & DESIGN PUBLICATION

SUMMER 2020

M I N N E A P OL I S C IT Y L AK ES SUMMER 2020

1


2

lake society magazine


CHARLESRSTINSON.COM

•

+ 1 9 5 2 .SUMMER 4 7 3 2020 . 9 5 0 33


4

lake society magazine


SUMMER 2020

5


Local Expertise in Fine Downtown Minneapolis and City Lakes Real Estate 612.327.5905 | betsylucasrealtor.com

6

lake society magazine


612.968.9777 2124 FREMONT AVE S MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55405 ANDREWFLESHER.COM SUMMER 2020

7


so•ci•e •ty: companionship or association with one’s fellows: a group of people involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory

L AKESOCIETYMAGAZINE.COM 8

lake society magazine


RICHARD MERCHÁN SUMMER OF LOVE SERIES

Represented by

artgirlsmpls.com NAPLES II, CANVAS 84 X 48 INCHES 2020© RICHARDMERCHAN.COM

SUMMER 2020

9


10

lake society magazine


www.spacecrafting.com

Rehkamp Larson Architects // Martha Dayton Design // Yerigan Construction Co

|

612.353.4073

SUMMER 2020

11


“TOO MUCH OF ANYTHING IS BAD, BUT TOO MUCH GOOD WHISKEY IS BARELY ENOUGH” -MARK TWAIN

CANTILEVERDISTILLERY.COM

12

lake society magazine


YO U R HOME IS OU R PU RPOSE NEW CONSTRUCTION RENOVATIONS ADDITIONS

TELOSMN.COM

SUMMER 2020

13


SUMMER 2020

THE CITY OF LAKES LIFESTYLE & DESIGN PUBLICATION

SUMMER 2020

PUBLISHER KAREN T. STOECKEL GRAPHIC DESIGN SHEBA CONCEPT & DESIGN, INC. ART DIRECTION KAREN T. STOECKEL

ON THE COVER Cayman Island Beach House designed by Charles R. Stinson Architecture + Design

MANAGING EDITOR ELLEN OLSON CONTRIBUTING WRITERS HOLLIE BLANCHARD ANDREW FLESCHER JANE MAIORANO SARA RYAN DUFFY M I N N E A P OL I S C IT Y L AK ES SUMMER 2020

Lakesocietymagazine.com Lakesocietymagazine@gmail.com @lsm_magazine

14

1

SOCIAL MEDIA JACOB PIERRE LOUIS III CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS SPACECRAFTING JOHN LAUENSTEIN PAUL CROSBY KELLY NETISHEN PERCEPTION PHOTOGRAPHY SCOTT AMUNDSON ALYSSAY LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

lake society magazine


SUMMER 2020

15


Letter from the Editors Once again we find ourselves at a loss for words. A lot has happened since we published our last issue. Within these pages we will continue to tell the stories of the people and the projects the community we hold so dearly. We do so with a deep respect and much sadness for all that has transpired in these last few weeks. In this issue, we feature Al and Kendra Bangoura, stewards of one of our city’s most sacred treasures, the historic Theodore Wirth Home and Administration building. Located in Lyndale Farmstead Park, it offers a sanctuary for even the most weary city dweller. Our friend, Judy Bell, brings light to all the lives she touches. Her boundless energy and intellectual curiosity is contagious. Our home features include projects from the portfolios of our area’s finest architects, builders and interior designers. The stunning Cayman Island getaway that Charles Stinson designed for a local Minneapolis couple celebrates the nature beauty of the site. The Tudor-style home on Dean Parkway was updated to meet the needs of a growing family, while maintaining the architectural integrity of the home. The recently completed New England style cottage in the Morningside neighborhood of Edina is timeless and classic, and its architecture and presence will be beautiful and relevant years from now. Art Girls’ Hollie Blanchard shares her very personal journey for creating a sanctuary for her new baby—and the role that fine art plays in her family’s daily life. Andrew Flesher continues to offer inspiration, as well as practical advice, on how to deal with some of your decorating challenges. Although travel has not been a part of our world-view for these past couple of months, Sara Ryan Duffy suggests that New England might be a good option for those willing to venture out. Not too close. Not too far. Several of the accommodations she recommends have social distancing built right in. If staying closer to home is more appealing, the Cantilever Distillery + Hotel in Rainer, MN, is a compelling destination. It’s just on the border with Canada, and if you decide to make the afternoon’s drive, you will be swept away by the beauty and the history of the region. The team at Cantilever will make sure you have an experience you will never forget. As a city and as a country, there are many wounds that need to be healed. The community that we love has been altered. Let’s all work together in order to address the injustices that have become commonplace in our lives. Do better. Be better. These are words to live by and we’ll try to meet to this challenge each and every day. We thank you for your unwavering support and readership. 16

lake society magazine


Time and Tide. Original painting by Jillian Lee.

Ready to collect art?

Your Art Concierge Curating Pieces with Only You in Mind.

artgirlsmpls.com @art_girls_mpls SUMMER 2020

17


CONTENTS SUMMER 2020

16 A LETTER FROM

the editors.

20 ASK ANDREW

Andrew Flesher gives advice about mixing periods and styles in your home.

22 HOME

A Minneapolis couple collaborated with architect Charles Stinson to create this stunning island paradise.

30 LIVING ART

Hollie Blanchard created a peaceful sanctuary that brings comfort to her new baby, as well as the rest of the family.

34 LIFESTYLE

The Bangoura family describes their thoughtful and caring stewardship of the historic Theodore Wirth Home and Administration Building in Lyndale Farmstead Park.

40 CONCIERGE

New England offers an abundance of choices for a luxurious and relaxing summer getaway.

42 DESTINATIONS

Cantilever Distillery + Hotel celebrates the history of the region and offers guests an unforgettable one-of-a-kind experience.

48 HOME

A timeless New England style cottage is the perfect blend of thoughtfully imagined spaces and classic design elements.

56 LIFESTYLE

Retail Design Maven and Author Judy Bell finds the heart of her inspiration in an artful blend of music halls, museums, and theatres in Minneapolis, New York and Paris.

60 HOME

Updating this 1929 Tudor-style home involved a reimagined flow for the kitchen and dining spaces while maintaining architectural and aesthetic integrity.

18

lake society magazine


open by appointment 12pm-5pm Thursday-Saturday shop our new online store islesstudio.com

1 3 1 1 W e s t 2 5 t h St r e e t • M i n n e a p o l i s, M N 5 5 4 0 5 • 6 1 2 .9 9 9.4 6 8 0 • c o n ta c t @ i s l e s s t u d i o.c o m

islesstudio.com SUMMER 2020

19


ASK ANDREW Andrew Flesher gives advice about mixing periods and styles in your home. photography by john lauenstein

20

lake society magazine


Q.

My husband and I found a beautiful old Victorian style home that is in need of some TLC. We fell in love with some of the architectural details of the house, but we are a bit stumped as to how we might furnish and decorate the space. Our tastes lean toward modern, clean and simple. Can we make it work?

A.

The short answer is “yes.” There are so many beautiful old properties in the Twin Cities that make wonderful homes, regardless of your style preferences. First of all, if you are purchasing a home that has strong architectural details and a “sense of place”—you need to honor it. I always advise my clients to keep the architectural details pure. Some older homes went through nightmare remodels in the 70’s and 80’s. If you have the budget to remove and redo those elements, go for it! But if your budget is tight, you still have options. Paint is an inexpensive fix and can do a lot to camouflage “ugly.” For example, if one of the rooms contains an unsightly cabinet—paint it the same color as your walls. It will recede. If wood details aren’t particularly special, don’t be afraid to paint over them. Flooring can create a cohesive backdrop for your furnishings and unify your home. In short, make the shell of the home as architecturally consistent as possible, but when you decorate—have some fun! You do not have to match the furniture to the architecture of the home; anybody can open a history book and copy it. Use a combination of periods and styles to reflect your own personality and style. You want to create balance. For example, in an old Victorian, you might have an amazing period antique, but offset that with clean, modern and tailored furnishings. Give each space it’s own identity—but find ways to tie the house together with consistent elements so that it flows. Have a color palette that connects each of the rooms, but use tone, value and texture to mix it up, so each room has it’s own personality but the house is still cohesive. Take some risks and stay true what you love. Most of your decisions won’t be life altering. If you are serious about an investment piece, consult a professional before you purchase it. Classic, well-made pieces will always stand the test of time and will fit in almost any setting. I wish you the best of luck on your journey! If you have a design question that you’d like me to address, please send it to editor@lakesocietymagazine and I’ll do my best to answer it. A portfolio of my work is available on my website: andrewflesher.com SUMMER 2020 21


22

lake society magazine


CAYMAN QUEEN

A Minneapolis couple collaborated with architect Charles Stinson to create this stunning island paradise.

written by ellen olson, photography by paul crosby

SUMMER 2020

23


i

In 2003, a young Minneapolis couple whisked away to Grand Cayman for their honeymoon. Chris and Lori rented a home on the north side of the island, away from the bustle of Seven-Mile Beach. They spent ten days soaking in the natural beauty of the island: stretches of white sand, azure waters, abundant sea life, and inky black stretches of sky littered with vast constellations of stars. The island’s inhabitants were welcoming, polite and kind, the culture as captivating as the island’s beauty. The island stole their hearts. Those memorable days birthed a dream of owning a home in the Cayman Islands. The couple made return trips to the island until they were able to purchase a parcel of land, not far from where their dream began. They became more familiar with the fascinating culture during frequent visits. “Even though Grand Cayman is not far from the United States, it feels like it’s a world away,” said Chris. “The island vibe is one of understated luxury and it attracts wealthy people. Yet it’s kid-friendly and dining options are plentiful and diverse. Retail businesses are closed on Sundays and the locals dress up for church and business. The island is clean and safe; people are helpful and trusting.” Once Chris and Lori were ready to build they engaged with a local, award-winning architect. They envisioned “something contemporary, low profile and easy to maintain.” They were all the way through the permit process and were gathering bids when they realized that the budget for the project was too high. “We had to stop and regroup,” said Lori. The couple had long admired the work of Minneapolis architect, Charles R. Stinson, but many of his projects were much grander in scale and they weren’t sure he would be interested in their project. Lori persisted. “I remember the call,” said Charles. “Their story was so lovely and after I looked at the site from Google Earth I, too, was smitten. The water looked so beautiful and the site pristine. I was intrigued by everything about the project. What an honor to be part of manifesting someone’s dream!” Charles understands island life. He started his business in Florida and was a frequent visitor to the Bahamas. Over the years he developed a knowledge and deep respect for the elements— the hurricanes, the salt air, the unrelenting sun, and the water. Charles and his wife, Carol, flew down to Grand Cayman to look at the site. “Immediately I was struck by the simplicity and power of the property,” said Charles. “I knew that I needed to get the architecture out of the way. I knew I could never compete with the view. The light is amazing. I saw the untamed beauty of the environment. I simply let the view do the work.” Chris and Lori shared their ideas and vision for their home. They wanted the home to be different from the typical Caymanian architecture. They wanted it to blend with the beach and ocean, with floor-to-ceiling windows and doors. The challenge was to keep costs in line and build within the local codes. The setback requirements kept the footprint small. Lori and Chris wanted a relaxed open floor plan with three bedrooms. They envisioned a small pool and bath ocean side, as much of their time there is spent outdoors—kayaking and snorkeling. Charles spent a week walking the site and interviewing local builders, understanding codes and researching building techniques. “We wanted to understand what works,” said Charles. “The salt air is so corrosive. We needed to understand which exterior finishes, windows and doors would be cost effective, yet long-lasting and strong.” Stinson was energized continued on page 28 24

lake society magazine


HOME

“Immediately I was struck by the simplicity and power of the property.” CHARLES R. STINSON

SUMMER 2020

25


“On a site this pristine and beautiful you have to get the architecture out of the way.� CHARLES R. STINSON

project team: architecture: charles r stinson architecture + design; architect: charles r stinson, aia, asid; builder: j & r construction; interior design: kim streeter, crs interiors; landscape design: cayman growers nursery and landscaping 26

lake society magazine


HOME

SUMMER 2020

27


continued from page 24 by the limitations. “We were limited by the land, the footprint, the budget and the harsh environment. My clients knew they wanted to rent the property, so everything needed to be tough and durable. The constraints were oddly appealing,” said Charles. Charles began with a pen and ink drawing of the structure and then the 3D models and architectural drawings. Technology eased the challenges of building a home in another country. “Had we attempted to complete this project before the time of cell phones and Dropbox, I don’t think we would have made it,” said Chris. “Our builder had his own architect redraw Charles’ plan to meet Cayman specs and secure a building permit. She was located in Mexico! We were also required to use a local engineer to draw up all the structural plans. Our builder was young, energetic, and full of good ideas about how to accomplish our design. His attention to detail was critical. We were dealing with poured concrete and block. Our electrical and plumbing were literally encased in cement!” As construction was set to begin, a final survey revealed that some oceanfront had been lost over the years. The plan had to be flipped and adjustments made to fit within the new setbacks. “The entire team took all of the challenges in stride,” said Lori. “Charles and his engineer, Larry, were responsive and accommodating. Charles’ enthusiasm for the project never wavered.” Kim Streeter, CRS Interiors, helped guide Lori and Chris through some of the material choices for the interiors. Lori had designed for Techline Furniture and Cabinetry so she knew that she wanted to use that product throughout. She and Chris desired to keep the furnishings clean and simple, with a mid-century modern aesthetic, instead of the predictable island choices of rattan and tropical florals. Greys, oranges and whites were the palette chosen for the main living area; and the bedrooms echo colors found in the sea—shades of blue and aqua. Kim helped Chris and Lori realize their goals of an uncluttered interior, hints of island color and motif, while keeping things simple, comfortable, and classic. “We wanted a home that would allow for beach towels to be strewn everywhere during the day, yet host a fancy dinner at night,” said Chris. “Our favorite moments are the late night conversations by the pool with the sound of waves crashing on the reef and the dark sky filled with stars.” The beachfront home is slung low and echoes the lines of the horizon. It seems to hover just above the water and its simple planes feel sculptural. Floor to ceiling windows and doors, and the clerestory windows flood the home with light and sky. Although the home is only 1700 square feet, it seems much bigger. Uninterrupted views of the ocean, sand and natural surroundings transport the viewer from the home, into nature and back again. “It is simply remarkable,” said Lori. “Every time we walk through our front door our breath catches, just a bit. It is so beautiful, and we are so grateful to have realized our dream. It turned out even better than we thought it would.” “Designing and building this home was a joyful creation,” said Charles. “There was such a tremendous sense of respect and trust between the entire project team and the homeowners. We all fell in love with the project, and we all wanted it done right.” The simplicity of the home is its most striking feature. It is in proportion and harmony with the natural surroundings and feels like it belongs. charlesrstinson.com 28

lake society magazine


HOME “Our favorite moments are the late night conversations by the pool with the sound of waves crashing on the reef and the dark sky filled with stars.” HOMEOWNERS CHRIS & LORI

SUMMER 2020

29


artwork this page: “royal palm i” original painting by richard merchán; “trinidad” original painting by richard merchán following page: “swim baby” original painting by mary catherine solberg; “eve” original painting by jillian lee

30

lake society magazine


DREAMSCAPE Hollie Blanchard created a peaceful sanctuary that brings comfort to her new baby, as well as the rest of the family.

written by hollie blanchard, photography by kelly netishen SUMMER 2020

31


A

As so many eager parents will be able to relate, I spent years dreaming about the future of this unborn babe. When I found out that I was pregnant with our third child I knew I wanted to create a nursery that was a little bit baby and a whole lotta me. As parents we get swept up in the notion that a nursery has to be all baby aesthetic; blue or pink, baseballs or ballerinas. I think it is important to land in a space that you love and brings comfort for all. I opted for a warm palette of neutrals, textures, and a nod of blue. I wanted the artwork to be the focal point of the design scape for the room. The pieces I chose felt peaceful and worked with each other to bring balance. Many of the pieces have traveled with me and were a part of my older boys’ space when they were younger. My journey was long with having another baby. “Royal Palm I” makes me think of strength and endurance, and the juxtaposition of complete rest and playing hard—all of which I experienced during my infertility. “Trinidad” brings a sense of serenity to the room; he is relaxed and just a beautiful soul gazing upon us each morning. The art has added dimension and depth to the nursery. My older boys, Frank & Evan (9 year old twins), love to be in the space as well. We play and often discuss what transpires for them from the art. Art is a great way to start a dialogue and be able to explain a bit of my journey in a way that they can understand. These pieces have brought us so much joy as they know Richard, the artist; they have become close with him as well. I hope that each morning when Baby Thomas wakes up he will feel the joy that these paintings imbue as well. “Not only would original artwork be a wonderful addition in a nursery for the parent who spends more time awake than the baby in the nursery, but also art is said to promote visual, emotional, and social development in children. I feel that the earlier you introduce them to art the more creative they will become when they are older.

LIVING ART

Studies have shown that early introduction of art will help with math and reading as well,” states Molly Akervik, Art Adventure Coordinator for Victoria Elementary. Famed American Artist Mark Rothko taught children K-8th grade for twenty plus years. Rothko adamantly believed that you don’t need to be professionally trained to make art, but in fact art is essential to everyone and crucial for human development. He believed the ability for children to create art was as important as learning the basics of math and English. In 1934 Rothko published an essay called “New Training for Future Artists and Art” with strong assumptions that children create intrinsic works of art that makes us feel what they feel. It’s an integral part of the human experience. By adding Fine Art to a nursery or a child’s bedroom you are intrinsically adding value to their world. By having art in my child’s room, I hope this spurs a love and appreciation for art. Someday they will have accumulated their own collection of emerging or established artists that they are fond of… and possibly their very own artwork that one day could be passed down to their own children. Hollie Blanchard owns Art Girls Mpls, an art concierge service, with sister-in-law Kelly Netishen. artgirlsmpls.com 32

lake society magazine


SUMMER 2020

33


34

lake society magazine


PARK PLACE

The Bangoura family is the thoughtful and caring steward of the historic Theodore Wirth Home and Administration Building in Lyndale Farmstead Park.

written by jane maiorano, photography by spacecrafting

SUMMER 2020

35


LIFESTYLE

36

“We fell in love with the story, the character and potential of the home.” –KENDRA LEWIS

lake society magazine


T

continued on page 38

Locally owned •

Wide selection of mouldings; select your own or work with our designers

HOURS 9am-6pm Mon-Sat 12pm-5pm Sun •

3107 W 50th St 612.924.0809 nashframe.com

Lake Harriet

W 50TH STREET

SUMMER 2020

PENN AVENUE S

Trusted framing experts for more than 40 years

XERXES AVENUE S

FRANCE AVENUE

The stately Theodore Wirth Home and Administration Building sits high upon a hill within Lyndale Farmstead Park in the East Lake Harriet neighborhood. The Dutch Colonial home was built in 1910 for Theodore Wirth, who at the time was Superintendent of Parks for the Minneapolis Park Board. There is a long and rich history of superintendents living in the residence, and most recently the house has welcomed the engaging and enchanting family of current Superintendent, Minneapolis Parks: Alfred Bangoura, his wife, Kendra Lewis, and their fifteen-year-old son, Gabriel. “I want to live in this house with my family because this home, and the people I see using the park where the home is located, reminds me daily of why I am here and the responsibility I have to the people I serve,” Al Bangoura explains. Kendra adds, “We fell in love with the story, the character and potential of the home.” The Bangoura family enjoys being present in the actual park, the unobstructed/panoramic views, and watching Minneapolis residents picnicking, walking, biking, sledding, and even napping in hammocks in the Theodore Wirth Home’s yard, right outside of their windows. The house has had some renovations throughout the years, but needs some tender, loving care and the Bangoura family is happily up for the challenge. Kendra explains, “There have been updates made over the years to the kitchen and an accessible bathroom was added on the first level. The home captures significant history of the parks and the contributions of previous superintendents. It would be a privilege to acknowledge their accomplishments within this house in some way. We wish to establish an endowment in the future for the sole purpose of restoring this home back to its grandeur for today and future generations.” Kendra is more than up for the adventure of refreshing the three-story property and comes well prepared with an extensive professional background. She explains, “I consider myself an imaginative and strategic visionary with an entrepreneurial mindset. I have a unique combination of creativity paired with a business mind. My extensive background is in the mass, specialty, home-improvement, and food industries. I launched a startup children’s lifestyle boutique, Bebe Babble, where I operated the “bricks and mortar” and e-commerce for five years. Currently as a Trend Strategist and owner/president of a retail consultancy, C360 Consulting, LLC, I guide businesses to better understand their customers, trends, and the evolving consumer landscape; ultimately, I advise in developing revenue streams.” Kendra Lewis is clearly a perfect match for rejuvenating this landmark home, listed on the National Register of Historic Places as of June 2002, and she is exuberant about the process. Kendra states, “Do the unexpected, take a risk every day, live a life you’ve created, and leave a trail!” The Bangoura family is high-energy and they love to laugh. Al describes his family, “We are loud, action-driven, and never boring. Our interests are quite different so our conversations are lively. We all love music so we have lots of it playing, or my son is practicing his viola, or singing, or whistling!” Gabriel is a freshman at St. Paul Academy (SPA) and swims competitively with the Edina Swim Club. This accomplished young man is a violist in SPA’s Honor’s Orchestra and enjoys debate, reading, current events, history, and politics. Biking and running in the family’s Southwest neighborhood are also passions of this

37


fun-loving teenager with a keen sense of humor. In fact, for this story, Gabriel jokingly asked to be described as “a cool cat.” Alfred Bangoura is a genuine servant leader. He comments, “I consider myself a visionary who carries out the wishes of the people, and one who understands the importance of empowering and inspiring others to give their best and to engage the communities we all serve.” Al adds, “I have always been passionate about the arts and parks. I grew up on the banks of Lake Michigan at Lake Park and McKinley Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I took art classes at the Milwaukee Art Institute. I’ve always enjoyed the freedom I found while immersed in the arts, ballet as a child, swimming, tennis, soccer, and basketball. I played soccer, tennis and basketball in high school, earning a Varsity letter in all three. I received a tennis scholarship to the University of St. Thomas, my alma mater.” Al continues to be a big supporter of the arts, parks, and nature and sits on numerous boards, including Minneapolis Parks Foundation, Green Minneapolis, St. Anthony Falls Heritage Board, Meet Minneapolis, and City Parks Alliance. The Bangoura family relocated from Charlotte, North Carolina in early 2019 to follow Al’s dream of returning to be at the helm of the Minneapolis Parks where he had served in other positions from 1995–2014. Both Kendra and Al have roots in Minnesota; Kendra was born in Bloomington, Minnesota, and Al moved here at age twelve. Al explains, “I have an interesting upbringing; my mother was CzechAmerican and my father was Guinean (Republic of Guinea). My parents met at Marquette University, fell in love, and then moved to Guinea. I was born In Fria, Guinea and moved to the states at age four. We settled In Milwaukee, and then moved to Minnesota just before my teen years.” The handsome and charismatic couple met in downtown Minneapolis in 1992 at Glam Slam, a nightclub owned by entertainer Prince and Gilbert Davison. Kendra reminisces, “I went to see the Prince, but instead met my prince. I asked Al to dance. He then literally jumped into my arms and I never let him go!” Al follows up saying affectionately, “When I asked my wife why I should marry her, Kendra answered, ‘Because you will never be bored,’ and I then knew she was the one!” The two complement each other well with Al being a self-proclaimed neat freak, disclosing, “I clean all the bathrooms, and the kitchen (including doing the dishes) and I enjoy cooking breakfast on the weekends.” Kendra loves to garden and explains, “We are fortunate to have a team of Minneapolis Park professionals who beautifully maintain our garden, but it is hard for me to just watch, so I have participated by weeding. I also have planted several containers that include some of my favorite succulents, tropical lavender, and irises. I am immersed in nature and love this aspect of East Lake Harriet where we have Lyndale Farmstead Park, Perennial Trial Gardens, Lyndale Park, the Rose Gardens, Peace Garden, King’s Highway, and Lake Harriet itself.” When she isn’t enjoying the outdoors, Kendra has a passion for the arts and supporting them by attending theatre, the orchestra, choral performances, and art exhibits. This loving couple both have an affinity for the upper levels of their historic home. Al equates the canopy of surrounding treetops to a feeling of living in a magical tree house. Kendra agrees, adding, “What is so beautiful is that we live in a park—Lyndale Farmstead— and since we are located on the highest elevation of the park, and our private rooms are mostly on the second and third floors, the views are amazing from all sides. I feel like I live in Central Park in a New York City flat—it truly is like we are living in the trees!” 38

L AKESOCIETYMAGAZINE.COM

continued from page 37

lake society magazine


Custom Design at its best!

Custom designed ring made with Sea Glass collected at the beach.

Laurie Kottke F IN E JEW ELER S

Lake Calhoun Center 3033 Excelsior Blvd Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (612) 825-9898

lauriekottkefinejewelers.com

SUMMER 2020

39


40

lake society magazine


New England

I

CONCIERGE

In these uncertain times of Covid-19, traveling can seem like an impossibility. While we are figuring out what our new normal looks like, we cannot lose sight of the joys of traveling. How we move forward from “stay in place” to visiting the places we love or want to explore will be a personal decision. Each person will have a different level of comfort with leaving the safety of his or her home. In the short term, the easiest way to venture out will be places closer to home via automobile or a short flight domestically. The tourism industry is taking great care and establishing protocols to ensure the safety of their incoming guests. Consider New England as starting point. It is a terrific year round getaway, but summers really shine. Maine has always been a favorite of mine. The nearly 3,500 miles of coastline exceed that of even California and are ruggedly beautiful. Founded in 1653, Kennebunkport was known as a fishing village. To this day it still has a working fishing harbor. President George H. W. Bush called Kennebunkport his summer home. Auberge Resort’s The White Barn Inn has been a local mainstay for over 150 years. The historical inn offers beautifully appointed rooms, suites and five stand alone cottages. Want to feel like a local? Partake in a guided bike ride with the hotel General Manager. The True Maine Lobster Experience will take you onboard a private boat to visit the lobster grounds while dining on poached eggs and lobster. Try the Cleopatra Milk & Honey treatment at the full service spa. Local honey and sea salt are blended to scrub away your cares followed by a milk bath and massage. The Forbes Five Star restaurant serves local cuisine in a setting of rustic elegance. To the south in Massachusetts, The Wauwinet has been welcoming guest since 1875. The inn was named after an Indian tribe that had once inhabited the island. Located on a private beach, you have easy and uncrowded access the ocean. The marine inspired colors create a soothing oasis in their rooms, suites and private home. Complimentary paddleboards, kayaks and bicycles make this a family friendly destination. Topper’s, the AAA Five Diamond rated restaurant, serves New England inspired cuisine that will make a foodie out of you! After dinner, have the in-room masseuse knead away the cares of the day. On the edge of the Nantucket Harbor, the White Elephant hotel has been named a top luxury hotel for years. They offer a wide range of accommodations from rooms, suites, residences and even a downtown loft. The residential décor makes you feel like you are home. Just steps away from Children’s Beach, the location cannot be beat. Take a tour of the iconic Brandt Point Lighthouse. It is a photographic must and has been protecting the harbor since 1746. Play 18 holes of golf at nearby Miacomet Golf Course or visit the Nantucket Whaling museum. Drinks anyone? Cisco Brewery and Triple Eight Distillery can expose your palate to a tasting of beer, ales or spirits. Navigating the daily changes with travel and the restrictions that currently go along with it will not be an easy undertaking. Having said that, it is worth it. There is so much to see, explore and experience. Whether Kennebunkport, Nantucket or another destination of choice, take that first step and reclaim your inner wanderer. SRD International offers a unique approach to travel—one tailored to the individual. This travel concierge offers traditional travel services as well as memorable, bespoke experiences for the adventurer, and those who desire highly personalized travel assistance. SUMMER 2020 41 srdinternational.com


photo by perceptions photography 42

lake society magazine


NORTHERN LIGHTS

SUMMER 2020

43


Cantilever Distillery + Hotel celebrates the history of the region and offers guests an unforgettable one-of-a-kind experience.

written by ellen olson, photography by scott amudson, photography courtesy of annie graunke, studio m interiors 44

lake society magazine


DESTINATIONS

SUMMER 2020

45


N

Northern Minnesota has long been a favored destination for residents of Minneapolis. With the recent opening of Cantilever Distillery + Hotel, the town of Ranier, MN, needs to be added to that list. Located just off Rainy Lake and close to the gateway of Voyageurs National Park, the region is steeped in a rich and colorful history and incredible natural beauty. The 31-room boutique hotel is part of the Wyndham Hotel Trademark collection and is adjoined by the Distillery, which produces handcrafted distilled spirits. The building design was inspired by the Cantilever Bridge, which was a major thoroughfare for importing contraband during the Prohibition. Cantilever Distillery + Hotel is a project that was conceived by four friends, who have long held a deep reverence and respect for the region. They all have homes in the area and have been vacationing there for years. The idea for the distillery was hatched about four years ago. “Marty Goulet, Kalan Wagner, Duane Cridland, and Patrick Bracken had the vision for this project,” said Ed Gackley, General Manager of the Distillery + Hotel. “They brought me on board as ‘boots on the ground’ to execute their vision.” Ed has years of experience in the restaurant industry; he opened up over 70 restaurants in Canada during his career. “All of us live, work and play in the area—and we love this place. We wanted to help revitalize the area—to create jobs, drive tourism, and give people a reason to explore and enjoy the historical town of Ranier.” The hotel is beautifully appointed and the rooms all have high ceilings with some industrial elements, luxurious bathrooms and bedding. The property has a sophisticated vibe; the service and attention to detail is impeccable. The restaurant features regionally inspired items and a rooftop sauna offers an opportunity to relax after long hike or day spent on the water. Although entry into Canada is not allowed at this time, there are plenty of opportunities for fishing on the shared waters. “We are a two nation destination,” said Ed. “You can see Canada from our rooftop.” The Cocktail Room is at the heart of the Cantilever Distillery. Here guests can enjoy a wide assortment of cocktails made with spirits made on-site. “Our handcrafted spirits are made from Minnesota’s finest grains and water from the Canadian Shield,” said Ed. “We source the grains from local farmers—everything from start to finish is created with great care and a love for the region.” Cantilever Distillery was one of the first distilleries in Minnesota to make aged (brown) sprits. The Cantilever brand pays homage to the folklore of the Prohibition era and includes Cantilever Straight Bourbon and Cantilever Juniperus Gin. The bottle, thoughtfully designed to create a sense of place, honors the Cantilever Bridge and captures the essence of a by-gone era. The distillery also produces a fun, lifestyle-driven spirit line, which honors the real life local lake legend and guide, Barry “Woody” Woods. Woody’s Fairly Reliable includes Woody’s Fairly Reliable Reel Good Vodka, Woody’s Fairly Reliable Totally Mixable Gin and Woody’s Fairly Reliable Am-Can Blended Rye Whiskey. These spirits, also handmade, evoke great adventures in the outdoors, lake life, and time with families and friends. Cantilever Distillery products are distributed by Vinocopia, and are currently available at over 70 locations in the state. A visit to the Woody’s Fairly Reliable website noted below provides a store locater for those products. Cantilever Distillery + Hotel is a perfect getaway destination for Twin Cities residents. It’s only an afternoon’s drive, but once there you will be transported a world away. cantileverdistillery.com • woodysfairlyreliable.com 46

lake society magazine


DESTINATIONS

“We wanted this project to create jobs, drive tourism, and give people a reason to explore and enjoy the historical town of Ranier.” ED GACKLEY SUMMER 2020

47


48

lake society magazine

written by ellen olson, photography by spacecrafting

A timeless New England style cottage is the perfect blend of thoughtfully imagined modern spaces and classic design elements.

CLASSIC COTTAGE


SUMMER 2020

49


HOME

50

lake society magazine


project team: builder: telos; architecture: 10k architecture; interior design: katie bassett interiors; landscape: sunnyside gardens SUMMER 2020

51


HOME

“Having the home blend into the neighborhood was very important to everyone involved in the project.” ERIK OLSON, PRESIDENT, TELOS

52

lake society magazine


SUMMER 2020

53


HOME

“Sunnyside represents a return to classic, timeless New England architecture and interiors, but with modern spaces and amenities. Our design philosophy was rooted in the belief that a new home should fully address neighborhood context, and fit in seamlessly to the existing street. Our side-load garage design allowed us to achieve this goal, and to deliver a “social” home that lives out the front door, and that will be beautiful and relevant from the curb in 30, 40 years down the road.” JOSH SPRAGUE, SOTHEBY’S 54

lake society magazine


T

This timeless, classic, New England style cottage is located in the quaint and highly desirable Edina Morningside neighborhood. The home, thoughtfully imagined and executed by Telos, Katie Bassett Interiors, and 10K Architecture, preserves the look of the neighborhood while creating a modern, energy efficient dwelling. Its proximity to the retail shops at 44th & France, the Country Club and the City Lakes, offers its occupants the best of urban living. The lot originally featured a tiny yellow house that could not be renovated cost effectively. The lot is small—only 50 feet wide—so the design challenge was real. “Our client was adamant that he didn’t want to have a street facing garage,” said Erik Olson, President of Telos, who also served as the project manager. “Having the home blend into the neighborhood was very important to everyone involved in the project and central to the design goals.” The front entrance of the home welcomes its guests with a roomy and inviting front porch and a front entry hall. The great room is spacious and full of light—and encompasses a space for family living, the dining room and the well-appointed kitchen. A small pocket den/office creates a quiet refuge just off the kitchen. Katie Bassett collaborated with the team to create the floor plan, design the interiors, make selections and oversee the installation. “I chose a mix of organic textures, including beautiful marble files, durable quartzite countertops and custom wood paneling to create feature walls in the office and up the stairs,” said Katie. She chose a neutral color palette for the interiors so that the prospective buyers could easily imagine their furnishings in the space. The custom millwork is beautifully crafted from solid wood and was enameled on-site to create a crisp, clean finish. Ample storage— built-ins, bookcases and cabinets—are strategically placed and are one of many luxe but practical details throughout the home. The flooring is 5-inch solid white oak—durable and kid-friendly. “I grew up in this neighborhood and raised my own family down the street so I have a strong connection to the community,” said Katie. “I imagine the new owners will be a young family, so I designed everything with that in mind.” A luxurious master suite, with a large bedroom and sitting area, a dressing area, vanity station, and three roomy closets are located on the second floor, along with a laundry room. The master bath features a soaking tub, and cozy heated floors. The home’s lower level was designed for family living, and includes an exercise room and a guest bedroom and bathroom. The design team maximized the living space in the home, despite the modest footprint, and created 4700 square feet of modern and elegant living. The grounds were professionally landscaped by Sunnyside Gardens. They engineered a gorgeous rain garden, which greets visitors at the front of the home, and a private, fenced in back yard. “We completed this project in eight months, start to finish,” said Erik. “We were fortunate that our client was focused on good design with high quality finishes.” Telos brought a very disciplined approach to the build process. Erik founded the company two years ago on the premise that he could apply his commercial building processes to the residential construction market. “These processes give my clients complete visibility into the budget and timeline for their projects. No one likes surprises.” His team’s commitment to a high-end “concierge” approach improves communication between all the trades and they are on-site every day working through the details. It has proven to be a big differentiator for Telos and was key to bringing this lovely property to market. If you are interested in more information about this property, please contact Josh Sprague, Sotheby’s International Realty, at 1.612.501.0252. telosmn.com • katiebassett.studio • 10karch.com SUMMER 2020

55


56

lake society magazine


MON CĹ’UR

Retail Design Strategist and Author Judy Bell finds the heart of her inspiration in an artful blend of music halls, museums, and theatres in Minneapolis, New York and Paris.

written by judy bell, photography by spacecrafting

SUMMER 2020

57


58

lake society magazine

JUDY BELL

“Minneapolis is a creative mecca for someone with a curious mind and a desire for inspiration.�


F

LIFESTYLE

For Judy Bell, Times Square is the “heart” of New York City. Traveling to work in the retail design community in New York for over 30 years, it has become her second home. No wonder then, that in Minneapolis she resides in the “heart” of the lakes community in her residence at Calhoun Beach Club. Listed in the US National Register of Historic Places, the art deco style of the vintage building is an inspiring backdrop for Bell’s lifestyle that also craves a taste of Paris. A member of Alliance Francaise and a frequent student of French language and cooking, in February Judy hosted a Gertrude Stein style Salon for 20 guests to discuss controversial topics. Appetizers like Quiche Lorraine, Gougeres, and Chocolate Ganache from Valorie’s French Kitchen were savored and the paintings of French inspired local artist Dan Raphael were admired. Passionate about good conversation, Bell is also a writer, currently revising the college textbook she authored: Silent Selling. Published by Bloomsbury, the book offers a path to creativity in retail store design and presentation. Paying homage to the Harry Potter books (also published by Bloomsbury), she is adding Creative Wizards and other potions to the mix as she brews up her 6th edition. Bell is also on the freelance team at Design:Retail magazine, where she enjoys spinning tales with a twist by incorporating her long time study of human behavior. Going hand-in-hand is Energetic Retail, (energetic-retail.com) where Bell is CEO, Chief Energetic Officer. In her half-day workshops, retailers and design firms envision a fresh perspective on retail environments. The process leads to novel and eloquent ways to engage and inspire shoppers. Earlier in her career, Bell’s love of writing and speaking landed her a job at Target for 22 years, where she traveled throughout the US and Europe to seek out presentation trends. She offered her photographs and commentary to 3000 team members annually in colorful and often humorous presentations in venues that included the Guthrie Theatre and Target Center. At Target she served on several national design boards for which she received numerous awards, including the coveted Markopoulos Award “in recognition of extraordinary achievements and outstanding contributions in the visual merchandising and store design industry.” The award honors Andrew Markopoulos, the late, legendary, Sr. VP of Visual Merchandising and Store Design at Dayton’s. Other recipients include past design executives at Barneys New York, Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus and design firms nationwide. For someone with a curious mind and a desire for inspiration, Judy finds Minneapolis to be a creative mecca. She regularly attends events like Creative Mornings and Capsule’s Think & Link Pants Optional, where innovators gather. She is a member of local chapters of both FGI (Fashion Group International and RDI (Retail Design Institute). Judy holds season tickets for the Jungle Theatre and the Theatre of Public Policy. Rustica Bakery is right down the block, Judy’s favorite place to boost her inspiration with a café au lait and the best chocolate chip cookies on earth. Annual fundraising events like Mais Oui? through Alliance Francais, and Minnesota Orchestra’s Symphony Ball are favorites. A member of the Walker Art Center Film Club, along with Mia and the MSP Film Society, she finds her muse in diverse places. That includes Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden where she learned to practice Shinrin Yoku. Judy led a session for design executives in the vineyards of Santa Rosa at the 2017 Design:Retail Forum. But while at home at CBC, an easy walk around the lakes right outside her door is always beckoning with the promise of a delicious new idea.

1828 Mount Curve Ave – $1,285000

French Provincial home, rich with European, old world charm. Fabulous alternative to condo living in the city

1771 Humboldt Ave S – $1,299,000

Stunning Home Designed by Boehme & Cordella (ASI architects) 6,800 finished sq ft provides flexible space for working at home, multi-generational living, blended families, or rental income (ADU)

612-599-7050 sue.westerman@cbburnet.com SUMMER 2020

59


TUDOR BLUE

60

lake society magazine


Updating this 1929 Tudor-style home involved a reimagined flow for the kitchen and dining spaces while maintaining architectural and aesthetic integrity. written by ellen olson, photography by alyssa lee photography

SUMMER 2020

61


62

lake society magazine


HOME

SUMMER 2020

63


W

When a beautiful 1920’s Tudor-style home on Dean Parkway changed hands, the new homeowners took a fresh look at the property that was to house their young family. Most of the home had been beautifully maintained and little done to waver from the original architecture and finishes. The exception was the kitchen. It had been modernized years earlier, but nothing about it was in keeping with the period of the home. The homeowners engaged Don Forsman, owner of Welch Forsman Associates, and Sara Whicher, co-owner of Chisel Architecture, to realize their vision. They wanted to remodel the kitchen into a more functional space that still honored the Tudor aesthetic present throughout the rest of the home. They also wanted to add bold color combinations and more natural materials; open up the space between the kitchen and the dining area; and create a flow from the dining area to the quaint exterior patio and English garden, by adding custom French doors. In order to retain the proportionality of room sizes, the team placed a cased opening between the dining room and kitchen versus opening it all up. In this way, the smaller-sized rooms characteristic of the Tudor style are still apparent and spatially felt. The team added a mudroom to the main level and an existing powder room was maintained, although it shrank a bit in the process.

Restoring beautiful period homes to their former grandeur is the sweet spot of Welch Forsman’s business. The construction team took the kitchen and the dining area down to the studs and created a footprint that fulfilled the vision of the architect and homeowner. “The home had some classic design elements from the 20’s, including beautiful millwork, an arched family room ceiling, and a sunken living room,” said Don. “White oak hardwood flooring was installed and new custom millwork, including cabinets, doors, window casings and base moldings, were built. Each of these elements match existing materials so the transition between old and 64

new is seamless.” The ceiling molding, which is most noticeable in the mudroom because it is painted blue, replicates what was found elsewhere in the home: a unique trim with a panel molding that sits about 5 ½” from the crown. These small, but distinctive, touches honor the original style of the home. Chisel Architecture’s trademarked approach to design, the Pattern of Life, was key to working out a reimagined flow for the spaces. “It guided us in developing a design that would influence how family gathered and moved from space to space or from activity to activity. We even considered family tasks such as who was going to be creating meals in the kitchen,” said Sara. “The family’s involvement truly informed the design and that is what we find so rewarding about this process.” The kitchen island, which features walnut burl veneered panels, resulted from the homeowners desired to have “furniture as an island.” They shared some photos of their inspiration, and the entire project team collaborated to create the final result. “The challenge was to design a piece that looked and functioned like a table for casual seating, while also supporting a highly functional workspace for serious cooking,” said Sara. “Chad Johnson, Ingrained Wood Studios, was the one who masterfully took it to the level it is today. It is gorgeous!” Outdated Tudors everywhere can look to this exemplary model of a functional and appropriately sized upgrade, with architectural and aesthetic integrity. welchforsman.com • chiselarch.com

lake society magazine


HOME

project team: builder: don forsman, owner, welch forsman associates; architecture: sara whicher, chisel architecture project supervisor: thom franklin, welch forsman associates; project manager: jim kalb, welch forsman associates; custom millwork and cabinetry: ingrained wood studios; interior design: sarah larson, twettens interior designSUMMER 2020

65


66

lake society magazine


justice love peace justice love

67

love peace justice love peace

june 2020

SUMMER 2020


68

lake society magazine

Profile for Lake Society Magazine

Lake Society Magazine Summer 2020  

Lake Society Magazine Summer 2020  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded